Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

2

Catalytic cracking process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Optimal control of fluid catalytic cracking processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was made of the applicability of optimal control theory to the design of control systems for non-linear, multivariable chemical processes. A hypothetical fluid catalytic cracking process was selected as a typical representative of such ...

L. A. Gould; L. B. Evans; H. Kurihara

1970-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fuzzy modeling of fluidized catalytic cracking unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper deals with the fuzzy system identification of reactor-regenerator-stripper-fractionator's (RRSF) section of a fluidized catalytic cracking unit (FCCU). The fuzzy system identification based on the data collected from an operating refinery of ... Keywords: Dynamic fuzzy model, FCCU models, Fuzzy clustering, Fuzzy inference systems, Fuzzy models, Hybrid learning, Mountain clustering, Supervised learning, Unsupervised learning

Mohammad Fazle Azeem; Nesar Ahmad; M. Hanmandlu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

6

Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Process: Catalytic Reforming Catalytic Cracking Catalytic Hydrocracking Delayed and Fluid Coking Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Process: Catalytic Reforming Catalytic Cracking Catalytic Hydrocracking Delayed and Fluid Coking Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Process Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 2,563 2,667 2,739 2,807 2,705 2,609 2010-2013 PADD 1 176 178 180 173 156 167 2010-2013 East Coast 166 164 163 161 140 153 2010-2013 Appalachian No. 1 9 14 16 12 15 14 2010-2013 PADD 2 642 638 668 695 677 615 2010-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 426 411 426 460 450 399 2010-2013 Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. 67 62 70 72 72 57 2010-2013 Okla., Kans., Mo.

7

Catalytic cracking. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning applications of catalytic cracking processes in fluidized bed systems, moving beds, refineries, vacuum distillations, and reformers. Design aspects, modeling, control systems, and operating procedures are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 149 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

,"Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Catalytic Reforming Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2010" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_a_(na)_ydr_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_a_(na)_ydr_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

9

Catalytic Cracking Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Process: Period-Unit: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Show Data By: Process: Area: Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 View History; U.S ...

10

Catalytic Cracking Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum ...

11

Spectroscopic studies on the formation of coke on individual Fluid Catalytic Cracking particles: the effect of poisoning metal compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The formation of coke on individual Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst particles was studied using UV/Vis microspectroscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, with n-hexane cracking as… (more)

Goetze, J.G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hydrodesulfurization of Fluid Catalytic Cracking Decant Oils for the Production of Low-sulfur Needle Coke Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Needle coke, produced by the delayed coking of fluid catalytic cracking decant oils, is the primary filler used in the production of graphite electrodes. The… (more)

Wincek, Ronald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Catalytic Cracking of Gaseous Heavy Hydrocarbons by Ceramic Filters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of syngas from waste or biomass gasification to generate electricity is a way which is attracting increasing attention especially with regard to the demands of regenerable energy consumption and to the reduction of waste disposal. In order to feed the syngas to a gas motor or a gas turbine the gas has to be cleaned. In future also the coupling of biomass gasification with a fuel cell will be applied, which needs a very efficient gas cleaning. The decomposition of tars and the removal of particles from the gas are the key issues of gas cleaning. Up to now these two steps are performed in two separate units. Normally, the tars are decomposed in catalytic beds or honeycomb structures. The catalytic decomposition is achieved at temperatures between 750 C and 900 C depending on the catalyst used. Particles are removed by filtration of the hot gas. Filtration at high temperatures and with high efficiencies is possible when using ceramic filter elements. Ceramic hot gas filters are well established in advanced coal gasification, such as the integrated gasification combined cycle process, as well as in waste and biomass gasification and pyrolysis processes. Since the catalytic reaction requires high temperatures the gas has to be reheated after the particles are removed in the filter or the hot unfiltered gas has to flow through the catalytic unit. If the gas is filtered first, reheating of the gas stream is an additional cost factor. Furthermore, pipes downstream of the filter can be plugged, if the temperature of the gas falls below the condensation temperature of the heavy hydrocarbons. Using the second way of hot unfiltered gas flows through the catalytic unit, there is the problem of deactivation of the catalyst by deposition of dust at higher dust concentrations. At worst the catalytic unit can be plugged by dust deposition.

Heidenreich, S.; Nacken, M.; Walch, A.; Chudzinski, S.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Catalytic cracking. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning applications of catalytic cracking in fluidized beds, moving beds, refineries, vacuum distillation, and reformers. Design criteria, models, controls, and operating procedures are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Catalytic cracking. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning applications of catalytic cracking in fluidized beds, moving beds, refineries, vacuum distillation, and reformers. Design criteria, models, controls, and operating procedures are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Catalytic cracking. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning applications of catalytic cracking in fluidized beds, moving beds, refineries, vacuum distillation, and reformers. Design criteria, models, controls, and operating procedures are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Final report, October 1984-March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Iron containing minerals and chars were screened as cracking catalysts for aromatic hydrocarbons (AHC) in simulated gasifier effluents. Catalytic activities of six minerals and two chars were measured and used to infer fundamental hetereogeneous rate constants using measured properties of the pore structure of the solids. Measurements were made for 200 ppM and 2000 ppM benzene cracking over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The active catalyst under gasifier conditions was found to be FeO. The minerals have a higher reactivity per unit mass in chars than in a pure form. H/sub 2/S was found to reduce the catalytic activity to one third of the unpoisoned value, but the catalysts maintained this reduced activity. These minerals have the potential to be economically feasible, disposable catalysts in a fixed bed or fluidized bed process if they can survive for ten hours. 8 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.O.; Moniz, G.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The selective catalytic cracking of Fischer-Tropsch liquids to high value transportation fuels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company, investigated a selective catalytic cracking process (FCC) to convert the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) gasoline and wax fractions to high value transportation fuels. The primary tasks of this contract were to (1) optimize the catalyst and process conditions of the FCC process for maximum conversion of F-T wax into reactive olefins for later production of C{sub 4}{minus}C{sub 8} ethers, and (2) use the olefin-containing light naphtha obtained from FCC processing of the F-T wax as feedstock for the synthesis of ethers. The catalytic cracking of F-T wax feedstocks gave high conversions with low activity catalysts and low process severities. HZSM-5 and beta zeolite catalysts gave higher yields of propylene, isobutylene, and isoamylenes but a lower gasoline yield than Y zeolite catalysts. Catalyst selection and process optimization will depend on product valuation. For a given catalyst and process condition, Sasol and LaPorte waxes gave similar conversions and product selectivities. The contaminant iron F-T catalyst fines in the LaPorte wax caused higher coke and hydrogen yields.

Schwartz, M.M.; Reagon, W.J.; Nicholas, J.J.; Hughes, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modelling and Experimental Study of Methane Catalytic Cracking as a Hydrogen Production Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production of hydrogen is primarily achieved via catalytic steam reforming, partial oxidation,and auto-thermal reforming of natural gas. Although these processes are mature technologies, they are… (more)

Amin, Ashraf Mukhtar Lotfi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Year/PAD District Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation Vacuum Cracking Thermal Catalytic Cracking Fresh Recycled Catalytic Hydro- Cracking Catalytic Reforming Desulfurization...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advanced research in coal gasification process modification technology: catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Topical report, 1 October 1984-31 June 1985  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to screen inexpensive materials for potential use as disposable aromatic hydrocarbon (AHC) cracking catalysts in the reaction zone of the coal gasifier or in a fixed bed downstream from the gasifier. The approach is based on the conclusions reported in the literature that iron in a reduced state is an effective catalyst for AHC destruction. It therefore follows that chars or minerals with high iron content, high porosity, and high internal surface area will provide the most effective catalysts. We have screened all six of the following iron containing minerals: Siderite, Ankerite, Hematite, Magnetite, Pyrite, and Jarosite. The experimental tests measure the catalytic activity of these minerals for cracking benzene over the parameter range relevant to coal gasifier operation. Simulated coal gas containing 200 to 2000 ppM of model aromatic molecules will be used in all experiments and destruction of benzene will be measured over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The porosity and surface area of these minerals (partially decomposed in coal gas) will be determined and utilized in a computer model describing pore structure, species transport and surface chemistry to interpret the reactivity data in terms of the intrinsic reactivity of the reduced state of each mineral. These results will provide a basis for catalyst selection, coal selection and economic comparison. 3 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.A.; Moniz, G.A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

,"U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1987" Annual",2012,"6/30/1987" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_dwns_dc_nus_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:17:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input" "Sourcekey","M_NA_YDR_NUS_MBBLD","MCRCCUS2","MCRCHUS2","MCRDFUS2" "Date","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Reforming Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Cracking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Catalytic Hydrocracking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)","U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input by Delayed and Fluid Coking Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)"

23

Methane cracking over a bituminous coal char  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane cracking over a bed of Chinese bituminous coal char was studied using a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 1073 and 1223 K. Methane conversion over the fresh char increased with increasing temperature to 90% at 1223 K. Hydrogen was the only gas-phase product that was detected during the experimentation. The char was shown to exert a significant catalytic effect on methane cracking by comparing results from experiments with the raw char and demineralised char as well as from blank experiments using quartz. It was further shown that the ash was not the source of the catalytic effect of the char. However, both methane conversion and hydrogen yield decreased with increasing reaction time, irrespective of other experimental conditions, indicating that the char rapidly became deactivated following the exposure to methane. It was speculated that the deposition of carbon from methane cracking was responsible for this deactivation, which is supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image analysis. It was demonstrated that the catalytic activity of the deactivated char can be partially recovered by burning off the carbon deposits with an oxidizing gas mixture containing 0.46% oxygen. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Zhi-qiang Sun; Jin-hu Wu; Mohammad Haghighi; John Bromly; Esther Ng; Hui Ling Wee; Yang Wang; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Texas Inland Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Process: Area: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History; Catalytic Reforming : 133: 125: 131: 2010-2012: Catalytic Cracking: 173: 158: 159: 149: 162: 164: 1987-2012 ...

25

U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Catalytic Reforming 2,632 2,571 2,606 2010-2012 Catalytic Cracking 5,250 4,983 4,957 4,873 4,952 4,901 1987-2012 Catalytic Hydrocracking...

26

Catalytic dewaxing of middle distillates  

SciTech Connect

The fractionation and stripping equipment of a middle distillate catalytic dewaxing unit may be eliminated by integrating the catalytic dewaxing unit with a catalytic cracking unit. The light cycle oil sidestream from the cat cracker fractionator, bypasses the sidestream stripper and serves as the feed to the catalytic dewaxing unit. The dewaxed product is separated into a gasoline fraction which is recycled for fractionation in the cat cracker fractionator and a fuel oil fraction which is recycled to the cat cracker sidestream stripper for removal of light materials to produce a low pour fuel oil meeting product specifications.

Antal, M.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Process: Area: Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 View History; Catalytic Reforming: 2,493: 2,563: 2,667: 2,739: 2,807: 2,705: 2010-2013: Catalytic Cracking ...

28

U.S. Downstream Processing of Fresh Feed Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Process: Area: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History; Catalytic Reforming : 2,632: 2,571: 2,606: 2010-2012: Catalytic Cracking: 5,250: 4,983: 4,957: 4,873: 4,952 ...

29

Catalytic Reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Don Little's Catalytic Reforming deals exclusively with reforming. With the increasing need for unleaded gasoline, the importance of this volume has escalated since it combines various related aspects of reforming technology into a single publication. For those with no practical knowledge of catalytic reforming, the chemical reactions, flow schemes and how the cat reformer fits into the overall refinery process will be of interest. Contents include: Catalytic reforming in refinery processing: How catalytic reformers work - chemical reactions; Process design; The catalyst, process variables and unit operation; Commercial processes; BTX operation; Feed preparation; naphtha hydrotreating and catalytic reforming; Index.

Little, D.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Catalytic Cracking Recycle Feed Downstream Charge Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

31

Contaminating Fresh Waters (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is illegal to discharge any dyestuff, coal tar, oil, sawdust, poison, or deleterious substances into any fresh running waters in Florida in quantities sufficient to injure, stupefy, or kill fish...

32

Catalytic Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic Distillation' refers to a chemical process which performs both a catalyzed reaction and primary fractionation of the reaction components simultaneously. A structured catalyst which also is an effective distillation component has been patented by Chemical Research & Licensing Co., Houston, Texas, and developed in a joint venture with Neochem Corp., Houston, Texas, and the Department of Energy. The catalytic distillation packing has been commercially demonstrated successfully with nearly three years continuous service for an acid catalyzed reaction in a carbon steel distillation tower.

Smith, L. A., Jr.; Hearn, D.; Wynegar, D. P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cracking knuckles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cracking knuckles Cracking knuckles Name: Renee Knuckles Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Does cracking your joints especially the knuckles cause arthritis? What are some of the results of doing so? Replies: Cracking knuckles has NEVER been associated with causing arthritis. This concept is as wrong as saying weight lifting makes you short, or playing basketball makes you tall. The "popping" of the knuckles results from forcing joint fluid to very rapidly pass from one side of the joint to the other, where the "sides" are partitioned off by the main bones of the joint. Let me rephrase that: a joint is an area where two or more separate and distinct bones meet. The joint fluid provides a cushioning between the joints so that they don't grate into each other. Cracking your knuckles forces the joint fluid from one part of the joint to another, and the popping sound is just the result of the high pressured rushing of fluid.

34

Fresh Equatorial Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically sheared eastward jet in the equatorial Pacific in late 1991 and early 1992 carried relatively fresh water from the western Pacific overriding the saltier surface layer of the central region. Salinity anomalies of about ?1.0 psu were ...

Dean Roemmich; Michele Morris; W. R. Young; J. R. Donguy

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hydrogen Assisted Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC): Laboratory Research and Field Experiences: Hydrogen Assisted Cracking Program Organizers: Suresh Divi, TIMET

36

Catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound. The process consists of contacting the feedstock under suitable reforming conditions with a catalyst composition selected from the group consisting of a catalyst. The catalyst essentially consists of zinc oxide and a spinel structure alumina. Another catalyst consists essentially of a physical mixture of zinc titanate and a spinel structure alumina in the presence of sufficient added hydrogen to substantially prevent the formation of coke. Insufficient zinc is present in the catalyst composition for the formation of a bulk zinc aluminate.

Aldag, A.W. Jr.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

High temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

High Performance Catalytic Heat Exchanger for SOFC Systems - FuelCell Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Heat Catalytic Heat Exchanger for SOFC Systems-FuelCell Energy Background In a typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generation system, hot (~900 °C) effluent gas from a catalytic combustor serves as the heat source within a high-temperature heat exchanger, preheating incoming fresh air for the SOFC's cathode. The catalytic combustor and the cathode air heat exchanger together represent the largest opportunity for cost

39

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-11 019 UC-61 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,Catalytic Liquefaction of Biomass,n M, Seth, R. Djafar, G.of California. CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION QUARTERLY

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Creep Crack Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Creep crack growth constants b and m for various ferritic steels...and Banerji, â??Creep Crack Growth Behavior

42

Fresh Air That's as Good as Gold | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fresh Air That's as Good as Gold Fresh Air That's as Good as Gold Fresh Air That's as Good as Gold July 8, 2013 - 5:25pm Addthis Brookhaven Lab physicists Peter Sutter, Eli Sutter,and Xiao Tong (left to right) with one of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials instruments used to characterize the new nanoparticle structures. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab. Brookhaven Lab physicists Peter Sutter, Eli Sutter,and Xiao Tong (left to right) with one of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials instruments used to characterize the new nanoparticle structures. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Car engines produce traces of carbon monoxide, but they use catalytic converters to reduce that pollutant and others, such as nitrogen

43

Raney nickel catalytic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

O' Hare, Stephen A. (Vienna, VA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effect of reformer conditions on catalytic reforming of biomass-gasification tars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric tests on catalytic reforming of tars produced in biomass gasification are performed using a bench-scale, fluid-bed catalytic reformer containing a commercial nickel-based catalyst. The product gas composition and yield vary with reformer temperature, space time, and steam: biomass ratio. Under certain catalytic tar reforming conditions, the gas yield increases by 70%; 97% of the tars are cracked into gases; and benzene and naphthalene, the predominant tar species, are virtually eliminated from the product gas.

Kinoshita, C.M.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid Fuels from Biomass: "Catalyst Screening and KineticUC-61 (l, RCO osn CDL or BIOMASS CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION ManuCATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION OF BIOMASS Manu Seth, Roger Djafar,

Seth, Manu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2014. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear. Sponsorship. Organizer(s) ...

47

CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solvent Systems Catalystic Biomass Liquefaction Investigatereactor Product collection Biomass liquefaction process12-13, 1980 CATALYTIC BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION Sabri Ergun,

Ergun, Sabri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Process for catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reforming process is disclosed wherein hydrogen and light hydrocarbons generated in the catalytic reaction zone are passed to a hydrogen production/purification zone and and reacted and processed therein to produce substantially pure hydrogen. A portion of the hydrogen is then admixed with the charge stock to the catalytic reforming zone to provide the hydrogen requirements of the catalytic reforming reaction zone.

James, R. B. Jr.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cracks Cleave Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of finding what direction cracks should move is not completely solved. A commonly accepted way to predict crack directions is by computing the density of elastic potential energy stored well away from the crack tip, and finding a direction of crack motion to maximize the consumption of this energy. I provide here a specific case where this rule fails. The example is of a crack in a crystal. It fractures along a crystal plane, rather than in the direction normally predicted to release the most energy. Thus, a correct equation of motion for brittle cracks must take into account both energy flows that are described in conventional continuum theories and details of the environment near the tip that are not.

Michael Marder

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

50

Rich catalytic injection  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Multizone catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons comprising contacting the hydrocarbon feed in two sequential catalyst zones. It comprises: a first catalyst zone contains a first catalytic composite consisting essentially of a platinum component, a germanium component, a refractory inorganic oxide, and a halogen component; and a second catalyst zone contains a second catalytic composite comprising a platinum component, a germanium component, a refractory inorganic oxide, a halogen component, and catalytically effective amounts of a metal promoter selected from rhenium, rhodium, ruthenium, cobalt, nickel, and iridium, and mixtures thereof.

Moser, M.C.; Lawson, R.J.; Antos, G.J.; Wang, L.; Parulekar, V.N.

1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming process is disclosed in which substantially all of the heat requirements of the product stabilizer column is supplied by multiple indirect heat exchange.

Peters, K.D.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

Catalytic conversion of biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Catalytic processes for conversion of biomass to transportation fuels have gained an increasing attention in sustainable energy production. The biomass can be converted to… (more)

Calleja Aguado, Raquel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fluid catalytic cracking is an important step in producing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (much as water makes sand into quicksand). Because the catalyst is fluid, it can circulate around the FCC, moving between reactor and regenerator vessels ...

55

Fluidic Catalytic Cracking Power Recovery Dynamic Computer Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluidic Cat Crackers (FCC) using the catalyst regeneration cycle are candidates for more power efficient operation by the use of high temperature dirty gas expanders. In a previous paper, a computer simulation was described for the steady state operation of the primary mechanical components, specifically the axial compressor and hot gas expander. The present work expands upon the steady state model to add the dynamic characteristics of these elements as well as the effects of the controlling process valves. In many applications the expander will develop more power than the axial compressor can absorb. A power absorbing source, specifically an electrical generator, converts the mechanical excess power into electrical energy. A review of the mechanical equipment and the electrical generator operating modes and controls is needed so that the process designer and operator will know how the system will respond if process upsets were to occur. The program code developed can simulate these elements for specific processes and demonstrate the logic control scheme proposed by the process designer. This information will therefore allow the process operator, process designer and mechanical equipment supplier an understanding of the interplay of the system control elements and define specific operating limits.

Samurin, N. A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Consumer bankruptcy: A fresh start  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We quantitatively analyze the welfare implications of different consumer bankruptcies rules. We look at a dynamic life cycle model where households face idiosyncratic uncertainty. Bankruptcy rules vary in two dimensions: whether discharge of debt is granted to borrowers on demand (fresh start) and the fraction of income garnished from defaulters. We find that the welfare comparison depends critically upon the nature and magnitude of income and expenses uncertainty.

Igor Livshits; James Macgee; Michele Tertilt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Catalytic distillation structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

CNEA Fresh Fuel Plate Characterization Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Characterization summary report outlining the findings of the fresh fuel examinations of the plates received from CNEA.

D. Keiser; F. Rice

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Selective dehydrogenation of propane over novel catalytic materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conversion of small alkanes into alkenes represents an important chemical processing area; ethylene and propylene are the two most important organic chemicals manufactured in the U.S. These chemicals are currently manufactured by steam cracking of ethane and propane, an extremely energy intensive, nonselective process. The development of catalytic technologies (e.g., selective dehydrogenation) that can be used to produce ethylene and propylene from ethane and propane with greater selectivity and lower energy consumption than steam cracking will have a major impact on the chemical processing industry. This report details a study of two novel catalytic materials for the selective dehydrogenation of propane: Cr supported on hydrous titanium oxide ion-exchangers, and Pt nanoparticles encapsulated in silica and alumina aerogel and xerogel matrices.

Sault, A.G.; Boespflug, E.P.; Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Selective Dehydrogenation of Propane over Novel Catalytic Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conversion of small alkanes into alkenes represents an important chemical processing area; ethylene and propylene are the two most important organic chemicals manufactured in the U.S. These chemicals are currently manufactured by steam cracking of ethane and propane, an extremely energy intensive, nonselective process. The development of catalytic technologies (e.g., selective dehydrogenation) that can be used to produce ethylene and propylene from ethane and propane with greater selectivity and lower energy consumption than steam cracking will have a major impact on the chemical processing industry. This report details a study of two novel catalytic materials for the selective dehydrogenation of propane: Cr supported on hydrous titanium oxide ion-exchangers, and Pt nanoparticles encapsulated in silica and alumina aerogel and xerogel matrices. 4 Acknowledgment The authors thank United Catalysts, Inc. for stimulating technical discussions and for providing samples of commercial ...

Allen Sault Elaine; Elaine P. Boespflug Anthony Martino; Jeffrey S. Kawola

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Multizone catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons comprising contacting the hydrocarbon feed in two sequential catalyst zones. It comprises: an initial catalyst zone which is a fixed-bed system and contains an initial catalytic composite comprising a platinum component, a germanium component, a refractory inorganic oxide, and a halogen component; and a terminal catalyst zone which is a moving-bed system with associated continuous catalyst regeneration and contains a terminal catalytic composite having the essential absence of germanium and comprising a platinum component, a refractory inorganic oxide, a halogen component, and catalytically effective amounts of a metal promoter selected from one or more of the rhenium, tin, indium, rhodium, ruthenium, cobalt, nickel, and iridium.

Moser, M.; Lawson, R.J.; Wang, L.; Parulekar, V.; Peer, R.L.; Hamlin, C.R.

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Catalytic distillation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Catalytic distillation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

LPG storage vessel cracking experience  

SciTech Connect

In order to evaluate liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) handling and storage hazards, Caltex Petroleum Corp. (Dallas) surveyed several installations for storage vessel cracking problems. Cracking was found in approximately one-third of the storage vessels. In most cases, the cracking appeared to be due to original fabrication problems and could be removed without compromising the pressure containment. Several in-service cracking problems found were due to exposure to wet hydrogen sulfide. Various procedures were tried in order to minimize the in-service cracking potential. One sphere was condemned because of extensive subsurface cracking. This article's recommendations concern minimizing cracking on new and existing LPG storage vessels.

Cantwell, J.E. (Caltex Petroleum Corp., P.O. Box 619500, Dallas, TX (US))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

LPG storage vessel cracking experience  

SciTech Connect

As part of an overall company program to evaluate LPG handling and storage hazards the authors surveyed several installations for storage vessel cracking problems. Cracking was found in approximately one third of the storage vessels. In most cases the cracking appeared due to original fabrication problems and could be removed without compromising the pressure containment. Several in-service cracking problems due to exposure to wet hydrogen sulfide were found. Various procedures were tried in order to minimize the in-service cracking potential. One sphere was condemned because of extensive subsurface cracking. Recommendations are made to minimize cracking on new and existing LPG storage vessels.

Cantwell, J.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Catalytic distillation structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

Multi-echelon inventory optimization for fresh produce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For fresh produce, the product freshness is a key value to end consumers. Retailers try to maximize product freshness at retail stores while maintaining high product availability. Fresh produce that is close to the end of ...

