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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

2

Fact #846: November 10, 2014 Trucks Move 70% of all Freight by Weight and 74% of Freight by Value – Dataset  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Excel file with dataset for Fact #846: Trucks Move 70% of all Freight by Weight and 74% of Freight by Value

3

Transforming California's Freight Transport System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport Standard #12;2050 Vision- Key Conceptual Outcomes Technology Transformation Early Action Cleaner Combustion Multiple Strategies Federal Action Efficiency Gains Energy Transformation 9 #12;Further reduce localized

California at Davis, University of

4

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

5

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand, the trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand. After describing federal policy actions that could influence future freight demand, the report then summarizes the capabilities of available analytical models for forecasting freight demand. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Grenzeback, L. R.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Hutson, N.; Lamm, C. R.; Pei, Y. L.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Winebrake, J. J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Strategic Freight Transportation Contract Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for truckload service contract procurement. Truckloadgiven the details of new service contracts including: demandin auctions for freight service contract procurement. 1.3.1

Nandiraju, Srinivas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Executive Education Program Freight Transportation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Executive Education Program Freight Transportation and Logistics: Delivering Results in a Volatile Environment September 9 ­11, 2013 Northwestern University Transportation Center NonprofitOrganization U.S.Postage PAID NorthwesternUniversity TransportationCenter RobertR.McCormickSchool of

Bustamante, Fabián E.

8

SuperTruck Team Achieves 115% Freight Efficiency Improvement...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

per gallon (MPG). Increasing the efficiency of Class 8 trucks is essential because they haul 80 percent of the goods in the U.S. and use about 20 percent of the fuel consumed in...

9

Strategic Freight Transportation Contract Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based Procurement for Transportation Services, Journal ofCoia, A. , Evolving transportation exchanges, World trade,an Auction Based Transportation Marketplace, Transportation

Nandiraju, Srinivas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation by Erica Bickford A dissertation rights reserved. #12;Abstract Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford.S. transportation is the largest source of national nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and the third largest source

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

11

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by reducing air pollution. Objective: This study sought to quantify the pollution-related health impactsPollution-Related Health Effects of Truck-to-Train Freight Modal Shifts in the Midwestern United Background: Outdoor air pollution causes increases in mortality, cardiovascular events, and respiratory

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

13

Optimal capital structure of deep sea foreign freight transportation companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to understand the optimal leverage range for shipping companies (maritime foreign freight transportation companies - SIC 4412), through data analysis. This study confirms that in a traditional industry ...

Georgiadis, Vasilis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effect of a sudden fuel shortage on freight transport in the United States: an overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was made of the potential effects of a sudden reduction of fuel supplies on freight transport via truck, rail, water, and pipeline. After a brief discussion of the energy characteristics of each of these modes of transport, short-term strategies for making better use of fuel in a crisis are investigated. Short-term is taken to mean something on the order of six months, and a crisis is taken to be the result of something on the order of a 20% drop in available fuel. Although no succinct or well-established conclusions are drawn, the gist of the paper is that the potential for short-term conservation, without a serious disruption of service, exists but does not appear to be large. It is remarked that it is possible, through further study, to obtain a fairly accurate reckoning of the physical ability of the freight transport network to weather a fuel crisis, but that it is impossible to say in advance what freight carriers will in fact do with the network.

Hooker, J N

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Freight Shuttle System: Cross-Border Movement of Goods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Freight Shuttle System (FSS) is designed to provide freight transportation services between those short and intermediate distance locations (within 600 miles) that are currently handling large volumes of freight traffic. Much like trucks, the FSS's transporters are autonomous: each transporter has its own propulsion and travels independently of other transporters. Inspired by railroads, each FSS transporter has steel wheels operating on a steel running surface and can carry either a standardsize freight container or an over-the-road truck trailer. However, unlike either rail or trucks, the FSS runs on an elevated, dedicated guideway to avoid the interference of other transportation systems. The objective of this report is to examine the potential viability for an alternative transportation system for trailers and containers in a multi-national, cross-border setting. The El Paso-Ciudad Juarez region serves as the environment of this analysis.

None

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

NREL: Transportation Research Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to heavy-duty freight trucks. Female researcher holding coin cell battery. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. Fuel cell electric sports...

17

NREL: Transportation Research - Truck Platooning Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test and Evaluation PhotoSystemsTransportationTruck

18

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Class 8 Truck...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project Presentation given by...

19

THE POTENTIAL FOR CO2 EMISSIONS TRADING IN TRANSPORT: THE CASE OF PERSONAL VEHICLES AND FREIGHT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE POTENTIAL FOR CO2 EMISSIONS TRADING IN TRANSPORT: THE CASE OF PERSONAL VEHICLES AND FREIGHT, it is of some interest to explore the inclusion of road transport in emission trading schemes. Starting from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

SciTech Connect: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

Graham, Sean (Primary Investigator); Bigatel, Patrick

2004-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Streamlining Transportation Corridor Planning Processess: Freight and Traffic Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traffic investigation is one of the most important parts of an Environmental Impact Statement of projects involving the construction of new roadway facilities and/or the improvement of existing ones. The focus of the traffic analysis is on the determination of anticipated traffic flow characteristics of the proposed project, by the application of analytical methods that can be grouped under the umbrella of capacity analysis methodologies. In general, the main traffic parameter used in EISs to describe the quality of traffic flow is the Level of Service (LOS). The current state of the practice in terms of the traffic investigations for EISs has two main shortcomings. The first one is related to the information that is necessary to conduct the traffic analysis, and specifically to the lack of integration among the different transportation models and the sources of information that, in general, reside in GIS databases. A discussion of the benefits of integrating CRS&SI technologies and the transportation models used in the EIS traffic investigation is included. The second shortcoming is in the presentation of the results, both in terms of the appearance and formatting, as well as content. The presentation of traffic results (current and proposed) is discussed. This chapter also addresses the need of additional data, in terms of content and coverage. Regarding the former, other traffic parameters (e.g., delays) that are more meaningful to non-transportation experts than LOS, as well as additional information (e.g., freight flows) that can impact traffic conditions and safety are discussed. Spatial information technologies can decrease the negative effects of, and even eliminate, these shortcomings by making the relevant information that is input to the models more complete and readily available, and by providing the means to communicate the results in a more clear and efficient manner. The benefits that the application and use of CRS&SI technologies can provide to improve and expedite the traffic investigation part of the EIS process are presented.

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fact #846: November 10, 2014 Trucks Move 70% of all Freight by...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

value because rail is often used to haul bulk commodities like coal and grains that are heavy but low value. Conversely, air transport carries just 0.04% (rounds to 0% in the pie...

24

Title: Best Practices in Urban Freight Management: Lessons from an International Survey Submission date: July 31, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

policies, and more stringent national fuel efficiency and emissions standards for heavy duty trucks. More Commercial transport is crucial for the functioning of metropolitan areas. Trucks and vans provide local "last mile" deliveries and pickups, as well as most medium haul freight transport. In metro areas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freig pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation ope

26

The Freight Shuttle System: Automated-Secure Trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the same volume) #12;HDD Truck vs. FSS (CO2 required to service the same volume) #12;Next Steps · Finalize footprint guide way ­ To be built within existing highway ROW The Freight Shuttle System 24/7 operations transportation #12;#12;#12;#12;Port of Entry Security #12;Ciudad Juarez El Paso Scan-in-motion Scan

27

Air Pollution Impacts of Shifting San Pedro Bay Ports Freight from Truck to Rail in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in pollutants compared to the baseline (Port trucks only).Improvement Program. 2008. 4. The Port of Long Beach.Port of Long Beach Air Emissions Inventory 2005. 2007. 5.

You, Soyoung Iris; Lee, Gunwoo; Ritchie, Stephen G.; Saphores, Jean-Daniel; Sangkapichai, Mana; Ayala, Roberto

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

208 | Intermodal transportatIon: movIng FreIght In a global economy 7.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

208 | Intermodal transportatIon: movIng FreIght In a global economy #12;7 7.1 Introduction Air become an indispensible part of the world's global economy, holding an important niche in the transport al mutawaly | 209© 2010 EnoTransportation Foundation.www.enotrans.com Reprinted from IntermodalTransportation:MovingFreightinaGlobalEconomy

Keskinocak, Pinar

29

2014 Texas FreighT Leadership summiT | Linking Freight Transportation and Economic Competitiveness Linking Freight Transportation and Economic Competitiveness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Welcome Marc D. Williams, Director of Planning, Texas Department of Transportation Jeff Moseley International 3:30­3:45Pm closing Remarks Marc D. Williams, Texas Department of Transportation AGENDA WEDNESDAy

30

Measuring the Value of Time in Highway Freight Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) .............................. 37 Table 4.4: Value of Time for Ubiquitous Congestion (80% Known Demand) ............... 37 Table 5.1: Logistic Operation Data by Industry Type...................................................... 53 Table 5.2: Single-Vehicle Value of Time... transportation cost, which 4 has been escalating over the years. For example, between 1981 and 2002, transportation costs increased from $228 billion to $577 billion, which corresponds to 45.1 percent and 63.4 percent of the total logistics cost...

Miao, Qing

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

PREPARED BY: Regional Freight Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5% Truck, ocean, rail, air Milled grain products and preparations and bakery products 3.3% Truck, rail instruments and apparatus 3.1% Truck, air Printed products 2.9% Truck, rail, air Nonmetallic mineral products for 60% of Oregon jobs · Transportation and logistics account for 20-25% of product cost · Average

Bertini, Robert L.

32

Delivering the Green: The Future of California's Freight Transportation System Summary and Reading List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

List California's freight sector is a critical part of California's economic engine, generating-duty vehicles in California. This includes, in the near term: efficiency improvements in the engines-in electric and hydrogen fuel cell electric powertrains and lower-carbon fuels. · In addition to their energy

California at Davis, University of

33

Assessment of the risk of transporting propane by truck and train  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risk of shipping propane is discussed and the risk assessment methodology is summarized. The risk assessment model has been constructed as a series of separate analysis steps to allow the risk to be readily reevaluated as additional data becomes available or as postulated system characteristics change. The transportation system and accident environment, the responses of the shipping system to forces in transportation accidents, and release sequences are evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a comparison with other reports in this series. Based on the information presented, accidents involving tank truck shipments of propane will be expected to occur at a rate of 320 every year; accidents involving bobtails would be expected at a rate of 250 every year. Train accidents involving propane shipments would be expected to occur at a rate of about 60 every year. A release of any amount of material from propane trucks, under both normal transportation and transport accident conditions, is to be expected at a rate of about 110 per year. Releases from propane rail tank cars would occur about 40 times a year. However, only those releases that occur during a transportation accident or involve a major tank defect will include sufficient propane to present the potential for danger to the public. These significant releases can be expected at the lower rate of about fourteen events per year for truck transport and about one event every two years for rail tank car transport. The estimated number of public fatalities resulting from these significant releases in 1985 is fifteen. About eleven fatalities per year result from tank truck operation, and approximately half a death per year stems from the movement of propane in rail tank cars.

Geffen, C.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program, a government-industry research partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 21st Century Truck Program has been established as a government-industry research partnership to support the development and implementation of commercially viable technologies that will dramatically cut fuel use and emissions of commercial trucks and buses while enhancing their safety and affordability as well as maintaining or enhancing performance. The innovations resulting from this program will reduce dependence on foreign oil, improve our nation's air quality, provide advanced technology for military vehicles, and enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. truck and bus industry while ensuring safe and affordable freight and bus transportation for the nation's economy. This Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program has been prepared to guide the development of the technical advancements that will enable the needed improvements in commercial truck fuel economy, emissions, and safety.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics AERODYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION FOR FREIGHT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 AERODYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION FOR FREIGHT TRUCKS and Astronautics 2 controls,4 , flight trajectories,5 wings and airfoils,6,7,9,10 inlets,14 rockets,16,19 missiles

Roy, Chris

36

Environmental implications of trade liberalization on North American transport services: the case of the trucking sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drayage ?eet is older. Line-haul trucks in the US and Mexicoacross the border. Line-haul trucks then pick up theand older than line-haul trucks and tend to produce higher

Fernandez, Linda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Freight Transportation Electronic Marketplaces: A Survey of the Industry and Exploration of Important Research Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coia, A. , Evolving transportation exchanges, World trade,of Carrier strategies in an auction based transportationmarketplace, Transportation Research Board, Journal of the

Nandiraju, Srinivas; Regan, Amelia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assessing the Environmental and Health Impacts of Port-Related Freight Movement in a Major Urban Transportation Corridor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NO X for port trucks, line-haul, and railyards for winterhaul movements. Compared to PM and NO X emission from port truckshaul distance and speed of locomotives are used. After estimating emissions for both trains and drayage trucks

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTrainingTransportationsearchDEMAND Freight

40

UF{sub 6} tiedowns for truck transport - right way/wrong way  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tiedown systems for truck transport of UF{sub 6} must be defined and controlled to assure the least risk for hauling the material over the highways. This paper and an associated poster display will present the current status of regulatory criteria for tiedowns, analyze the structural stresses involved in tiedowns for two major UF{sub 6} packaging systems, the 21PF series of overpacks and the 48 in. diameter shipping cylinders, and will present photographs showing some {open_quote}right ways{close_quotes} and some {open_quotes}wrong (or risky) ways{close_quotes} currently used for tiedown systems. Risky tiedown methods must be replaced with safer less risky methods to insure the safe transport of UF{sub 6}.

Stout, F.W. Jr. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Greenhouse gas emissions and the surface transport of freight in Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of several pre-defined factors to changes in energy consumption and energy-related gas emissions (Ang appearing to be rising proportionally as a transportation mode. Federal government initiatives on the US the transportation sector (Office of Energy Efficiency, 2004); a rise of nearly 25% over 1990. The geographical

42

INTRODUCTION TEA 21 (Transportation Equity Act 21) of 1998 allows heavy sugarcane truck loads on Louisiana interstate highways.These heavier loads are currently being  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are significant parameters of highway traffic.TEA 21 is allowing sugarcane trucks to haul loads up to 100,000 lb that the study include vehicles hauling sugarcane biomass for alternative fuel and electricity generation. DuringINTRODUCTION TEA 21 (Transportation Equity Act 21) of 1998 allows heavy sugarcane truck loads

Harms, Kyle E.

43

Merging qualitative and quantitative criteria for freight investment using scenario planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freight transportation is vital to the economy of the United States. The total volume of freight moving inside the nation is expected to continue growing, while the U.S. transportation system is aging and becoming more ...

Sánchez-Valero, Miguel Ángel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

ANALYSIS OF THE NON LINEAR DYNAMICS OF A 2AXLE FREIGHT WAGON IN CURVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and trucks continuously requires to increase the capacity on modern freight wagons. In order to reach this objective two options are available, increasing the total hauled mass or raising the speed of the wagons

45

Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark ForkB O

46

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

Sutton, W.H.

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Definition and Evaluation of Bus and Truck Automation Operations Concepts: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel efficiency Higher system capacity Rural Truck-AHS Long-haulhaul other companies’ trucks or just trailers; scheduled AHS Hauling services Better fuelhaul on some freight corridors (expedited Bus and Truck AHS – Final Report to California PATH Mainline Operations: Fuel

Taso, H. S. Jacob; Botha, Jan L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heavy- duty long-haul Class 8 trucks getting approximately 6which the trucks are sold from long-haul freight companiesof these trucks commonly involves initial use in long-haul

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Planning for Freight Management: Urban Freight and Gateway Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Low Off-hours deliveries High Medium Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Medium Medium Environment and parking regulations Medium High Local planning policy High High City logistics and consolidation programs Truck fuel efficiency and emissions standards High High Alternative fuels and vehicles Low Medium Low

California at Davis, University of

50

Truckstop -- and Truck!-- Electrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions of this paper are: 0.5-1.5 G/H and/or BUSG/Y--how much time and money will it take to quantify and WHY BOTHER TO DO SO? No shortage of things to do re truckstop--+ truck!-- electrification; Better that government and industry should put many eggs in lots of baskets vs. all in one or few; Best concepts will surface as most viable; Economic appeal better than regulation or brute force; Launch Ground Freight Partnership and give it a chance to work; Demonstration is an effective means to educate, and learn from, customers--learning is a two way street; Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD 3) are all important but only deployment gets results; TSE can start small in numbers of spaces to accommodate economically inspired growth but upfront plans should be made for expansion if meaningful idle reduction is to follow via TE; 110VAC 15A service/ parking space is minimal--if infrastructure starts like this, upfront plans must be made to increase capacity; Increased electrification of truckstop and truck alike will result in much better life on the road; Improved sleep will improve driver alertness and safety; Reduced idling will significantly reduce fuel use and emissions; Universal appeal for DOD, DOE, DOT, EPA, OEMs, and users alike; Clean coal, gas, hydro, nuclear, or wind energy sources are all distinctly American means by which to generate electricity; Nothing can compete with diesel fuel to serve mobile truck needs; stationary trucks are like power plants--they don't move and should NOT be powered by petroleum products whenever possible; Use American fueled power plants--electricity--to serve truck idling needs wherever practical to do so; encourage economic aspect; Create and reward industry initiatives to reduce fuel use; Eliminate FET on new trucks, provide tax credits (non highway fuel use and investment), provide incentives based on results; Encourage newer/ cleaner truck use; solicit BAAs with mandatory OEM/ fleet participation/ lead; and A gallon saved is a gallon earned-- start NOW, not later.

Skip Yeakel

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

51

Title: Best Practices in Urban Freight Management: Lessons from an International Survey Submission date: July 31, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas. Trucks and vans provide local "last mile" deliveries and pickups, as well as most medium haul reductions programs, local land use and parking policies, and more stringent national fuel efficiency and emissions standards for heavy duty trucks. More research is needed on intra- metropolitan freight movements

Boyer, Edmond

52

Truck and rail charges for shipping spent fuel and nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed techniques for calculating estimates of nuclear-waste shipping costs and compiled a listing of representative data that facilitate incorporation of reference shipping costs into varius logistics analyses. The formulas that were developed can be used to estimate costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel or nuclear waste by either legal-weight truck or general-freight rail. The basic data for this study were obtained from tariffs of a truck carrier licensed to serve the 48 contiguous states and from various rail freight tariff guides. Also, current transportation regulations as issued by the US Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were investigated. The costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear waste, as addressed by the tariff guides, are based on a complex set of conditions involving the shipment origin, route, destination, weight, size, and volume and the frequency of shipments, existing competition, and the length of contracts. While the complexity of these conditions is an important factor in arriving at a ''correct'' cost, deregulation of the transportation industry means that costs are much more subject to negotiation and, thus, the actual fee that will be charged will not be determined until a shipping contract is actually signed. This study is designed to provide the baseline data necessary for making comparisons of the estimated costs of shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear wastes by truck and rail transportation modes. The scope of the work presented in this document is limited to the costs incurred for shipping, and does not include packaging, cask purchase/lease costs, or local fees placed on shipments of radioactive materials.

McNair, G.W.; Cole, B.M.; Cross, R.E.; Votaw, E.F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

Carrier strategies in the spot trucking market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How an owner-operator chooses a specific load is a relatively unstudied field in transportation literature. Stakeholders in the decisions, such as freight brokers, stand to benefit from a better understanding of the selection ...

Leopando, Paul Jeffrey Ramirez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - air truck transportation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INSTITUTE THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Summary: for the Port of Houston Report Prepared for Office of Transportation and Air Quality: U.S. EPA April, 2009......

56

The Design of a New Freight Distribution System in Venice1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Design of a New Freight Distribution System in Venice1 Flavio Baita, Carlos Daganzo, Walter the transshipment operations from trucks to boats, and the organization of the boat distribution. Currently. Introduction The role of distribution logistics, as a strategic factor for competitive advantage in many

Daganzo, Carlos F.

57

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

How to lighten trucks to haul bigger payloads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses how lighter truck components can be used wisely for the highway transportation of coal, with maintenance and costs in mind, to increase the hauling capacity of trucks.

Smiely, C.H.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Service quality planning for freight distribution with time windows in large networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a quality factor of the service, since its nature and configuration also affects the total transportation1 Service quality planning for freight distribution with time windows in large networks Francesco introduces a methodology whose aim is to evaluate how the quality of a freight distribution service with time

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

60

Strategic Freight Transportation Contract Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be lowered if a follow-on load is available after doingof ?nding a follow-on load out of that destination. Securingprobability of getting a follow on load is more and remove

Nandiraju, Srinivas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to global climate change, diesel-fueled refuse trucks are one of the most concentrated sources of health-threatening air pollution in most cities. The landfills that they ultimately place their waste in are the second largest source of human-related methane...

Sprague, Stephen M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Lift truck safety review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark ForkB O2

64

Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark ForkB O21

65

Class 8 Truck Freight Efficiency Improvement Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark ForkB

66

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Class 8 Truck Freight  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote55 JeffersonFuel-Efficient

67

Super Truck -- 50% Improvement In Class 8 Freight Efficiency | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4 RecoveryJulyEvaluationOffi ce U.S.Super Dutyof

68

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report, May 10, 1994--December 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report encompasses the first year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on LNG research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (i) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (ii) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. Since this work was for fundamental research in a number of related areas to the use of LNG as a transportation fuel for long haul trucking, many of those results have appeared in numerous refereed journal and conference papers, and significant graduate training experiences (including at least one M.S. thesis and one Ph.D. dissertation) in the first year of this project. In addition, a potential new utilization of LNG fuel has been found, as a part of this work on the fundamental nature of adsorption of LNG vent gases in higher hydrocarbons; follow on research for this and other related applications and transfer of technology are proceeding at this time.

Sutton, W.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Towards understanding the impacts of congestion pricing on urban trucking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding policy impacts on freight is essential for planners who have overlooked this transport group in the past and must evaluate new congestion alleviation policies with respect to regional economic and social ...

Waliszewski, Janine M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Mixing Fast Trains on Freight Rail Corridors presented by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mixing Fast Trains on Freight Rail Corridors presented by: Minnesota Department of Transportation May 23, 2012 #12;Presentation Outline · State Plans for Fast (Passenger) Trains · Overarching) Suggest picture of CP grain train be inserted here #12;Passenger Rail Development Overarching Principles

Minnesota, University of

71

Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Incorporated...

72

Project Information Form Project Title Integrating Management of Truck and Rail Systems in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Information Form Project Title Integrating Management of Truck and Rail Systems in Los or organization) Volvo Research and Educational Foundation- $79,604.00 Total Project Cost $79,604.00 Agency ID of Research Project This project will develop models to optimize the balance of freight demand across rail

California at Davis, University of

73

National Deployment Strategy for Truck Stop Electrification Josias Zietsman, Ph.D., P.E.*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 long-haul trucks operating in the United States (2). The U.S. Department of Transportation mandates that drivers spend resting and sleeping in the cabs of their trucks. As a consequence, long-haul truck driversNational Deployment Strategy for Truck Stop Electrification by Josias Zietsman, Ph.D., P

74

Environmental conditions and responses of circus elephants transported by truck and railcar during relatively high and low temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and solar radiation were continuously measured during both extremes. Concentrations of ammonia and carbon monoxide during transport were also determined. Body temperature from a sample of elephants for each circus or exhibitor was also measured...