Limvorasak, Saran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Airvest's Breath of Fresh Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 The Cutting Edge: Airvest's Breath of Fresh Air Spray booths are a common sight in the industrial sector. Designed to remove pollutants during industrial processes such as spray painting or welding, a booth is a rectangular enclosure open on one side where the worker stands, and equipped on the opposite wall with a fan and filter arrangement to suck away the dirty air. The full-size mannequin in these photographs simulates a worker in a spray booth facing the exhaust filters. In experiments designed by LBL researcher Ashok Gadgil, smoke was released in front of the mannequin to simulate the spraying of paint in the booth. The photo on the left shows the spray booth during standard operation. The smoke-representing a pollutant-is entrained in the eddy that forms in

69

Characteristics Of Fresh Municipal Solid Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hossain, Sahadat The characteristics of fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) are critical in planning, designing, operating or upgrading solid waste management systems. Physical composition, moisture… (more)

Taufiq, Tashfeena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Catalytic Coal Gasification Process for the Production of Methane-Rich Syngas Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Production of Methane-Rich Syngas from Fuels Using Multi-functional Catalyst/Capture Agent." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Reducing pollution emitted by coal and waste power plants in an economically viable manner and building power plants that co-generate fuels and chemicals during times of low electricity demand are pressing goals for the energy industry. One way to achieve these goals in an economically viable manner is through the use of a catalytic gasifier that

71

Catalytic hydrotreating process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

Karr, Jr., Clarence (Morgantown, WV); McCaskill, Kenneth B. (Morgantown, WV)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Steam reformer with catalytic combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

Voecks, Gerald E. (La Crescenta, CA)

1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Catalytic Solutions Inc CSI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developer of the breakthrough catalytic coating technology and the Mixed Phase Catalyst (MPCTM), and also manufacturer of catalytic converters. References Catalytic...

74

Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth and Stress-Corrosion Cracking in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The high stress ratio (R=0.85) corrosion fatigue crack growth kinetics and stress-corrosion cracking resistance of sensitized (70-175 °C up to ...

75

Nevada Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 0: 0: 0: 0: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Hydro ...

76

North Carolina Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 0: 0: 0: 0: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2007-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2007-2013: Catalytic Hydro ...

77

Guam Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 0: 0: 0: 0: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Hydro ...

78

Catalytic coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Sunder, Swaminathan (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Catalytic conversion of LPG  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low reactivity of light paraffins has long hindered their utilization as petrochemical feedstocks. Except for their use in ethylene crackers, LPG fractions have traditionally been consumed as fuel. New catalytic processes now being commercialized open new avenues for the utilization of LPG as sources of valuable petrochemical intermediates. This paper discusses processes for the dehydrogenation and aromatization of LPG.

Pujado, P.R.; Vora, B.V.; Mowry, J.R.; Anderson, R.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Catalytic coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming process is disclosed wherein the reboiler heat requirements of the stabilizer column are supplied by means of indirect heat exchange with hot combustion gases in the reforming reactants fired heater convection heating section. Heat in excess of the reboiler requirements is passed to the stabilizer column with control being effected by removal of excess heat from the column.

James, R.B. Jr.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

82

Catalytic skeletal isomerization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains a derivative of cyclopentane or which contains organic compounds which are convertible to a derivative of cyclopentane is carried out in the presence of a hydrogrel of zinc titanate and a suitable acidic material. Also, the attrition resistance of zinc titanate is improved by incorporating the zinc titanate into a hydrogel structure.

Aldag, A.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of Cracked Pipe Weldments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI estimation formulas for predicting loads necessary for crack initiation and instability can facilitate leak-before-break analysis of cracked nuclear piping. Finite-element calculations carried out in this study verified the accuracy of these formulas for analyzing through-the-wall cracks in bimetallic weldments.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Concentric catalytic combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

Bruck, Gerald J. (Oviedo, FL); Laster, Walter R. (Oviedo, FL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

86

CSD: Research: Catalytic Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Science Catalytic Science The DOE Chemical Energy program supports basic research in the area of chemical transformations or conversions which are fundamental to new or existing concepts of energy production and storage. A further goal of the program is to identify and develop environmentally benign approaches to the synthesis of chemicals via routes requiring a minimal consumption of energy. These objectives lead naturally to an emphasis on catalysis. Novel homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts are constantly being sought to enable the synthesis of desired products from nontraditional reactants, often with the aim of minimizing the production of toxic intermediates or byproducts, or to enable the more efficient production of products via existing reaction pathways. To this end, efforts are undertaken to

87

Catalytic reforming catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Catalytic distillation : design and application of a catalytic distillation column.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Catalytic Distillation (CD) is a hybrid technology that utilizes the dynamics of si- multaneous reaction and separation in a single process unit to achieve a… (more)

Nieuwoudt, Josias Jakobus (Jako)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Catalytic reforming methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

1989-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

Analysis of Crack Growth Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Methods for calculating crack growth rates...the derivative at the midpoint of a data set. These methods use

92

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) method for the detection of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking initiation in Stainless Steels and ...

93

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Repairs of Oil Industry Pipelines, Tanks and Vessels by Welding Using Metal Arc Welding Under Oil (MAW-UO) · Interpretation of Crack Initiation and ...

94

PICEP: Pipe Crack Evaluation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a computer program that calculates the crack-opening area, the critical (stable) crack length and the two-phase flow rate through cracks in ductile stainless steel pipes and steam generator tubes. The program is useful in performing leak-before-break calculations in order to demonstrate detectable leak rates prior to a through-wall flaw reaching critical size. Necessary input to the code includes a definition of material properties, loads, thermal-hydraulic conditions, pipe geometry, and crack orientation. User information is provided in the report.

Norris, D.; Okamoto, A.; Chexal, B.; Griesbach, T.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Shale oil cracking. 1. Kinetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to determine kinetics for thermal cracking of shale oil vapor over shale. Cracking temperatures of 504 to 610/sup 0/C and residence times of 2 to 11 seconds were used. A first-order Arrhenius rate expression and stoichiometry were obtained. Also observed were changes in the oil quality. Cracking decreased the H/C ratio, increased the nitrogen content, and decreased the pour point of the oil. Gas-phase oil cracking is contrasted to liquid-phase oil coking as a loss mechanism in oil-shale retorting.

Burnham, A.K.; Taylor, J.R.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

Stuart Nemser, PhD

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on Fatigue Crack ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

gechanical driving force such as crack opening distance (COD) . However, at hold time loading, the crack growth rate is drastically decreased with an increase of ...

98

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically converting an alcohol ...

99

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically ...

100

Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) Mechanism of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials. Presentation Title ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Weldability Tests for Evaluating Cracking Susceptibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Weldability tests used to evaluate susceptibility to cracking...used to evaluate susceptibility to cracking Test Fields of use Controllable variables Type of data Specialized equipment Relative cost Lehigh restraint test Weld metal hot and cold cracking, root cracking,

102

Catalytic reforming optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have previously examined correlations between catalytic reforming parameters for an L-35-6 unit at the Gor'knefteorgsintez Industrial Association. Experimental design was used to derive polynomial equations describing the correlations for each reactor. Further research on optimizing the reforming has been based on these results. They adopted the following strategy to define the best working parameters: they define a temperature that would provide the maximum target-product yield while maintaining a given working life. Most of the aromatic hydrocarbons are formed by the naphthene dehydrogenation, which is endothermic, so the greater the temperature drop over the height, the more rapid the process. The temperature difference thus indicates the current catalyst activity. To increase the target-product yield, one must raise the inlet temperature and ensure the largest drop across the catalyst. They examined an algorithm with fixed inlet conditions as regards flow rate and raw material composition. This algorithm provides the basis of software for the automatic control of the L-35-6 reactor unit at the Gor'knefteorgsintez Industrial Association. The system has been checked out and put into experimental operation.

Mazina, S.G.; Rybtsov, V.V.; Priss-Titarenko, T.A.

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

104

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

105

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

106

Stable crack growth estimates based on effective crack length and crack-opening displacements  

SciTech Connect

A method was developed for estimating the amount of stable crack growth that has occurred in a fracture toughness specimen that were loaded into the plastic range and for which only a monotonically increasing load-displacement curve was measured. The method was applied to data from several pressure vessel steels. The resulting J vs ..delta..a values compare favorably with a resistance curve obtained by the multiple specimen heat-tinting technique for A533, Grade B, Class 1 steel. The method for estimating stable crack growth uses several existing concepts heretofore mainly used separately. These concepts include an approximate expression for J for the compact specimen proposed by Andrews, the effective crack length concept of McCabe and Landes, the UK representation of the crack profile as a pair of straight lines intersecting at a hinge point, and Well's expression, J = m sigma/sub y/delta, for relating the crack-opening displacement to the value of J. The value of the constraint factor, m, at the advancing crack tip is estimated by means of a relation between ductility and fracture toughness. When calculated with respect to the COD at the original fatigue crack tip, the constraint factor, m/sub o/, is found to have a value consistently close to 2.0 for compact and precracked Charpy specimens. The method of estimation requires no auxiliary load-deflection measurements or calculations, and so permits single specimen estimates of stable crack growth to be made without the necessity of making high precision unloading compliance measurements.

Merkle, J.G.; Hudson, C.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Aspects of Stress Corrosion Cracking Relevant to Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive survey of crack initiation issues in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). It considers microcracking on smooth specimens and the transition from microcracking to stable crack propagation.

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

Research Article HZSM-5 Catalyst for Cracking Palm Oil to Gasoline: A Comparative Study with and without Impregnation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important to develop a renewable source of energy to overcome a limited source fossil energy. Palm oil is a potential alternative and environmental friendly energy resource in Indonesia due to high production capacity of this vegetable oil. The research studied effect of catalyst to selectivity of biofuel product from cracking of palm oil. The catalyst consisted of HZSM-5 catalyst with or without impregnation. The research was conducted in two steps, namely catalyst synthesized and catalytic cracking process. HZSM-5 was synthesized using Plank methods. The characterization of the synthesized catalysts used AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy) and BET (Brunaueur Emmet Teller). The cracking was carried out in a fixed bed microreactor with diameter of 1 cm and length of 16 cm which was filled with 0.6 gram catalyst. The Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst was recommended for cracking palm oil for the high selectivity to gasoline. © 2013

Achmad Roesyadi; Danawati Hariprajitno; N. Nurjannah; Santi Dyah Savitri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Simulation of ethylbenzene dehydrogenation in microporous catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of systems of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e., dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result of the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass, large economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost reactants and energy. The controlled, defined reaction zone (the membrane interface), will facilitate the reactor design process and permit greater control of reactor dynamics.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Predicting the Behavior of Small Fatigue Cracks - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

are effective at providing crack propagation resistance in many materials and composites, these mechanisms result in a crack size dependence (i.e., “small crack ...

111

High severity catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-severity catalytic reforming process is described comprising: (a) passing a mixture comprising a catalytic reforming feed stream and a recycle stream into a catalytic reforming reaction zone which is maintained at high-severity reforming conditions; (b) cooling an effluent stream comprising hydrogen and hydrocarbonaceous catalytic reforming reaction products which is withdrawn from the reaction zone; (c) passing the cooled effluent stream into a vapor-liquid separation zone and recovering therefrom a liquid stream comprising hydrocarbons and a hydrogen-rich gas stream; (d) passing the hydrogen-rich gas stream through an adsorption zone wherein the gas is contacted with a treating material which removes polycyclic aromatic compounds from the gas stream, the compounds remaining in the adsorption zone; (e) mixing a portion of the hydrogen-rich gas stream, which is the recycle stream, with the feed stream to form the charge stock mixture and withdrawing the balance of the hydrogen-rich gas stream, which is denoted as net hydrogen, from the catalytic reforming area, all of the hydrogen-rich gas stream being substantially free of polycyclic aromatic compounds; and (f) fractionating the liquid stream and recovering an overhead product comprising light hydrocarbons and a bottoms product comprising reformate.

Bennett, R.W.; Cottrell, P.R.; Gilsdorf, N.L.; Winfield, M.D.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

Welch, Donald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Holdaway, Ray F. (Clinton, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Intergranular Cracking of Brass Sprinkler Heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Charles R. Morin Memorial Symposium on Failure Analysis and Prevention. Presentation Title, Intergranular Cracking of Brass Sprinkler Heads.

114

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Brass: A Comparative Study on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Carbon Steel in High Temperature Geothermal Well · Evaluation of the Susceptibility to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in ...

115

On the Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior of Superalloys at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ON THE FATIGUE CRACK PROPAGATION BEHAVIOR. OF SUPERALLOYS AT ... the FCP resistance of superalloys ... lead to poor crack propagation behavior.

116

Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth Rates in Sour ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Carbon Steel in High Temperature Geothermal Well · Evaluation of the Susceptibility to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in ...

117

Environmental Cracking Resistance of High Nickel Alloys (CRAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Carbon Steel in High Temperature Geothermal Well · Evaluation of the Susceptibility to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in ...

118

On Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Intergranular Cracking under ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Carbon Steel in High Temperature Geothermal Well · Evaluation of the Susceptibility to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in ...

119

Corrosion and Cracking of Carbon Steel in Fuel Grade Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Carbon Steel in High Temperature Geothermal Well · Evaluation of the Susceptibility to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in ...

120

Evaluation of the Susceptibility to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Carbon Steel in High Temperature Geothermal Well · Evaluation of the Susceptibility to Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Model of the Fresh Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous models of the Web graph have highlighted some interesting properties, but have failed to describe the behavior of new content, especially how links to newly created pages appear. We experimentally study new Internet content using real-world data collected at Yandex (Russia's most popular search engine) and then we propose a new model of the Web graph, which reflects the behavior of such new content. We show through a set of experiments that this model realistically predicts the personalized PageRank and the diameter of new Internet content, something already existing models did not do. This model can be used for crawling, for example to define and tune crawl policies to improve the freshness of a search engine's index.

Lefortier, Damien; Samosvat, Egor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Superconducting Cuprates on Catalytic Substrates - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission Superconducting Cuprates on Catalytic Substrates Brookhaven National Laboratory. Contact BNL About This Technology Technology Marketing ...

124

INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING FOR GAS TURBINE Prepared For: California Energy REPORT (FAR) INTEGRAL CATALYTIC COMBUSTION/FUEL REFORMING FOR GAS TURBINE CYCLES EISG AWARDEE University://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Integral Catalytic Combustion/Fuel Reforming for Gas Turbine Cycles EISG Grant # 99

125

Catalytic Device International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Catalytic Device International LLC Catalytic Device International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Catalytic Device International LLC Place Pleasanton, California Product California-based, firm focused on portable, heat-on-demand products. References Catalytic Device International LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Catalytic Device International LLC is a company located in Pleasanton, California . References ↑ "Catalytic Device International LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Catalytic_Device_International_LLC&oldid=343285" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

126

Endothermic photo-catalytic reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this report is to present the results of an investigation to provide guidelines for future experimental work, on solar energy driven endothermic photo-catalytic reactions, and primarily to select candidate synthesis reactions which lead to high $-value products. An intensive literature search was conducted to find properties, market demand, and prices of pertinent chemicals; meeting four criteria: (1) the reaction must be endothermic and favorable; (2) the reaction must be catalytic; (3) the product must be produced from low cost feedstocks; and (4) the product must have a sales price >$1.00/lb. Initial examination of low cost feedstocks to high value products lead to consideration of n-paraffins to aromatics and substituted aromatics. Fifteen candidate endothermic synthesis reactions, meeting the above criteria, are suggested. The ratio of product price by reactant cost indicates {approximately}5--8 for the best possibilities; all can be visualized as starting with low cost paraffin and methanol feedstocks.

Prengle, H.W. Jr.; Wentworth, W.E.; Polonczyk, K.C.; Saghafi, M.; Wilking, J.A.; Kramer, K.S. (Houston Univ., TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Fishery Leaflet 427) Cold-Storage Design and Refrigeration Equipment Part 3 (Fisher y Leaflet 429) FactorsHANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 2 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH 428 Washington 25, D, C. December 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART TWO HANDLING FRESH FISH By Charles

128

Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Monthly report, April 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities are reported in a program to determine the feasibility and to estimate the economics of hydroprocessing synthetic crude feedstocks to distillate fuels using presented available technology. The first feedstock is shale oil. The oil used in this evaluation is Paraho crude shale oil, produced in the indirectly heated mode. Pilot plant studies evaluating hydroprocessing of the whole shale oil have been in progress for about six months. Shale oil makes an excellent catalytic cracking feedstock provided its nitrogen content is reduced to at least 0.1 percent by appropriate hydrofining. Gasolines and cycle oils derived from the cracking of hydrofined shale oils are similar to those obtained from the cracking of hydrofined petroleum gas oils. The second feedstock is solvent refined coal (SRC). In SRC processing, an analysis of hydrofining feedstock was conducted and hydrofining tests were planned. (JRD)

Sullivan, R.F.; Rudy, C.E.; Chen, H.C.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Method of improving catalytic activity and catalytics produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for dissociating H{sub 2}S in a gaseous feed using an improved catalytic material is disclosed in which the feed is contacted at a temperature of at least about 275C with a catalyst of rutile nanocrystalline titania having grain sizes in the range of from about 1 to about 100 manometers. Other transition metal catalysts are disclosed, each of nanocrystalline material with grain sizes in the 1--100 nm range. This invention may have application to vehicle emissions control (three-way catalysts).

Beck, D.D.; Siegel, R.W.

1993-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

The influence of cracks in rotating shafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the influence of transverse cracks in a rotating shaft is analysed. The paper addresses the two distinct issues of the changes in modal properties and the influence of crack breathing on dynamic response during operation. Moreover, the evolution of the orbit of a cracked rotor near half of the first resonance frequency is investigated. The results provide a possible basis for an on-line monitoring system. In order to conduct this study, the dynamic response of a rotor with a breathing crack is evaluated by using the alternate frequency/time domain approach. It is shown that this method evaluates the nonlinear behaviour of the rotor system rapidly and efficiently by modelling the breathing crack with a truncated Fourier series. The dynamic response obtained by applying this method is compared with that evaluated through numerical integration. The resulting orbit during transient operation is presented and some distinguishing features of a cracked rotor are examined.

Jean-Jacques Sinou; A. W. Lees

2008-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

Catalytic steam gasification of carbon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unsupported carbide powders with high specific surface area, namely {alpha}-WC (35 m{sup 2}/g, hexagonal), {beta}-WC{sub 0.61} (100 m{sup 2}/g, cubic face centered) and {beta}-WC{sub 0.5} (15 m{sup 2}/g, hexagonal) have been prepared. The key element in this preparation is the successful removal of surface polymeric carbon by careful gasification to methane by means of dihydrogen. These tungsten carbide powders have been used in catalytic reactions of oxidation of H{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis of alkanes, such as butane, hexane, and neopentane.

Boudart, M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Catalytic membranes for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Bolingbrook, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

An update on catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UOP Platforming process is a catalytic reforming process in widespread use throughout the petroleum and petrochemical industries. Since the first unit went onstream in 1949, the process has become a standard feature in refineries worldwide. Over the years, significant improvements have been made in process catalysts and process design. The most recent improvement is the combination of a catalyst called R-72 with a new patented flow scheme, R-72 staged loading, which gives significantly higher yields and provides increased catalyst stability. In this article, the authors describe two types of Platforming processes and the new R-72 staged loading scheme.

Wei, D.H.; Moser, M.D.; Haizmann, R.S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Stress Corrosion Cracking - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Atomic Ordering in Alloy 690 and Its Effect on Long-term Structural Stability and Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility: Michael Kaufman1; ...

135

Creep Crack Growth Behaviour of Alloy 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

its creep crack growth is controlled by stress intensity factor regardless of load level .... energy. Since vacancies diffuse from a low strain energy position to a high ...

136

Quench Cracking Characterization of Superalloys Using Fracture ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the on-cooling thermal stress. (load) accumulated to a certain point, quench cracking happened abruptly. Based on the precrack length, the thermal stress ...

137

Evaluation of Stress-Corrosion Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Stress-corrosion cracking of selected material systems...chlorides, seawater Oil/gas production and transmission, oil refining,

138

Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Fatigue Crack ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, fatigue crack propagation behavior of rolled AZ31B magnesium ... Alloy Design for Enhancing the Fracture Resistance of Heat Treated High ...

139

Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Materials in the Oil and Gas Industry. Presentation Title, Sulfide Stress Cracking in Steels - A Review.

140

Environmentally Assisted Cracking Susceptibility Assessment of AP ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Environmentally Assisted Cracking Susceptibility Assessment of AP 1000 Reactor Coolant Pump Flywheel Retainer Ring A289 18Cr-18Mn ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Status Review of Initiation of Environmentally Assisted Cracking and Short Crack Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews current knowledge of environmentally assisted cracking EAC initiation and short crack growth by stress corrosion cracking, strain-induced corrosion cracking, and, to a lesser extent, corrosion fatigue in nickel base alloys, austenitic stainless steels, and carbon and low-alloy steels exposed to typical pressurized water reactor PWR and boiling water reactor BWR aqueous environments. The document identifies key gaps in knowledge and recommends areas where additional experimental work i...

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Lean (RCL TM ) technology, Figure 1, is being developed as an ultra low NOx gas turbine combustor for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC). In this concept,...

143

Discontinuous surface cracks during stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel single crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discontinuous surface cracks during stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel single crystal L Keywords: A. Stainless steel B. SEM C. Stress corrosion a b s t r a c t Single crystal 321 stainless steel, and the river-markings exhibited microshear facets along the {1 1 1} plane. Interaction between the main crack

Volinsky, Alex A.

144

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

Lyons, J.E.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Pemex opts for catalytic dehydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

In the gas-rich areas such as the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Canada, and Mexico, low-cost ethane is the feed of choice for ethylene production. Coproduct production is minimal. Continued growth in demand for propylene, isobutylene, normal butone-1, and butadiene requires that alternate sources of these normally coproduct olefins be developed. Catalytic dehydrogenation, with its high selectivity to the desired olefin, is the logical and economic choice. Mexico is a case in point. It's ethylene production is based on ethane. Demand is rising for propylene and butadiene derivatives, and a potential demand exists for isobutylene to produce octane enhancers to implement an announced lead phase down. Only modest amounts of by-product monoolefin will be available from refining operations. Pemex, the Mexican refining and petrochemical giant, recognized this and started up its first Houdry Catadene /SUP TM/ plant in 1975 at Ciudad Madero to produce 55,000 metric ton/year of butadiene from normal butane. Pemex recently committed to a large (350,000 metric ton/year) propylene-from-propane plant at Morelos based on the Houdry Catofin /SUP TM/ catalytic dehydrogenation process. The plant will supply propylene to a long list of derivative plants (Table 1).

Craig, R.G.; Penny, S.J.; Schwartz, W.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Bubbles Produced by Breaking Waves in Fresh and Salt Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A greater volume of air is entrained by breaking waves to produce many more bubbles in salt, than in fresh, water. There are, however, little differences in their sizes. These results are consistent with reported observations of whitecaps over ...

Jin Wu

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Designing and compiling functional Java for the Fresh Breeze architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fresh Breeze architecture is a novel approach to computing that aims to support a high degree of parallelism. Rather than striving for heroic complexity in order to support exceptional single-thread performance, as in ...

Jacobs, William J., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water International Safety Projects Overview Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier Global access to energy and fresh water International cooperation on safety of nuclear plants Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr International Safety Projects Global Access to Energy and Fresh Water Bookmark and Share Water Water shortages, unreliable water supplies, and poor water quality have been considered in recent years to be major obstacles to sustainable development and poverty alleviation that require urgent attention. Over 1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water. In such areas, water shortages are increasingly limiting development options.

149

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking, Gas Oil Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable ...

150

3:2:1 Crack Spread  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

:2:1 Crack Spread :2:1 Crack Spread Figure 1 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Thomson Reuters. A crack spread measures the difference between the purchase price of crude oil and the selling price of finished products, such as gasoline and distillate fuel, that a refinery produces from the crude oil. Crack spreads are an indicator of the short-term profit margin of oil refineries because they compare the cost of the crude oil inputs to the wholesale, or spot, prices of the outputs (although they do not include other variable costs or any fixed costs). The 3:2:1 crack spread approximates the product yield at a typical U.S. refinery: for every three barrels of crude oil the refinery processes, it makes two barrels of gasoline and one barrel of distillate

151

Method of fabricating a catalytic structure  

SciTech Connect

A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

Rollins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Characterization of Environment-Dependent Fatigue Crack Growth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

at high frequency levels to fully environment-dependent at very low frequency ... environment-dependent crack growth process, crack increment per cycle is ...

153

Computational Weld Mechanics of Hot Crack Nucleation in Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Computational weld mechanics (CWM) is used to estimate the likelihood of hot crack nucleation in a welded joint. A hot crack nucleates when ...

154

The Effect of Microstructure on the Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GROWTH RESISTANCE OF NICKEL BASE SUF'RRALLOYS. Randy Bowman ... damage are most resistant to crack growth. ... crack propagation. (FCP) was ...

155

High cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation behavior of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

And fatigue crack propagation rates of modified A7075 showed slightly lower. Those superior fatigue strength and resistance of fatigue crack propagation of ...

156

Characterization of Elevated Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

temperature fatigue and the crack growth rates may be adequately correlated with the ... During creep crack growth the use of rate dependent elastic/plastic frac-.

157

Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

Busey, H.M.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Catalytic reactor with improved burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

Faitani, Joseph J. (Hartford, CT); Austin, George W. (Glastonbury, CT); Chase, Terry J. (Somers, CT); Suljak, George T. (Vernon, CT); Misage, Robert J. (Manchester,all of, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

TCS 2014 Symposium on Thermal and Catalytic Sciences for Biofuels...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TCS 2014 Symposium on Thermal and Catalytic Sciences for Biofuels and Biobased Products TCS 2014 Symposium on Thermal and Catalytic Sciences for Biofuels and Biobased Products...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Catalytic Properties of Ni-Al Intermetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to pursue high catalytic performance of Ni-Al intermetallic ... very high catalytic activity for methanol decomposition and methane steam reforming.

162

Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the trapped soot. During this project an ancillary bio-medical application was discovered for lattices of hydroxyapatite. These structures show promise as bone scaffolds for the reparation of damaged bone. A case study depicting the manufacture of a customized device that fits into a damaged mandible is described.

Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes March 5, 2013 - 11:17am Addthis The GE GeoSpring™ Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint as a traditional 50-gallon tank water heater, the Electric Heat Pump Water Heater uses the existing water heater's plumbing and electrical connections. Credit: GE The GE GeoSpring(tm) Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint as a traditional 50-gallon tank water heater, the Electric Heat Pump Water Heater uses the existing water heater's plumbing and electrical connections. Credit: GE To introduce this new electric heat pump water heater, GE ran a memorable ad during the 2010 Winter Olympics featuring snow monkeys enjoying a hot soak. Credit: GE

164

Numerical modeling of crack reorientation and link-up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRANC3D/BES software system has been used to simulate the reorientation and link-up of hydraulic fractures in three-dimensional (3D) problems. The adopted technique only needs to discretize the body surface and the crack surface. The crack propagation ... Keywords: FRANC3D/BES, crack propagation, multiple cracks

C. Y. Dong; C. J. de Pater

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Year/PAD District Cokers Catalytic Crackers Hydrocrackers Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cokers Catalytic Crackers Hydrocrackers Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Table 8. Capacity and Fresh Feed Input to Selected Downstream Units at U.S. Refineries, 2011 - 2013 (Barrels per Calendar Day) Reformers Capacity Inputs 2011 2,396,787 5,794,214 1,687,745 2,093,849 4,952,455 1,466,627 2,570,970 3,346,457 93,700 673,300 41,500 37,932 490,729 18,030 PADD I 188,389 266,950 373,897 1,176,972 254,000 350,063 1,017,616 223,751 PADD II 664,852 812,244 1,318,440 2,933,842 841,285 1,183,318 2,570,348 744,638 PADD III 1,243,427 1,629,967 80,350 185,800 28,200 63,362 158,192 18,214 PADD IV 96,649 120,190 530,400 824,300 522,760 459,175 715,570 461,995 PADD V 377,652 517,106 2012 2,499,293 5,611,191 1,706,540 2,173,336 4,901,284 1,528,708 2,614,571 3,246,874 74,900 489,300 20,000

166

Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Glycoside hydrolases: Catalytic base/nucleophile diversity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glycoside Glycoside Hydrolases: Catalytic Base/Nucleophile Diversity Thu V. Vuong, David B. Wilson Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, 458 Biotechnology Building, Ithaca, New York 14850; telephone: 607-255-5706; fax: 607-255-2428; e-mail: dbw3@cornell.edu Received 1 April 2010; revision received 27 May 2010; accepted 2 June 2010 Published online 15 June 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22838 ABSTRACT: Recent studies have shown that a number of glycoside hydrolase families do not follow the classical catalytic mechanisms, as they lack a typical catalytic base/ nucleophile. A variety of mechanisms are used to replace this function, including substrate-assisted catalysis, a network of several residues, and the use of non-carboxylate residues or exogenous nucleophiles. Removal of the catalytic base/ nucleophile

168

Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

Chang, Shen-Lin (Woodridge, IL); Lottes, Steven A. (Naperville, IL); Zhou, Chenn Q. (Munster, IN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

California Caesar Salad $ Fresh Avocado, Parmesan Cheese, Roma Tomatoes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicken Breast $ 209 $ 209 $ 229 $ 599 $ 699 $ 799 $ 829 $ 899 $ 929 $ 529 $ 499 $ 259 Calories: Total Fat Substitute Soy Chicken Served w/ Fresh Grilled Seasonal Vegetables Calories: Total Fat: Fiber: 82 1g 1.4g Caesar Dressing With Chicken With Soy Chicken Tossed Cobb Salad $ 799 99 Chopped Turkey Breast, Bacon

170

Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature indicate that IASCC in 289 C water is dominated by a crack-tip grain-boundary process that involves S. An initial IASCC model has been proposed. A crack growth test was completed on mill annealed Alloy 600 in high-purity water at 289 C and 320 C under various environmental and loading conditions. The results from this test are compared with data obtained earlier on several other heats of Alloy 600.

Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effect of Hot Cracks on EAC Crack Initiation and Growth in Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

No crack initiation/extension from hot cracks occured in any weld metals, which is ... Applicability of Lean Grade of Duplex Stainless Steels in Nuclear Power Plants .... Wear of Zircaloy-4 Grid Straps Due to Fretting and Periodic Impact with RV ...

172

TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW  

SciTech Connect

Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

Langton, C.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

173

VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine  

SciTech Connect

This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of the catalytic bed.

Tom Barton

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine  

SciTech Connect

This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of the catalytic bed.

Tom Barton

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Deactivation and regeneration of ZSM-5 zeolite in catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Pyrolysis transforms plastic wastes in valuable liquids and gases useful as fuels or source of chemicals. > The use of ZSM-5 zeolite in pyrolysis favours the production of gases and of lighter and more aromatic liquids. > ZSM-5 zeolite is almost completely deactivated after one plastics pyrolysis experiment. > ZSM-5 zeolite used in plastic wastes pyrolysis can be regenerated by burning the deposited coke in an air stream. > Regenerated ZSM-5 recovers its activity and produces liquids and gases equivalent to those obtained with fresh catalyst. - Abstract: In this work, a study of the regeneration and reuse of ZSM-5 zeolite in the pyrolysis of a plastic mixture has been carried out in a semi-batch reactor at 440 deg. C. The results have been compared with those obtained with fresh-catalyst and in non-catalytic experiments with the same conditions. The use of fresh catalyst produces a significant change in both the pyrolysis yields and the properties of the liquids and gases obtained. Gases more rich in C3-C4 and H{sub 2} are produced, as well as lower quantities of aromatic liquids if compared with those obtained in thermal decomposition. The authors have proved that after one pyrolysis experiment the zeolite loses quite a lot of its activity, which is reflected in both the yields and the products quality; however, this deactivation was found to be reversible since after regeneration heating at 550 deg. C in oxygen atmosphere, this catalyst recovered its initial activity, generating similar products and in equivalent proportions as those obtained with fresh catalyst.

Lopez, A., E-mail: alex.lopez@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Adrados, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

182

Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fuel Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project concerns a diffusion driven desalination (DDD) process where warm water is evaporated into a low humidity air stream, and the vapor is condensed out to produce distilled water. Although the process has a low fresh water to feed water conversion efficiency, it has been demonstrated that this process can potentially produce low cost distilled water when driven by low grade waste heat. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A dynamic analysis of heat and mass transfer demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3 Hg. The optimum operating condition for the DDD process with a high temperature of 50 C and sink temperature of 25 C has an air mass flux of 1.5 kg/m{sup 2}-s, air to feed water mass flow ratio of 1 in the diffusion tower, and a fresh water to air mass flow ratio of 2 in the condenser. Operating at these conditions yields a fresh water production efficiency (m{sub fW}/m{sub L}) of 0.031 and electric energy consumption rate of 0.0023 kW-hr/kg{sub fW}. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. The analyses agree quite well with the current data. Recently, it has been recognized that the fresh water production efficiency can be significantly enhanced with air heating. This type of configuration is well suited for power plants utilizing air-cooled condensers. The experimental DDD facility has been modified with an air heating section, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is enhanced when air is heated prior to entering the diffusion tower. Further analytical analysis is required to predict the thermal and mass transport with the air heating configuration.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight; Venugopal Jogi

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Adsorbent-treated cat cracked gasoline in motor fuels  

SciTech Connect

A methof is described for supressing carburetor deposit formation of motor fuels containing untreated cat cracked gasoline by blending adsorbent-treated cat cracked gasoline into the motor fuel. Up to about 50 percent by weight of the total composition is adsorbent treated cat cracked gasoline, but preferably from about 5 to about 25 percent by weight of the total composition is adsorbent treated cat cracked gasoline. In a preferred embodiment a standard reference fuel capable of providing a predetermined level of carburetor deposit formation is provided by the addition of either adsorbent-treated cat cracked gasoline, untreated cat cracked gasoline, or aromatic amines to a base fuel.

Thomas, S.P.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Crack detection using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method and apparatus for detecting crack-like flaws in components. A plurality of exciting frequencies are generated and applied to a component in a dry condition to obtain a first ultrasonic spectrum of the component. The component is then wet with a selected liquid to penetrate any crack-like flaws in the component. The plurality of exciting frequencies are again applied to the component and a second ultrasonic spectrum of the component is obtained. The wet and dry ultrasonic spectra are then analyzed to determine the second harmonic components in each of the ultrasonic resonance spectra and the second harmonic components are compared to ascertain the presence of crack-like flaws in the component.

Migliori, A.; Bell, T.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and sequestration projects. The objectives of this project were to prove at a commercial scale that ECO is capable of extended operations over a range of conditions, that it meets the reliability requirements of a typical utility, and that the fertilizer co-product can be consistently generated, providing ECO with an economic advantage over conventional technologies currently available. Further objectives of the project were to show that the ECO system provides flue gas that meets the inlet standards necessary for ECO{sub 2} to operate, and that the outlet CO{sub 2} and other constituents produced by the ECO{sub 2} pilot can meet Kinder-Morgan pipeline standards for purposes of sequestration. All project objectives are consistent with DOE's Pollution Control Innovations for Power Plants program goals.

Morgan Jones

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

FreshTracks Capital LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FreshTracks Capital LP FreshTracks Capital LP Jump to: navigation, search Name FreshTracks Capital LP Address 29 Harbor Road, Suite 200 Place Shelburne, New Hampshire Zip 05482 Product Venture capital with a focus on investing in Vermont. Phone number (802) 923-1500 Website http://www.freshtrackscap.com/ Coordinates 44.38055°, -73.228195° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.38055,"lon":-73.228195,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

187

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An innovative Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) process was recently described where evaporation of mineralized water is driven by diffusion within a packed bed. The energy source to drive the process is derived from low pressure condensing steam within the main condenser of a steam power generating plant. Since waste heat is used to drive the process, the main cost of fresh water production is attributed to the energy cost of pumping air and water through the packed bed. This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. A combined thermodynamic and dynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production of 1.03 million gallon/day by utilizing waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant based on a condensing steam pressure of only 3'' Hg. Throughout the past year, the main focus of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower and direct contact condenser. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze these heat and mass transfer devices are described. An experimental DDD facility has been fabricated, and temperature and humidity data have been collected over a range of flow and thermal conditions. The analyses agree quite well with the current data and the information available in the literature. Direct contact condensers with and without packing have been investigated. It has been experimentally observed that the fresh water production rate is significantly enhanced when packing is added to the direct contact condensers.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

INNOVATIVE FRESH WATER PRODUCTION PROCESS FOR FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the annual progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system, which is powered by the waste heat from low pressure condensing steam in power plants. The desalination is driven by water vapor saturating dry air flowing through a diffusion tower. Liquid water is condensed out of the air/vapor mixture in a direct contact condenser. A thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that the DDD process can yield a fresh water production efficiency of 4.5% based on a feed water inlet temperature of only 50 C. An example is discussed in which the DDD process utilizes waste heat from a 100 MW steam power plant to produce 1.51 million gallons of fresh water per day. The main focus of the initial development of the desalination process has been on the diffusion tower. A detailed mathematical model for the diffusion tower has been described, and its numerical implementation has been used to characterize its performance and provide guidance for design. The analysis has been used to design a laboratory scale diffusion tower, which has been thoroughly instrumented to allow detailed measurements of heat and mass transfer coefficient, as well as fresh water production efficiency. The experimental facility has been described in detail.

James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Mohamed Darwish; Diego Acevedo; Jessica Knight

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Accelerated Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of PWA 1480 Single ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3 456. 610. 1520 30. AK . AKrss. MPa v'?! Fig. 10 Fatigue crack growth rate as a function of AKrss and AK. Prediction of the Microscopic Crack Behavior: An ...

190

Reading of cracked optical discs using iterative learning control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical discs, including Compact Discs (CDs), Digital Versatile Discs (DVDs), and Blu-ray Discs (BDs), can get cracked during storage and usage. Such cracks commonly lead to discontinuities in the data track, potentially preventing reading of the data ...

Maarten Steinbuch; Koos Van Berkel; George Leenknegt; Tom Oomen; Jeroen Van De Wijdeven

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel In Concentrated Nitrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials. Presentation Title, Stress ...

192

Interaction between Local Strains and Stress Corrosion Cracks ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC): Laboratory Research and Field ...

193

Stress Corrosion Cracking Observation in API G-105 Grade Drill ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials. Presentation Title, Stress ...

194

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Stainless Steels and Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) Mechanism of Structural Component Materials in Pressurized Water Reactors : Young Suk ...

195

stress corrosion cracking of iron and nickel based alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Table of Contents is from Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking published by TMS.

196

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Visbreaking Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

197

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

198

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

199

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Fluid Coking Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

200

Girth Weld Cracking at Ethanol Terminal Facilities - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Failure Analysis and Prevention. Presentation Title, Girth Weld Cracking at ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Puerto Rico Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

202

Latent Cracking of Tantalum - Titanium Welds Due to Hydrogen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials. Presentation Title, Latent ...

203

Molecular Dynamics of Fatigue Crack Growth in Nanocrystalline ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental techniques are prohibitive due to limitations of nano samples and advanced microscopic manipulators. In this study, crack propagation under ...

204

Fundamental kinetic modeling of the catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a fundamental kinetic model for the catalytic reforming process has been developed. The complex network of elementary steps and molecular reactions occurring in catalytic reforming has been generated through a computer algorithm characterizing ...

Rogelio Sotelo-Boyas / Gilbert F. Froment; Rayford G. Anthony

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Annual Operation of Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, many coal-fired generating units equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for nitrogen oxide (NOX) control will convert from seasonal to annual SCR operation. This report provides guidelines on how to prepare for annual operation. It focuses on existing experience with annual operation, catalyst management strategy, equipment reliability, cold weather issues, low load and cycling operation, and risk assessment.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

Richard S. Tuthill

2004-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

2001 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 100,000 megawatts of coal-fired capacity in the United States will employ selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for the control of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions by 2004. The 2001 Workshop on SCR, held in Baltimore, Maryland, provided a forum for discussion of current SCR issues.

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

209

Purification of reformer streams by catalytic hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic Reforming is one of the most important processes to produce high grade motor gasolines. Feedstocks are mainly gasoline and naphtha streams from the crude oil distillation boiling in the range of 212 F to 350 F. By catalytic reforming the octane number of these gasoline components is increased from 40--60 RON to 95--100 RON. Besides isomerization and dehydrocyclization reactions mainly formation of aromatics by dehydrogenation of naphthenes occur. Thus, catalytic reformers within refineries are an important source of BTX--aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylenes). Frequently, high purity aromatics are recovered from these streams using modern extractive distillation or liquid extraction processes, e.g. the Krupp-Koppers MORPHYLANE{reg_sign} process. Aromatics product specifications, notably bromine index and acid wash color, have obligated producers to utilize clay treatment to remove trace impurities of diolefins and/or olefins. The conventional clay treatment is a multiple vessel batch process which periodically requires disposal of the spent clay in a suitable environmental manner. BASF, in close cooperation with Krupp-Koppers, has developed a continuous Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation Process (SCHP) as an alternative to clay treatment which is very efficient, cost effective and environmentally compatible. In the following the main process aspects including the process scheme catalyst and operating conditions is described.

Polanek, P.J. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States); Hooper, H.M. [Krupp Wilputte Corp., Bridgeville, PA (United States); Mueller, J.; Walter, M. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Emmrich, G. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Honeywords: making password-cracking detectable  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a simple method for improving the security of hashed passwords: the maintenance of additional ``honeywords'' (false passwords) associated with each user's account. An adversary who steals a file of hashed passwords and inverts the hash function ... Keywords: authentication, chaffing, honeywords, login, password cracking, password hashes, passwords

Ari Juels, Ronald L. Rivest

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cracked rotor vibrations by multifractal analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multifractal analysis has been used to diagnoze cracked and healthy rotors. Is has been shown that the complexity and regularity criteria of the dynamical systems defined by the multiple scaling of the time series can indicate the damages of the rotating shaft.

Grzegorz Litak; Jerzy T. Sawicki

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling  

SciTech Connect

This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A. [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); UVHC, TEMPO EA 4542, F-59313 Valenciennes (France)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Segmentation of cracks in shale rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the use of morphological connected filters are studied for segmenting sheet- and thread-like cracks in images of shale rock. A volume formed from a stack of 2-D X-ray images is processed using 3-D attributes. The shape-preserving property ...

Erik R. Urbach; Marina Pervukhina; Leanne Bischof

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Digital radiographic systems detect boiler tube cracks  

SciTech Connect

Boiler water wall leaks have been a major cause of steam plant forced outages. But conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques have a poor track record of detecting corrosion fatigue cracking on the inside surface of the cold side of waterwall tubing. EPRI is performing field trials of a prototype direct-digital radiographic system that promises to be a game changer. 8 figs.

Walker, S. [EPRI, Charlotte, NC (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Stress corrosion cracking and crack tip characterization of Alloy X-750 in light water reactor environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Inconel Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition has been evaluated in high purity water at 93 and 288°C under Boiling Water Reactor Normal Water Chemistry (NWC) and Hydrogen Water ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The influence of crack-imbalance orientation and orbital evolution for an extended cracked Jeffcott rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vibration peaks occurring at rational fractions of the fundamental rotating critical speed, here named Local Resonances, facilitate cracked shaft detection during machine shut-down. A modified Jeffcott-rotor on journal bearings accounting for gravity effects and oscillating around nontrivial equilibrium points is employed. Modal parameter selection allows this linear model to represent first mode characteristics of real machines. Orbit evolution and vibration patterns are analyzed, yielding useful results. Crack detection results indicate that, instead of 1x and 2x components, analysis of the remaining local resonances should have priority; this is due to crack-residual imbalance interaction and to 2x multiple induced origins. Therefore, local resonances and orbital evolution around 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4 of the critical speed are emphasized for various crack-imbalance orientations.

Julio Gomez-Mancilla; Jean-Jacques Sinou; V. R. Nosov; Fabrice Thouverez; A. Zambrano

2008-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

Stress Corrosion Cracking and Crack Tip Characterization of Alloy X-750 in Light Water Reactor Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Inconel Alloy X-750 in the HTH condition has been evaluated in high purity water at 93 and 288°C under Boiling Water Reactor Normal Water Chemistry (NWC) and Hydrogen Water ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

218

Methods of cracking a crude product to produce additional crude products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a crude product is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce one or more crude products. At least one of the crude products has a boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. as determined by ASTM Method D5307. The crude product having the boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. is catalytically cracked to produce one or more additional crude products. At least one of the additional crude products is a second gas stream. The second gas stream has a boiling point of at most 38.degree. C. at 0.101 MPa.

Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

220

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking, Gas Oil Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking, Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Colorado Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Other/Residual Fuel Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Other/Residual Fuel Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

222

New Jersey Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Jersey Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

223

Arkansas Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arkansas Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

224

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

225

Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well established that Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) aluminum alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are commonly used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength. Overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). When freshly bared coupons of AA 7050 are exposed to 90 C, 90% RH air, hydrogen ingress follows inverse-logarithmic-type kinetics and is equivalent for underaged (HEAC susceptible) and overaged (HEAC resistant) tempers. However, when the native oxide is allowed to form (24 hrs in 25 C, 40% RH lab air) prior to exposure to 90 C, 90% RH air, underaged alloy shows significantly greater hydrogen ingress than the overaged alloy. Humid air is a very aggressive environment producing local ({approx}1{micro}m) hydrogen concentrations in excess of 10,000 wt. ppm at 90 C. In the copper bearing alloy, overaging also effects the apparent diffusivity of hydrogen. As AA 7050 is aged from underaged {yields} peak aged {yields} overaged, the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion increases and the apparent diffusivity for hydrogen decreases, In the low copper alloy, overaging has little effect on hydrogen diffusion. Comparison of the apparent activation energies for hydrogen diffusion and for K independent (stage II) crack growth rate in 90% RH air between 25 and 90 C indicates that hydrogen transport kinetics are responsible for the decreased crack growth rate of overaged AA 7050 relative to the peak aged temper.

G.A. Young; J.R. Scully

2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

PICEP: Pipe Crack Evaluation Program (Revision 1): Special report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes software for calculating single- or two-phase flow through cracks in pipes and steam generator tubes. Options are available for calculating the crack-opening area and the critical (stable) crack length. The program is useful in performing leak-before-break analysis to demonstrate detectable leak rates prior to crack growth instability. Input to the code includes material properties, loads, thermal-hydraulic conditions, pipe geometry, and crack type and orientation. Theory and user information are provided in this report. 16 refs., 7 figs.

Norris, D.M.; Chexal, B.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

228

Solar reforming of methane in a direct absorption catalytic reactor on a parabolic dish  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of solar driven chemical reactions in a commercial-scale volumetric receiver/reactor on a parabolic concentrator was successfully demonstrated in the CAtalytically Enhanced Solar Absorption Receiver (CAESAR) test. Solar reforming of methane (CH{sub 4}) with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was achieved in a 64-cm diameter direct absorption reactor on a parabolic dish capable of 150 kW solar power. The reactor was a catalytic volumetric absorber consisting of a multi-layered, porous alumina foam disk coated with rhodium (Rh) catalyst. The system was operated during both steady-state and solar transient (cloud passage) conditions. The total solar power absorbed reached values up to 97 kW and the maximum methane conversion was 70%. Receiver thermal efficiencies ranged up to 85% and chemical efficiencies peaked at 54%. The absorber performed satisfactorily in promoting the reforming reaction during the tests without carbon formation. However, problems of cracking and degradation of the porous matrix, nonuniform dispersion of the Rh through the absorber, and catalyst deactivation due to sintering and possible encapsulation, must be resolved to achieve long-term operation and eventual commercialization. 17 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Muir, J.F.; Hogan, R.E. Jr.; Skocypec, R.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Buck, R. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ensure cogen steam supply with fresh-air-fired HRSGs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat-recovery steam generators (HRSG) are used to capture thermal energy from the exhaust of gas turbines (GT), thus increasing a plant's overall efficiency. Where additional steaming capacity--above what can be recovered from the GT exhaust--is required, supplementary-fired duct or register burners can be installed. Because gas-turbine exhaust contains a relatively high level of excess air, no additional ambient combustion air is required in most cases; only fuel is needed. This article describes fresh-air-fired HRSGs which are similar to supplementary-fired units, but employ forced- or induced-draft (FD or ID) fans to rapidly convert to fully fired operation in the absence of hot exhaust during GT outages. Thus, fresh-air firing (FAF) is typically employed only at industrial plants where steam needs are more critical than electric-power generation requirements. In most plants using FAF, the GT is isolated using a damper or slide gate during fully fired HRSG operation. In virtually all applications, an FD fan is engaged automatically when a significant drop in exhaust flow is sensed, permitting the conversion to FAF with little or no interruption to the steam supply. However, one plant in Oklahoma employs an ID air fan, which operates even during GT operation, ensuring very rapid, reliable changeover to the FAF mode.

Froemming, J.; Hjalmarson, L.; Houshmand, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An Energy Analysis of the Catalytic Combustion Burner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas boilers of conventional flame always produce varying degrees of combustion products NOx and CO, which pollute the environment and waste energy. As a new way of combustion, catalytic combustion breaks the flammable limits of conventional flame combustion, and realizes the combustion of ultra-natural gas/air mixture under the flammable limits. Its combustion efficiency is higher, which improves the ratio of energy utilization. Applying the catalytic combustion to gas boilers could solve the gas boilers' lower combustion efficiency, and achieve energy savings. On the basis of the catalytic combustion burner, the catalytic combustion burner was designed according to the catalytic combustion and water heaters. In this paper, we analyzed the heat loss and thermal efficiency of the catalytic combustion burner, and compared it to that of flame combustion boilers. The results showed that catalytic combustion burner ?'s heat loss is not so high as originally considered, and its pollutant emissions are lower.