Toscano, Michael Jeffrey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

STATE-OF-THE-PRACTICE IN FREIGHT DATA: A REVIEW OF AVAILABLE FREIGHT DATA IN THE U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedures, freight demand characteristics, freight data quality control procedures, freight database, survey method, quality control procedure, geographical coverage, frequency of updates of each publicly available database, and the available documentation of commercial databases. In total, 31

Texas at Austin, University of

76

Freight Analysis Framework version 3 (FAF3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freight Analysis Framework version 3 (FAF3) Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT Technologies Research Brief T he Freight Analysis Framework version 3 (FAF3) database is a Federal Highway data to enable users to perform train analysis. FAF3 Geography Figure 1 shows the analysis regions

77

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Project Information Form Project Title Strategies for Transitioning to Zero-Emission Vehicles--Freight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source(s) and Amounts Provided (by each agency or organization) US DOT $38,884 Total Project Cost $38Project Information Form Project Title Strategies for Transitioning to Zero-Emission Vehicles Description of Research Project According to the EIA, freight modes accounted for 29% of transportation fuel

California at Davis, University of

79

Costs and benefits of logistics pooling for urban freight distribution: scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

logistics; resource sharing; freight transport pooling; policy-oriented modelling; simulation is that of logistics pooling, that can be defined analogously to car-pooling as the common usage of logistics resources). We observe several projects dealing with urban logistics resource sharing in the last years, most

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

80

A Geographical Information System-Based Decision Support Tool: GeoFreight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy@ornl.gov or hwanghl@ornl.gov The Port Statistics menu, accessed from the Major Ports map, allows the user to examine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that reduces long-haul truck transport growth between 2010ef?ciency. Most long-haul trucks use tandem drive axles, duepower demand in a long-haul truck, typically accounting for

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Aerodynamic Forces on Truck Models, Including Two Trucks in Tandem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rear-edge shaping on the aerodynamic drag of bluff vehiclesOF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Aerodynamic Forces on Truck Models,TRANSIT AND HIGHWAYS Aerodynamic Forces on Truck Models,

Hammache, Mustapha; Michaelian, Mark; Browand, Fred

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

basic shapes 33. Articles of base metal 41. Waste and scrap 3. Processed food 5. Meat, fish, seafood, and their preparations 6. Milled grain products and preparations, and bakery...

84

Haul truck selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Haul truck selection involves the consideration of a vast amount of information before the final decision is made. This judgment should not be made simply on the choice of power train, because to go for mechanical or electric drive has always been a case of horses for courses. Some sites are just better suited to electric drive. It could, for instance, be argued that coming out of deep mines with long haul roads is an ideal application for electric drive, but negotiating steep down gradients fully laden would favor mechanical drive. Engine selection on the other hand is easier to define but normally is the direct responsibility of the customer, with the truck manufacturer acting as impartial adviser. Understandably each will offer engines it believes to be well matched to the truck and to the site application requirements. Long term mine planning with careful attention to future equipment requirements is the key to all equipment purchases. This paper discusses the various considerations.

Porter, D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integrating regional strategic transportation planning and supply chain management : along the path to sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systems perspective for regional strategic transportation planning (RSTP) for freight movements involves an understanding of Supply Chain Management (SCM). This thesis argues that private sector freight shippers and ...

Sgouridis, Sgouris P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Effect of Wide-Based Single Tires on Fuel Efficiency of Class 8 Combination Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007 and 2008, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in collaboration with several industry partners, collected real-world performance and situational data for long-haul operations of Class- 8 trucks from a fleet engaged in normal freight operations. Such data and information is useful to support Class-8 modeling of heavy-truck performance, technology evaluation efforts for energy efficiency, and to provide a means of accounting for real-world driving performance within heavy-truck research and analyses. This paper presents some general statistics, including distribution of idling times during long-haul trucking operations. However, the main focus is on the analysis of some of the extensive real-world information collected in this project, specifically on the assessment of the effect that different types of tires (i.e., dual tires vs. new generation single wide-based tires or NGSWBTs) have on the fuel efficiency of Class-8 trucks. The tire effect is also evaluated as a function of the vehicle load level. In all cases analyzed, the statistical tests performed strongly suggest that fuel efficiencies achieved when using all NGSWBTs or combinations of duals and NGSWBTs are higher than in the case of a truck equipped with all dual tires.

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL] [ORNL; Knee, Helmut E [ORNL] [ORNL; Slezak, Lee [U.S. Department of Energy] [U.S. Department of Energy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Note on “Multistage Methods for Freight Train Classification”  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freight Train Classification”. Dirk Briskorn. 1. , Florian Jaehn. 2,?. November, 2012. 1 Universität Siegen, Lehrstuhl für Quantitative Planung, Hölderlinstraße 3,

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Improving haul truck productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

U.S Department of Transportation Office of Public Affairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S Department of Transportation Office of Public Affairs 1200 New Jersey Ave., S.E. Washington, DC Telephone: 202-366-0660 DOT Releases New Freight Transportation Data U.S. Department of Transportation, the most comprehensive publicly available data set of freight movement. "A transportation network

90

Investigating the Possibility of Using BART for Air Freight Movement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generally at night; Long-haul truck fleets are used forgenerally at night; (4) Long-haul truck fleets are used forand deliveries; Trucks are used for long distance haul. Each

Lu, Xiao-Yun; Hanson, Matt; Graham, Michael; Nishinaga, Eugene; Lu, Richard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Aerospace Engineering Pickup Truck AerodynamicsPickup Truck Aerodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution on a generic pickup truck geometry. · To measure the unsteady flow field in the near wake, suction type wind tunnel · Pickup truck model provided by GM R&D · Ground board mounted on top side of tunnel · Actual wind tunnel cross section 60 x 50 cm · Model mounted 380 mm from ground board leading

Al-Garni, Abdullah M.

92

Personal revised version of: Howitt et al. (2011), Carbon dioxide emissions from international air freight. Paper to appear in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presents a methodology to calculate the amount of fuel burnt and the resulting CO2 emissions from New calculated. The total amount of fuel consumed for the international air transport of New Zealand's imports to other nations and/or regions. Using data on fuel uplift, air freight and air craft movements

Otago, University of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Transportation Faculty Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington continues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Faculty Position The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of this action, applications are being solicited for a full-time, tenure-track faculty position in transportation in traffic operations, freight transportation, transportation planning, transportation safety

94

A Note on “Multistage Methods for Freight Train Classification”  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 21, 2012 ... Abstract: The paper “Multistage Methods for Freight Train Classification” by Jacob et al. ([2]) provides a great insight to the theory and practice ...

Dirk Briskorn

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

SuperTruck Team Achieves 115% Freight Efficiency Improvement in Class 8  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1 Special Report:StepRenewable Energy (EERE)to

96

Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 20112: July|Rise | Department of2011of

97

Fact #846: November 10, 2014 Trucks Move 70% of all Freight by Weight and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFYOxide Emission Standards,GrowingOperation

98

SuperTruck Team Achieves 115% Freight Efficiency Improvement in Class 8  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on EnergyEnergy Secretary ChuAs much as halfThe winners

99

Multistage Methods for Freight Train Classification Riko Jacob1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multistage Methods for Freight Train Classification Riko Jacob1 , Peter M´arton2 , Jens Maue3 , and Marc Nunkesser3 1 Computer Science Department, TU M¨unchen, Germany jacob@in.tum.de 2 Faculty, train classification 1 Introduction In real-world railways, a freight train consists of an engine

Riko Jacob

100

Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly Efficient Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly Efficient...

102

CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION The University of Texas at Austin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH The University of Texas at Austin February 2010 Freight Perspective on Texas's Transportation System #12;#12;Table of Contents Introduction.................................................................................................................... 4 1. Texas's Transportation System

Texas at Austin, University of

103

Design and Development of a Continuous Precast Prestressed Concrete Bridge System for the Multimodal Freight Shuttle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Society for Testing and Materials CARD Control and Repairability Damage CIP Cast-in-place DAD Damage Avoidance Design DBE Design Basis Earthquake DC Dead load of structural components and nonstructural attachments Ec Modulus of Elasticity... Pretensioned Precast Bulb T PCI Precast Concrete Institute viii SIP Stay-in-place TTI Texas Transportation Institute TxDOT Texas Department of Transportation MFS Multimodal Freight Shuttle NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NU...

Parkar, Anagha 1984-

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

104

Raley's LNG Truck Site Final Data Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raley's is a 120-store grocery chain with headquarters in Sacramento, California, that has been operating eight heavy-duty LNG trucks (Kenworth T800 trucks with Cummins L10-300G engines) and two LNG yard tractors (Ottawa trucks with Cummins B5.9G engines) since April 1997. This report describes the results of data collection and evaluation of the eight heavy-duty LNG trucks compared to similar heavy-duty diesel trucks operating at Raley's. The data collection and evaluation are a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project.

Battelle

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heavy Truck Engine Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine system was capable of meeting 2010 emissions requirements through the application of NOx and particulate matter reduction techniques proven earlier in the program.

Nelson, Christopher

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data from trucks operating in long-haul operations. The research program was designed to be conductedHeavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project OVERVIEW The Heavy Truck Duty Cycle (HTDC) Project. The project involves efforts to collect, analyze and archive data and information related to class -8 truck

108

Truck acoustic data analyzer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

Inbound freight consolidation : a simulation model to evaluate consolidation rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In logistics, freight can be consolidated over time (temporally) or over space (spatially). This thesis presents a simulation model to evaluate temporal and spatial consolidation rules. The model is the result of a research ...

Ford, Daniel J. (Daniel Jerome)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Truck Thermoacoustic Generator and Chiller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report describes the accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement project DE-FC26-04NT42113 - Truck Thermoacoustic Generator and Chiller - whose goal is to design, fabricate and test a thermoacoustic piezoelectric generator and chiller system for use on over-the-road heavy-duty-diesel trucks, driven alternatively by the waste heat of the main diesel engine exhaust or by a burner integrated into the thermoacoustic system. The thermoacoustic system would utilize engine exhaust waste heat to generate electricity and cab air conditioning, and would also function as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for idle reduction. The unit was to be tested in Volvo engine performance and endurance test cells and then integrated onto a Class 8 over-the-road heavy-duty-diesel truck for further testing on the road. The project has been a collaboration of The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Clean Power Resources Inc., and Volvo Powertrain (Mack Trucks Inc.). Cost share funding was provided by Applied Research Laboratory, and by Clean Power Resources Inc via its grant from Innovation Works - funding that was derived from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Los Alamos received its funding separately through DOE Field Work Proposal 04EE09.

Robert Keolian

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Analysis of major trends in U.S. commercial trucking, 1977-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002) and intermediate-range (1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends. The primary sources of data for this period were the U.S. Bureau of the Census Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey and Truck Inventory and Use Survey. In addition, selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration and from the U.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway Administration's Highway Statistics were used. The report analyzes (1) overall gasoline and diesel fuel consumption patterns by passenger vehicles and trucks and (2) the population changes and fuels used by all commercial truck classes by selected truck type (single unit or combination), during specified time periods, with cargo-hauling commercial trucks given special emphasis. It also assesses trends in selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-mile traveled, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption. In addition, the report examines long-range trends for related factors (e.g., long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes. It identifies the effects of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption. The report also discusses basic engineering design and performance, national legislation on interstate highway construction, national demographic trends (e.g., suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operations requirements, and it highlights their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D .J.; Vyas, A. D.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

NREL: Transportation Research - Truck Stop Electrification Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test and Evaluation

113

State-of-the art of freight forecast modeling: lessons learned and the road ahead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of-the art of freight forecast modeling: lessons learned andof goods as well as to forecast the expected future truckused for the short-term forecasts of freight volumes on

Chow, Joseph Y.; Yang, Choon Heon; Regan, Amelia C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mitigating the Social and Environmental Impacts of Multimodal Freight Corridor Operations at Southern California Ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPBP freight traffic, air pollution, and the health of localSPBP freight traffic, air pollution, and the health of localhealth impact assessment to quantitatively assess the characteristics of the populations bearing the brunt of air pollution

Recker, Will W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Solar hydrogen for urban trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Now (CAN) Solar Hydrogen Project, located at Xerox Corp., El Segundo, California, includes solar photovoltaic powered hydrogen generation, compression, storage and end use. Three modified Ford Ranger trucks use the hydrogen fuel. The stand-alone electrolyzer and hydrogen dispensing system are solely powered by a photovoltaic array. A variable frequency DC-AC converter steps up the voltage to drive the 15 horsepower compressor motor. On site storage is available for up to 14,000 standard cubic feet (SCF) of solar hydrogen, and up to 80,000 SCF of commercial hydrogen. The project is 3 miles from Los Angeles International airport. The engine conversions are bored to 2.9 liter displacement and are supercharged. Performance is similar to that of the Ranger gasoline powered truck. Fuel is stored in carbon composite tanks (just behind the driver`s cab) at pressures up to 3600 psi. Truck range is 144 miles, given 3600 psi of hydrogen. The engine operates in lean burn mode, with nil CO and HC emissions. NO{sub x} emissions vary with load and rpm in the range from 10 to 100 ppm, yielding total emissions at a small fraction of the ULEV standard. Two trucks have been converted for the Xerox fleet, and one for the City of West Hollywood. A public outreach program, done in conjunction with the local public schools and the Department of Energy, introduces the local public to the advantages of hydrogen fuel technologies. The Clean Air Now program demonstrates that hydrogen powered fleet development is an appropriate, safe, and effective strategy for improvement of urban air quality, energy security and avoidance of global warming impact. Continued technology development and cost reduction promises to make such implementation market competitive.

Provenzano, J.: Scott, P.B.; Zweig, R. [Clean Air Now, Northridge, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Project Information Form Project Title Reducing Truck Emissions and Improving Truck Fuel Economy via ITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Information Form Project Title Reducing Truck Emissions and Improving Truck Fuel Economy new traffic flow and traffic light control concepts with respect to emissions and fuel economy. Some

California at Davis, University of

117

Tipagornwong and Figliozzi 1 An Analysis of the Competitiveness of Freight Tricycle Delivery Services in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Freight tricycles, also known as electric- assisted trikes, are low-emissions vehicles powered by a combination of human effort and an electric engine. This research develops a cost model incorporating vehicle of freight tricycles, low-capacity freight delivery vehicles, as compared to diesel vans in urban areas

Bertini, Robert L.

118

Emission Controls for Heavy-Duty Trucks  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DEER Conference Emission Controls for Heavy-Duty Trucks Overview Emission Standards - US and Worldwide Technology Options for Meeting Emissions System Integration ...

119

Trucking | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) JumpCorpDist JumpTrucking Home

120

SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in 2005 SCR Systems for Heavy Duty Trucks: Progress Towards Meeting Euro 4 Emission Standards in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving cycles and interstate roads Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving...

122

NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

123

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of most line-haul class 8 trucks. Ballard Nexa Fuel Cell Thefuel cell powered auxiliary power units (APUs) to reduce idling in line-haul trucks.

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: SuperTruck Program...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review Presentation given by Detroit Diesel Corporation...

125

Thermoelectric Generator Development at Renault Trucks-Volvo...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Trucks-Volvo Group Reviews project to study the potential of thermoelectricity for diesel engines of trucks and passenger cars, where relatively low exhaust temperature is...

126

NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines - Testing and Simulation This report provides the results of an...

127

Ten Years of Development Experience with Advanced Light Truck...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ten Years of Development Experience with Advanced Light Truck Diesel Engines Ten Years of Development Experience with Advanced Light Truck Diesel Engines 2004 Diesel Engine...

128

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins SuperTruck...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins SuperTruck Program Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks...

129

Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk...

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Assessment of Out-of-State Heavy-Duty Truck Activity Trends In California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California-registered long-haul trucks that travel throughreferred to as “long haul” trucks. These trucks tend to beto include both “long haul” trucks and trucks that operate

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At present, nearly 80% of US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle research and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership and the SuperTruck development effort. Both of these efforts have the common goal of decreasing the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles. In the case of SuperTruck, a goal of improving the overall freight efficiency of a combination tractor-trailer has been established. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency; it is unique in that there is no other existing national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks based on collecting data from Class 6 and 7 vehicles. It involves the collection of real-world data on medium trucks for various situational characteristics (e.g., rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips). This research provides a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for FE and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involved a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles each from two vocations (urban transit and dry-box delivery) were instrumented for the collection of one year of operational data. The Part-2 FOT involved the towing and recovery and utility vocations for a second year of data collection. The vehicles that participated in the MTDC project did so through gratis partnerships in return for early access to the results of this study. Partnerships such as these are critical to FOTs in which real-world data is being collected. In Part 1 of the project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established partnerships with the H.T. Hackney Company (HTH), one of the largest wholesale distributors in the country, distributing products to 21 states; and with Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), the city of Knoxville s transit system, which operates across Knoxville and parts of Knox County. These partnerships and agreements provided ORNL access to three Class-7 day-cab tractors that regularly haul 28 ft pup trailers (HTH) and three Class-7 buses for the collection of duty cycle data. In addition, ORNL collaborated with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to determine if there were possible synergies between this duty cycle data collection effort and FMCSA s need to learn more about the operation and duty cycles of medium trucks. FMCSA s primary interest was in collecting safety data relative to the driver, carrier, and vehicle. In Part 2 of the project, ORNL partnered with the Knoxville Utilities Board, which made available three Class-8 trucks. Fountain City Wrecker Service was also a Part 2 partner, providing three Class-6 rollback trucks. In order to collect the duty cycle and safety-related data, ORNL developed a data acquisition system (DAS) that was placed on each test vehicle. Each signal recorded in this FOT was collected by means of one of the instruments incorporated into each DAS. Other signals were obtained directly from the vehicle s J1939 and J1708 data buses. A VBOX II Lite collected information available from a global positioning system (GPS), including speed, acceleration, and spatial location information at a rate of 5 Hz for the Part 1

Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Thomas, Neil [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Knee, Helmut E [ORNL

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

William W. Hay Railroad Engineering Seminar Freight Railroad Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(importance v difficulties) North American freight RRs (defining characteristics) Energy density of diesel fuel & alternatives (Btu's per gallon) Biodiesel, Fischer-Tropsch syn fuel & DME Liquefied natural of European RRs (lessons learned) Dual-mode locomotives ("electro-diesels") Unconventional alternatives

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

134

Optimizing the Aerodynamic Efficiency of IM Freight Trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimizing the Aerodynamic Efficiency of IM Freight Trains Yung-Cheng Lai University of Illinois aerodynamic penalties and fuel consumption than general trains IM trains suffer from their equipment design and loading pattern These large gaps directly affect the aerodynamic drag of the train. This effect is greater

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

135

Optimizing the aerodynamic efficiency of intermodal freight trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimizing the aerodynamic efficiency of intermodal freight trains Yung-Cheng Lai a,*, Christopher form 24 April 2007; accepted 17 May 2007 Abstract We develop an aerodynamic loading assignment model fuel-efficient trains. This is the first use of optimization modeling to address the aerodynamics

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

136

Freight/logistics symposium ..2 Airport guidebook...................3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Freight/logistics symposium ..2 · Airport guidebook...................3 · State Fair exhibit Administration in Boston, is charged with improving the nation's transpor- tation system through collaborations between the USDOT and other federal, state, local, and international agencies and entities. "This

Minnesota, University of

137

Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Brent Bailey; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study - Energy Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - EventsNEET Benefits

139

Simulated fuel economy and emissions performance during city and interstate driving for a heavy-duty hybrid truck  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare simulated fuel economy and emissions for both conventional and hybrid class 8 heavy-duty diesel trucks operating over multiple urban and highway driving cycles. Both light and heavy freight loads were considered, and all simulations included full aftertreatment for NOx and particulate emissions controls. The aftertreatment components included a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), urea-selective catalytic NOx reduction (SCR), and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Our simulated hybrid powertrain was configured with a pre-transmission parallel drive, with a single electric motor between the clutch and gearbox. A conventional HD truck with equivalent diesel engine and aftertreatment was also simulated for comparison. Our results indicate that hybridization can significantly increase HD fuel economy and improve emissions control in city driving. However, there is less potential hybridization benefit for HD highway driving. A major factor behind the reduced hybridization benefit for highway driving is that there are fewer opportunities to utilize regenerative breaking. Our aftertreatment simulations indicate that opportunities for passive DPF regeneration are much greater for both hybrid and conventional trucks during highway driving due to higher sustained exhaust temperatures. When passive DPF regeneration is extensively utilized, the fuel penalty for particulate control is virtually eliminated, except for the 0.4%-0.9% fuel penalty associated with the slightly higher exhaust backpressure.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Estimating commercial truck VMT (vehicle miles of travel) of interstate motor carriers: Data evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This memorandum summarizes the evaluation results of six data sources in terms of their ability to estimate the number of commercial trucks operating in interstate commerce and their vehicle miles of travel (VMT) by carrier type and by state. The six data sources are: (1) Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) from the Bureau of the Census, (2) nationwide truck activity and commodity survey (NTACS) from the Bureau of the Census, (3) National Truck Trip Information Survey (NTTIS) from the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), (4) highway performance monitoring system (HPMS) from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Department of Transportation, (5) state fuel tax reports from each individual state and the international fuel tax agreement (IFTA), and (6) International Registration Plan (IRP) of the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA). TIUS, NTACS, and NTTIS are designed to provide data on the physical and operational characteristics of the Nation's truck population (or sub-population); HPMS is implemented to collect information on the physical and usage characteristics of various highway systems; and state fuel tax reports and IRP are tax-oriented registrations. 16 figs., 13 tabs.

Hu, P.S.; Wright, T.; Miaou, Shaw-Pin; Beal, D.J.; Davis, S.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.

Freese, Charlie

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Natural Gas as a Fuel for Heavy Trucks: Issues and Incentives (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Alternative fuel trucks case studies: Running line-haul trucks on ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin describes case studies of trucks operating on ethanol fuel. Cost, maintenance and repair, as well as fuel economy are discussed.

Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Marek, N.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

In-Cab Air Quality of Trucks Air Conditioned and Kept in Electrified Truck Stop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At night, long-haul truck drivers rest inside the cabins of their vehicles. Therefore, the in-cab air quality while air conditioning (A/C) is being provided can be a great concern to the drivers health. The effect of using different A/C methods [truck's A/C, auxiliary power unit (APU), and truck stop electrification (TSE) unit] on in-cab air quality of a heavy-duty diesel vehicle was investigated at an electrified truck stop in the El Paso, Texas, area. The research team measured the in-cabin and the ambient air quality adjacent to the parked diesel truck as well as emissions from the truck and an APU while it was providing A/C. The measured results were compared and analyzed. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the TSE unit provided better in-cab air quality while supplying A/C. Furthermore, the truck and APU exhaust emissions were measured, and fuel consumption of the truck (while idling) and the APU (during operation) were compared. The results led to the finding that emissions from the APU were less than those from the truck's engine idling, but the APU consumed more fuel than the engine while providing A/C under given conditions.

Lee, Doh-Won [Texas Transportation Institute; Zietsman, Josias [Texas Transportation Institute; Farzaneh, Mohamadreza [Texas Transportation Institute; Li, Wen-Whai [University of Texas, El Paso; Olvera, Hector [University of Texas, El Paso; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Kranendonk, Laura [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Slow speed object detection for haul trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

NONE

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Water by truck in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply of water to urban households by tanker truck in developing and advanced developing countries is often associated with early stages of urbanization or with the private markets on which water vendors serve households ...

Pike, Jill (Jill Susan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

None

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

None

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

FedEx Freight Delivers on Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

by Latham, NY -based Plug Power. Refueling equipment and hydrogen will be supplied by Air Products of Allentown, PA. The forklift conversion project illustrates FedEx Freight's...

150

Promoting technological investment in the Australian rail freight sector: evaluating the feasibility of accelerated depreciation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Although regulation for emissions, pollution, etc., is becoming stricter, the Australian rail freight industry is still locked in to using large numbers of existing rolling… (more)

Koowattanatianchai, Nattawoot

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytic intermodal freight Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: these were given the highest priority in the simulations. Of the freight trains considered, intermodal trains... . For example we use "intermodal" as shorthand to...

152

Health Impacts of Moving Freight In and Out of the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Health Impacts of Port-Related Freight Movement in aMoving Freight In and Out of the Ports of Long Beach and LosISSUE The San Pedro Bay Port (SPBP) of Los Angeles and Long

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Health Impacts of Moving Freight In and Our of the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Health Impacts of Port-Related Freight Movement in aMoving Freight In and Out of the Ports of Long Beach and LosISSUE The San Pedro Bay Port (SPBP) of Los Angeles and Long

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Caterpillar Light Truck Clean Diesel Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, light trucks accounted for over 48% of new vehicle sales in the U.S. and well over half the new Light Duty vehicle fuel consumption. The Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) program seeks to introduce large numbers of advanced technology diesel engines in light-duty trucks that would improve their fuel economy (mpg) by at least 50% and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil. Incorporating diesel engines in this application represents a high-risk technical and economic challenge. To meet the challenge, a government-industry partnership (Department of Energy, diesel engine manufacturers, and the automotive original equipment manufacturers) is applying joint resources to meet specific goals that will provide benefits to the nation. [1] Caterpillar initially teamed with Ford Motor Company on a 5 year program (1997-2002) to develop prototype vehicles that demonstrate a 50% fuel economy improvement over the current 1997 gasoline powered light truck vehicle in this class while complying with EPA's Tier II emissions regulations. The light truck vehicle selected for the demonstration is a 1999 Ford F150 SuperCab. To meet the goals of the program, the 4.6 L V-8 gasoline engine in this vehicle will be replaced by an advanced compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engine. Key elements of the Caterpillar LTCD program plan to develop the advanced CIDI engine are presented in this paper.

Robert L. Miller; Kevin P. Duffy; Michael A. Flinn; Steve A. Faulkner; Mike A. Graham

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessment of Out-of-State Heavy-Duty Truck Activity Trends In California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

haul” trucks. These trucks tend to be the newest (median model year of 2004), have higher average fuel economy,

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

An Econometrics Analysis of Freight Rail Demand Growth in Albert Wijeweera a, *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 An Econometrics Analysis of Freight Rail Demand Growth in Australia Albert Wijeweera a, * , Hong of non-bulk freight demand in Australia. The paper uses a simple but robust econometrics method this growth at about four per cent per year (BTRE, 2006). The econometric model used herein enables us

157

Two algorithms for the sorting of unknown train vibration signals into freight and passenger train  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two algorithms for the sorting of unknown train vibration signals into freight and passenger train in particular. To facilitate this, two algorithms have been constructed with the aim of sorting unknown train vibration signals into freight and passenger train categories so that they can be further analysed. 307

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

158

RELATIONSHIP BUILDING WITH FREIGHT RAILROADS CRITICAL TO SUPPORT INTERCITY PASSENGER RAIL DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 million (2011) 93% of Amtrak's approximately 21,000 route system utilizes freight railroad owned Relationship between freight railroads and governments remains highly combative HOW CAN GOVERNMENT ENHANCE animosity; address issues through established relationships and dialog over regulation Generate Utility

Illinois at Chicago, University of

159

Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

Milam, David

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turning moments around curved track, wear of truck components, and increased detrimental dynamic effects. The recommended improvement of the rail truck interface is a set of two steel inserts, one concave and one convex, that can be retrofit to center...

Story, Brett Alan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fact #787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle Fuel Consumption Fact 787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle Fuel Consumption The U.S. Department of...

163

Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Partners  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The 21st Century Truck Partnership is an industry-government collaboration among heavy-duty engine manufacturers, medium-duty and heavy-duty truck and bus manufacturers, heavy-duty hybrid...

164

Hamilton Truck Route Study Prepared for the City of Hamilton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hamilton Truck Route Study Prepared for the City of Hamilton March 2012 #12;#12;Hamilton Truck and Logistics McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario March 2012 mitl.mcmaster.ca #12;#12;McMaster Institute

Haykin, Simon

165

Curbside eating : mobilizing food trucks to activate public space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past 5 years, cities across the United States have seen the rise of a new form of street vending: the modern food truck. Nearly overnight, food trucks have become an expected and anticipated occurrence in many ...

Sheppard, Alison Marguerite

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Examining factors affecting the safety performance and design of exclusive truck facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models were developed for truck-related (involving at least one truck and another vehicle), truck-only (two trucks or more) and single-truck crashes. The results suggested that the percentage of trucks in Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT...

Iragavarapu, Vichika

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

1.221J / 11.527J / ESD.201J Transportation Systems, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduces transportation as a large-scale, integrated system that interacts directly with the social, political, and economic aspects of contemporary society. Fundamental elements and issues shaping passenger and freight ...

Sussman, Joseph

168

Driving Pattern Recognition for Control of Hybrid Electric Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving Pattern Recognition for Control of Hybrid Electric Trucks CHAN-CHIAO LIN1 , SOONIL JEON2 strategy is to minimize fuel consumption and engine-out NOx and PM emissions on a set of diversified trucks. The 21st Century Truck program in the US, spearheaded by two government agencies, Department

Peng, Huei

169

Physiology and behaviour of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts during commercial land and sea transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transported to sea cage sites using a combination of trailer trucks and live-haul sea vessels (British Smoltification Commercial transport Transport stress Live-haul Cortisol Schooling behaviour This study examined freshwater farms to saltwater net pens. Smolts were transported by truck in closed tanks from two freshwater

Farrell, Anthony P.

170

International Experience in Transportation Analysis and Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Agency for International Development A team of researchers toured ports and land transport facilities

171

Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial...

Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fire Department Gets New Trucks, Saves Money  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. – Last year, the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) set out to replace its aging chemical truck used for metal fires. Originally purchased to respond to potential incidents at the Fast Flux Test Facility, the 31-year-old vehicle was at the end of its lifecycle.

173

Examining factors affecting the safety performance and design of exclusive truck facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were used to establish a relationship between truck crashes and various environmental, geometric and traffic variables. Separate models were developed for truck-related (involving at least one truck and another vehicle), truck-only (two trucks... Table 1: Proposed selection criterion for truck treatments (Middleton et al., 2006).......... 7 Table 2: Revised design vehicle dimensions to accommodate trucks in roadway design (Harwood et al., 2003...

Iragavarapu, Vichika

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional truck; the hydrogen fuel cell truck can improveconventional truck; the hydrogen fuel cell truck can improveLNG engines, fuel cell vehicles using hydrogen, and battery

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER AND TRUCK TEST SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study continues the modeling support of the SNL shaker table task from 2013 and includes analysis of the SNL 2014 truck test campaign. Detailed finite element models of the fuel assembly surrogate used by SNL during testing form the basis of the modeling effort. Additional analysis was performed to characterize and filter the accelerometer data collected during the SNL testing. The detailed fuel assembly finite element model was modified to improve the performance and accuracy of the original surrogate fuel assembly model in an attempt to achieve a closer agreement with the low strains measured during testing. The revised model was used to recalculate the shaker table load response from the 2013 test campaign. As it happened, the results remained comparable to the values calculated with the original fuel assembly model. From this it is concluded that the original model was suitable for the task and the improvements to the model were not able to bring the calculated strain values down to the extremely low level recorded during testing. The model needs more precision to calculate strains that are so close to zero. The truck test load case had an even lower magnitude than the shaker table case. Strain gage data from the test was compared directly to locations on the model. Truck test strains were lower than the shaker table case, but the model achieved a better relative agreement of 100-200 microstrains (or 0.0001-0.0002 mm/mm). The truck test data included a number of accelerometers at various locations on the truck bed, surrogate basket, and surrogate fuel assembly. This set of accelerometers allowed an evaluation of the dynamics of the conveyance system used in testing. It was discovered that the dynamic load transference through the conveyance has a strong frequency-range dependency. This suggests that different conveyance configurations could behave differently and transmit different magnitudes of loads to the fuel even when travelling down the same road at the same speed. It is recommended that the SNL conveyance system used in testing be characterized through modal analysis and frequency response analysis to provide context and assist in the interpretation of the strain data that was collected during the truck test campaign.

Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Hanson, Brady D.

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

The U. S. transportation sector in the year 2030: results of a two-part Delphi survey.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-part Delphi Survey was given to transportation experts attending the Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy in August, 2011. The survey asked respondents about trends in the US transportation sector in 2030. Topics included: alternative vehicles, high speed rail construction, rail freight transportation, average vehicle miles traveled, truck versus passenger car shares, vehicle fuel economy, and biofuels in different modes. The survey consisted of two rounds -- both asked the same set of seven questions. In the first round, respondents were given a short introductory paragraph about the topic and asked to use their own judgment in their responses. In the second round, the respondents were asked the same questions, but were also given results from the first round as guidance. The survey was sponsored by Argonne National Lab (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and implemented by University of California at Davis, Institute of Transportation Studies. The survey was part of the larger Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project run by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Of the 206 invitation letters sent, 94 answered all questions in the first round (105 answered at least one question), and 23 of those answered all questions in the second round. 10 of the 23 second round responses were at a discussion section at Asilomar, while the remaining were online. Means and standard deviations of responses from Round One and Two are given in Table 1 below. One main purpose of Delphi surveys is to reduce the variance in opinions through successive rounds of questioning. As shown in Table 1, the standard deviations of 25 of the 30 individual sub-questions decreased between Round One and Round Two, but the decrease was slight in most cases.

Morrison, G.; Stephens, T.S. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of California at Davis); (ES)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DiggFederalNationalandElectric-driveMobile Truck Stop

178

Estimation of economic impact of freight distribution due to highway closure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main aim of this study is to provide a theoretical framework and methodology to estimate and analyze the economic impact of freight disruption due to highway closure. The costs in this study will be classified into ...

Hu, Shiyin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Lubbock Metropolitan Transportation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and its predecessors, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991, specified the transportation systems on which certain federal funds can... in Chapter 5 ? Streets and Highways; Chapter 6 ? Public Transportation; Chapter 7 ? Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan; Chapter 8 ? Lubbock International Airport and Chapter 9 ? Railroads and Trucking. Federally funded transit projects were developed...

Lubbock Metropolitan Planning Organization

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effect of Weight and Roadway Grade on the Fuel Economy of Class-8 Frieght Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006-08, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in collaboration with several industry partners, collected real-world performance and situational data for long-haul operations of Class-8 trucks from a fleet engaged in normal freight operations. Such data and information are useful to support Class-8 modeling of combination truck performance, technology evaluation efforts for energy efficiency, and to provide a means of accounting for real-world driving performance within combination truck research and analyses. The present study used the real-world information collected in that project to analyze the effects that vehicle speed and vehicle weight have on the fuel efficiency of Class-8 trucks. The analysis focused on two type of terrains, flat (roadway grades ranging from -1% to 1%) and mild uphill terrains (roadway grades ranging from 1% to 3%), which together covered more than 70% of the miles logged in the 2006-08 project (note: almost 2/3 of the distance traveled on mild uphill terrains was on terrains with 1% to 2% grades). In the flat-terrain case, the results of the study showed that for light and medium loads, fuel efficiency decreases considerably as speed increases. For medium-heavy and heavy loads (total vehicle weight larger than 65,000 lb), fuel efficiency tends to increase as the vehicle speed increases from 55 mph up to about 58-60 mph. For speeds higher than 60 mph, fuel efficiency decreases at an almost constant rate with increasing speed. At any given speed, fuel efficiency decreases and vehicle weight increases, although the relationship between fuel efficiency and vehicle weight is not linear, especially for vehicle weights above 65,000 lb. The analysis of the information collected while the vehicles were traveling on mild upslope terrains showed that the fuel efficiency of Class-8 trucks decreases abruptly with vehicle weight ranging from light loads up to medium-heavy loads. After that, increases in the vehicle weight only decrease fuel efficiency slightly. Fuel efficiency also decreases significantly with speed, but only for light and medium loads. For medium-heavy and heavy, FE is almost constant for speeds ranging from 57 to about 66 mph. For speeds higher than 66 mph, the FE decreases with speed, but at a lower rate than for light and medium loads. Statistical analyses that compared the fuel efficiencies obtained when the vehicles were traveling at 59 mph vs. those achieved when they were traveling at 65 mph or 70 mph indicated that the former were, on average, higher than the latter. This result was statistically significant at the 99.9% confidence level (note: the Type II error i.e., the probability of failing to reject the null hypothesis when the alternative hypothesis is true was 18% and 6%, respectively).

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Davidson, Diane [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Contracting Rail Freight Services for Country Elevators in the Texas Panhandle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rooe ZTA245.7 B873 r\\O. 1473 -.-_ LIBRARY B-1473 JUDe 1984 JUL 27 1984 Co Rail Freight Services for Country Elevators in the Texas Panhandle The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Neville P. Clarke, Director, The Texas A&M University... ............................................................... 14 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ........................................................... 14 CONTRACTING RAIL FREIGHT-SERVICES FOR COUNTRY ELEVATORS IN THE TEXAS PANHANDLE Stephen Fuller Department of Agricultural Economics Texas Agricultural Experiment...

Fuller, Stephen

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Scheduling Direct and Indirect Trains and Containers in an Intermodal Setting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transportation to compete effectively with long-haul trucking. To improve the scheduling and coordination transportation consists of combining modes, usually ship, truck, or rail to transport freight. The focus of our research is on rail transpor- tation of intermodal containers for the long-haul portion of their journey

184

SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program: Engine Project Review SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

185

NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Program Review Presentation NJ COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS REFUSE TRUCKS, SHUTTLE BUSES AND INFRASTRUCTURE Chuck Feinberg, Principal Investigator New Jersey Clean...

186

WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for...

187

21st Century Truck Partnership Roadmap Roadmap and Technical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Roadmap Roadmap and Technical White Papers - 21CTP-0003, December 2006 21st Century Truck Partnership Roadmap Roadmap and Technical White Papers - 21CTP-0003, December 2006 Report...

188

21st Century Truck Partnership - Roadmap and Technical White...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Roadmap and Technical White Papers Appendix of Supporting Information - 21CTP-0003, December 2006 21st Century Truck Partnership - Roadmap and Technical White Papers Appendix of...

189

Rollover analysis of rotary mode core sampler truck No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides estimate of limiting speed and rollover analysis of rotary mode core sampler truck No. 2 (RMCST No. 2).

Ziada, H.H.

1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra Kevin Craft What does this mean for me? Smith Electric Vehicles included in Vice President's report on 100 Recovery Act Projects...

191

Very High Fuel Economy, Heavy Duty Truck, Narrow Range Speed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heavy Duty Truck, Narrow Range Speed Engine, Optimized Via Unique Energy Recovery Turbines and Facilitated by High Efficiency Continuously Variable Drivetrain Very High Fuel...

192

Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drayage Truck Replacement Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Drayage Truck Replacement Program Principal Investigator: Vicki White South Coast Air Quality Management District May 16, 2012 Project ID ARRAVT045 This...

193

High Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information ACE060 High Fuel Economy Heavy Duty Truck Engine Overview Timeline October 2007 - October 2011 Barriers...

194

Zero Emission Heavy Duty Drayage Truck Demonstration | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Zero Emission Heavy Duty Drayage Truck Demonstration 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

195

Truck Essential Power Systems Efficiency Improvements for Medium-Duty Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a variety of hybrid vehicles available in the passenger car market, electric technologies and components of that scale are becoming readily available. Commercial vehicle segments have lagged behind passenger car markets, leaving opportunities for component and system development. Escalating fuel prices impact all markets and provide motivation for OEMs, suppliers, customers, and end-users to seek new techniques and technologies to deliver reduced fuel consumption. The research presented here specifically targets the medium-duty (MD), Class 4-7, truck market with technologies aimed at reducing fuel consumption. These technologies could facilitate not only idle, but also parasitic load reductions. The development efforts here build upon the success of the More Electric Truck (MET) demonstration program at Caterpillar Inc. Employing a variety of electric accessories, the MET demonstrated the improvement seen with such technologies on a Class 8 truck. The Truck Essential Power Systems Efficiency Improvements for Medium-Duty Trucks (TEPS) team scaled the concepts and successes of MET to a MD chassis. The team designed an integrated starter/generator (ISG) package and energy storage system (ESS), explored ways to replace belt and gear-driven accessory systems, and developed supervisory control algorithms to direct the usage of the generated electricity and system behavior on the vehicle. All of these systems needed to fit within the footprint of a MD vehicle and be compatible with the existing conventional systems to the largest extent possible. The overall goal of this effort was to demonstrate a reduction in fuel consumption across the drive cycle, including during idle periods, through truck electrification. Furthermore, the team sought to evaluate the benefits of charging the energy storage system during vehicle braking. The vehicle features an array of electric accessories facilitating on-demand, variable actuation. Removal of these accessories from the belt or geartrain of the engine yields efficiency improvements for the engine while freeing those accessories to perform at their individual peak efficiencies to meet instantaneous demand. The net result is a systems approach to fuel usage optimization. Unique control algorithms were specifically developed to capitalize on the flexibility afforded by the TEPS architecture. Moreover, the TEPS truck technology mixture exhibits a means to supplant current accessory power sources such as on-board or trailer-mounted gasoline-powered generators or air compressors. Such functionality further enhances the value of the electric systems beyond the fuel savings alone. To demonstrate the fuel economy improvement wrought via the TEPS components, vehicle fuel economy testing was performed on the nearly stock (baseline) truck and the TEPS truck. Table 1 illustrates the fuel economy gains produced by the TEPS truck electrification. While the fuel economy results shown in Table 1 do reflect specific test conditions, they show that electrification of accessory hardware can yield significant fuel savings. In this case, the savings equated to a 15 percent reduction in fuel consumption during controlled on-road testing. Truck electrification allows engine shutdown during idle conditions as well as independent on-demand actuation of accessory systems. In some cases, independent actuation may even include lack of operation, a feature not always present in mechanically driven components. This combination of attributes allows significant improvements in system efficiency and the fuel economy improvements demonstrated by the TEPS team.

Larry Slone; Jeffery Birkel

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Assessing the impact of regulation and deregulation on the rail and trucking industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) Many Class I railroads disappeared and severe competition bankrupted many small carriers in the trucking industry. Larger trucking carriers gained market dominance. Real wages in the trucking industry fell. The ...

Lowtan, Donavan M. (Donavan Mahees), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Roadmap and Technical White Papers for 21st Century Truck Partnership...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Roadmap and Technical White Papers for 21st Century Truck Partnership Roadmap and Technical White Papers for 21st Century Truck Partnership Roadmap document for 21st Century Truck...

198

DOE SuperTruck utilizes ORNL technology to boost fuel economy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Media Relations 865.574.4165 DOE SuperTruck utilizes ORNL technology to boost fuel economy DOE SuperTruck DOE SuperTruck (hi-res image) Listen to the audio The Department of...

199

Mechanical properties of radial truck tires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determination of static properties of tire load vs. tire deflection and tire load vs. tire footprint area for radial and wide base radial truck tires is described and results are discussed. Determination of transmissibility for a conventional radial and a... (right) 12 13 15 Figure 7: Sidewall bulge measurement 16 Figure 8: Load vs. deflection; 385/65R22. 5 wide base tire tested at 90 psi inflation pressure 20 Figure 9: Load vs. deflection; 385/65R22. 5 wide base tire tested at 100 psi inflation...

Wasti, Mansoor-ul-Hassan

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine: 2007 Emissions with Excellent Fuel Economy 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cummins Improving Pick-Up Truck Engine Efficiency with DOE and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

better fuel economy. | Photo courtesy of Cummins. Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and Cummins Collaboration Cummins Improving Pick-Up Truck...

202

Can the Trucking Industry Benefit From Distance-Based Fees?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capital cost: $129 billion (over 30 years); today's reconstruction cost estimate: $1.3 to $2.5 trillion trucks pay more · Neither trucks nor cars pay for most cost externalities · Estimated THF revenues: $32B and other highways Comments: · Initial capital and ongoing maintenance costs were paid for · The system

Minnesota, University of

203

Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF) Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the wholesaler/distributor level or below. This presents additional challenges in tracking untaxed fuel after approved ORNL's plan to conduct a Phase II Pilot Test titled Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale

204

Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Project Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At the present time, nearly 80% of the US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle truck research, and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership whose stretch goals involve a reduction by 50% of the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles on a ton-mile basis. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) Project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency and is unique in that there is no other national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks. It involves the collection of real-world data for various situational characteristics (rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather, etc.) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips), to provide a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for fuel efficiency and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support heavy vehicle energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involves a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles, each from two vocations (urban transit and dry-box delivery) were instrumented for one year of data collection. The Part-2 FOT will involve the towing/recovery and utility vocations. The vehicles participating in the MTDC project are doing so through gratis partnerships in return for early access to the results of this study. Partnerships such as these are critical to FOTs in which real-world data is being collected. In Part 1 of the project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL) established partnerships with the H.T. Hackney Company, one of the largest wholesale distributors in the country, distributing products to 21 states; and with the Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), the City of Knoxville s transit system, operating services across the city of Knoxville and parts of Knox co. These partnerships and agreements provided ORNL access to three Class-7 2005/2007 International day-cab tractors, model 8600, which regularly haul 28 ft pup trailers (H.T. Hackney Co) and three Class-7 2005 Optima LF-34 buses (KAT), for collection of duty cycle data. In addition, ORNL has collaborated with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to determine if there were possible synergies between this duty cycle data collection effort and FMCSA s need to learn more about the operation and duty cycles of the second-largest fuel consuming commercial vehicle category in the US. FMCSA s primary interest was in collecting safety data relative to the driver, carrier, and vehicle. In order to collect the duty cycle and safety-related data, ORNL developed a data acquisition and wireless communication system that was placed on each test vehicle. Each signal recorded in this FOT was collected by means of one of the instruments incorporated into each data acquisition system (DAS). Native signals were obtained directly from the vehicle s J1939 and J1708 data buses. A VBOX II Lite collected Global Positioning System related information including speed, acceleration, and spatial location information at a rate of 5 Hz, and communicated this data via the CAN (J1939) protocol. The Air-Weigh LoadMaxx, a self-weighing system which determines the vehicle s gross weight by means of pressure transducers and posts the weight to the vehicle s J1939 data bus, was used to collect vehicle payload information. A cellular modem, the Raven X

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Anti-Idling Battery for Truck Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance to the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001036, the objective of this project was to develop an advanced high voltage lithium-ion battery for use in an all-electric HVAC system for Class-7-8 heavy duty trucks. This system will help heavy duty truck drivers meet the tough new anti-idling laws being implemented by over 23 states. Quallion will be partnering with a major OEM supplier of HVAC systems to develop this system. The major OEM supplier will provide Quallion the necessary interface requirements and HVAC hardware to ensure successful testing of the all-electric system. At the end of the program, Quallion will deliver test data on three (3) batteries as well as test data for the prototype HVAC system. The objectives of the program are: (1) Battery Development - Objective 1 - Define battery and electronics specifications in preparation for building the prototype module. (Completed - summary included in report) and Objective 2 - Establish a functional prototype battery and characterize three batteries in-house. (Completed - photos and data included in report); (2) HVAC Development - Objective 1 - Collaborate with manufacturers to define HVAC components, layout, and electronics in preparation for establishing the prototype system. (Completed - photos and data included in report) and Objective 2 - Acquire components for three functional prototypes for use by Quallion. (Completed - photos and data included in report).

Keith Kelly

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Freight mode choice : air transport versus ocean transport in the 1990's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Value density is often considered when considering the choice whether to ship cargo by air or by water. However, although cargo value is directly linked to the overall cost of shipment, it is the deciding factor in mode ...