Dong, Q.; Zhang, S.; Duan, Z.; Zhou, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Endothermic photo-catalytic reactions. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this report is to present the results of an investigation to provide guidelines for future experimental work, on solar energy driven endothermic photo-catalytic reactions, and primarily to select candidate synthesis reactions which lead to high $-value products. An intensive literature search was conducted to find properties, market demand, and prices of pertinent chemicals; meeting four criteria: (1) the reaction must be endothermic and favorable; (2) the reaction must be catalytic; (3) the product must be produced from low cost feedstocks; and (4) the product must have a sales price >$1.00/lb. Initial examination of low cost feedstocks to high value products lead to consideration of n-paraffins to aromatics and substituted aromatics. Fifteen candidate endothermic synthesis reactions, meeting the above criteria, are suggested. The ratio of product price by reactant cost indicates {approximately}5--8 for the best possibilities; all can be visualized as starting with low cost paraffin and methanol feedstocks.

Prengle, H.W. Jr.; Wentworth, W.E.; Polonczyk, K.C.; Saghafi, M.; Wilking, J.A.; Kramer, K.S. [Houston Univ., TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

Doctor, Richard D. (Lisle, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Circumferential cracking of steam generator tubes  

SciTech Connect

On April 28, 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 95-03, {open_quote}Circumferential Cracking of Steam Generator Tubes.{close_quote} GL 95-03 was issued to obtain information needed to verify licensee compliance with existing regulatory requirements regarding the integrity of steam generator tubes in domestic pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). This report briefly describes the design and function of domestic steam generators and summarizes the staff`s assessment of the responses to GL 95-03. The report concludes with several observations related to steam generator operating experience. This report is intended to be representative of significant operating experience pertaining to circumferential cracking of steam generator tubes from April 1995 through December 1996. Operating experience prior to April 1995 is discussed throughout the report, as necessary, for completeness.

Karwoski, K.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

Doctor, R.D.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

236

Database - Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Deactivation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst deactivation is a critical parameter controlling to a large extent achievable catalyst life, as well as overall SCR system performance. Accurate assessment and prediction of catalyst deactivation is required to adequately manage reactor potential. EPRI has on-going efforts underway aimed at better understanding the factors that affect catalyst deactivation, especially as a function of fuel, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions, in hopes of ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

237

2006 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held the 2006 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) on October 31 November 2, 2006 at the Dearborn Inn in Dearborn, Michigan and at DTE Energy's Monroe Station. Post-Combustion NOX Control Program members, invited speakers, and EPRI staff participated in this two and a half day event. The workshop agenda was comprised of twenty-seven presentations, two panel discussions, and a plant tour. Operating experience reports on SCR systems at Baldwin, Bowen, Bull Run, Crist, Cumberland, Gaston, Go...

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processing of Fresh Feed Input Processing of Fresh Feed Input Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Catalytic Cracking The refining process of breaking down the larger, heavier, and more complex hydrocarbon molecules into simpler and lighter molecules. Catalytic cracking is accomplished by the use of a catalytic agent and is an effective process for increasing the yield of gasoline from crude oil. Catalytic cracking processes fresh feeds and recycled feeds. Catalytic Hydrocracking A refining process that uses hydrogen and catalysts with relatively low temperatures and high pressures for converting middle boiling or residual material to high-octane gasoline, reformer charge stock, jet fuel, and/or high grade fuel oil. The process uses one or more catalysts, depending upon product output, and can handle high sulfur feedstocks without prior desulfurization.

239

Structures for dense, crack free thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

Jacobson, Craig P. (Lafayette, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); De Jonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

240

Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. A program of research for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols, via a low energy mechanistic pathway that is based on the use of the CO/CO{sub 2} couple to remove phenolic oxygen atoms, is underway. We are focusing on systems which have significant promise as catalysts: Ir(triphos)OPh, (Pt(triphos)OPh){sup +} and Rh(triphos)OPh. Our studies of phenol deoxygenation focus on monitoring the reactions for the elementary processes upon which catalytic activity will depend: CO insertion into M-OPh bonds, CO{sub 2} elimination from aryloxy carbonyls {l brace}M-C(O)-O-Ph{r brace}, followed by formation of a coordinated benzyne intermediate.

Kubiak, C.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A revolution in micropower : the catalytic nanodiode.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our ability to field useful, nano-enabled microsystems that capitalize on recent advances in sensor technology is severely limited by the energy density of available power sources. The catalytic nanodiode (reported by Somorjai's group at Berkeley in 2005) was potentially an alternative revolutionary source of micropower. Their first reports claimed that a sizable fraction of the chemical energy may be harvested via hot electrons (a 'chemicurrent') that are created by the catalytic chemical reaction. We fabricated and tested Pt/GaN nanodiodes, which eventually produced currents up to several microamps. Our best reaction yields (electrons/CO{sub 2}) were on the order of 10{sup -3}; well below the 75% values first reported by Somorjai (we note they have also been unable to reproduce their early results). Over the course of this Project we have determined that the whole concept of 'chemicurrent', in fact, may be an illusion. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the current measured from our nanodiodes is derived from a thermoelectric voltage; we have found no credible evidence for true chemicurrent. Unfortunately this means that the catalytic nanodiode has no future as a micropower source.

Cross, Karen Charlene; Heller, Edwin J.; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Creighton, James Randall; Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Baucom, Kevin C.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

IFP solutions for revamping catalytic reforming units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decision-making process for the refiner considering a revamp of a catalytic reforming unit comprises many factors. These may be grouped in two broad areas: technical and economic. This paper presents the results of a study performed by IFP that illustrates catalytic reforming unit revamp options. Three IFP processes are described and operating conditions, expected yields, and economic data are presented. The following options are discussed: base case Conventional, fixed-bed, semi-regenerative catalytic reformer; Case 1--revamp using IFP Dualforming technology; Case 2--revamp using IFP Dualforming Plus technology; and Case 3--revamp to IFP Octanizing technology. The study illustrates various options for the refiner to balance unit performance improvements with equipment, site, and economic constraints. The study was performed assuming design feedrate of 98.2 tons/hour (20,000 BPSD) in all cases. Because of the increased need for octane in many refineries, the study assumed that operating severity was set at a design value of 100 research octane number clear (RON). In all of the cases in this study, it was assumed that the existing recycle compressor was reused. Operating pressure differences between the cases is discussed separately. Also, in all cases, a booster compressor was included in order to return export hydrogen pressure to that of the conventional unit.

Gendler, J.L. [HRI, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Domergue, B.; Mank, L. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One potential failure mechanism for titanium and its alloys under repository conditions is via the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. The resulting decreased ductility and fracture toughness may lead to brittle mechanical fracture called hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, HIC may be a problem since the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this scientific analysis and modeling activity is to evaluate whether the drip shield will fail by HIC or not under repository conditions within 10,000 years of emplacement. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) addresses features, events, and processes related to hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield. REV 00 of this AMR served as a feed to ''Waste Package Degradation Process Model Report'' and was developed in accordance with the activity section ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' of the development plan entitled ''Analysis and Model Reports to Support Waste Package PMR'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This AMR, prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Materials Data Analyses and Modeling'' (BSC 2002), is to feed the License Application.

G. De

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

244

Crack tip plasticity in single crystal UO2: Atomistic simulations  

SciTech Connect

The fracture behavior of single crystal uranium dioxide is studied using molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Initially, an elliptical notch is created on either {111} or {110} planes, and tensile loading is applied normal to the crack planes. For cracks on both planes, shielding of crack tips by plastic deformation is observed, and crack extension occurs for crack on {111} planes only. Two plastic processes, dislocation emission and phase transformation are identified at crack tips. The dislocations have a Burgers vector of ?110?/2, and glide on {100} planes. Two metastable phases, the so-called Rutile and Scrutinyite phases, are identified during the phase transformation, and their relative stability is confirmed by separate density- functional-theory calculations. Examination of stress concentration near crack tips reveals that dislocation emission is not an effective shielding mechanism. The formation of new phases may effectively shield the crack provided all phase interfaces formed near the crack tips are coherent, as in the case of cracks residing on {110} planes.

Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks; Bulent Biner; Xiang-Yang Liu; David A. Andersson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Role of crack tip shielding in the initiation and growth of long and small fatigue cracks in composite microstructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of crack tip shielding in retarding the initiation and growth of fatigue cracks has been examined in metallic composite microstructures (consisting of hard and soft phases), with the objective of achieving maximum resistance to fatigue. Specifically, duplex ferritic-martensitic structures have been developed in AISI 1008 and 1015 mild steels to promote shielding without loss in strength. The shielding is developed primarily from crack deflection and resultant crack closure, such that unusually high long crack propagation resistance is obtained. It is found that the fatigue threshold ..delta..K/sub TH/ in AISI 1008 can be increased by more than 100 pct to over 20 MPa ..sqrt..m, without sacrifice in strength, representing the highest ambient temperature threshold reported for a metallic alloy to date. Similar but smaller increases are found in AISI 1015. The effect of the dual-phase microstructures on crack initiation and small crack (10 to 1000 ..mu..m) growth, however, is markedly different, characteristic of behavior influenced by the mutual competition of intrinsic and extrinsic (shielding) ''toughening'' mechanisms. Accordingly, the composite microstructures which appear to show the highest resistance to the growth of long cracks, show the lowest resistance to crack initiation and small crack growth. In general, dual-phase steels are found to display remarkable fatigue properties, with fatigue limits as high as 58 pct of the tensile strengths and fatigue thresholds in the range of 13 to 20 MPa..sqrt..m.

Shang, J.K.; Tzou, J.L.; Ritchie, R.O. (Materials and Chemical Sciences Div., Lawrence Berkeley Lab., and Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US))

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hydrogen induced crack growth in Grade-12 titanium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Internal hydrogen induced crack growth rates were measured in Grade-12 titanium which is a candidate material for high-level nuclear waste containers. As-received and hydrogen charged samples (5 ppM to 330 ppM hydrogen) were used for slow crack growth measurements at constant loads using a Krak Gauge. The testing temperature ranged from room temperature to 148/sup 0/C. The crack growth kinetics under low to moderate loads are linear, but this linear rate is interrupted by discrete fast crack jump segments with parabolic or cubic type kinetics. These fast jump segments are thought to be associated with the passage of the crack front through the alpha-beta interface phase or with the initial loading sequence. By measuring striation spacings on the fracture surface, most crack growth rates observed are found to be in stage II. The striations are considered to be associated with hydride fracture. The crack path is either transgranular in the alpha phase or interfacial in the alpha phase adjacent to the beta phase. For transgranular growth, crack growth rates are constant and slower than those for interfacial growth which is associated with fast crack growth through a high hydrogen concentration region. Most stage II crack growth rates depend slightly on the stress intensity suggesting the contribution of plastic tearing process to stage II kinetics. The activation energies for crack growth are much lower than the activation energy of hydrogen diffusion through the alpha phase, implying that hydrogen is transported along dislocations, grain boundaries or interfaces. When the temperature is increased, the crack velocity first reaches a maximum and then decreases at higher temperatures. These temperature effects come from lower hydrogen concentration trapped at dislocations or from slower hydride nucleation kinetics, both at higher temperatures.

Ahn, T.M.; Lee, K.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Relationships Between Stress Corrosion Cracking Tests and Utility ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking ... Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be ...

248

Influence of Different Cooling Structure on Surface Crack of HSLA ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Different Cooling Structure on Surface Crack of .... of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic Material Used for Tower Type Solar ...

249

Basic Aspects of Superalloy Design for Crack Growth Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

theories for fatigue and creep crack growth resistance that are particularly ... devices as the nuclear reactors and in such strategic and expensive vehicles.

250

Fatigue Property-Microstructure Relationships and Crack Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Effect of Microstructure on Fatigue Behavior of Two Pipeline Steels: .... to a transition crack length (LEFM applicable) is approximated using ...

251

In-vitro Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of Biomedical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of biodegradable and aluminium-free magnesium alloys, WZ21 and WE43, was investigated using ...

252

Corrosion Inhibition of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Localized ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Stress corrosion cracking of 7050 aluminum alloys in the turbo expander industry can cause expensive catastrophic failures, especially for turbo

253

Strain Rate Sensitivity of Alloy 718 Stress Corrosion Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were conducted in 36O'C pressurized- water-reactor. (PWR) primary water using. Alloy 718 heat-treated to produce.

254

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminium-Free Magnesium Alloys in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Stress Corrosion Cracking of Aluminium-Free Magnesium Alloys in a Simulated Human Body Fluid. Author(s), Lokesh Choudhary, R. K. Singh ...

255

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Alloy 7050-T7451 Exposed to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under cyclic loading notched specimens failed by transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Striations were observed on the cleavage-like facets. The number of ...

256

Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy 690 in Subcritical and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The objective of this study is to investigate the structure and chemistry of corrosion and stress corrosion crack initiation in Alloy 690. To avoid

257

grain boundary oxidation and stress corrosion cracking in nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerated stress corrosion cracking tests and exposures were conducted on alloy 600, Ni-9Fe, and Ni-9Fe-5Cr (LCr) in constant extension rate mode in ...

258

Model for the Superimposed Effects of Stress-Corrosion Cracking ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Fatigue and Corrosion Damage in Metallic Materials: Fundamentals, ... and a stress-corrosion cracking mode acting at high stress intensity in NaCl.

259

Stress Corrosion Cracking Threshold of Ti 6-4 Extrusions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ti 6Al-4V extrusions with standard chemistry and extra low interstitial are evaluated for their stress corrosion cracking resistance. Also examined is the affect of ...

260

A Study on the Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanism of Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Carbon steel is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in fuel grade ethanol (FGE). The research results obtained thus far have found ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Austenitic Alloys in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Austenitic Alloys in Supercritical Water. Author(s), Guoping Cao, Vahid Firouzdor, Todd Allen. On-

262

Galvanic Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

No aluminum bolt AW 7075 failed in magnesium due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Even aluminum bolts in T6 condition can be used for automotive ...

263

Orientation Effects and Influence of Delta Phase on Fatigue Crack ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

including a hold time at maximum load lead to increased crack propagation rates when compared ... 720°C ;' 8 hours .! controlled cooling rate at 50°C per hour.

264

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

265

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steels ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Stress Corrosion Cracking of Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steels in Various Types of Nuclear Power Plants by M.O. Speidel and R.

266

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: P wave...

267

Failure Analysis of a Cracked Thermite Welded Rail Section  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brittle fracture followed the fatigue crack propagation causing complete separation of the rail. Although the excess material was thought to reinforce the rails it ...

268

Thermal Cracking of Large-Diameter 706 Ingots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

responsible for the cracking. The most plausible scenario is that residual stresses generated by ... Analysis of Heat Up for Homogenization. Finite Element Model.

269

High-Temperature Stress Relaxation Cracking and Stress Rupture ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An incident occurred that resulted in the cracking of gasifier internals, bulging and stress rupture of the shell and the escape of hot syngas, causing a fire.

270

Corrosion Fatigue and Crack Propagation of Different Austenitic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A FIB Study of the Resistance of Grain Boundaries to Short Fatigue Crack Propagation in Three-Dimensions in High Strength Al Alloys · A Non-Linear Damage ...

271

Effect of Interstitial Content on High Temperature Fatigue Crack ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

instance; resulted in fatigue crack propagation (FCP)' programs like ESDADTA(2) and ENSIP(3). Fatigue resistance of nickel base superalloys is affected by ...

272

Fatigue and Fatigue Crack Propagation Behaviors of High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The S-N fatigue and fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behaviors of high ... The mechanisms associated with the improved fatigue resistance for the high ...

273

Effect of Thermal-Mechanical Treatment on the Fatigue Crack ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

that fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance without holding time has no significant difference between three alloys with 718Plus being the best and 718 the ...

274

Intergranular Liquid Formation, Distribution, and Cracking in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

zone adjacent to the fusion zone. These intergranular cracks form when liquid ...... 718, and A286 in Light Water Reactor. Environments",. J. Mater. Eng., 2, pp.

275

Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium in nitric acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The susceptibility of zirconium and its common alloys to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitric acid was investigated by slow strain-rate and constant deflection techniques. Cracking occurred at 25/sup 0/C over a wide range of acid concentrations and electrochemical potentials. The crack velocity increased slightly with increasing temperature. The failure mode was transgranular and the morphology was similar to SCC failures of zirconium alloys in other environments. The fracture was very orientation-dependent suggesting that it occurs on a single crystallographic plane in the material. The results of the study are not consistent with a hydrogen mechanism for cracking.

Beavers, J.A.; Griess, J.C.; Boyd, W.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

One-Dimensional Cold Rolling Effects on Stress Corrosion Crack ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Microstructural Investigation on the Effect of Cold Work on Environmentally .... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar ...

277

Solidification Cracking Study of High Chromium Nickel-Base Filler ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and rank the relative cracking susceptibility of these filler metal specifications. ... Surface Processing of Ag /TiO2 Nanowire Membranes for Solar Photovoltaic ...

278

Research and Evaluation of Low Temperature Crack Propagation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III) · On the Microstructure of Alloy 600 SCC Cracks Observed by TEM on PWR SG Pulled Tubes ...

279

DPQ Event Cracked Bushing Leads to Transformer Bank Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of EPRI's distribution power quality (DPQ) project this power quality (PQ) case study investigates cracked bushing recorded by PQ monitors that led to tranformer bank failure.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Ranking the Susceptibility to Hydrogen-assisted Cracking in Super ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thus, SDSS welds are exposed to hydrogen charging to under CP. There have been reported hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) failures in SDSS welds during ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrogen Induced Cracking Susceptibility of Titanium Alloys in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 16, 2007 ... This report evaluates hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) susceptibility of titanium alloys in environments anticipated in the Yucca Mountain ...

282

2002 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 100,000 MW of coal-fired generating capacity in the United States will be equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems to meet the nitrogen oxides (NOx) limits of the state implementation plan (SIP) call. Approximately 20,000 MW of capacity was expected to go into operation in 2002. Added to early SCR adopters in prior years, about 25 percent of the planned inventory is presently operable. Since 1999, EPRI has organized annual SCR workshops to discuss key issues and development...

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

2003 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 105,000 MW of coal-fired generating capacity in the United States will be equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems to meet the nitrogen oxide (NOx) limits of the state implementation plan (SIP). Power producers placed approximately 40,000 MW of capacity into operation in 2003. Combined with early SCR adopters from prior years, about 65 percent of the planned inventory is presently operable. Since 1999, EPRI has organized and held annual SCR workshops to discuss key issues a...

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

Transport in a Microfluidic Catalytic Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the heat and mass transfer, flow, and thermodynamics of the reacting flow in a catalytic microreactor is presented. Methanol reforming is utilized in the fuel processing system driving a micro-scale proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Understanding the flow and thermal transport phenomena as well as the reaction mechanisms is essential for improving the efficiency of the reforming process as well as the quality of the processed fuel. Numerical studies have been carried out to characterize the transport in a silicon microfabricated reactor system. On the basis of these results, optimized conditions for fuel processing are determined.

Park, H G; Chung, J; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Havstad, M; Morse, J D

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Noble metal alkaline zeolites for catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for producing a noble-metal containing zeolite suitable for catalytic reforming contacting a zeolite selected from alkaline faujasites and L zeolites and zeolites and zeolites isostructural thereto, with a noble-metal compound selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} and Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for a effective amount of time to incorporate Pt and/or Pd into the pore surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the Pt and/or Pd throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C, to about 600 {degrees} C for an effective amount of time.

Schweizer, A.E.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction (CMSL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. has conducted a series of eleven catalytic, multi-stage, liquefaction (CMSL) bench scale runs between February, 1991, and September, 1995. The purpose of these runs was to investigate novel approaches to liquefaction relating to feedstocks, hydrogen source, improved catalysts as well as processing variables, all of which are designed to lower the cost of producing coal-derived liquid products. This report summarizes the technical assessment of these runs, and in particular the evaluation of the economic impact of the results.

Comolli, A.G.; Ganguli, P.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, T.L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Popper, G.A.; Smith, T.; Stalzer, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Catalytic reforming and hydrocracking of organic compounds employing promoted zinc titanate as the catalytic agent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound or the hydrocracking of a feedstock which contains at least one hydrocrackable organic compound is carried out in the presence of a catalyst composition comprising zinc, titanium and rhenium.

Drehman, L.E.; Farha, F.E.

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

Catalytic reforming and hydrocracking of organic compounds employing zinc titanate as the catalytic agent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound or the hydrocracking of a feedstock which contains at least one hydrocrackable organic compound is carried out in the presence of a catalyst composition comprising zinc and titanium.

Drehman, L.E.; Farha, F.E.; Walker, D.W.

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Friedman, S. ,"Conversion of Anthraxylon - Kinetics ofiv- LBL 116807 CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COALand Mechanisms of Coal Conversion to Clean Fuel,iI pre-

Tanner, K.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

291

Revealing the rapid isothermal growth of graphene on catalytic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems Revealing the rapid isothermal growth of graphene on catalytic substrates July 01, 2013 Optical reflectivity tracks the rapid growth of...

292

Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of different fuels  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of methane (CH{sub 4}), n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and dimethyl ether (DME) were studied experimentally in a Pt-coated monolith catalytic reactor. It is concluded that DME has the lowest catalytic ignition temperature and the least required H{sub 2} flow, while CH{sub 4} has the highest catalytic ignition temperature and the highest required H{sub 2} flow among the three fuels. (author)

Zhong, Bei-Jing; Yang, Fan [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Qing-Tao [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang 621000 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Piloted rich-catalytic lean-burn hybrid combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic combustor assembly which includes, an air source, a fuel delivery means, a catalytic reactor assembly, a mixing chamber, and a means for igniting a fuel/air mixture. The catalytic reactor assembly is in fluid communication with the air source and fuel delivery means and has a fuel/air plenum which is coated with a catalytic material. The fuel/air plenum has cooling air conduits passing therethrough which have an upstream end. The upstream end of the cooling conduits is in fluid communication with the air source but not the fuel delivery means.

Newburry, Donald Maurice (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Catalytic Acceleration of Carbon Capture via Bio-processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, transformation of the biomass into fuels such as bioethanol, biodiesel or functional chemicals by means of catalytic and enzymatic conversion has ...

295

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels from biomass pyrolysis bio-oil (PNNL IPID 16665) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

296

Catalytic distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Catalytic Distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) is investigated in this thesis. The solvent, ethylene glycol, is proposed as a means of… (more)

Safinski, Tomasz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Short-Crack Response of Alloy 182 Weld Metal Undergoing Stress Corrosion Cracking in High-Temperature PWR Primary Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanistic investigations of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC), to date, have focused more on propagation relative to initiation. At the same time, components spend most of their life in the initiation and "short-crack" growth regimes. Prior exploratory work conducted at General Electric Global Research Center (GE GRC) showed that stainless steels, Alloy 600, and Alloy 182 weld metal exhibit lower average growth rates when the cracks are very short or small (1050 m). In those tests, the transition...

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Origin of undesirable cracks during layer transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the origin of undesirable transverse cracks often observed in thin films obtained by the layer transfer technique. During this process, two crystals bonded to each other containing a weak plan produced by ion implantation are heated to let a thin layer of one of the material on the other. The level of stress imposed on the film during the heating phase due to the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients of the substrate and the film is shown to be the relevant parameter of the problem. In particular, it is shown that if the film is submitted to a tensile stress, the microcracks produced by ion implantation are not stable and deviate from their straight trajectory making the layer transfer process impossible. However, if the compressive stress exceeds a threshold value, after layer transfer, the film can buckle and delaminate, leading to transverse cracks induced by bending. As a result, we show that the imposed stress \\sigma_m - or equivalently the heating temperature - must be within the ran...

Ponson, Laurent; Atwater, Harry; Ravichandran, Guruswami; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A nanomechanical investigation of the crack tip process zone of marble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the interaction between crack initiation and nanomechanical properties in the crack tip process zone (zone of microcracking at the tip of a propagating crack) of a brittle geomaterial. Samples of Carrara ...

Brooks, Zenzile (Zenzile Z.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gravity currents in cold fresh water Department of Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough University,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity currents in cold fresh water A. KAY Department of Mathematical Sciences, Loughborough.Kay@Lboro.ac.uk Abstract We consider surface gravity currents in fresh water where the temperatures of the current an empirical parametrisation of entrainment in lock-release gravity cur- rents, the distance travelled and time

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Method of handling foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­ Method of handling foods ­ Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, Akihisa a mobile manipulator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a super market from a remote location via the Internet. We

Ohya, Akihisa

302

Estimating evolution of freshness in Internet cache directories under the capture-recapture methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a new web sampling scheme for measuring the evolution of freshness in search engines. The methodology used is the capture-recapture, which is mainly applied for estimating evolution rates in wildlife biological studies. After ... Keywords: Capture-recapture methodology, Freshness, Internet search services, Web caching, Web evolution

Ioannis Anagnostopoulos; Christos Anagnostopoulos; Dimitrios D. Vergados

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Evaluation of Circumferential Cracking on Supercritical Boiler Waterwalls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circumferential cracking of the fireside surfaces of supercritical waterwalls remains a problem for many coal-fired boilers. Two parallel test programs at Pennsylvania Power and Light's (PPL) Brunner Island Unit 3 attempted to correlate operating conditions with the development and propagation of circumferential cracks.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Micro-crack Damage Evolution of Fracturing Rock Chaotic Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chaotic theory and bifurcation of modern nonlinear science were used to study the evolution of micro-cracks under the hydraulic fracturing of the rock mass characteristics, the tensor damage variable which described the chao evolution of micro-cracks ... Keywords: chaos theory, bifurcation theory, damage evolution

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

WATER PERMEABILITY OF CRACKED CEMENTITIOUS MICHAEL LEPECH & VICTOR C. LI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with inherently tight crack widths, typically less than 80 micron, even when strained up to 5% in uniaxial tension to undergo large deformations while maintaining load capacity. Of interest to this study are the tight crack mixture. Mixing proportions of both materials are shown in Table 1. The sand used in ECC had an average

Lepech, Michael D.

306

Fatigue-crack propagation behavior of Inconel 718  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics were used to characterize the effect of several variables (temperature, environment, cyclic frequency, stress ratio, and heat-treatment variations) upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Inconel 718 base metal and weldments. Relevant crack growth data on this alloy from other laboratories is also presented. (33 fig, 39 references) (auth)

James, L.A.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

U.S. Virgin Islands Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking/Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Cat. Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity ; Virgin Islands Downstream Charge Capacity of ...

308

Fatigue Crack Closure and Corrosion Fatigue in Al 7075 Alloy Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional methods to quantify crack closure load, such as load-displacement curves, are not very accurate. In this study, the degree of crack closure through ...

309

A Study on Fatigue-Crack-Deformation Behavior Following a Single ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2009 ... Width. Using this method, the respective crack—opening load (COL) at various crack-growth stages can be determined ?om the curve of the ...

310

Induction Heating Stress Improvement Effectiveness on Crack Growth in Operating Plants (BWRVIP-61)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New reports of intergranular stress corrosion cracking prompted this review of factors that could influence the performance of the pipe cracking remedy known as induction heating stress improvement.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assessment of Crack in Corrosion Defects in Natural Gas Transmission Pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pipelines are one of the safest forms of transportation for oil and gas. However, pipelines may experience some defects, such as cracks, corrosion and cracks… (more)

Hosseini, Seyed Aliakbar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

West Virginia Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 3,350: 3,850: 3,850: 3,850: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013 ...

313

Alabama Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 28,700: 36,000: 33,000: 33,000: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 12,600: 12,600: 12,600: 28,000: 30,000: 30,000: 1987-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh ...

314

Hawaii Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 11,800: 12,500: 12,500: 12,500: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 21,000: 21,000: 21,000 ...

315

New Mexico Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 34,243: 34,243: 34,243: 29,800: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 39,631: 39,631: 39,631 ...

316

Tennessee Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 34,200: 34,200: 33,000: 35,300: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 68,000: 68,000: 68,000 ...

317

Kansas Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 76,200: 76,700: 76,700: 76,700: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 59,530: 61,800: 61,800: 61,800: 61,800: 60,000: 1987-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh ...

318

Virginia Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 11,000: 11,000 : 2010-2011: Total Coking: 17,675: 21,800: 20,000: 20,000: 0: 0: 1987-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 27,800: 27,800: 27,800:

319

Wyoming Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 31,420: 30,670: 31,296: 31,448: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 13,500: 29,500: 29,500: 29,000: 31,200: 31,200: 1987-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh ...

320

Minnesota Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 64,770: 56,200: 57,800: 57,800: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 63,720: 60,500: 60,500: 58,700: 61,500: 58,600: 1987-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Arkansas Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Catalytic Reforming : 14,500: 14,500: 14,800: 14,800: 2010-2013: Total Coking: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 2006-2013: Catalytic Cracking - Fresh Feed: 19,500: 19,500: 20,500 ...

322

Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion  

SciTech Connect

Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical requirement for commercial deployment of biomass-based power/heat co-generation and biofuels production. There are several commonly used syngas clean-up technologies: (1) Syngas cooling and water scrubbing has been commercially proven but efficiency is low and it is only effective at small scales. This route is accompanied with troublesome wastewater treatment. (2) The tar filtration method requires frequent filter replacement and solid residue treatment, leading to high operation and capital costs. (3) Thermal destruction typically operates at temperatures higher than 1000oC. It has slow kinetics and potential soot formation issues. The system is expensive and materials are not reliable at high temperatures. (4) In-bed cracking catalysts show rapid deactivation, with durability to be demonstrated. (5) External catalytic cracking or steam reforming has low thermal efficiency and is faced with problematic catalyst coking. Under this program, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) is being evaluated for syngas tar clean-up in biomass gasification. The CPO reaction is exothermic, implying that no external heat is needed and the system is of high thermal efficiency. CPO is capable of processing large gas volume, indicating a very compact catalyst bed and a low reactor cost. Instead of traditional physical removal of tar, the CPO concept converts tar into useful light gases (eg. CO, H2, CH4). This eliminates waste treatment and disposal requirements. All those advantages make the CPO catalytic tar conversion system a viable solution for biomass gasification downstream gas clean-up. This program was conducted from October 1 2008 to February 28 2011 and divided into five major tasks. - Task A: Perform conceptual design and conduct preliminary system and economic analysis (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2009) - Task B: Biomass gasification tests, product characterization, and CPO tar conversion catalyst preparation. This task will be conducted after completing process design and system economics analysis. Major milestones include identification of syngas cleaning requirements for proposed system

Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Catalytic cartridge SO.sub.3 decomposer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO.sub.3 decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety.

Galloway, Terry R. (Berkeley, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Catalytic cartridge SO/sub 3/ decomposer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO/sub 3/ decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety. A fusion reactor may be used as the heat source.

Galloway, T.R.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture, comprising and feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in a liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure, consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor, contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

Jones, E.M. Jr.

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catatlyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture, comprising and feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in a liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure, consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

Jones, E.M. Jr.

1985-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Insights into Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms from High-Resolution Measurements of Crack-Tip Structures and Compositions  

SciTech Connect

The fundamental basis for mechanistic understanding and modeling of SCC remains in question for many systems. Specific mechanisms controlling SCC can vary with changes in alloy characteristics, applied/residual stress or environmental conditions. The local crack electrochemistry, crack-tip mechanics and material metallurgy are the main factors controlling crack growth. These localized properties are difficult or impossible to measure in active cracks. Nevertheless, it is essential to quantitatively interrogate these crack-tip conditions if mechanistic understanding is to be obtained. A major recent advance has been the ability to investigate SCC cracks and crack tips using high-resolution ATEM techniques. ATEM enables the characterization of SCC cracks including trapped tip solution chemistries, corrosion product/film compositions and structures, and elemental composition gradients and defect microstructures along the crack walls and at the crack tip. A wide variety of methods for imaging and analyses at resolutions down to the atomic level can be used to examine the crack and corrosion film characteristics. Surface films and reaction layers have been examined by cross-sectional TEM techniques, but little work had been conducted on environmentally induced internal cracks until that of Lewis and co-workers [1-3] and the current authors [4-17]. This capability combined with modern ATEM techniques has enabled exciting new insights into corrosion processes occurring at buried interfaces and is being used to identify mechanisms controlling IGSCC in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) components. The objective of this paper is to summarize certain results focused on IGSCC of Fe- base and Ni-base stainless alloys in high-temperature water environments. Representative crack-tip examples will be shown to illustrate specific aspects that are characteristic of SCC in the material/environment combinations. Differences and similarities in crack-tip structures- chemistries will be highlighted comparing Fe-base 316/304SS to Ni-base alloy 600/182 and for tests in oxidizing versus hydrogenated water environments.

Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cracking in liquid petroleum gas Horton spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas processing plant on the western coast of India produces sweet gas after processing sour natural gas. Liquid petroleum gas (LPG) is recovered from the sweet gas. The LPG, containing a H{sub 2}S concentration of 10 ppm to 20 ppm, is stored in Horton spheres, each 17 m in diameter with a capacity of {minus}27 C to 55 C. Horton spheres for containing liquid petroleum gas (LPG) were fabricated on-site using prestressed plates of high-strength carbon steel (CS) SA 537 Class-1 with post-weld heat treatment. High-residual tensile stresses and hydrogen absorption from H{sub 2}S present in LPG could be the cause of cracking at weld and heat-affected zone interfaces at high hardness locations. Recommendations are given for inspection and use of lower-strength CS and improved welding procedures.

Trivedi, D.K. Gupta, S.C. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp., Surat (India). Hazari Gas Processing Complex

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

THE NON-CONSTANT CTOD/CTOA IN CRACK PROPAGATION  

SciTech Connect

Unlike the common belief that crack propagation behavior can be predicted successfully by employing fracture criteria based on a constant crack tip opening displacement or angle (CTOD/CTOA), this paper shows that the initially non-constant portion of the CTOD/CTOA plays an essential role in predicting the fracture load for a growing crack. Three- and two-dimensional finite element analyses indicate that a severe underestimate of the experimental load vs. crack extension curve would occur if a constant CTOD/CTOA criterion is used. However, the use of a simplified, bilinear CTOD/CTOA criterion including its non-constant portion will closely duplicate the test data. Furthermore, as a result of using the experimental data from J-integral test with various crack length to specimen width ratios (a/W), it is demonstrated that the CTOD/CTOA is crack tip constraint dependent. The initially higher values of the CTOD/CTOA are in fact a natural consequence of crack growth process which is refl ected by the J-resistance curve and its slope (tearing modulus).

LAM, POH-SANG

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Analysis of Alloy 600 and X-750 stress corrosion cracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few months ago, KAPL evidence supported the view that Primary or Pure Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 results from a hydrogen mechanism. Figure 1 shows an Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) analysis of a stress corrosion crack (SCC) crack in an A600 split tube U-bend specimen exposed to primary water at 338{degree}C (640{degrees}F) for 462 days. The features which appear to confirm a hydrogen mechanism are: (1) A very narrow (< 200 {angstrom}) crack with a sharp tip, nearly free of deposits. (2) No evidence of severe plastic deformation in the region immediately ahead of the crack tip. (3) A line of small voids preceding the main crack tip, of which the largest is about 5 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm in length. Shen and Shewmon proposed that PWSCC of Alloy 600 occurs due to small microvoids ahead of a main crack tip. The hypothesis is that such voids result from pockets of methane gas formed by the reaction of atomic hydrogen with carbon in the base metal. The voids are about 10 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm diameter, approximately a factor of 2 larger than the largest voids.

Thompson, C.D.; Lewis, N.; Krasodomski, H.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Improved load ratio method for predicting crack length  

SciTech Connect

The elastic compliance from unloading/reloading sequences in a load-displacement record estimates well crack length in elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests of compact tension [C(T)] and bending type specimens. The need for partial unloading of the specimen makes it difficult to run the test under static loading and impossible under either dynamic loading or very high temperatures. Furthermore, fracture toughness testing in which crack length is determined from elastic compliance requires high precision testing equipment and highly skilled technicians. As a result, such tests are confined usually to research laboratories and seldom used under production settings. To eliminate these problems, an improved load ratio method of predicting crack length is proposed that utilizes only the recorded load versus load-line displacement curve (or load versus crack-mouth-opening displacement curve) without unloading/reloading sequences. As a result, the instrumentation is much simpler than in the elastic compliance or potential drop methods. If only a monotonic load-displacement record is to be measured the fracture toughness test becomes almost as simple to perform as a tension test. The method described here improves in three ways the ``original load ratio method`` proposed by Hu et al. First, a blunting term is added to the crack length before maximum load. Second, a strain hardening correction is included after maximum load. And, third, the initial crack length and the physical (final) crack length measured at the end of the test serve to anchor the predicted crack lengths, forcing agreement between predicted and measured values. The method predicts crack extension with excellent accuracy in specimens fabricated from A302, A508, and A533B piping and pressure vessel steels, A588 and A572 structural steels, and HY-80 ship steel.

Chen, X.; Albrecht, P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Inst. for Systems Research; Wright, W. [Federal Highway Administration, McLean, VA (United States). Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center; Joyce, J.A. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]).

F. Hua

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Prediction of Reflection Cracking in Hot Mix Asphalt Overlays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reflection cracking is one of the main distresses in hot-mix asphalt (HMA) overlays. It has been a serious concern since early in the 20th century. Since then, several models have been developed to predict the extent and severity of reflection cracking in HMA overlays. However, only limited research has been performed to evaluate and calibrate these models. In this dissertation, mechanistic-based models are calibrated to field data of over 400 overlay test sections to produce a design process for predicting reflection cracks. Three cracking mechanisms: bending, shearing traffic stresses, and thermal stress are taken into account to evaluate the rate of growth of the three increasing levels of distress severity: low, medium, and high. The cumulative damage done by all three cracking mechanisms is used to predict the number of days for the reflection crack to reach the surface of the overlay. The result of this calculation is calibrated to the observed field data (severity and extent) which has been fitted with an S-shaped curve. In the mechanistic computations, material properties and fracture-related stress intensity factors are generated using efficient Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms. In the bending and shearing traffic stress models, the traffic was represented by axle load spectra. In the thermal stress model, a recently developed temperature model was used to predict the temperature at the crack tips. This process was developed to analyze various overlay structures. HMA overlays over either asphalt pavement or jointed concrete pavement in all four major climatic zones are discussed in this dissertation. The results of this calculated mechanistic approach showed its ability to efficiently reproduce field observations of the growth, extent, and severity of reflection cracking. The most important contribution to crack growth was found to be thermal stress. The computer running time for a twenty-year prediction of a typical overlay was between one and four minutes.

Tsai, Fang-Ling

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Examination of cracked turbine discs from nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Investigations were performed on a cracked turbine disc from the Cooper Nuclear Power Station (BWR), and on two failed turbine discs from the Yankee-Rowe Nuclear Power Station (PWR). The Yankee-Rowe discs were subjected to SEM/EDAX, uniaxial tension tests, hardness testing, notch sensitivity tests, and environmental notched tensile tests. The results of this investigation support the model whereby the cracks initiated at startup of the turbine, probably from H/sub 2/S produced by hydrolysis of MoS/sub 2/, and grew at a rate consistent with published data for propagation of cracks in pure steam.

Czajkowski, C.J.; Weeks, J.R.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Shale oil cracking. 2. Effect on oil composition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from spectroscopic investigations are presented that demonstrate the effect of oil cracking on shale oil composition. Techniques used include infrared spectroscopy, capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance. We show that cracking causes an increase in aromatic and alkene content of the oil. We compare our results for oils prepared in the laboratory with oils prepared in the TOSCO-II semi-works and in modified and true-in-situ combustion retorts. We demonstrate that the napthalene/2-methyl-naphthalene ratio is a good indicator of cracking conditions in an oil shale retort.

Burnham, A.K.; Sanborn, R.H.; Crawford, R.W.; Newton, J.C.; Happe, J.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evaluation of Cracks in ABB HK Arc Chutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has a number of medium voltage (5 Kv-15 Kv) ABB HK air-magnetic circuit breakers with cracks in various places on the ceramic liner plate and cold-molded asbestos portions of the arc chutes. These cracks may or may not be cosmetic. This "jump gap crack" issue has been discussed in several ABB circuit breaker users group meetings. Five utilities (Brunswick, Seabrook, TVA, Duke, and Vogtle) have previously expressed interest in this issue. The present ABB Quality Assurance Proced...

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Solar reforming of methane in a direct absorption catalytic reactor on a parabolic dish: I-test and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of solar driven chemical reaction in a commercial-scale volumetric receiver/reactor on a parabolic concentrator was successfully demonstrated in the CAtalytically Enhanced Solar Absorption Receiver (CAESAR) test. Solar reforming of methane (CH[sub 4]) with carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) was achieved in a 64 cm diameter direct absorption reactor on a parabolic dish capable of 150 kW solar power. The reactor was a catalytic volumetric absorber consisting of a multilayered, porous alumina foam disk coated with rhodium (Rh) catalyst. The system was operated during both steady-state and solar transient (cloud passage) conditions. The total solar power absorbed reached values up to 97 kW and the maximum methane conversion was 70%. Receiver thermal efficiencies ranged up to 85% and chemical efficiencies peaked at 54%. The absorber performed satisfactorily in promoting the reforming reaction during the tests without carbon formation. However, problems of cracking and degradation of the porous matrix, nonuniform dispersion of the Rh through the absorber, the catalyst deactivation due to sintering and possible encapsulation, must be resolved to achieve long-term operation and eventual commercialization.

Muir, J.F.; Hogan, R.E. Jr.; Skocypec, R.D. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Buck, R. (DLR-ITT, Stuttgart (Germany))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Synergize fuel and petrochemical processing plans with catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the market, refiner`s plans to produce clean fuels and higher value petrochemicals will weigh heavily on the catalytic reformer`s flexibility. It seems that as soon as a timely article related to catalytic reforming operations is published, a new {open_quotes}boutique{close_quotes} gasoline fuel specification is slapped on to existing fuel standards, affecting reformer operations and processing objectives. Just as importantly, the petrochemical market (such as aromatics) that refiners are targeting, can be very fickle. That`s why process engineers have endeavored to maintain an awareness of the flexibility that technology suppliers are building into modern catalytic reformers.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Strategies for planar crack propagation based on the concept of material forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a computational framework for the simulation of planar crack growth (including kinking) driven by "material forces". An evolution law for the crack tip position is formulated, which is shown to give rise to different propagation strategies ... Keywords: Configurational forces, Crack curving, Crack propagation

Jim Brouzoulis; Fredrik Larsson; Kenneth Runesson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Exxon catalytic coal gasification process: predevelopment program. Monthly report, July 1977  

SciTech Connect

Operation of the catalyst recovery unit continued and water soluble potassium was recovered and recycled to the catalyst addition unit. The recovery of water soluble potassium increased to 94.0%. Approximately 324 hours of material-balanced operations were logged with excellent closures. The longest continuous run lasted over 290 hours. Carbon and steam conversions remained essentially the same as for the June material balance periods. Construction of a digestion unit for secondary catalyst recovery was completed. Bench scale studies of catalyst recovery via water washing were continued. Data confirmed the discovery that exposure of char to air adversely affects catalyst recovery. The effect of residence time on catalyst recovery by water-washing was also investigated. Over the range of conditions investigated, recovery of water-soluble catalyst is independent of residence time. Work continued on the use of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ digestion to recover water-insoluble potassium from gasifier ash/char residue. Recoveries of water-insoluble potassium from unwashed char decreased with a decrease in liquid/char ratio. A simulation of digestion using solutions of recovered catalyst was conducted. Recoveries from these recycle runs are in the same range as recoveries obtained in runs made under the same conditions with fresh 15% KOH solution. Work has continued on the development of the process basis for the Catalytic Gasification Study Design.

Kalina, T.

1977-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

Keeping mom and pop fresh : strategies for getting produce into corner stores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Availability of fresh, healthy produce for low-income people is a growing concern for advocates and public officials concerned with health disparities and diet-related disease. Healthy corner store conversions are a promising ...

Hadwin, Angela J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Understanding the Climate-Sensitive Decisions and Information Needs of Fresh Water Resource Managers in Hawaii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding how climate science can be useful in decisions about the management of fresh water resources requires knowledge of decision makers, their climate-sensitive decisions, and the context in which the decisions are being made. A mixed-...

Melissa L. Finucane; Rachel Miller; L. Kati Corlew; Victoria W. Keener; Maxine Burkett; Zena Grecni

347

Multi-echelon inventory management for a fresh produce retail supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perishability presents a challenging problem in inventory management for the fresh produce industry since it can lead to higher inventory costs and lower service levels. If a supply chain has multiple echelons, that further ...

Suryawanshi, Yogeshwar D. (Yogeshwar Dattatraya)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Crystalline Structure of Ice Formed by Droplet Accretion. I: Fresh Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystal structure of fresh samples of dry growth accreted ice grown on cylinders rotating in an icing tunnel has been determined by two methods: 1) by photographing thin sections between crossed polaroids and 2) by allowing microtomed ...

C. J. McCappin; W. C. Macklin

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

Helfritch, Dennis J. (Baltimore, MD)

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of high temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made in 1991 on the development of ceramic membranes as catalytic reactors. Efforts were focused on the design, construction and startup of a reactor system capable of duplicating relevant commercial operating conditions. With this system, yield enhancement was demonstrated for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in a membrane reactor compared to the standard packed bed configuration. This enhancement came with no loss in styrene selectivity. During operation, coke deposition on the membrane was observed, but this deposition was mitigated by the presence of steam in the reaction mixture and a steady state permeability was achieved for run times in excess of 200 hours. Work began on optimizing the membrane reactor by exploring several parameters including the effect of N{sub 2} diluent in the reaction feed and the effect of a N{sub 2} purge on the permeate side of the membrane. This report details the experimental progress made in 1991. Interactions with the University of Wisconsin on this project are also summarized. Finally, current status of the project and next steps are outlined.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of liquid fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidative pyrolysis of n-heptane was investigated with metal oxides Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MnO/sub 2/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, NiO, Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, and CuO supported on alumina. Metallic content of the catalyst weight varied from 0.1 to 2.0% with catalytic activity reaching a maximum when the metal content was 1%. The most active catalysts were Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, MnO/sub 2/, and NiO. Pyrolysis of cyclohexane and toluene was also studied with Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as catalyst. Hydrocarbon stability and coke formation increase with increase of hydrocarbon condensation in the series paraffin < naphthalene < aromatic hydrocarbons. Pyrolysis of the various hydrocarbons at 800/sup 0/C yielded a gas that has an octane number of 90 to 93, and the process was shown to be adaptable to pyrolysis of various commercial fractions such as benzines A-72 and A-76, petroleum fractions, and liquid paraffins to produce gas of about the same octane. (BLM)

Antonova, V.M.; Gorlov, E.G.; Paushkin, Ya.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Catalytic Preparation of Pyrrolidones from Renewable Resources  

SciTech Connect

Use of renewable resources for production of valuable chemical commodities is becoming a topic of great national interest and importance. This objective fits well with the USDOE’s objective of promoting the industrial bio-refinery concept in which a wide array of valuable chemical, fuel, food, nutraceuticals and animal feed products all result from the integrated processing of grains, oil seeds and other bio-mass materials. The bio-refinery thus serves to enhance the overall utility and profitability of the agriculture industry as well as helping to reduce the dependence on petroleum. Pyrrolidones fit well with the bio-refinery concept since they may be produced in a scheme beginning with the fermentation of a portion of the bio-refinery’s sugar product into succinate. Pyrrolidones are a class of industrially important chemicals with a variety of uses including as polymer intermediates, cleaners, and “green solvents” which can replace hazardous chlorinated compounds. Battelle has developed an efficient process for the thermo – catalytic conversion of succinate into pyrrolidones, especially n-methylpyrrolidone. The process uses both novel Rh based catalysts and novel aqueous process conditions and results in high selectivities and yields of pyrrolidone compounds. The process also includes novel methodology for enhancing yields by recycling and converting non-useful side products of the catalysis into additional pyrrolidone. The process has been demonstrated in both batch and continuous reactors. Additionally, stability of the unique Rh-based catalyst has been demonstrated.

Frye, John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Catalytic Preparation of Pyrrolidones from Renewable Resources  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Use of renewable resources for production of valuable chemical commodities is becoming a topic of great national interest and importance. This objective fits well with the U.S. DOE’s objective of promoting the industrial bio-refinery concept in which a wide array of valuable chemical, fuel, food, nutraceuticals, and animal feed products all result from the integrated processing of grains, oil seeds, and other bio-mass materials. The bio-refinery thus serves to enhance the overall utility and profitability of the agriculture industry as well as helping to reduce the USA’s dependence on petroleum. Pyrrolidones fit well into the bio-refinery concept since they may be produced in a scheme beginning with the fermentation of a portion of the bio-refinery’s sugar product into succinate. Pyrrolidones are a class of industrially important chemicals with a variety of uses including polymer intermediates, cleaners, and “green solvents” which can replace hazardous chlorinated compounds. Battelle has developed an efficient process for the thermo-catalytic conversion of succinate into pyrrolidones, especially n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. The process uses both novel Rh based catalysts and novel aqueous process conditions and results in high selectivities and yields of pyrrolidone compounds. The process also includes novel methodology for enhancing yields by recycling and converting non-useful side products of the catalysis into additional pyrrolidone. The process has been demonstrated in both batch and continuous reactors. Additionally, stability of the unique Rh-based catalyst has been demonstrated.