Lewis, Dale B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTrainingTransportationsearchDEMAND

208

Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation in ancient Egypt entailed the use of boats2007 Land transport in Roman Egypt: A study of economics andDieter 1991 Building in Egypt: Pharaonic stone masonry. New

Vinson, Steve

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

CONTAINER MOVEMENT BY TRUCKS IN METROPOLITAN NETWORKS: MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Maged Dessouky , Petros Ioannou , and Anastasios Chassiakos * Department of Electrical Engineering Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0193 *** College of Engineering/LB) twin ports, the U.S. largest ocean freight hub and busiest container port complex, has been quite

Dessouky, Maged

210

QER Public Meeting in Chicago, IL: Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans | Department of Energy20

211

Agenda: Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAboutSheet,ProposedEnergySITING Agenda:Energy

212

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCHThermalPlug-inTexasFleetBiodiesel

213

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Long-Haul Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Long-Haul Trucks Modeling and Control Mohammad fuel ce · SOFC based truck APU will reduce long haul truck fuel usage and dependence on foreign oil Long-haul trucks require electrical power to operate lights, heating/air conditioning and televisions

214

Selection of Light Duty Truck Engine Air Systems Using Virtual Lab Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated development approach using seasoned engine technology methodologies, virtual lab parametric investigations, and selected hardware verification tests reflects today's state-of-the-art R&D trends. This presentation will outline such a strategy. The use of this ''Wired'' approach results in substantial reduction in the development cycle time and hardware iterations. An example showing the virtual lab application for a viable design of the air-exhaust-turbocharger system of a light duty truck engine for personal transportation will be presented.

Zhang, Houshun

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

Supercomputers, Semi Trucks and America's Clean Energy Future...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

South Carolina and Georgia, the BMI corporation, has used the Jaguar to develop some aerodynamic components that can be attached to the undercarriage of a semi truck to reduce wind...

216

Dual-Fuel Truck Fleet: Start-Up Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although dual-fuel engine technology has been in development and limited use for several years, it has only recently moved toward full-scale operational capability for heavy-duty truck applications. Unlike a bifuel engine, which has two separate fuel systems that are used one at a time, a dual-fuel engine uses two fuel systems simultaneously. One of California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) current programs is a demonstration of dual-fuel engine technology in heavy-duty trucks. These trucks are being studied as part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Alternative Fuel Truck Program. This report describes the start-up experience from the program.

NREL

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performed a study on PEM fuel cell APUs. Based upon previousConsiderations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU Davidsuccessfully demonstrated a PEM fuel cell APU on a Century

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Plus, it's compliant with new emissions standards -- an important element in cutting our air pollution in the U.S. If all light trucks and SUVs used an engine like this, Americans...

219

Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 2013 (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64% of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12% of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12%) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9%).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act: Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Packs and Hydrogen Refueling for Lift Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEB Grocery Company, Inc. (H-E-B) is a privately-held supermarket chain with 310 stores throughout Texas and northern Mexico. H-E-B converted 14 of its lift reach trucks to fuel cell power using Nuvera Fuel Cells’ PowerEdge™ units to verify the value proposition and environmental benefits associated with the technology. Issues associated with the increasing power requirements of the distribution center operation, along with high ambient temperature in the summer and other operating conditions (such as air quality and floor surface condition), surfaced opportunities for improving Nuvera’s PowerEdge fuel cell system design in high-throughput forklift environments. The project included on-site generation of hydrogen from a steam methane reformer, called PowerTap™ manufactured by Nuvera. The hydrogen was generated, compressed and stored in equipment located outside H-E-B’s facility, and provided to the forklifts by hydrogen dispensers located in high forklift traffic areas. The PowerEdge fuel cell units logged over 25,300 operating hours over the course of the two-year project period. The PowerTap hydrogen generator produced more than 11,100 kg of hydrogen over the same period. Hydrogen availability at the pump was 99.9%. H-E-B management has determined that fuel cell forklifts help alleviate several issues in its distribution centers, including truck operator downtime associated with battery changing, truck and battery maintenance costs, and reduction of grid electricity usage. Data collected from this initial installation demonstrated a 10% productivity improvement, which enabled H-E-B to make economic decisions on expanding the fleet of PowerEdge and PowerTap units in the fleet, which it plans to undertake upon successful demonstration of the new PowerEdge reach truck product. H-E-B has also expressed interst in other uses of hydrogen produced on site in the future, such as for APUs used in tractor trailers and refrigerated transport trucks in its fleet.

Block, Gus

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Rail Focused US DOTRITA Tier I University Transportation Center University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. freight railroad system is one of the transportation success stories of the latter 20th and early 21st is a seven- university consortium led by the Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (Rail Engineering at UIUC. Christopher Barkan Center Director Conrad Ruppert, Jr. Associate Director for Research

Entekhabi, Dara

223

Transportation Outlook 2035: Creating a Blueprint for the Sherman-Denison Region's Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................................................... 61 7.1 Freight Transportation ....................................................................................................................................... 65 8.1 North Texas Regional Airport Share of Aircraft... days as small settlements in the Texoma region the cities of Sherman-Denison- VanAlstyne-Howe-Pottsboro fortunes have been tied to transportation. From historical roads, followed by railroads followed by, highways, and a county airport have all shaped...

Sherman-Denison Metropolitan Planning Organization

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

Simulations aimed at safer transport of explosives | Argonne...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Utah highway, brought on by a process called deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT), posed something of a mystery. The semi truck was transporting 8,400 cylinders of...

225

Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

THERMOELECTRICAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM THE EXHAUST OF A LIGHT TRUCK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team formed by Clarkson University is engaged in a project to design, build, model, test, and develop a plan to commercialize a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system for recovering energy from the exhaust of light trucks and passenger cars. Clarkson University is responsible for project management, vehicle interface design, system modeling, and commercialization plan. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (sub-contractor to Clarkson) is responsible for TEG design and construction. Delphi Corporation is responsible for testing services and engineering consultation and General Motors Corporation is responsible for providing the test vehicle and information about its systems. Funds were supplied by a grant from the Transportation Research Program of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), through Joseph R. Wagner. Members of the team and John Fairbanks (Project Manager, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology). Currently, the design of TEG has been completed and initial construction of the TEG has been initiated by Hi-Z. The TEG system consists of heat exchangers, thermoelectric modules and a power conditioning unit. The heat source for the TEG is the exhaust gas from the engine and the heat sink is the engine coolant. A model has been developed to simulate the performance of the TEG under varying operating conditions. Preliminary results from the model predict that up to 330 watts can be generated by the TEG which would increase fuel economy by 5 percent. This number could possibly increase to 20 percent with quantum-well technology. To assess the performance of the TEG and improve the accuracy of the modeling, experimental testing will be performed at Delphi Corporation. A preliminary experimental test plan is given. To determine the economic and commercial viability, a business study has been conducted and results from the study showing potential areas for TEG commercialization are discussed.

Karri, M; Thacher, E; Helenbrook, B; Compeau, M; Kushch, A; Elsner, N; Bhatti, M; O' Brien, J; Stabler, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Aerodynamic Analysis of Intermodal Freight Trains Using Machine Vision World Congress on Railway Research, May 22-26, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerodynamic Analysis of Intermodal Freight Trains Using Machine Vision 9 th World Congress. However, intermodal trains use rolling stock that generates significantly greater aerodynamic drag increases annual operating expenditures. There are opportunities to improve intermodal train aerodynamics

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

228

Productivity of the U.S. freight rail industry: a review of the past and prospects for the future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Productivity growth in the U.S. freight rail industry has slowed in recent years, raising the issue of the sustainability of the significant improvements achieved during the past three decades. Indeed, between 1979 and ...

Kriem, Youssef

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

Corbett, J.E.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power System of Diesel and WHR-ORC Engines A Quantum Leap for Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Efficiency - Hybrid Power...

231

Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Garrett...

232

Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

233

Ann Arbor's New Recycling Trucks Get an 'Assist' from Clean Cities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

four recycling trucks with hydraulic hybrid power systems implemented by Ohio-based Eaton Corporation. For these trucks, which make up to 1,200 stops each day, the Hydraulic...

234

Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck...

235

Project Startup: Evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing the project startup for evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 hybrid-electric delivery trucks.

Not Available

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Heavy-Duty Truck Idling Characteristics: Results from a Nationwide Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel consumption long-heul for trucks. CONCLUSIONS This study provides an enhanced understanding of long-haul

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Sperling, Dan; Oglesby, Carollyn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The market for large rigid haul trucks in surface mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Originally published in 2001 this updated report provides a definition of the market for large rigid haulers in surface mining. The analysis covers changes to the mining market segments buying these machines including the gains made by coal producers, retrenchment in copper mining, the consolidation taking place among gold mining companies, and the expansion of iron ore producers in Australia and Brazil. It includes a detailed accounting of 2001 truck shipments, and an analysis of trends in the Ultra-truck segment. It concludes with a revised forecast for shipments through 2006. 12 charts, 56 tabs., 2 apps.

Gilewicz, P.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Road Weather and Transportation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whiteout http://youtu.be/x9d5BcXq_7Q Wind vs. Trucks http://youtu.be/vA16ivK6iDI #12;#12;What should ­ Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) ­ Connected Vehicles ­ Autonomous Vehicles #12;Intelligent

Bertini, Robert L.

239

Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis based on ELECTRE and AHP methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis on a case of freight transport between Paris and Marseille. Keywords: Supply chain, Environmental impacts with lower environmental impacts, such as rail and waterways. The dilemma here is that all motorized modes

Boyer, Edmond

240

ORNL/TM-2008/122 Class-8 Heavy Truck Duty Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................................2 1.1.2 Heavy Truck Long-Haul OperationsORNL/TM-2008/122 Class-8 Heavy Truck Duty Cycle Project Final Report December 2008 Prepared by Mary Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2008/122 Vehicle Systems Program CLASS-8 HEAVY TRUCK DUTY CYCLE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States 1013776 #12;#12;ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com www.epri.com Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA: 2008. 1013776. #12;#12;v PRODUCT

242

CoolCab: Reducing Thermal Loads in Long-Haul Trucks (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCab project tested and modeled the effects of several thermal-load reduction strategies applied to long-haul truck cabs. NREL partnered with two major truck manufacturers to evaluate three long-haul trucks at NREL's outdoor test facility in Golden, Colorado.

Not Available

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Truck Stop Electrification as a Strategy To Reduce Greenhouse Gases, Fuel Consumption and Pollutant Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Truck Stop Electrification as a Strategy To Reduce Greenhouse Gases, Fuel Consumption and Pollutant, Schneider, Lee, Bubbosh 2 ABSTRACT Extended truck idling is a very large source of fuel wastage, greenhouse, most long-haul truck drivers idle their vehicles for close to 10 hours per day to operate heating

244

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck Emissions in the Austin- San Marcos Area: August, HC, and NO to CO2 and to get percent opacity readings for heavy-duty diesel trucks with elevated. The fleet of these heavy-duty diesel trucks exhibits a distribution that is close to normal where the top 20

Denver, University of

245

The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road Emissions G A R Y A . B I S H O P , * J oxide from 5772 heavy-duty diesel trucks at five locations in the United States and Europe show slightly health risk (2). These and other factors have brought new attention to diesel truck emissions. Because

Denver, University of

246

TRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRB 08-1311 Link-Based Emission Factors for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Based on Real-World Data H and Zhai 1 ABSTRACT Heavy-duty diesel vehicles contribute a substantial fraction of nitrogen oxides unloaded trucks. Replacing diesel fuel with biodiesel fuel for heavy-duty trucks may reduce tailpipe

Frey, H. Christopher

247

Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler TinaContact-Information-Transmission SignTransport

248

The Diversification Effects on the Freight Forwarding Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. v NOMENCLATURE NVOCC Non-Vessel Operating/Owning Common Carrier CHB Custom House Brokerage 3PL Third Party Logistics vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... in transportation, ?entities that provide third party supply chain logistics services to achieve the desired goal of timely, safe and compliant delivery of the shipper?s goods through the international supply chain at the lowest practical cost,? are a necessity...

Greer, Britney 1990-

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Truck Technology Efficiency Assessment (TTEA) Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle data in order to quantify the fuel savings and emissions reduction potential of technologies climate change in transportation, and related environmental impacts. Drive Cycle Data Analysis to Evaluate Fuel and Emissions Benefits Drive cycle data (velocity, acceleration and elevation histories

250

RESULTSRESULTS Assisted in selection of APU mounting configuration on truck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subcomponents, using actual frame-rail data as vibration input from truck · Enabled measurement location Motion Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit (APU): Dynamic ModelingFuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit (APU@coe.eng.ua.edu OBJECTIVESOBJECTIVES ·Develop a computer model to predict the vibratory response of the fuel cell APU components ·Use

Carver, Jeffrey C.

251

DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) Program Final Caterpillar Public Report Light Truck Clean Diesel Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy and Caterpillar entered a Cooperative Agreement to develop compression ignition engine technology suitable for the light truck/SUV market. Caterpillar, in collaboration with a suitable commercialization partner, developed a new Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) engine technology to dramatically improve the emissions and performance of light truck engines. The overall program objective was to demonstrate engine prototypes by 2004, with an order of magnitude emission reduction while meeting challenging fuel consumption goals. Program emphasis was placed on developing and incorporating cutting edge technologies that could remove the current impediments to commercialization of CIDI power sources in light truck applications. The major obstacle to commercialization is emissions regulations with secondary concerns of driveability and NVH (noise, vibration and harshness). The target emissions levels were 0.05 g/mile NOx and 0.01 g/mile PM to be compliant with the EPA Tier 2 fleet average requirements of 0.07 g/mile and the CARB LEV 2 of 0.05 g/mile for NOx, both have a PM requirement of 0.01 g/mile. The program team developed a combustion process that fundamentally shifted the classic NOx vs. PM behavior of CIDI engines. The NOx vs. PM shift was accomplished with a form of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). The HCCI concept centers on appropriate mixing of air and fuel in the compression process and controlling the inception and rate of combustion through various means such as variable valve timing, inlet charge temperature and pressure control. Caterpillar has adapted an existing Caterpillar design of a single injector that: (1) creates the appropriate fuel and air mixture for HCCI, (2) is capable of a more conventional injection to overcome the low power density problems of current HCCI implementations, (3) provides a mixed mode where both the HCCI and conventional combustion are functioning in the same combustion cycle. Figure 1 illustrates the mixed mode injection system. Under the LTCD program Caterpillar developed a mixed mode injector for a multi-cylinder engine system. The mixed mode injection system represents a critical enabling technology for the implementation of HCCI. In addition, Caterpillar implemented variable valve system technology and air system technology on the multi-cylinder engine platform. The valve and air system technology were critical to system control. Caterpillar developed the combustion system to achieve a 93% reduction in NOx emissions. The resulting NOx emissions were 0.12 gm/mile NOx. The demonstrated emissions level meets the stringent Tier 2 Bin 8 requirement without NOx aftertreatment! However, combustion development alone was not adequate to meet the program goal of 0.05gm/mile NOx. To meet the program goals, an additional 60% NOx reduction technology will be required. Caterpillar evaluated a number of NOx reduction technologies to quantify and understand the NOx reduction potential and system performance implications. The NOx adsorber was the most attractive NOx aftertreatment option based on fuel consumption and NOx reduction potential. In spite of the breakthrough technology development conducted under the LTCD program there remains many significant challenges associated with the technology configuration. For HCCI, additional effort is needed to develop a robust control strategy, reduce the hydrocarbon emissions at light load condition, and develop a more production viable fuel system. Furthermore, the NOx adsorber suffers from cost, packaging, and durability challenges that must be addressed.

Eric Fluga

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Environmental Baseline File: National Transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Baseline File summarizes and consolidates information related to the national-level transportation of commercial spent nuclear fuel. Topics address include: shipmnents of commercial spent nuclear fuel based on mostly truck and mostly rail shipping scenarios; transportation routing for commercial spent nuclear fuel sites and DOE sites; radionuclide inventories for various shipping container capacities; transportation routing; populations along transportation routes; urbanized area population densities; the impacts of historical, reasonably foreseeable, and general transportation; state-level food transfer factors; Federal Guidance Report No. 11 and 12 radionuclide dose conversion factors; and national average atmospheric conditions.

NONE

1999-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

253

Impact of logistical choices on freight transport carbon efficiency Rizet, Christophe; Cruz, Cecilia; De Lapparent Matthieu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variability of carbon intensity per shipment: from less than 0.01 to more than 100 kgCO2/tkm. We then analyse this carbon intensity per shipment according to two types of shipment characteristics: the shippers shipped to the same client). Using a log log model, where carbon intensity is a function

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

Behavioural insights into the Modelling of Freight Transportation and Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuelled the extension of supply chains and the globalization of the world economy. At the micro-step modelling paradigm cannot provide adequate answers in the twenty-first century global customer-driven economy. This special issue is dedicated to innovative modelling efforts that provide new insights

Bertini, Robert L.

255

Project Information Form Project Title Eco-Friendly Intelligent Transportation System Technology for Freight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions designed. In this project, the researchers will utilize port/roadway network microscopic models (specifically for the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles

California at Davis, University of

256

Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated over the 5-day test period, May 17-21, 2004. The runway slopes rather uniformly upward from north-to-south. Over the distance of 2424 meters between our two ''start'' markers at either end of the runway, the net change in elevation is a little over ten meters. Test results clearly show the greater fuel consumption required to lift the truck against gravity in the southbound direction For this reason, it is important that the tests be averaged over a round trip circuit--that is, a run in both directions over the identical portion of the roadway. Northbound-southbound averages require an overlap segment of the runway (near the middle of the runway) where the truck--starting from either end--has achieved its target speed. For the target truck speed of 60 mph, this overlap region is approximately 700 meters in length. Typically a run and the return run are accomplished within a time interval of 6 minutes. Analysis of the data show fuel consumption savings at all flap angle settings tested, when compared to the ''no flaps'' condition. The most beneficial flap angle appears to be 13 degrees, for which the fuel consumption is 0.3778 {+-} 0.0025 liters/km compared to the ''no flaps'' control of 0.3941 {+-} 0.0034 liters/km. The error bounds expressed above mark the 99% confidence interval in the mean values given. That is, additional estimates of the mean fuel consumption would be expected to lie within the bounds given, approximately 99% of the time. The fuel consumption saving is--to reasonable accuracy--about 1.63 liters/100 kilometers. These savings represent the increment associated only with the change in drag due to the presence or absence of flaps. The result will hold for any truck of similar size and shape and engine performance regardless of the loading of the truck or the rolling resistance. The economy achieved by use of base flaps can be compared to the economy resulting from driving two trucks in a tandem configuration. In December 2003, such fuel consumption tests were performed at the same Crows Landing testsite. In the tests, two identical trucks are ope

Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Fleet Deployment Projects Final Technical Report May 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this project were to evaluate the performance, operability and safety of fork lift trucks powered by fuel cells in large distribution centers. This was accomplished by replacing the batteries in over 350 lift trucks with fuel cells at five distribution centers operated by GENCO. The annual cost savings of lift trucks powered by fuel cell power units was between $2,400 and $5,300 per truck compared to battery powered lift trucks, excluding DOE contributions. The greatest savings were in fueling labor costs where a fuel cell powered lift truck could be fueled in a few minutes per day compared to over an hour for battery powered lift trucks which required removal and replacement of batteries. Lift truck operators where generally very satisfied with the performance of the fuel cell power units, primarily because there was no reduction in power over the duration of a shift as experienced with battery powered lift trucks. The operators also appreciated the fast and easy fueling compared to the effort and potential risk of injury associated with switching heavy batteries in and out of lift trucks. There were no safety issues with the fueling or operation of the fuel cells. Although maintenance costs for the fuel cells were higher than for batteries, these costs are expected to decrease significantly in the next generation of fuel cells, making them even more cost effective.

Klingler, James J [GENCO Infrastructure Solutions, Inc.] [GENCO Infrastructure Solutions, Inc.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Intermodal transportation of spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate.

Elder, H.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The ethanol heavy-duty truck fleet demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to test and demonstrate the use of a high- percentage ethanol-blended fuel in a fleet of heavy-duty, over-the- road trucks, paying particular attention to emissions, performance, and repair and maintenance costs. This project also represents the first public demonstration of the use of ethanol fuels as a viable alternative to conventional diesel fuel in heavy-duty engines.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Vehicle Technologies Office: 21st Century Truck Technical Goals and Teams  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fuel efficiency in heavy trucks depends on a number of factors associated with the truck and its components. The top figure shows the power use inventory for a basic Class 8 tractor-trailer combination, listing its balance of fuel input, engine output, and tractive power (losses from aerodynamics, rolling resistance, and inertia). The power use inventory in this diagram highlights areas in which research efforts can lead to major benefits in truck fuel efficiency, including engine efficiency, aerodynamics, and rolling resistance.

262

Probability of spent fuel transportation accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transported volume of spent fuel, incident/accident experience and accident environment probabilities were reviewed in order to provide an estimate of spent fuel accident probabilities. In particular, the accident review assessed the accident experience for large casks of the type that could transport spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel. This review determined that since 1971, the beginning of official US Department of Transportation record keeping for accidents/incidents, there has been one spent fuel transportation accident. This information, coupled with estimated annual shipping volumes for spent fuel, indicated an estimated annual probability of a spent fuel transport accident of 5 x 10/sup -7/ spent fuel accidents per mile. This is consistent with ordinary truck accident rates. A comparison of accident environments and regulatory test environments suggests that the probability of truck accidents exceeding regulatory test for impact is approximately 10/sup -9//mile.

McClure, J. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Experiments DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint Experiments Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

264

DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

D.C. vss14salari.pdf More Documents & Publications DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint Experiments and Computations Vehicle Technologies Office Merit...

265

DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Experiments and Computations DOEs Effort to Reduce Truck Aerodynamic Drag through Joint Experiments and Computations 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual...

266

Analysis of liquid natural gas as a truck fuel: a system dynamics approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the potential for growth in use of liquid natural gas (LNG) fueled trucks. . A system dynamics model was constructed for the analysis and a variety of scenarios were investigated. The analysis considers the economics of LNG fuel in the context of the trucking industry to identify barriers to the increased use of LNG trucks and potential interventions or leverage points which may overcome these barriers. The study showed that today, LNG use in trucks is not yet economically viable. A large change in the savings from fuel cost or capital cost is needed for the technology to take off. Fleet owners have no way now to benefit from the environmental benefits of LNG fuel nor do they benefit from the clean burning nature of the fuel. Changes in the fuel cost differential between diesel and LNG are not a research issue. However, quantifying the improvements in reliability and wear from the use of clean fuel could support increased maintenance and warranty periods. Many people involved in the use of LNG for trucks believe that LNG has the potential to occupy a niche within the larger diesel truck business. But if LNG in trucks can become economic, the spread of fuel stations and technology improvements could lead to LNG trucks becoming the dominant technology. An assumption in our simulation work is that LNG trucks will be purchased when economically attractive. None of the simulation results show LNG becoming economic but then only to the level of a niche market.

Bray, M.A.; Sebo, D.E.; Mason, T.L.; Mills, J.I.; Rice, R.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ton Pick-up Truck application 40% Better miles per gallon - Compared to V8 gasoline powered equivalent US Tier 2, Bin 2 emissions levels Commercially Viable...

268

Schewel and Schipper 1 FOSSIL FREIGHT: HOW MUCH FOSSIL FUEL DOES IT TAKE TO MOVE FOSSIL1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understanding of the full cost of5 fossil fuel reliance, and help create the foundation for models to analyzeSchewel and Schipper 1 FOSSIL FREIGHT: HOW MUCH FOSSIL FUEL DOES IT TAKE TO MOVE FOSSIL1 FUEL?2.schewel@berkeley.edu)13 UC Berkeley Energy and Resources Group14 310 Barrows Hall15 UC Berkeley16 Berkeley CA 9470917 Cell

Kammen, Daniel M.