Frye, John G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbon fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is the primary candidate as the power source for light-duty transportation systems. On-board conversion of fuels (reforming) to supply the required hydrogen has the potential to provide the driving range that is typical of today's automobiles. Petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline or some distillate similar to it, are attractive because of their existing production, distribution, and retailing infrastructure. The fuel may be either petroleum-derived or other alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas, etc. [1]. The ability to use a variety of fuels is also attractive for stationary distributed power generation [2], such as in buildings, or for portable power in remote locations. Argonne National Laboratory has developed a catalytic reactor based on partial oxidation reforming that is suitable for use in light-duty vehicles powered by fuel cells. The reactor has shown the ability to convert a wide variety of fuels to a hydrogen-rich gas at less than 800 C, temperatures that are several hundreds of degrees lower than alternative noncatalytic processes. The fuel may be methanol, ethanol, natural gas, or petroleum-derived fuels that are blends of various hydrocarbons such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, etc., as in gasoline. This paper will discuss the results obtained from a bench-scale (3-kWe) reactor., where the reforming of gasoline and natural gas generated a product gas that contained 38% and 42% hydrogen on a dry basis at the reformer exit, respectively.

Ahmed, S.

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

357

Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmentally Assisted Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors Bookmark and Share

358

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys [Corrosion and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LWRs > Environmentally Assisted LWRs > Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors

359

Crack coalescence in rock-like material under cycling loading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A total of 170 tests (68 tests for monotonic loading, 102 tests for cyclic loading) have been performed to investigate crack initiation, propagation and coalescence. The specimens have two pre-existing flaws which are ...

Ko, Tae Young, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Drill Pipe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

G-105 and S-135 grades of drill pipe steels have been used to study the effect of temperature and solution chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC Research Cracks Puzzle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Release Archive SLAC Research Cracks Puzzle of Enzyme Critical to Food Supply November 17, 2011 Menlo Park, Calif. - If we could make plant food from nitrogen the way nature...

362

3D Characterization and Modeling of Fatigue Cracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HEDM and CT are performed with high energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). One set of LSHR specimens has small cracks on the order of ...

363

Cracked shaft detection and diagnostics: A literature review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT—Cracks in shafts have long been identified as factors limiting the safe and reliable operation of turbomachines. They can sometimes result in catastrophic failure of equipment (rotor bursts) and, more often, in costly process upsets, repairs and premature scrapping and replacement of equipment. Cracked shafts still pose a significant and real threat to equipment in spite of the great advances made in the areas of metallurgy, manufacturing and design. In the past two decades, much research and many resources have gone into developing various on-line and off-line diagnostic techniques to effectively detect cracks before they cause serious damage. Because of the enormous amount of ongoing research in this area (more than 500 technical papers have been published in English alone in the past 30 years), there is a real need to periodically condense and summarize the information. This paper reviews literature on cracked shaft detection and diagnostics published after 1990.

Giridhar Sabnavis; R. Gordon Kirk; Mary Kasarda; Dane Quinn; Giridhar Sabnavis; R. Gordon Kirk; Mary Kasarda; Dane Quinn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effect of Oxygen Potential on Crack Growth in Alloy 617  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Static crack growth rate increases from 4 x 10-9 m/sec to 4 x 10-8 m/sec when the oxygen concentration decreases from .001 to .0000001 atm. Proceedings ...

365

Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

Lackey, Jr., Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Temperature dependence of the intrinsic small fatigue crack growth behavior in Ni-base superalloys based on measurement of crack closure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on the small fatigue crack growth behavior of a single crystal and directionally solidified Ni-base superalloys was investigated at temperatures between 873 to 1,123 K by measuring the crack closure. The results were also compared with those of the physically long crack. It was found that the propagation resistance and the fatigue threshold of the long cracks increased with temperature in all the materials. The long crack growth rates at three temperatures were approximately represented by an unique curve, after taking account of crack closure level and elastic modulus. In contrast, the small crack growth resistance decreased with temperature even when the crack closure phenomenon was taken into consideration. Furthermore, the small fatigue cracks exhibited considerably higher growth rates than the long cracks at a given effective stress intensity factor range and also grew under effective stress intensity factor ranges below the long crack threshold. The factors responsible for the lack of similitude in propagation rates between small and long cracks were also discussed, based on these observations and the chemical analysis near the crack tip using the electron probe microanalyzer.

Okazaki, M.; Yamada, H. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Nohmi, S. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Akashi (Japan)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nucleation and growth of cracks in vitreous-bonded aluminum oxide at elevated temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nucleation and growth of cracks was studied at elevated temperatures on a grade of vitreous-bonded aluminium oxide that contained approx. =8 vol% glass at the grain boundaries. Cracks were observed to nucleate within the vitreous phase, close to the tensile surface of the flexural test specimens used in these experiments. Crack nucleation occurred at a strain of approx. =0.08% to 0.12% which corresponded to a crack nucleation time of approx. =35% of the time to failure by creep rupture. Once nucleated, cracks propagated along grain boundaries, as long as the stress for crack propagation was maintained. The crack velocity for cracks that were nucleated by the creep process was found to be linearly proportional to the apparent stress intensity factor, whereas for cracks that were nucleated by indentation, the crack velocity was proportional to the fourth power of the apparent stress intensity factor.

Jakus, K.; Wiederhorn, S.M.; Hockey, B.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

In situ XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XAS Characterization of Catalytic Nano-Materials with Applications to Fuel Cells and Batteries Friday, July 12, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Qingying...

369

Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golen, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Reliability Centered Lifetime Prediction of Environmentally Assisted Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of joint research sponsored by EPRI in cooperation with Tohoku University and a number of Japanese organizations to address the issue of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The term EAC includes intergranular stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. The goal of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of processes controlling EAC of stainless steels and nickel-base alloys i...

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

Crack reconstruction using a level-set strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a level-set based technique to recover key characteristics of a defect or crack (e.g. location, length and shape) in a two-dimensional material from boundary electrical measurements. The key feature of this work is to extend the usual level-set ... Keywords: 02.30.Zz, 41.20.Cv, 42.30.Wb, Crack reconstruction, Electrical impedance tomography, Level-sets

Diego Álvarez; Oliver Dorn; Natalia Irishina; Miguel Moscoso

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Numerical Analysis of the Channel Wheel Fresh Air Ventilator Under Frosting Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As new equipment, the channel wheel fresh air ventilator has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, when such equipment is operated under low ambient temperature in the freezing area in winter, the formation of frost on the outdoor waste air surface becomes problematic, leading to the degradation of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's performance or even the shutdown of equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to have a detailed investigation on the operational characteristics of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting in order to guide its application. This paper first reports on the development of a detailed model for the channel wheel heat exchanger, which is the core part of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting conditions. The model developed, first seen in open literature, consists of a frosting sub-model and a channel wheel heat exchanger sub-model. This is followed by reporting an evaluation of the operational characteristics of a frosted channel wheel heat exchanger under different ambient conditions using the model developed. These include frost formation on the surface of the channel wheel heat exchanger, and impacts on the operational performance of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator. Furthermore, the interval of defrosting is obtained, which provides the basis for the adoption of effective defrosting measures, and thus increasing the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's energy efficiency and operating reliability.

Gao, B.; Dong, Z.; Cheng, Z.; Luo, E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products Background Many industrial processes contribute large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to the earth's atmosphere. In an effort to reduce the amount of CO 2 released to the atmosphere, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding efforts to develop CO 2 capture and storage technologies. In addition to permanent storage of CO 2 in underground reservoirs, some

374

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the 2009 update to Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems, originally published in 2001. The landscape of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology has significantly changed since then and promises to continue to change in the coming years. Specifically, the number of SCR applications on coal-fired units has increased considerably beyond the 15 units operating in mid 2001. Approximately 120 GW of capacity are expected to utilize SCR for NOx co...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timely and proper execution of operation and maintenance (O&M) activities may be a key factor in ensuring the successful function of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. This report serves as the 2012 update of EPRI’s Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems, originally published in 2001 and updated annually. New and revised content this year includes: 1) recent developments in in situ NOx analyzers, including a ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

377

Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the 2011 update of Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems, originally published in 2001 and updated annually. New and revised content this year includes: (1) an analysis of the performance of the U.S. fleet of selective catalytic reduction (SCR)equipped generating units in 2009, 2010, and 2011; (2) a discussion of experience in mitigating the role of arsenic in catalyst deactivation, including the addition of alkali material to the coal; (3) an updat...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis of fats  

SciTech Connect

Hydrolysis of fats and oils produces fatty acid and glycerol. The catalyzed, liquid phase Colgate-Emry process, state-of-the-art, produces impure products that require extensive energy investment for their purification to commercial grade. Non-catalytic steam hydrolysis may produce products more easily purified. A bench-scale hydrolyzer was designed and constructed to contact descending liquid fat or oil with rising superheated steam. Each of the five stages in the reactor was designed similar to a distillation column stage to promote intimate liquid-gas contact. Degree of hydrolysis achieved in continuous tests using tallow feed were 15% at 280C and 35% at 300C at a tallow-to-steam mass feed ratio of 4.2. At a feed ratio of 9.2, the degree of hydrolysis was 21% at 300C. Decomposition was strongly evident at 325C but not at lower temperatures. Soybean oil rapidly polymerized under reaction conditions. Batch tests at 320C produced degrees of hydrolyses of between 44% and 63% using tallow and palm oil feeds. Over 95% fatty acids were present in a clean, readily separated organic portion of the overhead product from most tests. The test reactor had serious hydraulic resistance to liquid down-flow which limited operation to very long liquid residence times. These times are in excess of those that tallow and palm oil are stable at the reaction temperature. Little glycerol and extensive light organics were produced indicating that unexplained competing reactions to hydrolysis occurred in the experimental system. Further tests using an improved reactor will be required.

Deibert, M.C.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

Green, David J. (State College, PA); Sglavo, Vincenzo M. (Roncegno, IT); Tandon, Rajan (Fremont, CA)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cannabidiol induced a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect between freshly isolated and precultured human monocytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been documented that cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis in a variety of transformed cells, including lymphocytic and monocytic leukemias. In contrast, a differential sensitivity between normal lymphocytes and monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis has been reported. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on human peripheral monocytes that were either freshly isolated or precultured for 72 h. CBD markedly enhanced apoptosis of freshly isolated monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas precultured monocytes were insensitive. By comparison, both cells were sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. CBD significantly diminished the cellular thiols and glutathione in freshly isolated monocytes. The apoptosis induced by CBD was abrogated in the presence of N-acetyl-{sub L}-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. In addition, precultured monocytes contained a significantly greater level of glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) compared to the freshly isolated cells. The HO-1 competitive inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin partially but significantly restored the sensitivity of precultured monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrated a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect of CBD between precultured and freshly isolated monocytes, which was closely associated with the cellular level of glutathione and the antioxidative capability of the cells.

Wu, Hsin-Ying; Chang, An-Chi; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Fu-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ya [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Der-Zen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jan, Tong-Rong, E-mail: tonyjan@ntu.edu.t [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia reduction in fuel allowing potential reductions in the burner NOx production. These reductions of NOx emissions and expanded alternative fuel capability make the rich catalytic combustor uniquely situated to provide reductions in capital costs through elimination of requirements for SCR, operating costs through reduction in need for NOx abating dilution, SCR operating costs, and need for co-firing fuels allowing use of lower value but more available fuels, and efficiency of an engine through reduction in dilution flows.

Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.  

SciTech Connect

Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

Crack Surface Roughness in Three-Dimensional Random Fuse Networks  

SciTech Connect

Using large system sizes with extensive statistical sampling, we analyze the scaling properties of crack roughness and damage profiles in the three-dimensional random fuse model. The analysis of damage profiles indicates that damage accumulates in a diffusive manner up to the peak load, and localization sets in abruptly at the peak load starting from a uniform damage landscape. The global crack width scales as $W \\sim L^{0.5}$ and is consistent with the scaling of localization length $\\xi \\sim L^{0.5}$ used in the data collapse of damage profiles in the post-peak regime. This consistency between the global crack roughness exponent and the post-peak damage profile localization length supports the idea that the post-peak damage profile is predominantly due to the localization produced by the catastrophic failure, which at the same time results in the formation of the final crack. Finally, the crack width distributions can be collapsed for different system sizes and follow a log-normal distribution.

Nukala, Phani K [ORNL; Zapperi, Stefano [University of La Sapienza, Rome; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

FITNESS-FOR-SERVICE ASSESSMENT FOR A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK THAT CONTAINS STRESS CORROSION CRACKS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tanks are examined by ultrasonic (UT) methods for thinning, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking in order to assess fitness-for-service. During an inspection in 2002, ten cracks were identified on one of the tanks. Given the location of the cracks (i.e., adjacent to welds, weld attachments, and weld repairs), fabrication details (e.g., this tank was not stress-relieved), and the service history the degradation mechanism was stress corrosion cracking. Crack instability calculations utilizing API-579 guidance were performed to show that the combination of expected future service condition hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive any of the identified cracks to instability. The cracks were re-inspected in 2007 to determine if crack growth had occurred. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the nine previously measured cracks. The crack length extension ranged from 0.25 to 1.8 inches. However, in all cases the cracks still remained within the residual stress zone (i.e., within two to three inches of the weld). The impact of the cracks that grew on the future service of Tank 15 was re-assessed. API-579 crack instability calculations were again performed, based on expected future service conditions and trended crack growth rates for the future tank service cycle. The analysis showed that the combined hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive the identified cracks to instability. This tank expected to be decommissioned in the near future. However, if these plans are delayed, it was recommended that a third examination of selected cracks in the tank be performed in 2014.

Wiersma, B; James Elder, J; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Charles Mckeel, C

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

385

V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild 3: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild V-143: Fresh Java issues being exploited in the wild April 26, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A new Metasploit module for the Java 7u17 sandbox bypass emerged PLATFORM: All versions of Java SE-7 (including the recently released 1.7.0_21-b11) ABSTRACT: Java issues are being exploited in the wild by exploit kits, with Cool and Redkit specifically being known to use these bugs, and others likely to follow shortly. REFERENCE LINKS: SecList SE-2012-01 Security Explorations IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: It can be used to achieve a complete Java security sandbox bypass on a target system. IMPACT: Manipulation of data System access SOLUTION: Vendor recommends patch systems immediately Addthis Related Articles V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary

386

Promoting Offshore Wind Along the "Fresh Coast" | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Promoting Offshore Wind Along the "Fresh Coast" Promoting Offshore Wind Along the "Fresh Coast" Promoting Offshore Wind Along the "Fresh Coast" October 12, 2010 - 12:18pm Addthis Chris Hart Offshore Wind Team Lead, Wind & Water Power Program When people think about offshore wind power, the first location that comes to mind probably isn't Cleveland, Ohio. Most of the offshore wind turbines installed around the world are operating in salt water, like Europe's North Sea and Baltic Sea, and most of the offshore wind projects proposed in U.S. waters are in the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico. But the winds blowing above Lake Erie, only a few miles off the shore from Cleveland, represent a huge potential source of clean, renewable energy that could yield substantial benefits for the regional economy and

387

Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School District |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School District Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School District May 24, 2010 - 11:01am Addthis Each classroom has a geothermal unit installed. Although large, the units blend into surroundings and don’t produce excess noise. | Photo Courtesy of Sterling Public Schools Each classroom has a geothermal unit installed. Although large, the units blend into surroundings and don't produce excess noise. | Photo Courtesy of Sterling Public Schools Lindsay Gsell Superintendent Tad Everett had two priorities when deciding on a new system to replace the aging oil-based boiler heating and cooling systems for the seven schools in his district: improving learning environments and saving

388

Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School District |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School District Geothermal Systems are a Breath of Fresh Air for Illinois School District May 24, 2010 - 11:01am Addthis Each classroom has a geothermal unit installed. Although large, the units blend into surroundings and don’t produce excess noise. | Photo Courtesy of Sterling Public Schools Each classroom has a geothermal unit installed. Although large, the units blend into surroundings and don't produce excess noise. | Photo Courtesy of Sterling Public Schools Lindsay Gsell Superintendent Tad Everett had two priorities when deciding on a new system to replace the aging oil-based boiler heating and cooling systems for the seven schools in his district: improving learning environments and saving

389

Angle of crack propagation for a vertical hydraulic fracture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the strain-energy-density-factor (S) theory, the positive fracture angle +theta/sub o/ (the initial fracture angle of crack propagation) of a near-vertical crack is predicted by using the opening- and sliding-mode stress-intensity factors in the presence of the overburden pressure, the least in situ horizontal principal stress, and the borehole fluid pressure. The crack spreads in the positive theta/sub o/ direction (counter-clockwise) in the plane for which S is a minimum, S/sub min/. It was verified that S/sub min/ is greater than or equal to S/sub c/. The quantity S/sub c/ is defined as the critical value of S, and remains essentially constant. Of interest is the numerical example for calculating fracture angle and the critical uniform borehole fluid pressure required to initiate fracture at such an angle for the present LASL Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Energy Program. (auth)

Sarda, J.P.; Hsu, Y.C.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

391

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper aims to improve current understanding of the subsurface fracture system in the Coso geothermal field, located in east-central California. The Coso reservoir is in active economic development, so that knowledge of the subsurface fracture system is of vital importance for an accurate evaluation of its geothermal potential and day-to-day production. To detect the geometry and density of fracture systems we applied the shear-wave splitting technique to a large number of

392

Cracking Condition of Cohesionless Porous Materials in Drying Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The invasion of air into porous systems in drying processes is often localized in soft materials, such as colloidal suspensions and granular pastes, and it typically develops in the form of cracks before ordinary drying begins. To investigate such processes, we construct an invasion percolation model on a deformable lattice for cohesionless elastic systems, and with this model we derive the condition under which cracking occurs. A Griffith-like condition characterized by a dimensionless parameter is proposed, and its validity is checked numerically. This condition indicates that the ease with which cracking occurs increases as the particles composing the material become smaller, as the rigidity of the system increases, and as the degree of heterogeneity characterizing the drying processes decreases.

So Kitsunezaki

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials  

SciTech Connect

Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Park, J.Y.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery Cracking a Cold Case and Enduring Mystery July 1, 2013 - 3:04pm Addthis Chris Brandon of the ROMACONS project collects a sample of ancient Roman concrete drilled from a breakwater in Pozzuoli Bay, near Naples, Italy. The breakwater dates back to roughly 37 B.C. | Photo courtesy of J.P. Oleson. Chris Brandon of the ROMACONS project collects a sample of ancient Roman concrete drilled from a breakwater in Pozzuoli Bay, near Naples, Italy. The breakwater dates back to roughly 37 B.C. | Photo courtesy of J.P. Oleson. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Modern concrete buildings -- most made with Portland cement -- are built to last for a hundred or so years. But Roman concrete has withstood

395

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Catalytic Co - PA 40  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Co - PA 40 Catalytic Co - PA 40 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Catalytic Co. (PA.40 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.40-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 PA.40-1 Site Operations: Prime contractor for construction of the Fernald facility. Records indicate one time shipment of a very small quantity (4 lbs) of uranium metal to this site. PA.40-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Construction contractor - Potential for residual contamination from the very small quantity of uranium shipped to this site is considered remote PA.40-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None - as a construction contractor Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal - Believed to be a Souvenier. PA.40-1

396

Method for measuring recovery of catalytic elements from fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is provided for measuring the concentration of a catalytic clement in a fuel cell powder. The method includes depositing on a porous substrate at least one layer of a powder mixture comprising the fuel cell powder and an internal standard material, ablating a sample of the powder mixture using a laser, and vaporizing the sample using an inductively coupled plasma. A normalized concentration of catalytic element in the sample is determined by quantifying the intensity of a first signal correlated to the amount of catalytic element in the sample, quantifying the intensity of a second signal correlated to the amount of internal standard material in the sample, and using a ratio of the first signal intensity to the second signal intensity to cancel out the effects of sample size.

Shore, Lawrence (Edison, NJ); Matlin, Ramail (Berkeley, NJ)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

Introduction 1 2BChapter 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These processes include catalytic reforming (to increase the octane number), catalytic cracking (to increase

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

398

97e Intermediate Temperature Catalytic Reforming of Bio-Oil for Distributed Hydrogen Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the world's energy demands rapidly increasing, it is necessary to look to sources other than fossil fuels, preferably those that minimize greenhouse emissions. One such renewable source of energy is biomass, which has the added advantage of being a near-term source of hydrogen. While there are several potential routes to produce hydrogen from biomass thermally, given the near-term technical barriers to hydrogen storage and delivery, distributed technologies such that hydrogen is produced at or near the point of use are attractive. One such route is to first produce bio-oil via fast pyrolysis of biomass close to its source to create a higher energy-density product, then ship this bio-oil to its point of use where it can be reformed to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. This route is especially well suited for smaller-scale reforming plants located at hydrogen distribution sites such as filling stations. There is also the potential for automated operation of the conversion system. A system has been developed for volatilizing bio-oil with manageable carbon deposits using ultrasonic atomization and by modifying bio-oil properties, such as viscosity, by blending or reacting bio-oil with methanol. Non-catalytic partial oxidation of bio-oil is then used to achieve significant conversion to CO with minimal aromatic hydrocarbon formation by keeping the temperature at 650 C or less and oxygen levels low. The non-catalytic reactions occur primarily in the gas phase. However, some nonvolatile components of bio-oil present as aerosols may react heterogeneously. The product gas is passed over a packed bed of precious metal catalyst where further reforming as well as water gas shift reactions are accomplished completing the conversion to hydrogen. The approach described above requires significantly lower catalyst loadings than conventional catalytic steam reforming due to the significant conversion in the non-catalytic step. The goal is to reform and selectively oxidize the bio-oil and catalyze the water gas shift reaction without catalyzing methanation or oxidation of CO and H{sub 2}, thus attaining equilibrium levels of H{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} at the exit of the catalyst bed. Experimental Bio-oil (mixed with varied amounts of methanol to reduce the viscosity and homogenize the bio-oil) or selected bio-oil components are introduced at a measured flow rate through the top of a vertical quartz reactor which is heated using a five zone furnace. The ultrasonic nozzle used to feed the reactants allows the bio-oil to flow down the center of the reactor at a low, steady flow rate. Additionally, the fine mist created by the nozzle allows for intimate mixing with oxygen and efficient heat transfer, providing optimal conditions to achieve high conversion at relatively low temperatures in the non-catalytic step thus reducing the required catalyst loading. Generation of the fine mist is especially important for providing good contact between non-volatile bio-oil components and oxygen. Oxygen and helium are also delivered at the top of the reactor via mass flow meters with the amount of oxygen being varied to maximize the yields of H{sub 2} and CO and the amount of helium being adjusted such that the gas phase residence time in the hot zone is {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.45 s for bio-oil and methanol experiments, respectively. A catalyst bed can be located at the bottom of the reactor tube. To date, catalyst screening experiments have used Engelhard noble metal catalysts. The catalysts used for these experiments were 0.5 % rhodium, ruthenium, platinum, and palladium (all supported on alumina). Experiments were performed using pure alumina as well. Both the catalyst type and the effect of oxygen and steam on the residual hydrocarbons and accumulated carbon containing particulates were investigated. The residence time before the catalyst is varied to determine the importance of the non-catalytic step and its potential effect on the required catalyst loading. Non-catalytic experiments (primarily homogeneous cracking) use a bed of quartz p

Marda, J. R.; Dean, A. M.; Czernik, S.; Evans, R. J.; French, R.; Ratcliff, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Dynamic crack initiation toughness : experiments and peridynamic modeling.  