269

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 axles – the standard long-haul truck in the U.S. Chapter 5that, on average, a long-haul truck consumed about 1,600

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Class 8 Line-Haul Truck, SAE 2010 Commercial VehicleHeavy-Duty Long Haul Combination Truck Fuel Consumption andhaul, and long haul driving cycles were constructed using truck

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy-Duty Long Haul Combination Truck Fuel Consumption andand fuel cell trucks over the day drive and the short and long hauland fuel cell trucks were modeled and simulated over the day drive, the short haul

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The 21st Century Truck Partnership | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOfficeThe 21st Century Truck Partnership The

274

Diesel Trucks - Then and Now | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA and DOW Automotive) | DepartmentTrucks - Then

275

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the hybrid-electric diesel and LNG Class 8 trucks wereengine truck, diesel hybrid-electric, conventional LNGhybrid-electric vehicles with diesel and LNG engines, fuel

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

58 THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE www.joc.com JUNE 14.2010 TRUCKING ECONOMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

58 THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE www.joc.com JUNE 14.2010 TRUCKING ECONOMICS By Chris CapliceBy Chris.Andwithaprivatefleetexperiencing.Andwithaprivatefleetexperiencing.Andwithaprivatefl ofmorethan6,500trucks part, long-haul full truckload ship- ments. Most vendors are moving these loads using contracted, for

de Weck, Olivier L.

277

IMPACT OF TIRE AND AERODYNAMIC AIDS ON TRUCK PERFORMANCE ALONG UPGRADE SECTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT OF TIRE AND AERODYNAMIC AIDS ON TRUCK PERFORMANCE ALONG UPGRADE SECTIONS Hesham Rakha1 and aerodynamics aids on the truck acceleration behavior. The objectives of this paper are two-fold. First of vehicle tires, the vehicle's aerodynamic features, the percentage mass on the tractive axle

Rakha, Hesham A.

278

HEALTHY FOOD OUTSIDE: FARMERS' MARKETS, TACO TRUCKS, AND SIDEWALK FRUIT VENDORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTHY FOOD OUTSIDE: FARMERS' MARKETS, TACO TRUCKS, AND SIDEWALK FRUIT VENDORS Alfonso Morales FOOD OUTSIDE: FARMERS' MARKETS, TACO TRUCKS, AND SIDEWALK FRUIT VENDORS Alfonso Morales1 and Gregg College School of Law. #12;2009 Healthy Food Outside 21 INTRODUCTION One hundred years ago street vendors

Illinois at Chicago, University of

279

The impact of incentives on the use of toll roads by trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Unfortunately, the low profit margin in the trucking industry and the relatively high tolls truckers pay leads to their reluctance to use toll facilities. Incentives for truck use of a toll road, State Highway 130 (SH 130) near Austin, Texas, were analyzed...

Zhou, Lin

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan which has short-hauls and small trucks turns out to beFor example trucks and locomotives used to haul freight can

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Short sea shipping : barriers, incentives and feasibility of truck ferry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many problems plague the United States' transportation infrastructure: congestion, poor roadway conditions, obsolescence, and maintenance cost not the least among these. In recent years, the Department of Transportation, ...

Darcy, Joseph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Environmental Impacts of Transportation to the Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada analyzes a Proposed Action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. As part of the Proposed Action, the EIS analyzes the potential impacts of transporting commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to Yucca Mountain from 77 sites across the United States. The analysis includes information on the comparative impacts of transporting these materials by truck and rail and discusses the impacts of building a rail line or using heavy-haul trucks to move rail casks from a mainline railroad in Nevada to the site. This paper provides an overview of the analyses and the potential impacts of these transportation activities. The potential transportation impacts were looked at from two perspectives: transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste by legal-weight truck or by rail on a national scale and impacts specific to Nevada from the transportation of these materials from the State borders to the Yucca Mountain site. In order to address the range of impacts that could result from the most likely modes, legal-weight truck and rail, the EIS employed two analytical scenarios--mostly legal-weight truck and mostly rail. Estimated national transportation impacts were based on 24 years of transportation activities. Approximately 8 fatalities could occur from all causes in the nationwide general population from incident-free transportation activities of the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 4 from the mostly rail scenario. The analysis examined the radiological consequences under the maximum foreseeable accident scenario and also overall accident risk. The overall accident risk over the 24 year period would be about 0.0002 latent cancer fatality for the mostly legal-weight truck scenario and about 0.0005 latent cancer fatality for the mostly rail scenario. The maximum reasonably foreseeable accident scenario resulted in 0.55 latent cancer fatality for the legal-weight truck case and 5 latent cancer fatalities in the case of mostly rail. The EIS also analyzed the impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the State of Nevada. This included: constructing a branch rail line and using it to ship waste to the repository; upgrading highways in Nevada for use by heavy-haul trucks; constructing and operating an intermodal transfer station; and transporting personnel and materials to support construction and operation of the repository.

R.L. Sweeney; R. Best; P. Bolton; P. Adams

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Software Project Management Plan (SPMP). Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a cabinet level federal agency with a diverse range of missions and an infrastructure spanning the United States, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has extensive freight transportation requirements. Performance and management of this freight activity is a critical function. DOE`s Transportation Management Division (TMD) has an agency-wide responsibility for overseeing transportation activities. Actual transportation operations are handled by government or contractor staff at the field locations. These staff have evolved a diverse range of techniques and procedures for performing transportation functions. In addition to minimizing the economic impact of transportation on programs, facility transportation staff must be concerned with the increasingly complex task of complying with complex shipment safety regulations. Maintaining the department`s safety record for shipping hazardous and radioactive materials is a primary goal. Use of automation to aid transportation functions is not widespread within DOE, though TMD has a number of software systems designed to gather and analyze data pertaining to field transportation activities. These systems are not integrated. Historically, most field facilities have accomplished transportation-related tasks manually or with minimal computer assistance. At best, information and decision support systems available to transportation staffs within the facilities are fragmented. In deciding where to allocate resources for automation, facility managers have not tended to give the needs of transportation departments a high priority. This diversity causes TMD significant difficulty in collecting data for use in managing department-wide transportation activities.

Weidert, R.S.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCARâ??s test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of imported oil, that much less air pollution, and an equivalent reduction in the trade deficit, which is expected to lower the inflation rate.

N.B. Elsner; J.C. Bass; S. Ghamaty; D. Krommenhoek; A. Kushch; D. Snowden; S. Marchetti

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Stress analysis of jacks, frame and bearing connections, and drill rod for core sampler truck No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the structural design adequacy of several components and connections for the rotary mode core sampler truck (RMCST) No. 2. This analysis was requested by the Characterization Equipment Group (WHC 1994a). The components addressed in this report are listed below: front jack assembly and connection to the truck chassis; rear jack assembly and connection to the truck chassis; center outrigger jacks and connection to the truck chassis; lower frame assembly and connection to the truck chassis; bolt connections for bearing plate assembly (for path of maximum load); traverse slide brackets and mounting of the traverse jack cylinders; and drill rod (failure loads).

Ziada, H.H.

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Current Trends and Future Challenges in the Freight Railroad Industry: Balancing Private Industry Interests and the Public Welfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?dimensional?impact?on?the?public?welfare,?local,?state,?and?federal?government?entities?play?a? significant?role?in?ensuring?the?industry?operates?efficiently?and?safely.?In?October?2006,?the?Government? Accountability?Office?(GAO)?released?a?report?on...? ? Current?Trends?and?Future?Challenges?in? the?Freight?Railroad?Industry Balancing?Private?Industry?Interests?and?the?Public?Welfare? ? ? ? Sarah?Allen? Kendra?Kelson? Hayden?Migl? Rodney?Schmidt? David?Shoemaker? Heather?Thomson? ? ? A?Report...

Allen, Sarah; Kelson, Kendra; Migl, Hayden; Schmidt, Rodney; Shoemaker, David; Thomson, Heather

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparative Study of Hybrid Powertrains on Fuel Saving, Emissions, and Component Energy Loss in HD Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compared parallel and series hybrid powertrains on fuel economy, component energy loss, and emissions control in Class 8 trucks over both city and highway driving. A comprehensive set of component models describing battery energy, engine fuel efficiency, emissions control, and power demand interactions for heavy duty (HD) hybrids has been integrated with parallel and series hybrid Class 8 trucks in order to identify the technical barriers of these hybrid powertrain technologies. The results show that series hybrid is absolutely negative for fuel economy benefit of long-haul trucks due to an efficiency penalty associated with the dual-step conversions of energy (i.e. mechanical to electric to mechanical). The current parallel hybrid technology combined with 50% auxiliary load reduction could elevate 5-7% fuel economy of long-haul trucks, but a profound improvement of long-haul truck fuel economy requires additional innovative technologies for reducing aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance losses. The simulated emissions control indicates that hybrid trucks reduce more CO and HC emissions than conventional trucks. The simulated results further indicate that the catalyzed DPF played an important role in CO oxidations. Limited NH3 emissions could be slipped from the Urea SCR, but the average NH3 emissions are below 20 ppm. Meanwhile our estimations show 1.5-1.9% of equivalent fuel-cost penalty due to urea consumption in the simulated SCR cases.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Interim Results from Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. Currently, the project has four sites: Raley's in Sacramento, CA (Kenworth, Cummins LlO-300G, liquefied natural gas - LNG); Pima Gro Systems, Inc. in Fontana, CA (White/GMC, Caterpillar 31768 Dual-Fuel, compressed natural gas - CNG); Waste Management in Washington, PA (Mack, Mack E7G, LNG); and United Parcel Service in Hartford, CT (Freightliner Custom Chassis, Cummins B5.9G, CNG). This paper summarizes current data collection and evaluation results from this project.

Kevin L. Chandler; Paul Norton; Nigel Clark

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in long-haul operations, where most truck fuel is burned,Greszler Truck Fuel Ef?ciency Trucks haul a wide variety of6 to 9 percent of fuel in long haul truck operation. Anti-

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unintended Impacts of Increased Truck Loads on Pavement Supply-Chain Emissions Nakul Sathaye, Arpad emissions, raising the question of whether increased vehicle weights may cause unintended environmental consequences. This paper presents scenarios with estimated emissions resulting from load consolidation

California at Berkeley, University of

294

Trucking country : food politics and the transformation of rural life in Postwar America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trucking replaced railroads as the primary link between rural producers and urban consumers in the mid-twentieth century. With this technological change came a fundamental transformation of the defining features of rural ...

Hamilton, Shane, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Engineering Task Plan for Water Supply for Spray Washers on the Support Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) defines the task and deliverables associated with the design, fabrication and testing of an improved spray wash system for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) System Support Trucks.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

296

Productivity and competition in the U.S. trucking industry since deregulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1980 Congress passed the Motor Carrier Act, substantially liberating trucking carriers from a federal regulatory structure that had exercised broad economic control over the industry for over four decades. Changes in ...

Parming, Veiko Paul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Modeling for Market Analysis: HTEB, TRUCK, and LVChoice  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by TA Engineering, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about HTEB, TRUCK, and...

298

Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation...

299

Proposed Revisions to Light Truck Fuel Economy Standard (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In August 2005, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published proposed reforms to the structure of CAFE standards for light trucks and increases in light truck Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for model years 2008 through 201. Under the proposed new structure, NHTSA would establish minimum fuel economy levels for six size categories defined by the vehicle footprint (wheelbase multiplied by track width), as summarized in Table 3. For model years 2008 through 2010, the new CAFE standards would provide manufacturers the option of complying with either the standards defined for each individual footprint category or a proposed average light truck fleet standard of 22.5 miles per gallon in 2008, 23.1 miles per gallon in 2009, and 23.5 miles per gallon in 2010. All light truck manufacturers would be required to meet an overall standard based on sales within each individual footprint category after model year 2010.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Volvo SuperTruck - Powertrain Technologies for Efficiency Improvement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

highway transportation technologies to reduce petroleum consumption, reducing operating cost, fuel consumption, environmental impact, and time to market * Approach: Through...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mexico's Energy Reform and the Potential Impact on Texas' Transportation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preparation ­ Heavy bulldozers and dump trucks to build road to serve pad site · Move rotary rig to pad site;Transportation and Well Development · Five-step well development process: ­ Site preparation ­ Rigging up ­ Drilling ­ Hydraulic fracturing ­ Rigging down #12;Transportation and Well Development · Initial site

302

Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

Cobble, C.

1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

Transportation impacts on the Tennessee highway system proposed monitored retrievable storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The issue of the transport of spent fuels to the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility in Tennessee is discussed. Relevant issues include the ability of the roads and bridges on the transport routes to handle the weight of the trucks. (CBS)

Cobble, C.

1985-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Volvo SuperTruck - Powertrain Technologies for Efficiency Improvement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

efficient highway transportation technologies to reduce petroleum consumption, operating cost, fuel consumption, environmental impact, and time to market for high risk high...

306

Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy: Study 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limited feasible options exist when considering the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. These options are rail or truck; because of the weight associated with transportation casks (68.0 to 113.4 tonnes/75 to 125 tons), heavy-haul trucks are also considered. Yucca Mountain currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way for rail; it also lacks a dedicated highway suitable for heavy-haul trucks. Approximately 11,230 shipments by rail are planned from waste producer sites to Nevada, with an additional 1,041 shipments by legal-weight truck from four reactor sites not capable of upgrading for rail shipment. This study identifies the reasonable alternatives for waste transport to the potential repository site, describes the evaluation process performed to identify those alternatives, and discusses the reasons for elimination of transportation routes deemed to be not reasonable. The study concluded that heavy haul truck transportation is feasible-cost is very favorable when compared to rail-but route restrictions must be further evaluated. In addition to restrictions due to seasonal weather conditions, specific routes have additional restrictions, including no travel on holidays or weekends, and travel during daylight hours only. Further restrictions will be imposed by the U.S. Department of Transportation based on routing of radioactive materials by highway. Operation and maintenance costs for heavy-haul over a 24-year period, based on preliminary information, were calculated on an estimated operational cost of $15,000 per trip, with an estimated 468 trips per year average (11,230 total trips), for an estimated cost of $171 million to $173 million, depending on the route used. Because the initial costs and the total system life cycle costs of heavy-haul are approximately 50 percent lower than the lowest rail cost, this option will continue to be evaluated.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

"Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" Session One: The Role of Freight Transportation in Achieving Clean Air,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy for 4 years, and taught at the Independent University of Bangladesh and the University of Maryland is the Assistant Chief of the Stationary Source Division for the California Air Resources Board. He is responsible experience with the Air Resources Board. He is a graduate of UCLA with a degree in Chemical Engineering

California at Davis, University of

308

Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

Fenn, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Network Design Formulations, Modeling, and Solution Algorithms for Goods Movement Strategic Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1956). The long haul less-than-truck-load and truckloadare competitive to truck when the line haul is more than 500haul freight demand is decided by the shipper model which represents the truck

Apivatanagul, Pruttipong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Application for CHE-CCE 2012 Summer Internship Title of project: "Public Acceptance of Congestion Pricing of Transportation"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pricing of Transportation" Worksite Location: Ithaca, NY Faculty sponsor: Rick Geddes County Cornell standards for cars and light trucks reduce greenhouse gas emissions and enhance energy independence the acceptance of variable transportation pricing. This includes extant studies that utilize data from telephone

Keinan, Alon

311

FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

Barnitt, R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Statistical Modeling of Freight Train Derailments at Highway-Rail Level Crossings Samantha G. Chadwick, C. Tyler Dick, Mohd Rapik Saat, Christopher P.L. Barkan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discusses level-crossing-caused freight train derailments in a larger risk-analysis context. We generalize an additional tool for decision makers to prioritize level crossings upgrades and/or closures. 2. Development reduction in the risk of level crossings to North American highway users over the past several decades. Much

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

313

The impacts of congestion on time-definitive urban freight distribution networks CO2 emission levels: Results from a case study in Portland,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impacts of congestion on time-definitive urban freight distribution networks CO2 emission Accepted 29 November 2010 Keywords: Vehicle routing Time-dependent travel time speed GHG or CO2 emissions pressures to limit the impacts associated with CO2 emissions are mounting rapidly. A key challenge

Bertini, Robert L.

314

The Impacts of Congestion on Time-definitive Urban Freight Distribution1 Networks CO2 Emission Levels: results from a case study in Portland,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Impacts of Congestion on Time-definitive Urban Freight Distribution1 Networks CO2 Emission pressures to limit the impacts13 associated with CO2 emissions are mounting rapidly. A key challenge on CO2 emissions are hindered by the complexities of vehicle routing18 problems with time

Bertini, Robert L.

315

Environmental implications of trade liberalization on North American transport services: the case of the trucking sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mexico Border Port of Laredo Concentration year pollution,air pollution. In Table 2, for NO x on the US–Mexico border,

Fernandez, Linda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Heavy-Duty Trucks Poised to Accelerate Growth of American Alternative Transportation Fuels Market  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cellHeat Transfer in GEoperation inHeavy

317

Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.03 Vehicle Use Reports: Automobiles/Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Automobiles/Trucks Approved: September 20, 2011 Revised: March 26, 2013 Next Scheduled Review: March 26, 2015: Automobiles/Trucks Page 1 of 2 PROCEDURE STATEMENT To comply with the provisions of the applicable civil Laboratory Procedures 21.01.08.V0.03 Vehicle Use Reports: Automobiles/Trucks Page 2 of 2 2.6 Record

318

NOx is emitted. In addition, extended idling can result in a consid-erable waste of fuel and cause wear on truck engines. More than  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Studies (5) have shown that a long-haul truck can idle away more than a gallon of diesel fuel per hour, Hector A. Olvera, John M. E. Storey, and Laura Kranendonk 17 At night, long-haul truck drivers rest were measured, and fuel consumption of the truck (while idling) and the APU (during operation) were

319

Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science & Technology Albuquerque, NM)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Technologies and policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the U. S. automobile and light truck fleet.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The message conveyed by the above discussion is that there are no shortages of technologies available to improve the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet of autos and light trucks. It clearly is technically feasible to improve greatly the fuel economy of the average new light-duty vehicle. Many of these technologies require tradeoffs, however, that manufacturers are unwilling or (as yet) unable to make in today's market and regulatory environment. These tradeoffs involve higher costs (that might be reduced substantially over time with learning and economies of scale), technical risk and added complexity, emissions concerns (especially for direct injection engines, and especially with respect to diesel engine technology), and customer acceptance issues. Even with current low U.S. oil prices, however, many of these technologies may find their way into the U.S. market, or increase their market share, as a consequence of their penetration of European and Japanese markets with their high gasoline prices. Automotive technology is ''fungible'' that is, it can be easily transported from one market to another. Nevertheless, it probably is unrealistic to expect substantial increases in the average fuel economy of the U.S. light-duty fleet without significant changes in the market. Without such changes, the technologies that do penetrate the U.S. market are more likely to be used to increase acceleration performance or vehicle structures or enable four wheel drive to be included in vehicles without a net mpg penalty. In other words, technology by itself is not likely to be enough to raise fleet fuel economy levels - this was the conclusion of the 1995 Ailomar Conference on Energy and Sustainable Transportation, organized by the Transportation Research Board's Committees on Energy and Alternative Fuels, and it is one I share.

Plotkin, S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Hybrid Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm For Solving Truck And Trailer Vehicle Routing Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost) so that the day- to-day operational cost could be kept at the minimum. 1.2 Background on VehicleA Hybrid Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm For Solving Truck And Trailer Vehicle Routing Problems K. C. Tan, T. H. Lee, Y. H. Chew Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering National

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

322

Home Away from Home: The Evolution and Meaning of American Truck Stops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Truck stops provide a tie to place for mobile, long-haul drivers. Truckers rely on these businesses for necessities and help to shape their form and function with their perceptions and actions. An increasing domination of the industry by chain...

Day, Stephanie L.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Technology in Motion Vehicle (TMV) To promote truck and bus safety programs and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology in Motion Vehicle (TMV) Goal To promote truck and bus safety programs and technologies messages at multiple venues Demonstrate proven and emerging safety technologies to state and motor carrier stakeholders Promote deployment of safety technologies by fleets and state MCSAP agencies Evaluate program

324

CoolCalc: A Long-Haul Truck Thermal Load Estimation Tool: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, intercity long-haul trucks idle approximately 1,800 hrs annually for sleeper cab hotel loads, consuming 838 million gallons of diesel fuel per year. The objective of the CoolCab project is to work closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that keep the cab comfortable with minimized engine idling. Truck engine idling is primarily done to heat or cool the cab/sleeper, keep the fuel warm in cold weather, and keep the engine warm for cold temperature startup. Reducing the thermal load on the cab/sleeper will decrease air conditioning system requirements, improve efficiency, and help reduce fuel use. CoolCalc is an easy-to-use, simplified, physics-based HVAC load estimation tool that requires no meshing, has flexible geometry, excludes unnecessary detail, and is less time-intensive than more detailed computer-aided engineering modeling approaches. It is intended for rapid trade-off studies, technology impact estimation, and preliminary HVAC sizing design and to complement more detailed and expensive CAE tools by exploring and identifying regions of interest in the design space. This paper describes the CoolCalc tool, provides outdoor long-haul truck thermal testing results, shows validation using these test results, and discusses future applications of the tool.

Lustbader, J. A.; Rugh, J. P.; Rister, B. R.; Venson, T. S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Field monitoring and modeling of pavement response and service life consumption due to overweight truck traffic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of pavement structures experience deterioration due to high traffic volume and growing weights. Recently, the Texas Legislatures passed bills allowing trucks of gross vehicle weight (GVW) up to 556 kN routinely to use a route in south Texas...

Oh, Jeong-Ho

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Control System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chan-Chiao Lin, Huei Peng and J. W. Grizzle University of Michigan Jason Liu and Matt Busdiecker Eaton Corporation Copyright © 2003 SAE International ABSTRACT The power management control system development management control system for the prototype truck produced by the Eaton Innovation Center

Grizzle, Jessy W.

327

Development of LNG-Powered Heavy-Duty Trucks in Commercial Hauling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's development, deployment, and evaluation of alternative fuels, NREL and the Trucking Research Institute contracted with Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) to develop and operate a liquid natural gas fueled tractor powered by a DDC Series 50 prototype natural gas engine. This is the final report on the project.

Detroit Diesel Corporation; Trucking Research Institute

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

See More Jobs From Agrium Wholesale Truck Analyst (175535-001) -(Calgary, Alberta, Western Canada, Canada)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

See More Jobs From Agrium Wholesale Truck Analyst (175535-001) - (Calgary, Alberta, Western Canada, Canada) Company: Agrium Wholesale Apply below Industry Sector: Agribusiness Industry Type: Agronomy a growing world. Growth is a top priority for Agrium Wholesale and it doesn't just apply to the nutrients we

Behmer, Spencer T.

329

Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Analysis of technology options to reduce the fuel consumption of idling trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000--3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Vyas, A.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hybrid Control of a Truck and Trailer Vehicle Claudio Altafini1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Control of a Truck and Trailer Vehicle Claudio Altafini1 , Alberto Speranzon2 , and Karl, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden, albspe@s3.kth.se, kallej@s3.kth.se Abstract. A hybrid control scheme is proposed for the stabilization of backward driving along simple paths for a miniature vehicle composed

Johansson, Karl Henrik

332

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks of California, Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Berkeley, CA 94720-1710 Abstract Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel

333

Scheduling Freight Trains Traveling on Complex etworks SHI MU and MAGED DESSOUKY*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, namely a simple look-ahead greedy heuristic and a global neighborhood search algorithm, in terms goods from other countries usually enter the United States through ports and then transported inland

Dessouky, Maged

334

Emission Changes Resulting from the San Pedro Bay, California Ports Truck Retirement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emissions regulations have resulted in lower emissions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen from heavy-duty diesel trucks. To accelerate fleet turnover the State of California in 2008 along with the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (San Pedro Bay Ports) in 2006 passed regulations establishing timelines forcing the retirement of older diesel trucks. On-road emissions measurements of heavy-duty diesel trucks were collected over a three-year period, beginning in 2008, at a Port of Los Angeles location and an inland weigh station on the Riverside freeway (CA SR91). At the Port location the mean fleet age decreased from 12.7 years in April of 2008 to 2.5 years in May of 2010 with significant reductions in carbon monoxide (30%), oxides of nitrogen (48%) and infrared opacity (a measure of particulate matter, 54%). We also observed a 20-fold increase in ammonia emissions as a result of new, stoichiometrically combusted, liquefied natural gas powered trucks. These results compare with changes at our inland site where the average ages were 7.9 years in April of 2008 and 8.3 years in April of 2010, with only small reductions in oxides of nitrogen (10%) being statistically significant. Both locations have experienced significant increases in nitrogen dioxide emissions from new trucks equipped with diesel particle filters; raising the mean nitrogen dioxide to oxides of nitrogen ratios from less than 10% to more than 30% at the Riverside freeway location.

Bishop, G. A.; Schuchmann, B. G.; Stedman, D. H.; Lawson, D. R.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Impact of Paint Color on Rest Period Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cab climate conditioning is one of the primary reasons for operating the main engine in a long-haul truck during driver rest periods. In the United States, sleeper cab trucks use approximately 667 million gallons of fuel annually for rest period idling. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) CoolCab Project works closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that minimize engine idling and fuel use while maintaining occupant comfort. Heat transfer to the vehicle interior from opaque exterior surfaces is one of the major heat pathways that contribute to air conditioning loads during long-haul truck daytime rest period idling. To quantify the impact of paint color and the opportunity for advanced paints, NREL collaborated with Volvo Group North America, PPG Industries, and Dometic Environmental Corporation. Initial screening simulations using CoolCalc, NREL's rapid HVAC load estimation tool, showed promising air-conditioning load reductions due to paint color selection. Tests conducted at NREL's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility using long-haul truck cab sections, 'test bucks,' showed a 31.1% of maximum possible reduction in rise over ambient temperature and a 20.8% reduction in daily electric air conditioning energy use by switching from black to white paint. Additionally, changing from blue to an advanced color-matched solar reflective blue paint resulted in a 7.3% reduction in daily electric air conditioning energy use for weather conditions tested in Colorado. National-level modeling results using weather data from major U.S. cities indicated that the increase in heating loads due to lighter paint colors is much smaller than the reduction in cooling loads.

Lustbader, J.; Kreutzer, C.; Jeffers, M.; Adelman, S.; Yeakel, S.; Brontz, P.; Olson, K.; Ohlinger, J.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

ASSESSING EXPOSURE TO THE PUBLIC FROM LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLW) TRANSPORTATION TO THE NEVADA TEST SITE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one of two regional sites where low-level radioactive waste (LLW) from approved DOE and U.S. DOD generators across the United States is disposed. In federal fiscal year (FY) 2002, over 57,000 cubic meters of waste was transported to and disposed at the NTS. DOE and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations ensure that radiation exposure from truck shipments to members of the public is negligible. Nevertheless, particularly in rural communities along transportation routes in Utah and Nevada, there is perceived risk from members of the public about incremental exposure from LLW trucks, especially when ''Main Street'' and the LLW transportation route are the same. To better quantify the exposure to gamma radiation, a stationary monitoring array of four pressurized ion chambers (PICs) have been set up in a pullout just before LLW trucks reach the entrance to the NTS. The PICs are positioned at a distance of one meter from the sides of the truck trailer and at a height appropriate for the design of the trucks that will be used in FY2003 to haul LLW to the NTS. The use of four PICs (two on each side of the truck) is to minimize and to correct for non-uniformity where radiation levels from waste packages vary from side to side, and from front to back in the truck trailer. The PIC array is being calibrated by collecting readings from each PIC exposed to a known 137Cs source that was positioned at different locations on a flatbed stationed in the PIC array, along with taking secondary readings from other known sources. Continuous data collection using the PICs, with and without a truck in the array, is being used to develop background readings. In addition, acoustic sensors are positioned on each side of the PIC array to record when a large object (presumably a truck) enters the array. In FY2003, PIC surveys from as many incoming LLW trucks as possible will be made and survey data recorded automatically by dataloggers that will be periodically downloaded. Solar panels provide power for the batteries to run both the dataloggers and PICs. Truck drivers have been asked to park their truck within the PIC array for only the time it takes to complete an information log before moving on to one of two Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) on the NTS. On the log, the truck drivers record their shipment identification number, the time of day, where the waste originated, and information on the route they used to reach the NTS. This data will facilitate comparison of PIC readings with waste manifests and other waste disposal operations data collected at the RWMSs. Gamma radiation measurements collected from the PICs will be analyzed using standard health physics and statistical methods for comparison to DOT standards, but with the added benefit of obtaining an improved understanding of the variability of readings that can occur in the near vicinity of a LLW truck. The data collected will be combined with measurements of street width and other information about transportation routes through towns to develop realistic dose scenarios for citizens in Nevada and Utah towns.

Miller, J.J.; Campbell, S.; Church, B.W.; Shafer, D. S.; Gillespie, D.; Sedano, S.; Cebe, J.J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

STATE-OF-THE-ART AND EMERGING TRUCK ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES FOR OPTIMIZED PERFORMANCE, EMISSIONS AND LIFE CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The challenge for truck engine product engineering is not only to fulfill increasingly stringent emission requirements, but also to improve the engine's economical viability in its role as the backbone of our global economy. While societal impact and therefore emission limit values are to be reduced in big steps, continuous improvement is not enough but technological quantum leaps are necessary. The introduction and refinement of electronic control of all major engine systems has already been a quantum leap forward. Maximizing the benefits of these technologies to customers and society requires full use of parameter optimization and other enabling technologies. The next big step forward will be widespread use of exhaust aftertreatment on all transportation related diesel engines. While exhaust gas aftertreatment has been successfully established on gasoline (Otto cycle) engines, the introduction of exhaust aftertreatment especially for heavy-duty diesel engines will be much mo re demanding. Implementing exhaust gas aftertreatment into commercial vehicle applications is a challenging task but the emission requirements to be met starting in Europe, the USA and Japan in the 2005-2007 timeframe require this step. The engine industry will be able to implement the new technology if all stakeholders support the necessary decisions. One decision has already been taken: the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel being comparable with the elimination of lead in gasoline as a prerequisite for the three-way catalyst. Now we have the chance to optimize ecology and economy of the Diesel engine simultaneously by taking the decision to provide an additional infrastructure for a NOx reduction agent needed for the introduction of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology that is already implemented in the electric power generation industry. This requires some effort, but the resulting societal benefits, fuel economy and vehicle life cycle costs are significantly better when compared to other competitive technologies. After long discussions this decision for SCR has been made in Europe and is supported by all truck and engine manufacturers. The necessary logistic support will be in place when it will be needed commercially in 2005. For the US the decision has to be taken this year in order to have the infrastructure available in 2007. It will enable the global engine industry to focus their R & D resources in one direction not only for 2007, but for the years beyond 2010 with the best benefit for the environment, the customers and the industry.

Schittler, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Project Summary Report 0-4169-S PROJECTSUMMARYREPORT CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Summary Report 0-4169-S ­ ­ PROJECTSUMMARYREPORT CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Project Summary Report 0-469-S Project 0-469: Managing Rural Truck Traffic needs of the people and economy of rural Texas is not an easy mat- ter. Policies and procedures

Texas at Austin, University of

339

[Interstate Clean Transportation]. Final Report for FG02-99EE50591  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Interstate Clean Transportation (ICTC) purpose is to develop a public-private partnership dedicated to accelerating the market penetration of clean, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in interstate goods movement. In order to foster project development, the ICTC activity sought to increase awareness of heavy-duty AFVs among truck fleet operators.

Wendt, Lee

2002-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Transportation System Inside a Living Cell Department of Physics and Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or 32 nanometer steps depending on the load it is hauling or on the amount of ATP (fuel. It has workers (proteins), a power plant (mitochondria), roads (actin fibers and microtubules), trucks is the fuel that is used to power molecular motors. The second way is through active transport that works like

Yu, Clare C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

BuildSense Compressed natural gas (CNG) bi-fuel conversions for two Ford F-series pickup trucks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BuildSense Compressed natural gas (CNG) bi-fuel conversions for two Ford F-series pickup trucks $141,279 $35,320 $176,599 City of Charlotte Solid Waste Services Compressed natural gas ( CNG) up fits

343

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 7, DOE/AL68080-TSR07  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis and results show hybrid system weight and efficiency affect productivity and fuel usage. Analysis shows equivalent hybrid benefits for adjacent size classes of mine truck. Preparations are ongoing for full power test. The battery cycling test protocol was modified.

Lembit Salasoo

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Evaluation of the adequacy of the 2000P test vehicle as a surrogate for light truck subclasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study evaluated the adequacy of the 2000P test vehicle as a surrogate for light truck subclasses. The National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 350 recommended the use of a 3/4-ton (approximately 2000 kg) pickup...

Titus-Glover, Cyril James

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

Fischer, M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Application of Sleeper Cab Thermal Management Technologies to Reduce Idle Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each intercity long-haul truck in the U.S. idles approximately 1,800 hrs per year, primarily for sleeper cab hotel loads. Including workday idling, over 2 billion gallons of fuel are used annually for truck idling. NREL's CoolCab project works closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that keep the cab comfortable with minimized engine idling and fuel use. The impact of thermal load reduction technologies on idle reduction systems were characterized by conducting thermal soak tests, overall heat transfer tests, and 10-hour rest period A/C tests. Technologies evaluated include advanced insulation packages, a solar reflective film applied to the vehicle's opaque exterior surfaces, a truck featuring both film and insulation, and a battery-powered A/C system. Opportunities were identified to reduce heating and cooling loads for long-haul truck idling by 36% and 34%, respectively, which yielded a 23% reduction in battery pack capacity of the idle-reduction system. Data were also collected for development and validation of a CoolCalc HVAC truck cab model. CoolCalc is an easy-to-use, simplified, physics-based HVAC load estimation tool that requires no meshing, has flexible geometry, excludes unnecessary detail, and is less time-intensive than more detailed computer-aided engineering modeling approaches.

Lustbader, J. A.; Venson, T.; Adelman, S.; Dehart, C.; Yeakel, S.; Castillo, M. S.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Engineering task plan for upgrades to the leveling jacks on core sample trucks number 3 and 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site is accomplished by obtaining a representative core sample for analysis. Core sampling is one of the numerous techniques that have been developed for use given the environmental and field conditions at the Hanford Site. Core sampling is currently accomplished using either Push Mode Core Sample Truck No.1 or; Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks No.2, 3 or 4. Past analysis (WHC 1994) has indicated that the Core Sample Truck (CST) leveling jacks are structurally inadequate when lateral loads are applied. WHC 1994 identifies many areas where failure could occur. All these failures are based on exceeding the allowable stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) code. The mode of failure is for the outrigger attachments to the truck frame to fail resulting in dropping of the CST and possible overturning (Ref. Ziada and Hundal, 1996). Out of level deployment of the truck can exceed the code allowable stresses in the structure. Calculations have been performed to establish limits for maintaining the truck level when lifting. The calculations and the associated limits are included in appendix A. The need for future operations of the CSTS is limited. Sampling is expected to be complete in FY-2001. Since there is limited time at risk for continued use of the CSTS with the leveling controls without correcting the structural problems, there are several design changes that could give incremental improvements to the operational safety of the CSTS with limited impact on available operating time. The improvements focus on making the truck easier to control during lifting and leveling. Not all of the tasks identified in this ETP need to be performed. Each task alone can improve the safety. This engineering task plan is the management plan document for implementing the necessary additional structural analysis. Any additional changes to meet requirements of standing orders shall require a Letter of Instruction from Numatec Hanford Company (NHC).

KOSTELNIK, A.J.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duty Diesel Truck Internal Combustion Engine Lower Heatinglow efficiency internal combustion engine (ICE) operation,the fuel in internal combustion engines, there are several

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trucks can increase fuel economy by 3-6% over the long haultrucks can increase fuel economy by 3-6% over the long haul

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from diesel-truck delivery and electric generation at powerfrom diesel-truck delivery and electric generation at power

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy use in ground transportation. Final report, June-December 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation systems account for approximately twenty-five percent of the country's total energy consumption. Such a large fraction on the Nation's energy resources has prompted increased awareness of the role which transportation technology plays in the area of energy consumption. Of the different transportation modes, automobiles and trucks combine to consume approximately three-quarters of all transportation energy as of 1980. The report stresses that the importance of technologies aimed at reducing these large expenditures of our Nation's resources cannot be minimized.

Karlin, A.; Riviera, A.; McDonald, M.; Turner, D.; Stickler, J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fact #647: November 1, 2010 Sales Shifting from Light Trucks to Cars |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 20112: July 19, 2010 The CostsTrucks|to 2010

353

SuperTruck Making Leaps in Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at Young -Final ProgramAbout »SuperTruck Making Leaps

354

SuperTruck Making Leaps in Fuel Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at Young -Final ProgramAbout »SuperTruck Making

355

Transportation Network Modeling in Passenger Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Cars (hybrid and gasoline) ­ Trains (electric and diesel) ­ Barges ­ Planes · Decision Variables. Coal 2. Non-coal Truck/ diesel Train/ diesel Highway Railway Node/Arc based (k-ton/year) 1. Induced 2

Daniels, Thomas E.

356

Transfer and transport of solid waste with case studies of facilities in northern New Jersey and New York City  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transfer stations are used to consolidate the waste from collection vehicles for its transport to a disposal site that can be a waste-to-energy facility and/or a landfill. Separation of materials for recycling and/or composting may also be done at a transfer station. Transfer stations are developed and used primarily when the travel time to a disposal site is too far for a collection truck to transport waste in an economic manner. Travel time includes the actual transport time and the unloading time at a disposal site. Local factors such as the capacity of collection trucks, wage rates, and the size of collection crews will affect the economics of direct haul versus transfer haul. The various types of approaches used to transfer and transport wastes are reviewed in this paper.

Peterson, C.; Towne, C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Transportation energy data book: edition 16  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 16 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares U.S. transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high- occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data on environmental issues relating to transportation.

Davis, S.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFarlin, D.N. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity and range. Long-haul trucks typically have a fuelin heavy-duty long-haul trucks is used in the realisticcase. For smaller, short-haul trucks such as delivery vans (

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Voluntary Truck and Bus Fuel-Economy-Program marketing plan. Final technical report, September 29, 1980-January 29, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the program is to improve the utilization of fuel by commercial trucks and buses by updating and implementing specific approaches for educating and monitoring the trucking industry on methods and means of conserving fuels. The following outlines the marketing plan projects: increase use of program logo by voluntary program members and others; solicit trade publication membership and support; brief Congressional delegations on fuel conservation efforts; increase voluntary program presence before trade groups; increase voluntary program presence at truck and trade shows; create a voluntary program display for use at trade shows and in other areas; review voluntary program graphics; increase voluntary program membership; and produce placemats carrying fuel conservation messages; produce a special edition of Fuel Economy News, emphasizing the driver's involvement in fuel conservation; produce posters carrying voluntary program fuel conservation message. Project objectives, activities, and results for each project are summarized.

none,

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

System design specification for rotary mode core sample trucks No. 2, 3, and 4 programmable logic controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The system this document describes controls several functions of the Core Sample Truck(s) used to obtain nuclear waste samples from various underground storage tanks at Hanford. The system will monitor the sampling process and provide alarms and other feedback to insure the sampling process is performed within the prescribed operating envelope. The intended audience for this document is anyone associated with rotary or push mode core sampling. This document describes the Alarm and Control logic installed on Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) {number_sign}2, 3, and 4. It is intended to define the particular requirements of the RMCST alarm and control operation (not defined elsewhere) sufficiently for detailed design to implement on a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC).

Dowell, J.L.; Akers, J.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

363

Proceedings of the 2002 Advanced Vehicle Control Conference, Hiroshima, Japan, September 2002 Control of a Hybrid Electric Truck Based on Driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

initiated, aiming to duplicate the success of hybrid powertrain on passenger cars to light and heavy trucks demonstrated by several prototype hybrid passenger cars, produced by the PNGV program, will be an unrealistic Control of a Hybrid Electric Truck Based on Driving Pattern Recognition Chan-Chiao Lin, Huei Peng Soonil

Peng, Huei

364

Optimal Vehicle Routing with Real-Time Traffic Information Seongmoon Kim1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to accidents, bad weather, traffic con- gestion, etc., trucks hauling time-sensitive freight build "buffer time cost. Indeed a truck parked at the origin is less expensive than one that is in use. Moreover

Lewis, Mark E.

365

Transportation energy data book: Edition 15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 15 is a statistical compendium. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. Purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter I compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

Davis, S.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Transportation energy data book: Edition 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes -- highway, air, water, rail, pipeline -- is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Transportation energy data book: Edition 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes - highway, air, water, rail, pipeline - is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G. Schuchmann,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy-Duty Truck Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin of California Gary A. Bishop,* Brent G, Colorado 80208, United States ABSTRACT: California and Federal emissions regulations for 2007 and newer of nitrogen spurring the introduction of new aftertreatment systems. Since 2008, four emission measurement

Denver, University of

369

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E road ) of long-haul trucks, including improvingfor local truck deliveries rather than long-haul highway

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power (SOFC APU) development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14318. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner development leading to successful demonstration of the SOFC APU objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant SOFC APU Milestones: Demonstrated: Operation meeting SOFC APU requirements on commercial Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel. SOFC systems operating on dry CPOX reformate. Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC APU system without inert gas purge. Developed: Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. Demonstrated efficient SOFC output power conditioning. Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods.

Vesely, Charles John-Paul [Cummins Power Generation; Fuchs, Benjamin S. [Cummins Power Generation; Booten, Chuck W. [Protonex Technology, LLC

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fuel Economy Standards for New Light Trucks (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In March 2006, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) finalized Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards requiring higher fuel economy performance for light-duty trucks in model year (MY) 2008 through 2011. Unlike the proposed CAFE standards discussed in Annual Energy Outlook 2006, which would have established minimum fuel economy requirements by six footprint size classes, the final reformed CAFE standards specify a continuous mathematical function that determines minimum fuel economy requirements by vehicle footprint, defined as the wheelbase (the distance from the front axle to the center of the rear axle) times the average track width (the distance between the center lines of the tires) of the vehicle in square feet.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fuel Economy Improvement Potential of a Heavy Duty Truck using V2x Communication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce an intelligent driver assistance system to reduce fuel consumption in heavy duty vehicles irrespective of the driving style of the driver. We specifically study the potential of V2I and V2V communications to reduce fuel consumption in heavy duty trucks. Most ITS communications today are oriented towards vehicle safety, with communications strategies and hardware that tend to focus on low latency. This has resulted in technologies emerging with a relatively limited range for the communications. For fuel economy, it is expected that most benefits will be derived with greater communications distances, at the scale of many hundred meters or several kilometers, due to the large inertia of heavy duty vehicles. It may therefore be necessary to employ different communications strategies for ITS applications aimed at fuel economy and other environmental benefits than what is used for safety applications in order to achieve the greatest benefits.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Verma, Rajeev [Eaton Corporation; Norris, Sarah [Eaton Corporation; Cochran, Robert [Eaton Corporation

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Response to the Caldecott Tunnel Fire Scenario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 7, 1982, a tank truck and trailer carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline was involved in an accident in the Caldecott tunnel on State Route 24 near Oakland, California. The tank trailer overturned and subsequently caught fire. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook analyses to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by truck. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was used to determine the thermal environment in the Caldecott tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used to define boundary conditions for a thermal transient model of a truck transport cask containing spent nuclear fuel. The Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) Legal Weight Truck (LWT) transportation cask was selected for this evaluation, as it represents a typical truck (over-the-road) cask, and can be used to transport a wide variety of spent nuclear fuels. Detailed analysis of the cask response to the fire was performed using the ANSYS® computer code to evaluate the thermal performance of the cask design in this fire scenario. This report describes the methods and approach used to assess the thermal response of the selected cask design to the conditions predicted in the Caldecott tunnel fire. The results of the analysis are presented in detail, with an evaluation of the cask response to the fire. The staff concluded that some components of smaller transportation casks resembling the NAC LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade significantly. Small transportation casks similar to the NAC LWT would probably experience failure of seals in this severe accident scenario. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the cask response to the Caldecott tunnel fire. Although some components heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant release as a result of the fire for the NAC LWT and similar casks.

Adkins, Harold E.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Cuta, Judith M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

Davis, S.C.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diesel-powered trucks consumeonly about 2 of the 15 quadril- lion BtusDiesel Methanol/ethanol Ethanol Ethanol Hydrogen $ per physical gallon 0.80-I.10 $ per million Btu

Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT OF E-TURBO FOR SUV AND LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to develop an electronically controlled, electrically assisted turbocharging system, e-Turbo, for application to SUV and light truck class of passenger vehicles. Earlier simulation work had shown the benefits of e-Turbo system on increasing low-end torque and improving fuel economy. This paper will present further data from the literature to show that advanced turbocharging can enable diesel engine downsizing of 10-30% with 6-17% improvement in fuel economy. This is in addition to the fuel economy benefit that a turbocharged diesel engine offers over conventional gasoline engines. E-Turbo is necessary to get acceptable driving characteristics with downsized diesel engines. As a first step towards the development of this technology for SUV/light truck sized diesel engines (4-6 litre displacement), design concepts and hardware were evaluated for a smaller engine (2 litre displacement). It was felt that design and developments issues could be minimized, the concept proven progressively on the bench, on a small engine and then applied to a large Vee engine (one on each bank). After successful demonstration of the concept, large turbomachinery could be designed and built specifically for larger SUV sized diesel engines. This paper presents the results of development of e-Turbo for a 2 litre diesel engine. A detailed comparison of several electric assist technologies including permanent magnet, six-phase induction and conventional induction motor/generator technology was done. A comparison of switched reluctance motor technology was also done although detailed design was not carried out.

Balis, C; Middlemass, C; Shahed, SM

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

Transportation Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transporting nuclear materials within the United States and throughout the world is a complicated and sometimes highly controversial effort requiring...

380

Local Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Greening Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Goal 2: Greening Transportation LANL supports and encourages employees to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions by offering various commuting and work...

382

The Value of Flexibility in Robust Location-Transportation Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and distribution of products can be delayed until actual orders are ... such as hub locations, supplier locations, air freight hub locations, railway station

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

Diesel Truck Traffic in Low-Income and Minority Communities Adjacent to Ports: Environmental Justice Implications of Near-Roadway Land Use Conflicts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Panel OKs Cleanup Plan for Port Trucks. Los Angeles Times,in Communities near the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.8. Emission Reduction Plan for Ports and Goods Movement.