SciTech Connect

This is a dissertation on research conducted studying the dynamic crack initiation toughness of a 4340 steel. Researchers have been conducting experimental testing of dynamic crack initiation toughness, K{sub Ic}, for many years, using many experimental techniques with vastly different trends in the results when reporting K{sub Ic} as a function of loading rate. The dissertation describes a novel experimental technique for measuring K{sub Ic} in metals using the Kolsky bar. The method borrows from improvements made in recent years in traditional Kolsky bar testing by using pulse shaping techniques to ensure a constant loading rate applied to the sample before crack initiation. Dynamic crack initiation measurements were reported on a 4340 steel at two different loading rates. The steel was shown to exhibit a rate dependence, with the recorded values of K{sub Ic} being much higher at the higher loading rate. Using the knowledge of this rate dependence as a motivation in attempting to model the fracture events, a viscoplastic constitutive model was implemented into a peridynamic computational mechanics code. Peridynamics is a newly developed theory in solid mechanics that replaces the classical partial differential equations of motion with integral-differential equations which do not require the existence of spatial derivatives in the displacement field. This allows for the straightforward modeling of unguided crack initiation and growth. To date, peridynamic implementations have used severely restricted constitutive models. This research represents the first implementation of a complex material model and its validation. After showing results comparing deformations to experimental Taylor anvil impact for the viscoplastic material model, a novel failure criterion is introduced to model the dynamic crack initiation toughness experiments. The failure model is based on an energy criterion and uses the K{sub Ic} values recorded experimentally as an input. The failure model is then validated against one class of problems showing good agreement with experimental results.

Foster, John T.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

FITNESS-FOR-SERVICE ASSESSMENT FOR A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK THAT CONTAINS STRESS CORROSION CRACKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tanks are examined by ultrasonic (UT) methods for thinning, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking in order to assess fitness-for-service. During an inspection in 2002, ten cracks were identified on one of the tanks. Given the location of the cracks (i.e., adjacent to welds, weld attachments, and weld repairs), fabrication details (e.g., this tank was not stress-relieved), and the service history the degradation mechanism was stress corrosion cracking. Crack instability calculations utilizing API-579 guidance were performed to show that the combination of expected future service condition hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive any of the identified cracks to instability. The cracks were re-inspected in 2007 to determine if crack growth had occurred. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack API-579 crack instability calculations were again performed, based on expected future service conditions and trended crack growth rates for the future tank service cycle. The analysis showed that the combined hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive the identified cracks to instability. This tank expected to be decommissioned in the near future. However, if these plans are delayed, it was recommended that a third examination of selected cracks in the tank be performed in 2014.

Wiersma, B; James Elder, J; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Charles Mckeel, C

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

403

Acidity and catalytic activity of zeolite catalysts bound with silica and alumina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeolites ZSM-5 (SiO2/Al2O3=30~280) and Y(SiO2/Al2O3=5.2~80) are bound with silica gel (Ludox HS-40 and Ludox AS-40) and alumina (?- Al2O3 and boehmite) by different binding methods, namely, gel-mixing, powder-mixing and powder-wet-mixing methods. The acidities of the bound catalysts and the zeolite powder are determined by NH3-TPD and FTIR. The textures of these catalysts are analyzed on a BET machine with nitrogen as a probe molecule. The micropore surface area and micropore volume are determined by t-plot method. Micropore volume distribution is determined by Horvath-Kawazoe approach with a cylindrical pore model. Mesopore volume distribution is determined by BJH method from the nitrogen desorption isotherm. Silica from the binder may react with extra-framework alumina in zeolites to form a new protonic acid. SiO2-bound catalysts have less strong acidity, Bronsted acidity and Lewis acidity than the zeolite powder. Also, the strength of strong acid sites of the zeolites is reduced when silica is embedded. Micropore surface area and micropore volume are reduced by about 19% and 18%, respectively, indicating some micropores of ZSM-5 are blocked on binding with silica. SiO2-bound ZSM-5 catalysts have less catalytic activity for butane transformation (cracking and disproportionation) and ethylene oligomerization than ZSM-5 powder. When alumina is used as a binder, both the total acid sites and Lewis acid sites are increased. Micropore surface area and micropore volume of ZSM-5 powder are reduced by 26% and 23%, respectively, indicating some micropores of ZSM-5 are blocked by the alumina binder. Alumina-bound catalysts showed a lower activity for butane transformation and ethylene oligomerization than ZSM-5 powder. Alkaline metals content in the binder is a crucial factor that influences the acidity of a bound catalyst. The metal cations neutralize more selectively Bronsted acid sites than Lewis acid sites. Alkaline metal cations in the binder and micropore blockage cause the bound catalysts to have a lower catalytic activity than the zeolite powder.

Wu, Xianchun

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hydrogen sulfide stress corrosion cracking in materials for geothermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies to evaluate the performance of alloys used in geothermal power systems are reported. Alloys which are commercially available and those which have modified metallurgical structures and/or composition modifications were tested to determine the corrosive effects of the H/sub 2/S and thermal environments in geothermal fluids. Hydrogen embrittlement and sulfide stress corrosion cracking were tested. Test results showing the effects of alloy composition, tempering temperatures, fluid temperature and salt content, and ageing on sulfide stress cracking are tabulated. (LCL)

Hehemann, R.F.; Troiano, A.R.; Abu-Khater, B.; Ferrigno, S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Optimum catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this contract are to discover and evaluate the catalytic properties of novel homogeneous, heterogeneous, or combination catalytic systems for the production of alcohol fuel extenders from syngas, to evaluate analytically and on the bench scale novel reactor concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products, and to develop on the bench scale the best combination of chemistry, reactor, and total process configuration to achieve the minimum product cost for conversion of syngas to liquid fuel products. Methanol production and heterogeneous catalysis utilizing transition elements supported on metal oxides with spinel structure are discussed. 12 figs., 16 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

New process model proves accurate in tests on catalytic reformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model has been devised to represent the process that takes place in a fixed-bed, tubular, adiabatic catalytic reforming reactor. Since its development, the model has been applied to the simulation of a commercial semiregenerative reformer. The development of mass and energy balances for this reformer led to a model that predicts both concentration and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison of the model's results with experimental data illustrates its accuracy at predicting product profiles. Simple steps show how the model can be applied to simulate any fixed-bed catalytic reformer.

Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ancheyta-Juarez, J. (Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico))

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thermal stress cracking and enhancement of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of thermal stress cracking, upon heat extraction were studied. Very fundamental approximate analyses were performed to elucidate the mechanics of thermal stress cracking, and the main results are summarized.

Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Crack Growth in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials: From Discrete to Continuum Damage Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the cracking problem of glass and ceramic materials used in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Analyses of an internal crack and of an interface crack between dissimilar materials were conducted using a modified boundary layer modeling approach. In this approach, fracture is allowed to occur in a small process window situated at an initial crack tip. Elastic displacement crack-tip fields are prescribed as remote boundary conditions. Crack propagation was first modeled discretely. Next, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for brittle materials was developed to capture damage and crack growth in the process window. In particular, the damage model was applied to a glass-ceramic material that had been developed in-house for sealing purposes. Discrete and continuum damage solutions were then compared. Finally, the CDM model was used to determine the crack propagation direction as a function of a mode mixity measure.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Koeppel, Brian J.; Ahzi, Said; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Singh, Prabhakar

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Laboratory And Field Investigations To Address Erosion, Volume Change And Desiccation Cracking Of Compost Amended Expansive Subsoils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Puppala, Anand Desiccations cracks are formed during drying process of fine grained cohesive soils in summer and these cracks often appear on unpaved subgrades due… (more)

Intharasombat, Napat

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Status Report on Studies of Recovery Boiler Composite Floor Tube Cracking  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

likelihood of cracking. This report is the latest in a series of progress reports presented on this project.

Eng, P.; Frederick, L.A.; Hoffmann, C.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Mahmood, J.; Maziasz, P.J.; Prescott, R.; Sarma, G.B.; Singbeil, D.L.; Singh, P.M.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wang, X.-L.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

411

Influence of p-method finite element parameters on predictions of crack front geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of various p-method finite element model parameters on the prediction of planar crack front geometry in three dimensional structures is evaluated. An automatic crack growth method was developed using the commercial software StressCheck coupled ... Keywords: ?, Corner crack, Crack front, Finite element, Mesh, Stress intensity factor, a, b, b/a, c, ctrat, ipr, m, mrat, p-method, trans

Diane Wowk, Kyle Gamble, Ross Underhill

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Effect of Specimen Size on the Crack Growth Rate Behavior of Irradiated Type 304 Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundCracks in actual plant components are mainly under plane strain. In order to generate relevant crack growth rate data in the laboratory, specimens where most of the crack front is under plane strain should be used. Since the ASTM E399 size criterion for linear elastic plane-strain fracture toughness is probably conservative, it seems appropriate to also apply it to SCC tests. However, in stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) tests on austenitic stainless ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

413

Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh diesel soot. (2007) Title Filter loading corrections for real-time aethalometer measurements of fresh diesel soot. (2007) Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Jimenez, Jorge, Candis S. Claiborn, Timothy Larson, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Air and Waste Management Association Volume 57 Issue 7 Pagination 868-873 Abstract In this study, a correction was developed for the aethalometer to measure real-time black carbon (BC) concentrations in an environment dominated by fresh diesel soot. The relationship between the actual mass-specific absorption coefficient for BC and the BC-dependent attenuation coefficients was determined from experiments conducted in a diesel exposure chamber that provided constant concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM; PM(2.5); PM < 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) from diesel exhaust. The aethalometer reported BC concentrations decreasing with time from 48.1 to 31.5 microg m(-3) when exposed to constant PM(2.5) concentrations of 55 +/- 1 microg m(-3) and b(scat) = 95 +/- 3 Mm(-1) from diesel exhaust. This apparent decrease in reported light-absorbing PM concentration was used to derive a correction K(ATN) for loading of strong light-absorbing particles onto or into the aethalometer filter tape, which was a function of attenuation of light at 880 nm by the embedded particles

414

Investigation of Feasibility of All-Fresh Air Supply in an All-Air System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility of an all-fresh air supply in an all-air system is investigated in theory, and the problem of AHU-handling air in low efficiency in summer and winter conditions is analyzed. The air supply temperature is almost up to standards when a heat recovery unit is fixed in the air conditioning system.

Wang, J.; Yan, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Development of the foods grasping mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this mechanism, and shows performance. Key Words: Remote shopping, Mobile Manipulator, Foods handling 1. 1·1 1) 1Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­Development of the foods grasping mechanism­ Tetsuo) Abstract-- Our purpose is developing the remote shopping system as a concrete application. A human uses

Ohya, Akihisa

416

WELL BEING WEDNESDAY Oven Baked Chicken Tandoori with Side Salad, Fresh Lime &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELL BEING WEDNESDAY Low Fat Oven Baked Chicken Tandoori with Side Salad, Fresh Lime & Homemade with a reduced Fat Tomato Sauce HM V £3.80 Jacket Potato Fillings Low Fat Cottage Cheese Deli Style Coleslaw with Low Fat Mayonnaise Lean Mince Chilli Con Carne Grated Welsh Cheddar Tuna Mayonnaise ­ (responsibly

Davies, Christopher

417

Development of a catalytic combustion system for the MIT Micro Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the MIT micro-gas turbine engine project, the development of a hydrocarbon-fueled catalytic micro-combustion system is presented. A conventionally-machined catalytic flow reactor was built to simulate the ...

Peck, Jhongwoo, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Catalytic activation and reforming of methane on supported palladium clusters Aritomo Yamaguchi, Enrique Iglesia *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of pollutants, oxygen generation, and intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells, as well as catalytic reforming. Sekine et al.56 investigated four catalytic reactions assisted with an electric field to promote

Iglesia, Enrique

419

Continued investigations of the catalytic reduction of N? to NH? by molybdenum triamidoamine complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the effects of employing different solvents and the introduction of dihydrogen during the catalytic reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia with [HIPTN 3N]Mo complexes was completed. During a catalytic reaction, the ...

Hanna, Brian S. (Brian Stewart)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A computational study of the time dependent crack growth process  

SciTech Connect

Universal studies of creep crack growth for (1) constant load and (2) variable load cases are presented. Results of the constant load cases is compared to experiment. The behavior of displacements and integral creep for fracture parameters are discussed for both load cases. The need for using a constitutive law which can handle cyclic creep is discussed.

Brust, F.W.; Krishnaswamy, P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ductile Fracture Handbook, Volume 1: Circumferential Throughwall Cracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 10 years, the focus of fracture research related to nuclear power plants has shifted from brittle fractures to fractures of steels used for piping and vessels. This handbook developed by EPRI and Novetech Corporation is the first single-source document containing formulas for evaluating throughwall cracks in these tough ductile steels.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

Sullivan, Richard W. (Denver, CO)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fatigue crack growth estimation by relevance vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigation of damage propagation mechanisms on a selected safety-critical component or structure requires the quantification of its remaining useful life (RUL) to verify until when it can continue performing the required function. In this work, ... Keywords: Bayesian techniques, Fatigue crack growth, Prognostics, Relevance vector machine, Residual useful life, Support vector machine

Enrico Zio; Francesco Di Maio

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Solvent control of crack dynamics in a reversible hydrogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The resistance to fracture of reversible biopolymer hydrogels is an important control factor of the cutting/slicing and eating characteristics of food gels. It is also critical for their utilization in tissue engineering, for which mechanical protection of encapsulated components is needed. Its dependence on loading rate and, recently, on the density and strength of cross-links has been investigated. But no attention was paid so far to solvent nor to environment effects. Here we report a systematic study of crack dynamics in gels of gelatin in water/glycerol mixtures. We show on this model system that: (i) increasing solvent viscosity slows down cracks; (ii) soaking with solvent increases markedly gel fragility; (iii) tuning the viscosity of the (miscible) environmental liquid affects crack propagation via diffusive invasion of the crack tip vicinity. The results point toward the fact that fracture occurs by viscoplastic chain pull-out. This mechanism, as well as the related phenomenology, should be common to all reversibly cross-linked (physical) gels.

Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli; David Martina

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Incipient Crack Detection in Composite Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents some analysis results for incipient crack detection in a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading to failure. The blade was manufactured to standard specifications, and it underwent harmonic excitation at its first resonance using a hydraulically-actuated excitation system until reaching catastrophic failure. This work investigates the ability of an ultrasonic guided wave approach to detect incipient damage prior to the surfacing of a visible, catastrophic crack. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, which were used in an active, pitchcatch mode with guided waves over a range of excitation frequencies. The performance results in detecting incipient crack formation in the fiberglass skin of the blade is assessed over the range of frequencies in order to determine the point at which the incipient crack became detectable. Higher excitation frequencies provide consistent results for paths along the rotor blade's carbon fiber spar cap, but performance falls off with increasing excitation frequencies for paths off of the spar cap. Lower excitation frequencies provide more consistent performance across all sensor paths.

Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Choi, Mijin [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, Jae Kyeong [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam National University, Korea; Farinholt, Kevin [Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing, VA; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Jung-Ryul [Chonbuk National University, Korea

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Early Development Of Stress Corrosion Cracks At The Grain Scale: Incomplete Random Tessellation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early Development Of Stress Corrosion Cracks At The Grain Scale: Incomplete Random Tessellation is needed to quantify those effects more accurately. 1 INTRODUCTION Intergranular stress corrosion cracking to the dependence of microscopic stress fields at crack tips on the random orientation of neighboring grains

Cizelj, Leon

427

Age-based preventive maintenance for passive components submitted to stress corrosion cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with an age-based preventive maintenance for critical systems or structures subject to a gradual degradation phenomenon such as stress corrosion cracking. We analyze a system subjected to different cracks. A crack can be only detected ... Keywords: Age-based maintenance, Counting processes, Gamma process, Non-homogeneous Poisson process, SCC models

I. T. Castro; Anne Barros; Antoine Grall

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Permeability and elastic properties of cracked glass under pressure A. OugierSimonin,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on slow crack growth and stress corrosion processes [Wiederhorn, 1966; Anderson and Grew, 1977; Atkinson for independent controls of the confining pressure, the axial stress, and pore pressure. We produced cracks, to our knowledge, none con- sidered crack evolution under compressive stress. Some of this work explored

Fortin, Jérôme

429

How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks  

SciTech Connect

Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Uplift Pressures in Cracks in Concrete Gravity Dams--An Experimental Study: Volume 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uplift pressure distribution in cracks in concrete dams is affected by a combination of several factors, such as crack properties, drain dimensions, and the type of flow in the crack. This study shows that most uplift pressure distributions can be controlled using a vertical drain system with diameters from two to four inches and spacing of about ten feet.

1992-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading to Transportation Fuels by Catalytic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as fast- pyrolysis and catalytic fast-pyrolysis for producing liquid fuels from biomass feedstocks biomass to a fast-pyrolysis reactor (Table 3.4), the greatest mass yield of bio-oil can be attributed............................................................................................- 70 - TABLE 2.18. BIOMASS PYROLYSIS TECHNOLOGIES, REACTION CONDITIONS AND PRODUCTS................- 70

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

432

Catalytic Esterification of Model Compounds of Biomass Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass pyrolysis oil is a complex mixture containing a wide variety of oxygenated compounds, which results in difficulties in bio-oil upgrading. To gain a clearer understanding of the reaction pathways, seven compounds were chosen to represent biomass ... Keywords: pyrolysis oil, model compounds, catalytic esterification

Zuo-gang Guo; Shu-rong Wang; Ying-ying Zhu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Homogeneous catalytic hydrogenations of complex carbonaceous substrates. [16 references  

SciTech Connect

Results of homogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of complex unsaturated substrates including coal and coal-derived materials are reported, with organic soluble molecular complexes as catalysts. Among the substrates used were Hvab coal, solvent-refined coal, and COED pyrolysate. The hydrogenations were carried out in an autoclave. The results are summarized in tables.

Cox, J L; Wilcox, W A; Roberts, G L

1976-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

ULTRA LOW NOx CATALYTIC COMBUSTION FOR IGCC POWER PLANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using PCI's two-stage (catalytic / gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage is a Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{trademark}) catalytic reactor, wherein a fuel-rich mixture contacts the catalyst and reacts while final and excess combustion air cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, wherein the catalyst cooling air mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During the reporting period, PCI successfully achieved NOx = 0.011 lbs/MMBtu at 10 atm pressure (corresponding to 2.0 ppm NOx corrected to 15% O{sub 2} dry) with near-zero CO emissions, surpassing the project goal of baseload conditions corresponding to Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station operation on 100% syngas (no co-firing of natural gas).

Lance L. Smith

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Catalytic pyrolysis of xylan-based hemicellulose over zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Xylan was selected as model compound of hemicellulose to investigate its thermal behavior over zeolites by using TG-FTIR. The chemical structure of xylan and characterization of catalysts were first studied. All the three catalysts, HZSM-5, H-? ... Keywords: TG-FTIR, acids, catalytic pyrolysis, furans, hemicellulose, xylan, zeolites

Xiujuan Guo; Shurong Wang; Yan Zhou; Zhongynag Luo

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Gold-Copper Nanoparticles: Nanostructural Evolution and Bifunctional Catalytic Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding of the atomic-scale structure is essential for exploiting the unique catalytic properties of any nanoalloy catalyst. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of the nanoscale alloying of gold-copper (AuCu) nanoparticles and its impact on the surface catalytic functions. Two pathways have been explored for the formation of AuCu nanoparticles of different compositons, including wet chemical synthesis from mixed Au- and Cu-precursor molecules, and nanoscale alloying via an evolution of mixed Au- and Cu-precursor nanoparticles near the nanoscale melting temperatures. For the evolution of mixed precursor nanoparticles, synchrotron x-ray based in-situ real time XRD was used to monitor the structural changes, revealing nanoscale alloying and reshaping towards an fcc-type nanoalloy (particle or cube) via a partial melting–resolidification mechanism. The nanoalloys supported on carbon or silica were characterized by in-situ high-energy XRD/PDFs, revealing an intriguing lattice "expanding-shrinking" phenomenon depending on whether the catalyst is thermochemically processed under oxidative or reductive atmosphere. This type of controllable structural changes is found to play an important role in determining the catalytic activity of the catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation reaction. The tunable catalytic activities of the nanoalloys under thermochemically oxidative and reductive atmospheres are also discussed in terms of the bifunctional sites and the surface oxygenated metal species for carbon monoxide and oxygen activation.

Yin, Jun; Shan, Shiyao; Yang, Lefu; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Petkov, Valeri; Cai, Fan; Ng, Mei; Luo, Jin; Chen, Bing H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

Recycling and Disposal of Spent Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology has become widespread within the utility industry as a means of controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The technology uses a solid catalyst that deactivates over time; and thus significant volumes of catalyst will need regeneration, recycle, or disposal. This study examined issues related to spent catalyst recycle and disposal.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

Chemical Imaging of Catalytic Solids with Synchrotron Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous catalysis is a term normally used to describe a group of catalytic processes, yet it could equally be employed to describe the catalytic solid itself. A better understanding of the chemical and structural variation within such materials is thus a pre-requisite for the rationalising of structure-function relationships and ultimately to the design of new, more sustainable catalytic processes. The past 20 years has witnessed marked improvements in technologies required for analytical measurements at synchrotron sources, including higher photon brightness, nano-focusing, rapid, high resolution data acquisition and in the handling of large volumes of data. It is now possible to image materials using the entire synchrotron radiative profile, thus heralding a new era of in situ/operando measurements of catalytic solids. In this tutorial review we discuss the recent work in this exciting new research area and finally conclude with a future outlook on what will be possible/challenging to measure in the not-too-distant future.

A Beale; S Jacques; B Weckhuysen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Simulation of Hydrogen Production from Biomass Catalytic Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, biomass catalytic gasification process for producing H2-rich gas was presented. The process consists of mainly two fluidized beds—a gasifier and a CaO regenerator. The objective of this research is to develop a computer model of ... Keywords: biomass gasification, hydrogen production, Aspen Plus

Shan Cheng; Qian Wang; Hengsong Ji

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Coal conversion wastewater treatment by catalytic oxidation in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, the authors examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which they can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that the authors could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, they performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2}, which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

Phillip E. Savage

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER  

SciTech Connect

Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, we examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}. We used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which we can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that we could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, we performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2} , which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

Phillip E. Savage

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing  

SciTech Connect

PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOEâ??s goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines, Incorporated Saturn engine rig. High pressure single-injector rig and modified engine rig tests demonstrated NOx less than 2 ppm and CO less than 10 ppm over a wide flame temperature operating regime with low combustion noise (<0.15% peak-to-peak). Minimum NOx for the optimized engine retrofit Full RCL® designs was less than 1 ppm with CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Durability testing of the substrate and catalyst material was successfully demonstrated at pressure and temperature showing long term stable performance of the catalytic reactor element. Stable performance of the reactor element was achieved when subjected to durability tests (>5000 hours) at simulated engine conditions (P=15 atm, Tin=400C/750F.). Cyclic tests simulating engine trips was also demonstrated for catalyst reliability. In addition to catalyst tests, substrate oxidation testing was also performed for downselected substrate candidates for over 25,000 hours. At the end of the program, an RCL® catalytic pilot system has been developed and demonstrated to produce NOx emissions of less than 3 ppm (corrected to 15% O2) for 100% and 50% load operation in a production engine operating on natural gas. In addition, a Full RCL® combustor has been designed and demonstrated less than 2 ppm NOx (with potential to achieve 1 ppm) in single injector and modified engine testing. The catalyst/substrate combination has been shown to be stable up to 5500 hrs in simulated engine conditions.

Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Component Development to Accelerate Commercial Implementation of Ultra-Low Emissions Catalytic Combustion  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes a 2000-2003 program for the development of components and processes to enhance the commercialization of ultra-low emissions catalytic combustion in industrial gas turbines. The range of project tasks includes: development of more durable, lower-cost catalysts and catalytic combustor components; development and design of a catalytic pre-burner and a catalytic pilot burner for gas turbines, and on-site fuel conversion processing for utilization of liquid fuel.

Jon McCarty, Brian Berry, Kare Lundberg, Orris Anson

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Procurement Guideline for Simple- and Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) procurement guideline for simple- and combined-cycle combustion turbines.

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Plasma Catalytic Conversion of Methane in Ultra Rich Flame using Transient Gliding Arc Combustion Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be carried out in a number of ways: steam reforming, thermo-catalytic reforming, partial oxidation, etc. [1

448

How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Blunt-crack band propagation in finite-element analysis for concrete structures. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

The knowledge of concrete fracture is needed in nuclear reactor safety. The question of safety arises from the potential of concrete to crack under thermal loading. It has been postulated that structural concrete could be exposed to very high temperature, which may result from hot reactor coolant or even core debris coming in direct contact with the concrete. The utilization of the blunt crack approach for simulating concrete cracking in a general-purpose code is explored. The difficulties encountered in establishing the proper direction of crack propagation in an arbitrary discretization are described. Crack propagation is considered within the context of two types of solution techniques: (1) implicit solution of the static crack advance, and (2) explicit time integration using a dynamic relaxation technique to simulate the static crack advance. Also, in both solution techniques an elastic model is used to characterize the concrete.