Houston, Douglas; Krudysz, Margaret; Winer, Arthur

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Chamber transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

OLSON,CRAIG L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

REPORT on the TRUCK BRAKE LINING WORKSHOP and FLEET OPERATORS' SURVEY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes what transpired during brake linings-related workshop held at the Fall 2003 meeting of the Technology and Maintenance Council (TMC) in Charlotte, NC. The title of the workshop was ''Developing a Useful Friction Material Rating System''. It was organized by a team consisting of Peter Blau (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Jim Britell (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), and Jim Lawrence (Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association). The workshop was held under the auspices of TMC Task Force S6 (Chassis), chaired by Joseph Stianche (Sanderson Farms, Inc.). Six invited speakers during the morning session provided varied perspectives on testing and rating aftermarket automotive and truck brake linings. They were: James R. Clark, Chief Engineer, Foundation Brakes and Wheel Equipment, Dana Corporation, Spicer Heavy Axle and Brake Division; Charles W. Greening, Jr, President, Greening Test Labs; Tim Duncan, General Manager, Link Testing Services;Dennis J. McNichol, President, Dennis NationaLease; Jim Fajerski, Business Manager, OE Sales and Applications Engineering, Federal Mogul Corporation; and Peter J. Blau, Senior Materials Development Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The afternoon break-out sessions addressed nine questions concerning such issues as: ''Should the federal government regulate aftermarket lining quality?''; ''How many operators use RP 628, and if so, what's good or bad about it?''; and ''Would there be any value to you of a vocation-specific rating system?'' The opinions of each discussion group, consisting of 7-9 participants, were reported and consolidated in summary findings on each question. Some questions produced a greater degree of agreement than others. In general, the industry seems eager for more information that would allow those who are responsible for maintaining truck brakes to make better, more informed choices on aftermarket linings. A written fleet operator survey was also conducted during the TMC meeting. Twenty-one responses were received, spanning fleet sizes between 12 and 170,000 vehicles. Responses are summarized in a series of tables separated into responses from small (100 or fewer powered vehicles), medium (101-1000 vehicles), and large fleets (>1000 vehicles). The vast majority of fleets do their own brake maintenance, relying primarily on experience and lining manufactures to select aftermarket linings. At least half of the responders are familiar to some extent with TMC Recommended Practice 628 on brake linings, but most do not use this source of test data as the sole criterion to select linings. Significant shortfalls in the applicability of TMC RP 628 to certain types of brake systems were noted.

Blau, P.J.

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

386

Transportation Science and the Dynamics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Airports, Railyards Roads, Airline Routes, Railroad Track Automobiles, Trains, and Planes, Manufacturing Computers, Satellites, Telephone Exchanges Fiber Optic Cables Radio Links Voice, Data, Video Energy Pumping Stations, Plants Pipelines, Transmission Lines Water, Gas, Oil, Electricity #12;US Railroad Freight Flows

Nagurney, Anna

387

Laredo 2010-2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................................................................5?1? Congressional?High?Priority?Corridors ........................................................................5?1? Freight?Infrastructure.................................................................................................5...?4? International?Border?Bridges .....................................................................................5?5? Mexican?Multimodal?Corridor ...................................................................................5?6? Foreign...

Laredo Urban Transportation Study

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

Shielding and criticality analyses of phase I reference truck and rail cask designs for spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented herein to determine the adequacy with respect to shielding regulations of reference designs for a truck cask containing 2 PWR or 5 BWR assemblies of standard burnup (45 GWd/MTU for PWR, 40 GWd/MTU for BWR) and 1 PWR assembly with extended burnup (55 GWd/MTU). The study also includes reference and modified rail cask designs with projected payloads of 8, 10, or 12 PWR assemblies. The burnup/age trends are analyzed in one dimension for both Pb and depleted uranium (DU) gamma-ray shields. The results of the two-dimensional shielding analysis uphold the one-dimensional results as being an appropriate means of studying the burnup/age trends for the truck cask. These results show that the reference design for the Pb-shield truck cask is inadequate for all cases considered, while the DU-shield truck cask is capable of carrying the desired payloads. The one-dimensional shielding analysis results for the reference Pb and DU rail casks indicate substantial margins exist in the side doses for reasonable burnup/age combinations. For a Pb-cask configuration, margins exist primarily for long-cooled (15 years) fuel. For the modified Pb and DU rail casks, the 2-m dose rates offer substantial margins below the regulatory limits for all burnup values considered provided the spent fuel has cooled for {>=}10 years. The modified Pb and DU casks yield essentially identical results and, hence, could be considered equivalent from a shielding perspective. The criticality analyses that were performed indicate that a truck basket can be designed to provide an adequate subcritical margin for 2 PWR assemblies enriched to 5 wt%. While the 10- and 12- assembly rail cask designs are very close to the regulatory limit of 0.95 for k{sub eff}, after accounting for a 0.01 {Delta}k bias and 2 standard deviations, the limit is exceeded by about 3%. It is believed that a combination of decreased enrichments and/or increased water gaps should allow these baskets to be acceptable.

Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Parks, C.V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

"Dedicated To The Continued Education, Training and Demonstration of PEM Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks In Real-World Applications."  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to further assist in the commercialization of fuel cell and H2 technology by building further upon the successful fuel cell lift truck deployments that were executed by LiftOne in 2007, with longer deployments of this technology in real-world applications. We involved facilities management, operators, maintenance personnel, safety groups, and Authorities Having Jurisdiction. LiftOne strived to educate a broad group from many areas of industry and the community as to the benefits of this technology. Included were First Responders from the local areas. We conducted month long deployments with end-users to validate the value proposition and the market requirements for fuel cell powered lift trucks. Management, lift truck operators, Authorities Having Jurisdiction and the general public experienced 'hands on' fuel cell experience in the material handling applications. We partnered with Hydrogenics in the execution of the deployment segment of the program. Air Products supplied the compressed H2 gas and the mobile fueler. Data from the Fuel Cell Power Packs and the mobile fueler was sent to the DOE and NREL as required. Also, LiftOne conducted the H2 Education Seminars on a rotating basis at their locations for lift trucks users and for other selected segments of the community over the project's 36 month duration. Executive Summary The technology employed during the deployments program was not new, as the equipment had been used in several previous demos and early adoptions within the material handling industry. This was the case with the new HyPx Series PEM - Fuel Cell Power Packs used, which had been demo'd before during the 2007 Greater Columbia Fuel Cell Challenge. The Air Products HF-150 Fueler was used outdoors during the deployments and had similarly been used for many previous demo programs. The methods used centered on providing this technology as the power for electric sit-down lift trucks at high profile companies operating large fleets. As a long-standing lift truck dealership, LiftOne was able to introduce the fuel cells to such companies in the demanding applications. Accomplishments vs Objectives: We were successful in respect to the stated objectives. The Education Segment's H2 Education Sessions were able to introduce fuel cell technology to many companies and reached the intended broad audience. Also, demos of the lift truck at the sessions as well as the conferences; expos and area events provided great additional exposure. The Deployments were successful in allowing the 6 participating companies to test the 2 fuel cell powered lift trucks in their demanding applications. One of the 6 sites (BMW) eventually adopted over 80 fuel cells from Plug Power. LiftOne was one of the 3 fuel cell demonstrators at BMW for this trial and played a major role in helping to prove the viability and efficiency of this alternative form of energy for BMW. The other 5 companies that participated in the project's deployments were encouraged by the trials and while not converting over to fuel cell power at this time, expressed the desire to revisit acquisition scenarios in the near future as the cost of fuel cells and infrastructure continue to improve. The Education sessions began in March of 2009 at the 7 LiftOne Branches and continued throughout the duration of the project. Attendees came from a large base of lift truck users in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. The sessions were free and invitations were sent out to potential users and companies with intrigue. In addition to the Education content at the sessions (which was offered in a 'H2 101' format), LiftOne was able to demonstrate a working fuel cell powered lift truck, which proved to be a big draw with the 'hands on' experience. LiftOne also demo'd the fuel cell lift trucks at many conferences, expos, professional association meetings, trade shows and 'Green' events in major cities region including Charlotte, Greenville, and Columbia. Such events allowed for H2 Education Material to be presented, and recruit attendees for future sessi

Dever, Thomas J.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - asphalt plants truck Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aging of asphalt binder in HMA occurs in ... Source: Southwest Region University Transportation Center Collection: Engineering ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 12...

393

The cost of silage harvest and transport systems for herbaceous crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the highest yielding herbaceous biomass crops are thick-stemmed species such as energy cane (Saccharum ssp.), Napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum), and forage sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). Their relatively high moisture content necessitates they be handled and stored as silage rather than hay bales or modules. This paper presents estimated costs of harvesting and transporting herbaceous crops as silage. Costs are based on an engineering-economic approach. Equipment costs are estimated by combining per-hour costs with the hours required to complete the operation. Harvest includes severing, chopping, and blowing stalks into a wagon or track. For 50% moisture content, in-field costs using trucks in the field (options 0 and 1) are $3.72-$5.99/dry Mg ($3.37-$5.43/dt) for a farmer and $3.09-$3.64/dry Mg ($2.81- $3.30/dt) for custom operators. However, slopes and wet field conditions may not permit trucks to enter the field. Direct-cut harvest systems using wagons to haul silage to trucks waiting at the field edge (option 2) are $8.52-$11.94/dry Mg ($7.73-$10.83/dt) for farmers and $7.20-$7.36/dry Mg ($6.53-$6.68/dt) for custom operators. Based on four round trips per 8-hour day, 50% and 70% moisture silage, truck transport costs are $8.37/dry Mg ($ 7.60/dt) and $13.98/dry Mg ($12.68/dt), respectively. Lower yields, lower hours of machine use, or a higher discount rate result in higher costs.

Turhollow, A.; Downing, M.; Butler, J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

The GIS Revolution in Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis (http://cta.ornl.gov/cta/) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This is a group of 34 researchers and support contractors that focus on freight, energy, safety, supply chain, defense, and security studies and systems development for air, rail, water...

Harrison, Glen

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

In-Use and Vehicle Dynamometer Evaluation and Comparison of Class 7 Hybrid Electric and Conventional Diesel Delivery Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compared fuel economy and emissions between heavy-duty hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and equivalent conventional diesel vehicles. In-use field data were collected from daily fleet operations carried out at a FedEx facility in California on six HEV and six conventional 2010 Freightliner M2-106 straight box trucks. Field data collection primarily focused on route assessment and vehicle fuel consumption over a six-month period. Chassis dynamometer testing was also carried out on one conventional vehicle and one HEV to determine differences in fuel consumption and emissions. Route data from the field study was analyzed to determine the selection of dynamometer test cycles. From this analysis, the New York Composite (NYComp), Hybrid Truck Users Forum Class 6 (HTUF 6), and California Air Resource Board (CARB) Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) drive cycles were chosen. The HEV showed 31% better fuel economy on the NYComp cycle, 25% better on the HTUF 6 cycle and 4% worse on the CARB HHDDT cycle when compared to the conventional vehicle. The in-use field data indicates that the HEVs had around 16% better fuel economy than the conventional vehicles. Dynamometer testing also showed that the HEV generally emitted higher levels of nitric oxides than the conventional vehicle over the drive cycles, up to 77% higher on the NYComp cycle (though this may at least in part be attributed to the different engine certification levels in the vehicles tested). The conventional vehicle was found to accelerate up to freeway speeds over ten seconds faster than the HEV.

Burton, J.; Walkowicz, K.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Comparative study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transportation alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WIPP transportation studies in the Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement for WIPP are the baseline for this report. In an attempt to present the most current analysis, this study incorporates the most relevant data available. The following three transportation options are evaluated for the Disposal Phase, which is assumed to be 20 years: Truck shipments, consisting of a tractor and trailer, with three TRUPACT-IIs or one RH-72B; Regular commercial train shipments consisting of up to three railcars carrying up to 18 TRUPACT-IIs or up to six RH-72Bs; Dedicated train shipments consisting of a locomotive, an idle car, railcars carrying 18 TRUPACT-IIs or six RH-72Bs, another idle car, and a caboose or passenger car with an emergency response specialist. No other cargo is carried. This report includes: A consideration of occupational and public risks and exposures, and other environmental impacts; A consideration of emergency response capabilities; and An extimation of comparative costs.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transportation Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work...

398

Computational Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), in-vehicle computers, and computers in the transportation infrastructure are integrated ride- sharing, real-time multi-modal routing and navigation, to autonomous/assisted driving

Illinois at Chicago, University of

399

Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) Project: Tractive Energy Analysis Methodology and Results from Long-Haul Truck Drive Cycle Evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the approach that will be used in the Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) project to evaluate the fuel savings potential of various truck efficiency technologies. The methods and equations used for performing the tractive energy evaluations are presented and the calculation approach is described. Several representative results for individual duty cycle segments are presented to demonstrate the approach and the significance of this analysis for the project. The report is divided into four sections, including an initial brief overview of the LSDC project and its current status. In the second section of the report, the concepts that form the basis of the analysis are presented through a discussion of basic principles pertaining to tractive energy and the role of tractive energy in relation to other losses on the vehicle. In the third section, the approach used for the analysis is formalized and the equations used in the analysis are presented. In the fourth section, results from the analysis for a set of individual duty cycle measurements are presented and different types of drive cycles are discussed relative to the fuel savings potential that specific technologies could bring if these drive cycles were representative of the use of a given vehicle or trucking application. Additionally, the calculation of vehicle mass from measured torque and speed data is presented and the accuracy of the approach is demonstrated.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transportation analysis for the concept of regional repositories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, planning associated with the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program assumed the use of one or two large, centrally located repository facilities. Recently, an alternative approach has been proposed which consists of the use of multiple, smaller regional repositories. In this report, several regional concepts were studied and the transportation requirements for the shipment of spent fuel to the regional repositories were estimated. In general, the transportation requirements decrease as the number of repositories increase. However, as far as transportation is concerned, the point of diminishing returns is reached at approximately one repository in each of three to four regions. Additional savings beyond this point are small. A series of sensitivity studies is also included to demonstrate the impact on the total transportation requirements of varying cask capacity, rail speed, or truck speed. Since most of the projected fuel shipments are to be made by rail, varying the capacity of the rail cask or varying average rail transport speed will have a major effect on overall transportation requirements.

Joy, D.S.; Hudson, B.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

DeLuchi, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Performance Analysis of the SensorNet's Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot Viewer at the Dorchester West Bound Interstate Weigh Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 9-11 attacks, the United States has increased its focus on developing technologies designed to warn us in the event of another attack and to prevent these attacks from happening in the first place. The SensorNet research group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Computer Science and Engineering Division is participating in this effort by developing systems to give critical real-time information to federal, state, and local emergency response decision makers. SensorNet has approached this goal by putting together a system with several sensors and programs called the Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot project (SETCP). The SETCP utilizes interstate weigh stations not only to weigh the passing trucks but also to check for gamma and neutron radiation inside the truck without the aid of a human in close proximity. The system also collects additional data that help identify the truck (the truck's length, weight, license plate number, and photographs of the truck). The objective of this research work was to characterize and analyze the data collected from the South Carolina weigh station on I-26W and compare it with previous data analysis on the performance of the Tennessee weigh station on I-40E. The purpose was to find patterns in the trucks with radioactive alarms and, regional truck traffic, as well as to find patterns of inconsistency in the system (illogical length measurements of the truck, inaccurate readings and character recognition of the license plate). During a three-month period, radioactive alarms and traffic patterns were identified and characterized by grouping all of the data and making graphs and charts in Microsoft Excel to show the flow of traffic, the type of truck traffic, the number of alarms and other information. Inconsistence patterns were found by analyzing the data, looking for missing or illogical information, and determining how often it happens. The improvements of these inconsistencies were also analyzed after repairs were made to the system. Given the small number of radiation alarms detected, there were no clear patterns found. Further research has to be done in this area; also, the analysis period needs to be extended from three months to a year. For traffic flow patterns, it was found that the truck traffic was heaviest on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. The inconsistencies found and fixed in the system were the illogical length measurements and the inaccurate reading and character recognition of the license plate. During the summer of 2007, a Florida International University (FIU) student supported this research work under the direct supervision of Mr. David Hill at ORNL's Computer Science and Engineering Division. The 10-week student internship was supported by the DOE/FIU Science and Technology Workforce Initiative, an innovative program developed by the US Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and FIU's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) (authors)

Colon Mendoza, R.A.; Lagos, L.E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Hill, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

2005 International Truck & Bus Safety & Security Symposium 447 SAFETY AND SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES OF IMPORTANCE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Michigan; Ventura County Transportation Commission (VCTC) in Ventura County, California; and Tri solution. According to Dan Marchand of TriMet, Portland, Oregon, "technology makes it possible to deliver trips. TriMet, on the other hand, coordinates a very large, fixed route, multi-modal transit program

406

SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, JANUARY 2001; REVISED MAY 2001, AND AUG 2001 1 A feedback control scheme for reversing a truck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, JANUARY 2001; REVISED MAY 2001, AND AUG 2001 1 A feedback control scheme for reversing a truck and trailer vehicle Claudio Alta#12;ni, Alberto the parts of the multibody vehicle, sometimes it is necessary to drive forward to enter in a speci#12;c

Altafini, Claudio

407

Testimony to the United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources POLICIES TO INCREASE PASSENGER CAR AND LIGHT TRUCK FUEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO INCREASE PASSENGER CAR AND LIGHT TRUCK FUEL ECONOMY 2:30 pm, Tuesday, January 30, 2007 Dirksen Senate to formulate effective policies to significantly increase motor vehicle fuel economy. The views I express today to supply the world's growing demand for liquid fuels. Why do we need fuel economy policy? For too long we

408

Since 1975, the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks has been regulated by the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since 1975, the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks has been regulated by the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, established during the energy crises of the 1970s. Calls to increase fuel economy are usually met by a fierce debate on the effectiveness of the CAFE standards

409

Assessing economic impacts of clean diesel engines. Phase 1 report: U.S.- or foreign-produced clean diesel engines for selected light trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light trucks' share of the US light vehicle market rose from 20% in 1980 to 41% in 1996. By 1996, annual energy consumption for light trucks was 6.0 x 10{sup 15} Btu (quadrillion Btu, or quad), compared with 7.9 quad for cars. Gasoline engines, used in almost 99% of light trucks, do not meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. These engines have poor fuel economy, many getting only 10--12 miles per gallon. Diesel engines, despite their much better fuel economy, had not been preferred by US light truck manufacturers because of problems with high NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. The US Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, has funded research projects at several leading engine makers to develop a new low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine, first for large trucks, then for light trucks. Recent advances in diesel engine technology may overcome the NO{sub x} and particulate problems. Two plausible alternative clean diesel (CD) engine market penetration trajectories were developed, representing an optimistic case (High Case) and an industry response to meet the CAFE standards (CAFE Case). However, leadership in the technology to produce a successful small, advanced diesel engine for light trucks is an open issue between U.S. and foreign companies and could have major industry and national implications. Direct and indirect economic effects of the following CD scenarios were estimated by using the Standard and Poor's Data Resources, Inc., US economy model: High Case with US Dominance, High Case with Foreign Dominance, CAFE Case with US Dominance, and CAFE Case with Foreign Dominance. The model results demonstrate that the economic activity under each of the four CD scenarios is higher than in the Base Case (business as usual). The economic activity is highest for the High Case with US dominance, resulting in maximum gains in such key indicators as gross domestic product, total civilian employment, and federal government surplus. Specifically, the cumulative real gross domestic product surplus over the Base Case during the 2000--2022 period is about $56 x 10{sup 9} (constant 1992 dollars) under this high US dominance case. In contrast, the real gross domestic product gains under the high foreign dominance case would be only about half of the above gains with US dominance.

Teotia, A.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Cuenca, R.M.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

410

Overview of the environmental concerns of coal transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 30 environmental concerns were analyzed for the transportation of coal by rail, roads (trucks), high voltage transmission lines (that is, from mine-mouth generating plants to distribution networks), coal slurry pipelines, and barges. The following criteria were used to identify these problems: (1) real physical environmetal impacts for which control technologies must be developed, or regulation made effective where control technologies presently exist; (2) the level of impact is uncertain, although the potential impact may be moderate to high; (3) the concerns identified by the first two criteria are specific to or exacerbated by coal transportation. Generic transportation problems are not included. The significant environmental problems identified as a result of this study are: (1) rail transport - community traffic disruption and human health, safety, and habitat destruction; (2) coal haul roads - road degradation, traffic congestion and safety, air quality, and noise; (3) high voltage transmission lines - changed land use without local benefits, biological health and safety effects, and disruption of world weather patterns; (4) slurry pipelines - water availability, water quality, and possible spills from non-water slurry pipelines; and (5) barge transport - impacts common to all barge traffic. (DMC)

Bertram, K.; Dauzvardis, P.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS -- NOx = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY -- The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT -- Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

Stang, John H.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS--NO{sub x} = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NO{sub x} = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY--The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT--Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

John H. Stang

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

A TRANSPORTATION RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR ANALYZING THE TRANSPORT OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TO THE PROPOSED YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis addressed the potential for transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from 77 origins for 34 types of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, and 10,911 rail shipments. The analysis evaluated transportation over 59,250 unique shipment links for travel outside Nevada (shipment segments in urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 links in Nevada. In addition, the analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The analysis also used mode-specific accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. This complex mix of data and information required an innovative approach to assess the transportation impacts. The approach employed a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database tool that incorporated data from many sources, including unit risk factors calculated using the RADTRAN IV transportation risk assessment computer program. Using Microsoft{reg_sign} Access, the analysts organized data (such as state-specific accident and fatality rates) into tables and developed queries to obtain the overall transportation impacts. Queries are instructions to the database describing how to use data contained in the database tables. While a query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one sequence of queries that is used to calculate a particular transportation impact. For example, the incident-free dose to off-link populations in a state is calculated by a query that uses route segment lengths for each route in a state that could be used by shipments, populations for each segment, number of shipments on each segment, and an incident-free unit risk factor calculated using RADTRAN IV. In addition to providing a method for using large volumes of data in the calculations, the queries provide a straight-forward means used to verify results. Another advantage of using the MS Access database was the ability to develop query hierarchies using nested queries. Calculations were broken into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing unit risk factors calculated using RADTRAN IV to produce radiological impacts. Through the use of queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained. The paper will show both the flexibility of the assessment tool and the ease it provides for verifying results.

NA

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

US EPA SmartWay Transport Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Way Partner Results 2, 700 Partners ­ Most of the top 100 carriers in the US (700,000 trucks) ­ All the Class 1 railroads; several short haul railroads ­ 25% of the Fortune 100 shipper partners ­ In addition - logistics companies, technology manufacturers, trucks stops, ports, banks, vehicle and equipment dealer

Minnesota, University of

415

The impact of fuel price volatility on transportation mode choice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, the price of oil has driven large fluctuations in the price of diesel fuel, which is an important cost component in freight logistics. This thesis explores the impact of fuel price volatility on supply ...

Kim, Eun Hie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

HYDROGEN COMMERCIALIZATION: TRANSPORTATION FUEL FOR THE 21ST CENTURY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1999, SunLine Transit Agency has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to develop and test hydrogen infrastructure, fuel cell buses, a heavy-duty fuel cell truck, a fuel cell neighborhood electric vehicle, fuel cell golf carts and internal combustion engine buses operating on a mixture of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG). SunLine has cultivated a rich history of testing and demonstrating equipment for leading industry manufacturers in a pre-commercial environment. Visitors to SunLine's "Clean Fuels Mall" from around the world have included government delegations and agencies, international journalists and media, industry leaders and experts and environmental and educational groups.

APOLONIO DEL TORO

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon during Barge Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To mitigate for fish losses related to passage through the Federal Columbia River Power System, an extensive fish transportation program using barges and trucks to move fish around and downstream of dams and reservoirs was implemented in 1981. Population modeling and other analyses to support Pacific salmon recovery efforts have assumed that the survival of juvenile salmonids during the transportation experience was 98%. To estimate survival during barge transport from Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River to a release area downstream of Bonneville Dam, a distance of 470 km, we used a novel adaptation of a release-recapture model with acoustic-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) smolts. A total of 1,494 yearling Chinook salmon were surgically implanted with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponders (PIT) and divided into three groups. The three tagged groups consisted of; (1) a group which was released into the raceway with the population of fish which were later loaded into transportation barges (R{sub B}), (2) a group which was held in a net-pen suspended within the general barge population until 5-6 h prior to barge evacuation, at which time they were confirmed to be alive and then released into the general barge population (R{sub A}), and (3) to validate a model assumption, a group which was euthanized and released into the barge population 2-8 h prior to barge evacuation (R{sub D}). Six replicates of these groups were loaded onto fish transport barges that departed Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River between 29 April and 13 May, 2010. Acoustic receiver arrays between 70 and 220 km downstream of the barge evacuation site were used to detect tagged fish and served as the basis for estimation of survival within the barge. Tag-life-corrected estimates of reach survival were calculated for barged and control fish in each of the six replicate trials. The ratio of survival from release to Rkm 153 for barged fish relative to control fish provided the estimate of within-barge survival. The replicate survival estimates ranged from 0.9503 (SE = 0.0253) to 1.0003 (SE = 0.0155). The weighted average of the replicate estimates of within-barge survival was computed to be = 0.9833 (SE = 0.0062). This study provides the first documentation that assumed survival of 98% inside barges during yearling Chinook salmon smolt transport appears to be justified. Survival of other species or stocks by barge or for any species/stock by truck remains unknown.

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Skalski, J. R.; Deters, Katherine A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Neurotransmitter Transporters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at specialized synaptic junctions where electrical excitability in the form of an action potential is translated membrane of neurons and glial cells. Transporters harness electrochemical gradients to force the movement.els.net #12;The response produced when a transmitter interacts with its receptors, the synaptic potential

Bergles, Dwight

419

TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT AND RETURN FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) of the repository including the personnel at the security gate and cask staging areas. This calculation is required to support the preclosure safety analysis (PCSA) to ensure that the predicted doses are within the regulatory limits prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Cask Receipt and Return Facility receives NRC licensed transportation casks loaded with spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TCRRF operation starts with the receipt, inspection, and survey of the casks at the security gate and the staging areas, and proceeds to the process facilities. The transportation casks arrive at the site via rail cars or trucks under the guidance of the national transportation system. This calculation was developed by the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization and is intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in work regarding facility design. Environmental and Nuclear Engineering personnel should be consulted before using this calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or for use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization.

V. Arakali

2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Sustainable Transportation: Accelerating Widespread Adoption of Energy Efficient Vehicles & Fuels (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously slash oil consumption and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, a truly sustainable solution will require more than just putting drivers behind the wheels of new fuel-efficient cars. As the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) accelerates widespread adoption of high-performance, low-emission, energy-efficient passenger and freight vehicles, as well as alternative fuels and related infrastructure. Researchers collaborate closely with industry, government, and research partners, using a whole-systems approach to design better batteries, drivetrains, and engines, as well as thermal management, energy storage, power electronic, climate control, alternative fuel, combustion, and emission systems. NREL's sustainable transportation research, development, and deployment (RD&D) efforts are not limited to vehicles, roads, and fueling stations. The lab also explores ways to save energy and reduce GHGs by integrating transportation technology advancements with renewable energy generation, power grids and building systems, urban planning and policy, and fleet operations.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 21.01.08.X0.03 Vehicle Use Reports: Automobiles/Trucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 21.01.08.X0.03 Vehicle Use Reports: Automobiles, 2014 Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Procedures 21.01.08.X0.03 Vehicle Use Reports: Automobiles Use Reports: Automobiles/Trucks Page 2 of 2 2.5 Enter the purpose of use for each trip. Terms

422

Engineering task plan for the development, fabrication and installation of rotary mode core sample truck grapple hoist box level wind system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Task Plan is to design, generate fabrication drawings, fabricate, test, and install the grapple hoist level wind system for Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) 3 and 4. Deliverables will include generating fabrication drawings, fabrication of one level wind system, updating fabrication drawings as required, and installation of level wind systems on RMCST 3 or 4. The installation of the level wind systems will be done during a preventive maintenance outage.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Future of Sustainable Transportation This is the January 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. Illustration of an electric vehicle Illustration of an...

424

Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

David Lyons

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Greening Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGetGraphene's 3D CounterpartDepartmentTransportation

427

Transportation Infrastructure  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012 Greenbuy3 Archive Transportation Fact of the Week

428

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

High Efficiency, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous challenges to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases, meet stringent emissions regulations, provide customer value, and improve safety. The HECC program successfully reduced engine fuel consumption and greenhouse gases while providing greater customer valve. The US EPA 2010 emissions standard poses a significant challenge for developing clean diesel powertrains that meet the DoE Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for fuel efficiency improvement while remaining affordable. Along with exhaust emissions, an emphasis on heavy duty vehicle fuel efficiency is being driven by increased energy costs as well as the potential regulation of greenhouse gases. An important element of the success of meeting emissions while significantly improving efficiency is leveraging Cummins component technologies such as fuel injection equipment, aftertreatment, turbomahcinery, electronic controls, and combustion systems. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 55% peak brake thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The first step in developing high efficiency clean products has been supported by the DoE co-sponsored HECC program. The objectives of the HECC program are: (1) To design and develop advanced diesel engine architectures capable of achieving US EPA 2010 emission regulations while improving the brake thermal efficiency by 10% compared to the baseline (a state of the art 2007 production diesel engine). (2) To design and develop components and subsystems (fuel systems, air handling, controls, etc) to enable construction and development of multi-cylinder engines. (3) To perform an assessment of the commercial viability of the newly developed engine technology. (4) To specify fuel properties conducive to improvements in emissions, reliability, and fuel efficiency for engines using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) technologies. To demonstrate the technology is compatible with B2

Donald Stanton

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Fourth quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project encompasses the first year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on LNG research issues that may be categorized as direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. In addition, a potential new utilization of LNG fuel has been found, as a part of this work on the fundamental nature of adsorption of LNG vent gases in higher hydrocarbons; follow on research for this and other related applications and transfer of technology are proceeding at this time.

Sutton, W.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Using real-time truck transportation information to predict customer rejections and refrigeration-system fuel efficiency in packaged salad distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Companies that operate cold supply chains can greatly benefit from information availability and data generation. The abundance of information now available to cold chain operators and harvested from every echelon of the ...

Seminario, Carlos (Carlos Manuel Seminario Velarde)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Simulation Analysis Center for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the reactor sites include rail car, truck, and heavy haul movements; cask opening, loading, and closing policy makers in the planning for the loading of spent nuclear fuel at commercial utility reactors

434

Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Transporting particulate material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fact #699: October 31, 2011 Transportation Energy Use by Mode...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

gas, and electricity) by various transporation sectors including light vehicles, mediumheavy trucks and buses, air, water, rail, and pipeline. Highway vehicles are responsible...

437

Transportation Security | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

438

Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

Willigan, Rhonda

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

"Educating transportation professionals."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Educating transportation professionals." Michael Demetsky Henry L. Kinnier Professor mjd of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works closely with the Virginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research (VCTIR), located

Acton, Scott

440

Transportation Efficiency Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transportation efficiency reduces travel demand as measured by vehicle miles traveled (VMT). While transportation efficiency policies are often implemented under local governments, national and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Chapter 12 Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2-1 November 2012 Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 12 Transportation This chapter describes existing transportation resources in...

442

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Transporting radioactive materials: Q & A to your questions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 2 million packages of radioactive materials are shipped each year in the United States. These shipments are carried by trucks, trains, ships, and airplanes every day just like other commodities. Compliance with Federal regulations ensures that radioactive materials are transported safely. Proper packaging is the key to safe shipment. Package designs for radioactive materials must protect the public and the environment even in case of an accident. As the level of radioactivity increases, packaging design requirements become more stringent. Radioactive materials have been shipped in this country for more than 40 years. As with other commodities, vehicles carrying these materials have been involved in accidents. However, no deaths or serious injuries have resulted from exposure to the radioactive contents of these shipments. People are concerned about how radioactive shipments might affect them and the environment. This booklet briefly answers some of the commonly asked questions about the transport of radioactive materials. More detailed information is available from the sources listed at the end of this booklet.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) canister impact testing and analyses for the Transportation Technology Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A legal weight truck cask design has been developed for the US Department of Energy by GA Technologies, Inc. The cask will be used to transport defense high-level waste canisters produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The development of the cask required the collection of impact data for the DWPF canisters. The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) performed this work under the guidance of the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Two full-scale DWPF canisters filled with nonradioactive borosilicate glass were impacted under ''normal'' and ''hypothetical'' accident conditions. Two canisters, supplied by the DWPF, were tested. Each canister was vertically dropped on the bottom end from a height of either 0.3 m or 9.1 m (for normal or hypothetical accident conditions, respectively). The structural integrity of each canister was then examined using helium leak and dye penetrant testing. The canisters' diameters and heights, which had been previously measured, were then remeasured to determine how the canister dimensions had changed. Following structural integrity testing, the canisters were flaw leak tested. For transportation flaw leak testing, four holes were fabricated into the shell of canister A-27 (0.3 m drop height). The canister was then transported a total distance of 2069 miles. During transport, the waste form material that fell from each flaw was collected to determine the amount of size distribution of each flaw release. 2 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

Farnsworth, R.K.; Mishima, J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TRUCK EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGIES IN CLASS 8 TRACTOR-TRAILERS BASED ON A TRACTIVE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING MEASURED DRIVE CYCLE DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantifying the fuel savings that can be achieved from different truck fuel efficiency technologies for a fleet s specific usage allows the fleet to select the combination of technologies that will yield the greatest operational efficiency and profitability. This paper presents an analysis of vehicle usage in a commercial vehicle fleet and an assessment of advanced efficiency technologies using an analysis of measured drive cycle data for a class 8 regional commercial shipping fleet. Drive cycle measurements during a period of a full year from six tractor-trailers in normal operations in a less-than-truckload (LTL) carrier were analyzed to develop a characteristic drive cycle that is highly representative of the fleet s usage. The vehicle mass was also estimated to account for the variation of loads that the fleet experienced. The drive cycle and mass data were analyzed using a tractive energy analysis to quantify the fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions benefits that can be achieved on class 8 tractor-trailers when using advanced efficiency technologies, either individually or in combination. Although differences exist among class 8 tractor-trailer fleets, this study provides valuable insight into the energy and emissions reduction potential that various technologies can bring in this important trucking application.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Calcagno, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Yun, Jeongran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Development of an Effective Transportation Risk Assessment Model for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past approaches for assessing the impacts of transporting spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste have not been effectively implemented or have used relatively simple approaches. The Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) analysis considers 83 origins, 34 fuel types, 49,914 legal weight truck shipments, 10,911 rail shipments, consisting of 59,250 shipment links outside Nevada (shipment kilometers and population density pairs through urban, suburban or rural zones by state), and 22,611 shipment links in Nevada. There was additional complexity within the analysis. The analysis modeled the behavior of 41 isotopes, 1091 source terms, and used 8850 food transfer factors (distinct factors by isotope for each state). The model also considered different accident rates for legal weight truck, rail, and heavy haul truck by state, and barge by waterway. To capture the all of the complexities of the transportation analysis, a Microsoft{reg_sign} Access database was created. In the Microsoft{reg_sign} Access approach the data is placed in individual tables and equations are developed in queries to obtain the overall impacts. While the query might be applied to thousands of table entries, there is only one equation for a particular impact. This greatly simplifies the validation effort. Furthermore, in Access, data in tables can be linked automatically using query joins. Another advantage built into MS Access is nested queries, or the ability to develop query hierarchies. It is possible to separate the calculation into a series of steps, each step represented by a query. For example, the first query might calculate the number of shipment kilometers traveled through urban, rural and suburban zones for all states. Subsequent queries could join the shipment kilometers query results with another table containing the state and mode specific accident rate to produce accidents by state. One of the biggest advantages of the nested queries is in validation. Temporarily restricting the query to one origin, one shipment, or one state and validating that the query calculation is returning the expected result allows simple validation. The paper will show the flexibility of the assessment tool to consider a wide variety of impacts. Through the use of pre-designed queries, impacts by origin, mode, fuel type or many other parameters can be obtained.

McSweeney; Thomas; Winnard; Ross; Steven B.; Best; Ralph E.

2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Graduate Certificate in Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

Bertini, Robert L.

448

TRANSPORTATION Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN publication is a report of transportation research, education, and outreach activities for the period July

Minnesota, University of

449

Regional Transportation Coordination Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Planning Commission Wanda Carter-Dyer Public Transportation Coordinator Texas Department of Transportation Councilperson Debra Martinez Briseno Cities in Calhoun County Laura G. Sanders Executive Director Golden Crescent Workforce... Regional Planning Commission Wanda Carter-Dyer Public Transportation Coordinator Texas Department of Transportation Councilperson Debra Martinez Briseno Cities in Calhoun County Laura G. Sanders Executive Director Golden Crescent Workforce...

Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

450

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from freight transport This guidance provides clear instructions on calculating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from freight and report your greenhouse gas emissions', by providing more specific information and examples relating

451

A ROUTING SYSTEM BASED ON SPACEFILLING CURVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is cheapest to ship long distance by train and so railroads are capturing an in- creasing amount of long-haul, and all local freight, is handled by truck. The basic problem faced by a distribution manager, then among the vehicles so that not too many trucks are required. Copyright c 1995,6 John J. Bartholdi, III

Bartholdi III, John J.

452

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corridors, Megaregions, Rail, Truck, Fuel Efficiency, Freight Operating Costs. 18. Distribution Statement. To address this need, a truck-rail intermodal toolkit was developed for multimodal corridor analysis characteristics. The toolkit includes techniques to acquire data for simulating line-haul movements, and models

453

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wondering about the strap-on porn. Well, so what? I likeone. I like two kinds of porn. Asian Milf and Teachers withWATSON What is it, kiddie porn? Acid? The Sheriff unfolds it

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in. INSIDE OWSLEY MANOR TODD Hello? Mr. Owsley? Keith? It'sRIORDAN (CONT'D) Yes, hi, hello to your little friends too.Fitz Family. FATHER TITUS Hello boys. I know you were here

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hydrogen Industrial Trucks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slides from the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop held November 4, 2010 in Livermore, CA.

456

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it last night. MIKE The porno aboretum thing. Totally! TODDset the children are watching switches to porno. MRS.poltergeist really likes porno. SMALL CHILD 1 This is Anal

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Empty WIPP truck overturns  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage of theEMIKristen Honig June9 of

458

Barge Truck Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 566 8021 1 2 22008662 564 1,1460 0Year0Barge

459

Graduate Studies Transportation Systems Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Studies Transportation Systems Engineering TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS The transportation that transportation systems engineering can promote a thriving economy and a better quality of life by ensuring that transportation systems themselves affect the environment through operations, construction, and maintenance

Jacobs, Laurence J.

460

Introduction Transport in disordered graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

Fominov, Yakov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

Minnesota, University of

462

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 2, DOE/AL68080-TSR02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid OHV Energy Storage System concept was defined to be a mix of two energy storage technologies. The energy management system hardware configuration was identified, based on available GE Transportation Systems hardware. The subscale demonstration energy management system protection, performance, and sequencing requirements have been specified. A set of hybrid energy management strategies has been developed.

Lembit Salasoo

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

463

Transportation Baseline Schedule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The “1999 National Transportation Program - Transportation Baseline Report” presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste/material transportation. The companion “1999 Transportation ‘Barriers’ Analysis” analyzes the data and identifies existing and potential problems that may prevent or delay transportation activities based on the data presented. The “1999 Transportation Baseline Schedule” (this report) uses the same data to provide an overview of the transportation activities of DOE EM waste/materials. This report can be used to identify areas where stakeholder interface is needed, and to communicate to stakeholders the quantity/schedule of shipments going through their area. Potential bottlenecks in the transportation system can be identified; the number of packages needed, and the capacity needed at receiving facilities can be planned. This report offers a visualization of baseline DOE EM transportation activities for the 11 major sites and the “Geologic Repository Disposal” site (GRD).

Fawcett, Ricky Lee; John, Mark Earl

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

465

A Novel MagPipe Pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel capsule pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives, called Magplane MagPipe, is under development with the intention to replace trucks and railways for hauling materials from the mine to the rail head, power plant, or processing plant with reduced operating cost and energy consumption. The initial demonstration of a MagPipe line in Inner Mongolia will be a 500-m-long double-pipe coal transport system with the design transportation capacity of 3 Mega-Mg per year. The pipeline consists of 6-m-long plastic pipe modules with an I-beam suspension system inside the pipe to carry sets of five coupled capsules. The pipe will also contain noncontinuous motor winding modules spaced at 50-m intervals. A set of Halbach-arrayed permanent magnets on the bottom of the capsules interact with the linear motor windings to provide propulsion. The motor is driven by variable frequency drives outside the pipe to control the speed. This paper briefly describes the overall MagPipe pipeline transportation system, including the preliminary conclusions of the linear synchronous motor analysis.

Fang, J.R.; Montgomery, D.B.; Roderick, L. [Magplane Technology Inc., Littleton, MA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Department of Energy Spent Fuel Shipping Campaigns: Comparisons of Transportation Plans and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 30 years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully and safely transported shipments of spent nuclear fuel over America's highways and railroads. During that time, an exemplary safety record has been established with no identifiable fatalities, injuries, or environmental damage caused by the radioactive nature of the shipments. This paper evaluates some rail and truck shipping campaigns, planning processes, and selected transportation plans to identify lessons learned in terms of planning and programmatic activities. The intent of this evaluation is to document best practices from current processes and previous plans for DOE programs preparing or considering future plans. DOE's National Transportation Program (NTP) reviewed 13 plans, beginning with core debris shipments from Three Mile Island to current, ongoing fuel campaigns. This paper describes lessons learned in the areas of: emergency planning, planning information, security, shipment prenotification, emergency notification/response, terrorism/sabotage risk, and recovery and cleanup, as well as routing, security, carrier/driver requirements, transportation operational contingencies, tracking, inspections and safe parking.

Holm, Judith A.; Thrower, Alex W.; Antizzo, Karen

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

467

Spent Fuel Transportation Package Response to the Baltimore Tunnel Fire Scenario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 18, 2001, a freight train carrying hazardous (non-nuclear) materials derailed and caught fire while passing through the Howard Street railroad tunnel in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook an investigation of the train derailment and fire to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by railroad. Shortly after the accident occurred, the USNRC met with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB, the U.S. agency responsible for determining the cause of transportation accidents), to discuss the details of the accident and the ensuing fire. Following these discussions, the USNRC assembled a team of experts from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine the thermal conditions that existed in the Howard Street tunnel fire and analyze the effects of this fire on various spent fuel transportation package designs. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code, developed by NIST, was used to determine the thermal environment present in the Howard Street tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used as boundary conditions in the COBRA-SFS and ANSYS® computer codes to evaluate the thermal performance of different package designs. The staff concluded that larger transportation packages resembling the HOLTEC Model No. HI STAR 100 and TransNuclear Model No. TN-68 would withstand a fire with thermal conditions similar to those that existed in the Baltimore tunnel fire event with only minor damage to peripheral components. This is due to their sizable thermal inertia and design specifications in compliance with currently imposed regulatory requirements. The staff also concluded that some components of smaller transportation packages resembling the NAC Model No. LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the package responses to the Baltimore tunnel fire. Though components in some packages heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant dose as a result of the fire for any of these and similar packages.

Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Bajwa, Christopher S.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making,” Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

Boarnet, Marlon G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Transportation Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Analysis SHARE Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contribute to the efficient, safe, and free movement of...

470

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Transportation Management Research Collection /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Peterbilt Motors, and General Electric. He was a national panel member of the American Arbitration, Noise and Environmental Pollution, Transportation Co-ordination and Consolidation, Transportation -- Docket 8613 1957 Civil Aeronautics Board ­ General passenger fare investigation -- Docket 8008 et al

Handy, Todd C.

473

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

474

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

475

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

476

Transportation Investment and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Investment and Economic Development: Has the TIED turned? David Levinson University Transportation Investments was Historically Concomitant with Land and Economic Development #12;Canals Railways Surfaced Roads Crude Oil Pipelines Gas Pipelines Telegraph 1825 1985 Proportion of Maximum Extent Growth

Levinson, David M.

477

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subsidies on fossil transport fuels, subsidies on commutingC. , 2003: Subsidies that encourage fossil fuel use in

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Transportation Routing Analysis Georgraphic Information System (WebTRAGIS) User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1980s, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed two transportation routing models: HIGHWAY, which predicts truck transportation routes, and INTERLINE, which predicts rail transportation routes. Both of these models have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) community for a variety of routing needs over the years. One of the primary uses of the models has been to determine population-density information, which is used as input for risk assessment with the RADTRAN model, which is available on the TRANSNET computer system. During the recent years, advances in the development of geographic information systems (GISs) have resulted in increased demands from the user community for a GIS version of the ORNL routing models. In April 1994, the DOE Transportation Management Division (EM-261) held a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session with transportation routing experts and users of the HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models. As a result of the session, the development of a new GIS routing model, Transportation Routing Analysis GIS (TRAGIS), was initiated. TRAGIS is a user-friendly, GIS-based transportation and analysis computer model. The older HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models are useful to calculate routes, but they cannot display a graphic of the calculated route. Consequently, many users have experienced difficulty determining the proper node for facilities and have been confused by or have misinterpreted the text-based listing from the older routing models. Some of the primary reasons for the development of TRAGIS are (a) to improve the ease of selecting locations for routing, (b) to graphically display the calculated route, and (c) to provide for additional geographic analysis of the route.

Michelhaugh, R.D.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

479

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

480

PalladianDigest Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

Farritor, Shane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "freight transportation trucking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

Minnesota, University of

482

Louisiana Transportation Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

Harms, Kyle E.

483

Introduction to Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 on a Saturday night, transportation is not an objective in and of itself, but a means to carry out the functions of daily living (i.e., it's a "derived good"). As a consequence, the transportation systems we build

Tipple, Brett

484

Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems In a technical session at the 2011 NACE conference, Dennis Foderberg of SEH Inc. discussed intelligent transportation systems (ITS) developed by SEH in collaboration with Network Transportation Technologies, Inc. These systems address the problem of crashes on low-volume roads

Minnesota, University of

485

Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU CTS Research Conference May 21, 2014 Lisa Rasmussen, WTS / Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc #12;Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth SummitTransportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit Agenda What is Transportation YOU? Transportation YOU ­ WTS Local Chapter

Minnesota, University of

486

Theory of contributon transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general discussion of the physics of contributon transport is presented. To facilitate this discussion, a Boltzmann-like transport equation for contributons is obtained, and special contributon cross sections are defined. However, the main goal of this study is to identify contributon transport equations and investigate possible deterministic solution techniques. Four approaches to the deterministic solution of the contributon transport problem are investigated. These approaches are an attempt to exploit certain attractive properties of the contributon flux, psi = phi phi/sup +/, where phi and phi/sup +/ are the solutions to the forward and adjoint Boltzmann transport equations.

Painter, J.W.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Pomraning, G.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

Fernandez, Eduardo

488

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

Minnesota, University of

489

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced...

491

The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport vehicles, including renderers' trucks, that may be used to haul carcasses away from your premises

Navara, Kristen

492

EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

J. Prouty

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

493

Consortium for coal log pipeline research and development. Final technical progress report, August 10, 1993--August 9, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this project was to conduct intensive research and development of the Coal Log Pipeline (CLP). Specifically, the R & D was to concentrate on previously neglected and insufficiently studied aspects of CLP which were deemed significant. With improvements in these areas, CLP could be implemented for commercial use within five years. CLP technology is capable of transporting coal logs for long distances. The many potential advantages of CLP over truck and railroad transportation include: lower freight costs, less energy consumption, less air pollution, decreased environmental problems, increased safety, and improved reliability. Previous studies have shown that CLP is advantageous over slurry pipeline technology. First, CLP uses one-third the water required by a coal slurry pipeline. Second, CLP provides easier coal dewatering. Third, the CLP conveying capacity of coal is twice as much as a slurry transport line of equal diameter. In many situations, the cost for transporting each ton of coal is expected to be less expensive by CLP as compared to other competing modes of transportation such as: truck, unit train and slurry pipeline.

Marrero, T.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Alternative Fuel Transportation Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

495

Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

UZ Colloid Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

M. McGraw

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

497

Energy Storage and Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage and Transportation INL Logo Search Skip Navigation Links Home Newsroom About INL Careers Research Programs Energy and Environment National and Homeland Security New Energy...

498

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

500

Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z