Pfeiffer, P.A.; Bazant, Z.P.; Marchertas, A.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

Shore, Lawrence (Edison, NJ); Matlin, Ramail (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Heinz, Robert (Ludwigshafen, DE)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650 degrees C.

Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Integrating Broad-Band High-Fidelity Acoustic Emission Sensors and Array Processing to Study Drying Shrinkage Cracking in Concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, cracks can create stress concentrations which can cause further cracking at loads which are well under energy released from the formation of a crack is converted into stress waves which in turn produce Shrinkage Cracking in Concrete Gregory C. McLaskeya,1 , Steven D. Glasera , Christian U. Grosseb

Glaser, Steven D.

454

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

Rick J. Migliore

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Size Effect of Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Catalytic Carbon Monoxide Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide oxidation over ruthenium catalysts has shown an unusual catalytic behavior. Here we report a particle size effect on CO oxidation over Ru nanoparticle (NP) catalysts. Uniform Ru NPs with a tunable particle size from 2 to 6 nm were synthesized by a polyol reduction of Ru(acac){sub 3} precursor in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) stabilizer. The measurement of catalytic activity of CO oxidation over two-dimensional Ru NPs arrays under oxidizing reaction conditions (40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2}) showed an activity dependence on the Ru NP size. The CO oxidation activity increases with NP size, and the 6 nm Ru NP catalyst shows 8-fold higher activity than the 2 nm catalysts. The results gained from this study will provide the scientific basis for future design of Ru-based oxidation catalysts.

Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, Jeong Y.; Renzas, J. Russell; Butcher, Derek R.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2010-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

"Cracking-the-whip" effect stretches driven polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cracking the whip accelerates the tail of a chain to hit the air loudly and clearly. We proved that the similar acceleration effect causes coil deformation of driven chain-like polymers. We first preformed Monte Carlo simulations of a single driven polymer coil to demonstrate its deformation in company with faster or slower deviations of velocities. We then performed parallel Brownian Dynamics simulations to demonstrate that the coil deformation can be caused by the so-called "cracking-the-whip" effect due to non-synchronous biased Brownian motions of monomers inherited in Monte Carlo simulations. Since such non-synchronous motions represent random perturbations in the environmentally dependent potential energy landscape or mobility, reflecting heterogeneous dynamics of polymers in the liquid phase, our observations bring new insights into the non-linear dynamics of driven chain-like polymers.

Juan Li; Wenbing Hu

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Modeling of solar receiver for cracking of liquid petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the model of an industrial solar receiver/reactor for thermal cracking of liquid petroleum gas (LPG) at the typical temperature range of 800--850 C. The concentrated solar radiation enters the receiver located on the ground and provided with a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) at the ceiling. This is achieved with a reflecting solar tower. The radiative model uses the classical concept of equivalent gray plane to represent a panel of 40 cracking tubes placed in parallel of a refractory wall of the receiver. The radiative flux distribution on each wall is calculated and the chemistry in each reactor tube is evaluated until convergence is achieved. The design of an industrial size receiver, its behavior, and performance have been evaluated using this model. The computer program based on this model was run for a variety of flow conditions, feed compositions, and pressures.

Segal, A.; Epstein, M. [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Solar Research Facilities Unit

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh Diesel Soot Title Loading Effect Correction for Real-Time Aethalometer Measurements of Fresh Diesel Soot Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Jimenez, Jorge, Candis S. Claiborn, Timothy Larson, Timothy Gould, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association Volume 57 Issue 7 Pagination 868-873 Abstract In this study, a correction was developed for the aethalometer to measure real-time black carbon (BC) concentrations in an environment dominated by fresh diesel soot. The relationship between the actual mass-specific absorption co-efficient for BC and the BC-dependent attenuation coefficients was determined from experiments conducted in a diesel exposure chamber that provided constant concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM; PM2.5; PM <2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) from diesel exhaust. The aethalometer reported BC concentrations decreasing with time from 48.1 to 31.5 μg m-3 when exposed to constant PM2.5 concentrations of 55 ± 1 μg m-3 and bscat 95 ± 3Mm-1 from diesel exhaust. This apparent decrease in reported light-absorbing PM concentration was used to derive a correction K (ATN) for loading of strong light-absorbing particles onto or into the aethalometer filter tape, which was a function of attenuation of light at 880 nm by the embedded particles.

462

Environmental Levels Of 129I Present In Bovine Thyroid And Fresh Water In Argentina  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of {sup 129}I in bovine thyroid and fresh water samples coming from all over Argentina were analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and total iodine present in samples by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Once we complete this study, it will be the first set of data of this kind from an extended region of the south American subcontinent.

Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Carnellia, P. F. F.; Barbara, E. de; Figueira, J. M.; Fimiani, L.; Heimanna, D. M.; Zalazara, L. [Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernandez Niello, J. [Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Campus Miguelete, B1650BWA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); La Gamma, A. M. [Gerencia Quimica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wallner, A. [VERA-Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Str. 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

463

Thermochemical Equilibrium Modeling of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SRC) Catalyst Poisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous EPRI publication (1022073) provided a detailed literature review on the propensity of the alkali and alkaline earth metals sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and the Group (V) elements phosphorus (P) and arsenic (As) to deactivate selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts in commercial flue gas cleaning systems. It also listed the conditions under which such deactivation has been reported. This report extends this earlier work to predict the transformation of SCR catalyst ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Selective Catalytic Reduction Mercury Oxidation Data to Support Catalyst Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) mercury oxidation can be pivotal for Mercury and Air Toxics Standards compliance, especially for those units that rely on co-benefits as their primary method of mercury control. Much work has been done historically to understand the mercury behavior across SCRs, especially as a function of operating conditions, and in particular, flue gas composition. The present work seeks to integrate the accumulated knowledge into a practical document that will aid utilities in ...

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

465

Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) Technology Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a technology overview regarding the application and operation of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) to coal-fired electric utility boilers for the incremental reduction of NOx emissions. The document provides a historical perspective of the SNCR technology development, background regarding the reaction chemistry, and process parameters that impact SNCR NOx reduction performance. In addition, a review of reagent choices along with storage and handling requirements is ...

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the 2010 version of Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems, originally published in 2001 and updated annually. New content this year includes: (1) A section on static mixers added in Chapter 3; (2) Substantial expansion of the discussion on inspection of ammonia storage and delivery equipment in Chapter 8; (3) Expanded coverage of unit startup, shutdown, and low-load operation in Chapter 15; (4) a new chapter, Chapter 18, on the means to ensure tha...

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

467

CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING PENETRATING RADIATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of hydrogenating an olefinic hydrocarbon by irradiating a substrate catalyst and increasing its catalytic activity is described. Ferric oxide with about 0.005% by weight of at least one oxide of a metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, magnesium, nickel, zirconium, and manganese incorporated therein is irradiated. Then an alkane is placed upon the surface of the catalyst and irradiated in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Any olefin produced from this radiolysis becomes hydrogenated. (AEC)

Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Equilibrium Characteristics of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Catalyst Poisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Power River Basin (PRB) coal applications, phosphorus (P) is known as the primary catalyst poison. Recent utility experience shows that some units burning PRB coal are deactivating the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst more rapidly than others. The exact mechanism is not well understood but could be related to boiler type or combustion modifications leading to increased levels of phosphorus vaporization. With increased levels of phosphorus in flue gas, greater quantities of phosphorus would...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

469

Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Recycle and Re-Use Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the widespread implementation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology, there is a great deal of interest in finding viable recycle/re-use routes for spent catalyst as an alternative to landfilling. The current effort has focused on detailed evaluation of several recycle/re-use processes that were identified in previous EPRI studies. These recycle/re-use technologies include mineral filler applications, incorporation into wet-bottom boiler slag, cement kiln co-processing, and use in iron/s...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

470

Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification Process Predevelopment Program. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of work conducted on Predevelopment Research for the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification Process. The eighteen-month effort (July 1976-December 1977) was a coordinated program which included operation of a continuous fluidized-bed gasifier, parallel bench-scale research, and engineering studies leading to the preparation of a commercial-scale plant study design and economics for producing SNG from Illinois coal.

Kalina, T.; Nahas, N.C.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials  

SciTech Connect

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used.

Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Method for making dense crack free thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

Jacobson, Craig P. (Lafayette, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); De Jonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

473

Gas Turbine Rotor Life: General Electric FA Disc Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the integrated results of the investigation into the occurrence of cooling slot and other rim cracking found in GE 7FA and 9FA gas turbine first and second stage rotor discs. Sections of the report address dimensional characterization, rim temperature measurement, metallurgical results, analytical methods, evaluation of mitigation approaches, and damage tolerance. Structural stress analysis assessed the effectiveness of the blend-polish-peen slot modification and a redesigned ...

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

474

Stress relief cracking in creep resisting low alloy ferritic steels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Problem of Stress Relief Cracking in Low Alloy Steels During the welding of a ferritic steel, the HAZ adjacent to the weld transforms to austenite, the grains close to the fusion zone attaining particularly high tempel'ature and undergoing considerable... growth. At the same time, carbides tend to dissolve, dissolution being more complete in the coarse 14 grained region because it attains a higher temperature. The HAZ is cooled rapidly by the cold parent metal and, as a result, re- precipitation...

Tait, Robert Andrew

1976-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

Evaluation of Fundamental Linkage Among Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) Phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many in-core components of stainless steels in light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to a degradation process known as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). This report describes the results of environmental testing on irradiated Type 304 stainless steel in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments to assess their susceptibility to IASCC. The work was sponsored by the Cooperative IASCC Research (CIR I) Program, an international research effort ma...

2002-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

476

Computer Simulation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking via Hydrogen Embrittlement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer simulation has been applied to the investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in Ni-based alloys based on a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The simulation employs computational modules that address (a) transport and reactions of aqueous species giving rise to hydrogen generation at the liquid-metal interface, (b) solid state transport of hydrogen via intergranular and transgranular diffusion pathways, and (c) fracture due to the embrittlement of metallic bonds by hydrogen. A key focus of the computational model development has been the role of materials microstructure (precipitate particles and grain boundaries) on hydrogen transport and embrittlement. Simulation results reveal that intergranular fracture is enhanced as grain boundaries are weakened and that microstructures with grains elongated perpendicular to the stress axis are more susceptible to cracking. The presence of intergranular precipitates may be expected to either enhance or impede cracking depending on the relative distribution of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the precipitate-matrix interfaces. Calculations of hydrogen outgassing and in gassing demonstrate a strong effect of charging method on the fracture behavior.

Smith, R.W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The synthesis of ethane and ethylene from methane and oxygen will be carried out in novel hydrogen transport inorganic membranes and in cyclic reactors in order to prevent undesirable secondary reactions of C{sub 2} molecules to CO and CO{sub 2}. Neither inorganic membrane reactors nor cyclic tubular reactors are presently used in commercial processes. Their application to catalytic reactions represents a novel application of engineering and solid-state chemistry concepts to catalytic reactions. Our approach combines high temperature membrane and cyclic experimental reactors, synthesis and characterization of thin membrane films and of high surface area catalysts, and detailed models of complex gas phase and surface reactions involved in oxidative coupling. We anticipate that this approach will lead to novel reactors for carrying our kinetic-controlled sequential reactions, such as the oxidative coupling of methane. Careful spectrographic and wet chemical analyses of fresh and silent catalysts have shown considerable differences which have permitted conclusions as to the source of deactivation. Our activities in the first quarter FYI 995 have focused on the synthesis, structural characterization, and catalytic evaluation of membrane films, disks, and reactors. We have also continued to exploit reaction-transport models to predict the performance of membrane, cyclic, and recycle reactors in the oxidative coupling of methane.

Iglesia, E.; Perry, D.L.; Heinemann, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Comparing Methods of Estimating Crack Volume in Shrink-Swell Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting soil crack formation and closure in high shrink-swell soils is crucial for modeling water movement and solute transport. However, soil cracking, as it occurs in natural conditions, is not well understood. The objectives of this research are to 1) compare shrinking and swelling of two Vertisols with different mineralogy and 2) compare two methods for estimating soil crack volume. The first soil monitored, Ships Clay (Very-fine, mixed, thermic Chromic Hapluderts) has mixed mineralogy and is located in Snook, TX. The second soil monitored is a Burleson Clay (Fine, smectitic, thermic Udic Haplusterts), which has smectitic mineralogy and is located 1 mile southwest of the Ships site. During two drying events, vertical subsidence and cracking were measured on both soils. Vertical subsidence was measured at three locations in each soil with rods fixed at four depths. Rod movement was converted to soil crack volume by assuming equi-dimensional shrinkage. A second method for estimating crack volume used direct measurements of cracks in the field. This second method was time consuming and the accuracy is unknown. A neutron moisture meter access tube was installed to measure soil moisture at each subsidence location. A total of 20 levling and moisture measurements were completed and 10 hand measurements of cracking were made. At the completion of the study, full characterization of each measurement location was performed, including COLE measurements. These COLE measurements were used as a third method of estimating crack volume in relation to soil moisture. Total crack volume will be compared at both sites to show the differences in the drying and cracking patterns. Crack volume as a function of moisture will be used to show how soil cracking and moisture relate. The two methods of estimating crack volume will be compared to see where possible cracking was measured with subsidence but not seen visually. The results showed the leveling-predicted crack volume was ten times that of the hand measured crack volume but followed the same temporal trend. The leveling-predicted crack volume is the most accurate of the three methods. COLE was also shown to be a good predictor a soils shrink-swell potential.

Rivera, Leonardo D.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

480

Fatigue Crack Propagation from Notched Specimens of 304 SS in elevated Temperature Aqueous Environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates for 304 stainless steel (304SS) were determined in 24 degree C and 288 degree C air and 288 degree C water using double-edged notch (DEN) specimens of 304 stainless steel (304 SS). Test performed at matched loading conditions in air and water at 288 degree C with 20-6- cc h[sub]2/kg h[sub]2O provided a direct comparison of the relative crack growth rates in air and water over a wide range of crack growth rates. The DEN crack extension ranged from short cracks (0.03-0.25 mm) to long cracks up to 4.06 mm, which are consistent with conventional deep crack tests. Crack growth rates of 304 SS in water were about 12 times the air rate. This 12X environmental enhancement persisted to crack extensions up to 4.06 mm, far outside the range associated with short crack effects. The large environmental degradation for 304 SS crack growth is consistent with the strong reduction of fatigue life in high hydrogen water. Further, very similar environmental effects w ere reported in fatigue crack growth tests in hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). Most literature data in high hydrogen water show only a mild environmental effect for 304 SS, of order 2.5 times air or less, but the tests were predominantly performed at high cyclic stress intensity or equivalently, high air rates. The environmental effect in low oxygen environments at low stress intensity depends strongly on both the stress ratio, R, and the load rise time, T[sub]r, as recently reported for austenitic stainless steel in BWR water. Fractography was performed for both tests in air and water. At 288 degree C in water, the fracture surfaces were crisply faceted with a crystallographic appearance, and showed striations under high magnification. The cleavage-like facets on the fracture surfaces suggest that hydrogen embrittlement is the primary cause of accelerated cracking.

Wire, G. L.; Mills, W. J.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh catalytic cracking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

On the micromechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation in aluminum- lithium alloys: Sheet vs. plate material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Micromechanisms influencing the propagation of long (>10 mm) fatigue cracks in aluminum-lithium alloys are examined by specifically comparing crack-growth kinetics in a peak-aged Al-Li-Cu-Zr alloy 2090, processed as 1.6-mm thin (T83) sheet and 12.7-mm thick (T81) plate. It is found that in general crack-growth rates are significantly faster in the sheet material at equivalent stress-intensity levels, due to differences in the role of crack-tip shielding, resulting from crack deflection and consequent crack closure from wedging of fracture-surface asperities. Microstructurally, such differences are related to variations in the degree of recrystallization, grain structure and deformation texture in the two wrought-product forms. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Rao Venkateswara, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Bucci, R.J. (Aluminum Co. of America, Alcoa Center, PA (United States). Alcoa Labs.)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect

The presence of dissolved metallurgical sulfides in pressure vessel and piping steels has been linked to Environmentally-Assisted Cracking (EAC), a phenomenon observed in laboratory tests that results in fatigue crack growth rates as high as 100 times that in air. Previous experimental and analytical work based on diffusion as the mass transport process has shown that surface cracks that are initially clean of sulfides will not initiate EAC in most applications. This is because the average crack tip velocity would not be sufficiently high to expose enough metallurgical sulfides per unit time and produce the sulfide concentration required for EAC. However, there is a potential concern for the case of a relatively large embedded crack breaking through to the wetted surface. Such a crack would not be initially clean of sulfides, and EAC could initiate. This paper presents the results of a series of experiments conducted on two heats of an EAC susceptible, high-sulfur, low-alloy steel in 243{degrees}C low-oxygen water to further study the phenomenon of EAC persistence at low crack tip velocities. A load cycle profile that incorporated a significant load dwell period at minimum load was used. In one experiment, the fatigue cycling history was such that relatively high crack tip velocities at the start of the experiment produced a persistent case of EAC even when crack tip velocities were later reduced to levels below the EAC initiation velocity. The other series of experiments used initial crack tip velocities that were much lower and probably more realistic. Air precracking of the compact tension specimens produced an initial inventory of undissolved sulfides on the crack flanks that directly simulates the array of sulfides expected from the breakthrough of an embedded crack. In all cases, results showed EAC ceased after several hundred hours of cycling.

Li, Y.Y.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

LARGE NUMBERS OF UNDETECTED CRACKS IN THE WORLD’S PWRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Documents of the Davis-Besse incident reveal a strong possibility that there are large numbers of undetected cracks in the world’s pressurized water reactors, particularly in the US. This suspicion has been confirmed by the discovery of an additional crack at Davis-Besse itself. (568.5402) NIRS/WISE Amsterdam – The cracks are nothing new: they were first discovered in Bugey-3,

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Significance of crack opening monitoring for determining the growth behavior of hydrofractures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for determining the size of a crack induced by hydraulic fracturing is presented. The procedure is based on the measurement of the crack opening displacement and the fracture mechanics approach. The proposed method has been tested by conducting laboratory small-scale hydraulic fracturing tests on a granite. It is shown from the preliminary tests that the method provides a reasonable prediction of experimentally observed crack sizes.

Hashida, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kazushi; Takahashi, Hideaki

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

485

Elevated-Temperature Creep-Fatigue Crack-Growth Behavior of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the nickel-base HAYNES R-41, HAYNES 230 and HASTELLOY. X superalloys at temperatures ... The crack-growth tests for R-41 alloy were conducted using a.

486

An introduction to crack spreads - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crack spreads are differences between wholesale petroleum product prices and crude oil prices. These spreads are often used to estimate refining margi ...

487

A model of crack based on dislocations in smectic A liquid crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A plastic crack model for smectic A liquid crystals under longitudinal shear is suggested. The solution of screw dislocation in smectic A is the key in which the correct result is just obtained by overcoming a longstanding puzzle [19]. We further use the dislocation pile-up principle and the singular integral equation method, construct the solution of the crack in the phase. From the solution we can determine the size of the plastic zone at the crack tip and the crack tip opening (tearing) displacement, which are parameters being relevant to the local stability/instability of materials. The results may be useful in developing soft-matter mechanics.

Tian You Fan

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue Cracking Mechanisms of F.C.C. ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatigue Crack Tip Mechanics Following a Tensile Overload · Fatigue Weak-Link Density and Strength Distribution in High Strength Al Wrought and Cast Alloys.

489

Innovative Approach to Establish Root Causes for Cracking in Aggressive Reactor Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research focuses on the high-resolution characterization of degradation microstructures and microchemistries in specimens tested under controlled conditions for the environment and for the material where in-service complexities can be minimized. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of crack-tip processes is employed to analyze corrosion-induced structures and gain insights into degradation mechanisms. Novel mechanistic ''fingerprinting'' of crack-tip structures is used to isolate causes of environmental cracking in tandem with quantitative measurements of crack growth. Sample preparation methods and advanced analytical techniques are used to characterize corrosion/oxidation reactions and crack-tip structures at near atomic dimensions in order to gain insight into fundamental environmental cracking mechanisms. Reactions at buried interfaces, not accessible by conventional approaches, are being systematically interrogated. Crack-growth experiments in high-temperature water environments are evaluating and isolating the effects of material condition (matrix strength, grain boundary composition and precipitation) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The fundamental understanding of crack advance mechanisms will establish the basis to design new corrosion-resistant alloys for current light-water reactors and advanced reactor systems.

Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.; Vetrano, John S.; Simonen, Edward P.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

Manufacturing of Crack-Free Hastelloy-X Components by Selective ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lubricants in Deposition and Machining of Wire and Arc Additive Manufactured Structures · Manufacturing of Crack-Free Hastelloy-X Components by Selective ...

491

Production of algal-based biofuel using non-fresh water sources.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this LDRD involves development of a system dynamics model to understand the interdependencies between water resource availability and water needs for production of biofuels. Specifically, this model focuses on availability and feasibility of non-traditional water sources from dairy wastewater, produced water from crude oil production and from coal-bed methane gas extraction for the production of algal-based biofuel. The conceptual simulation framework and historical data are based on two locales within New Mexico, the San Juan basin in the northwest and the Permian basin in the southeast, where oil and gas drilling have increased considerably in the last ten years. The overall water balance ignores both transportation options and water chemistry and is broken down by county level. The resulting model contains an algal growth module, a dairy module, an oil production module, and a gas production module. A user interface is also created for controlling the adjustable parameters in the model. Our preliminary investigation indicates a cyclical demand for non-fresh water due to the cyclical nature of algal biomass production and crop evapotranspiration. The wastewater from the dairy industry is not a feasible non-fresh water source because the agricultural water demand for cow's dry feed far exceeds the amount generated at the dairy. The uncertainty associated with the water demand for cow's dry matter intake is the greatest in this model. The oil- and gas-produced water, ignoring the quality, provides ample supply for water demand in algal biomass production. There remains work to address technical challenges associated with coupling the appropriate non-fresh water source to the local demand.

Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Reno, Marissa Devan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Production of algal-based biofuel using non-fresh water sources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this LDRD involves development of a system dynamics model to understand the interdependencies between water resource availability and water needs for production of biofuels. Specifically, this model focuses on availability and feasibility of non-traditional water sources from dairy wastewater, produced water from crude oil production and from coal-bed methane gas extraction for the production of algal-based biofuel. The conceptual simulation framework and historical data are based on two locales within New Mexico, the San Juan basin in the northwest and the Permian basin in the southeast, where oil and gas drilling have increased considerably in the last ten years. The overall water balance ignores both transportation options and water chemistry and is broken down by county level. The resulting model contains an algal growth module, a dairy module, an oil production module, and a gas production module. A user interface is also created for controlling the adjustable parameters in the model. Our preliminary investigation indicates a cyclical demand for non-fresh water due to the cyclical nature of algal biomass production and crop evapotranspiration. The wastewater from the dairy industry is not a feasible non-fresh water source because the agricultural water demand for cow's dry feed far exceeds the amount generated at the dairy. The uncertainty associated with the water demand for cow's dry matter intake is the greatest in this model. The oil- and gas-produced water, ignoring the quality, provides ample supply for water demand in algal biomass production. There remains work to address technical challenges associated with coupling the appropriate non-fresh water source to the local demand.

Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Reno, Marissa Devan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Catalytic hydroprocessing of shale oil to produce distillate fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of a Chevron Research Company study sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) to demonstrate the feasibility of converting whole shale oil to a synthetic crude resembling a typical petroleum distillate. The synthetic crude thus produced can then be processed, in conventional petroleum-refining facilities, to transportation fuels such as high octane gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. The raw shale oil feed used is a typical Colorado shale oil produced in a surface retort in the so-called indirectly heated mode. It is shown that whole shale oil can be catalytically hydrodenitrified to reduce the nitrogen to levels as low as one part per million in a single catalytic stage. However, for economic reasons, it appears preferable to denitrify to about 0.05 wt % nitrogen. The resulting synthetic crude resembles a petroleum distillate that can be fractionated and further processed as necessary in conventional petroleum refining facilities. Shale oil contains about 0.6% sulfur. Sulfur is more easily removed by hydrofining than is nitrogen; therefore, only a few parts per million of sulfur remain at a product nitrogen of 0.05 wt %. Oxygen contained in the shale oil is also reduced to low levels during hydrodenitrification. The shale oil contains appreciable quantities of iron and arsenic which are also potential catalyst poisons. These metals are removed by a guard bed placed upstream from the hydrofining catalyst. Based on correlations, the naphthas from the shale oil hydrofiner can readily be upgraded to high octane gasolines by catalytic reforming. The middle distillate fractions may require some additional hydrofining to produce salable diesel or jet fuel. The technology is available, and pilot plant studies are scheduled t