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Sample records for free-electron laser xfel

  1. The European XFEL Free Electron Laser at DESY

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Weise, Hans [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Germany

    2009-09-01

    The European X-ray Free-Electron laser Facility (XFEL) is going to be built in an international collaboration at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Germany, and the Technical Design Report was published in 2006. The official project is expected for summer 2007. This new facility will offer photon beams at wavelengths as short as 1 angstrom with highest peak brilliance being more than 100 million times higher than present day synchrotron radiation sources. The radiation has a high degree of transverse coherence and the pulse duration is reduced from {approx}100 picoseconds (typ. for SR light sources) down to the {approx}10 femtosecond time domain. The overall layout of the XFEL will be described. This includes the envisaged operation parameters for the linear accelerator using superconducting TESLA technology. The complete design is based on the actually operated FLASH free-electron laser at DESY. Experience with the operation during first long user runs at wavelengths from 30 to 13 nm will be described in detail.

  2. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  3. Free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  4. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  5. Feasibility considerations of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser pumped by an X-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Feasibility considerations of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser pumped by an X-FEL Jean feedback laser (DFL) pumped by an x- ray free electron laser (X-FEL). The DFL under consideration is a Mg/SiC bi-layered Bragg reflector pumped by a single X-FEL bunch at 57.4 eV, stimulating the Mg L2

  6. Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat April 10, 2006 Free-Electron Laser Scientists Rox Anderson, right, and Free-Electron Laser Scientist Steve Benson, left, discuss laser beam...

  7. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  8. Enabling X-ray free electron laser crystallography for challenging biological systems from a limited number of crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Hattne, Johan; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Weis, William I.

    2015-03-17

    There is considerable potential for X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to enable determination of macromolecular crystal structures that are difficult to solve using current synchrotron sources. Prior XFEL studies often involved the collection of thousands to millions of diffraction images, in part due to limitations of data processing methods. We implemented a data processing system based on classical post-refinement techniques, adapted to specific properties of XFEL diffraction data. When applied to XFEL data from three different proteins collected using various sample delivery systems and XFEL beam parameters, our method improved the quality of the diffraction data as well as themore »resulting refined atomic models and electron density maps. Moreover, the number of observations for a reflection necessary to assemble an accurate data set could be reduced to a few observations. These developments will help expand the applicability of XFEL crystallography to challenging biological systems, including cases where sample is limited.« less

  9. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  10. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the Electron Beam Radius Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL) can be increased when the undulator is tapered after...

  11. Using XFELs for Probing of Complex Interaction Dynamics of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluge, Thomas; Huang, Lingen; Metzkes, Josefine; Schramm, Ulrich; Bussmann, Michael; Cowan, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advancethe understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena may become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. We demonstrate the potentials of XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions using exemplary the small angle X-ray scattering technique, focusing on general considerations for XFEL probing.

  12. Reconstructing Three-dimensional Helical Structure With an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Uddin

    2015-06-29

    Recovery of three-dimensional structure from single particle X-ray scattering of completely randomly oriented diffraction patterns as predicted few decades back has been real due to advent of the new emerging X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) technology. As the world's first XFEL is in operation starting from June 2009 at SLAC National Lab at Stanford, the very first few experiments being conducted on larger objects such as viruses. Many of the important structures of nature such as helical viruses or deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) consist of helical repetition of biological subunits. Hence development of method for reconstructing helical structure from collected XFEL data has been a top priority research. In this work we have developed a method for solving helical structure such as TMV from a set of randomly oriented simulated diffraction patterns exploiting symmetry and Fourier space constraint of the diffraction volume.

  13. Spectrometer for Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Based on Diffraction Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohn, V G; Vartanyants, I A

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short, spatially coherent pulses of x-ray radiation. We propose the diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of $\\Delta E/E\\approx 2\\times 10^{-6}$. This is much better than for most modern x-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from the metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. We show that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV.

  14. Reconstructing Three-dimensional Helical Structure With an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Uddin

    2015-11-21

    Recovery of three-dimensional structure from single particle X-ray scattering of completely randomly oriented diffraction patterns as predicted few decades back has been real due to the advent of the new emerging X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) technology. As the worlds first XFEL is in operation starting from June 2009 at SLAC National Lab at Stanford, the very first few experiments being conducted on larger objects such as viruses. Many of the important structures of nature such as helical viruses or deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) consist of helical repetition of biological subunits. Hence development of method for reconstructing helical structure from collected XFEL data has been a top priority research. In this work we have developed a method for solving helical structure such as TMV (tobacco mosaic virus) from a set of randomly oriented simulated diffraction patterns exploiting symmetry and Fourier space constraint of the diffraction volume.

  15. Simulation of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    potential shortcoming of the standing- wa.ve FEL. ReferencesPREPRINT SIMULATION OF A STANDING-WAVE FREE-ELECTRON LASERauthor. SIMULATION OF A STANDING·WAVE FREE-ELECTRON LASEr

  16. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  17. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Whitney; George Neil

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  18. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  19. Purified self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron lasers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Purified self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron lasers with slippage-boosted filtering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Purified self-amplified spontaneous...

  20. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; LASERS; PERFORMANCE; PLASMA GUNS; RADIATIONS; WIGGLER MAGNETS...

  1. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  2. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore »in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  3. Macroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayama, K.

    2008-01-01

    Macroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron LaserMacroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron LaserMacroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser

  4. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  5. Jefferson Lab's upgraded Free-Electron Laser produces first ligh...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Navy's goals and expectations and we expect no less from the upgraded FEL." The Free-Electron Laser upgrade project is funded by the Department of Defense's Office of...

  6. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  7. Phase stability of a standing-wave free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    J. S. Wurtele, "Simulation of a Standing-Wave Free-ElectronPhase Stability of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser W. M.Phase stability of a standing-wave free-electron laser W. M.

  8. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA); Haas, Roger A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  9. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  10. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. . Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Free-Electron Laser | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vacuum ultraviolet light, and is also a source of Terahertz light. The FEL uses electrons to produce laser light. The electrons are energized using the lab's superconducting...

  12. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA); Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  13. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori; Molecular Reaction Dynamics Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (?E/E ? 5 × 10{sup ?3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ?3 × 10{sup ?3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  14. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    uSXRD orientation map of the LCLS Photocathode. The field ofimage of the center of the LCLS photocathode. The horizontalsize of the laser spot in LCLS. The image was taken with a

  15. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; et al

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy ofmore »>1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of ?/?? > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.« less

  16. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  17. Free-electron laser scientist is one of two newly elected American...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steve Benson Steve Benson of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) group was recently selected as a 2002 Fellow of the American Physical Society Free-electron laser scientist is one of two...

  18. Crystallographic data processing for free-electron laser sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Thomas A. Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Holton, James M.; Kirian, Richard A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-07-01

    A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A processing pipeline for diffraction data acquired using the ‘serial crystallography’ methodology with a free-electron laser source is described with reference to the crystallographic analysis suite CrystFEL and the pre-processing program Cheetah. A detailed analysis of the nature and impact of indexing ambiguities is presented. Simulations of the Monte Carlo integration scheme, which accounts for the partially recorded nature of the diffraction intensities, are presented and show that the integration of partial reflections could be made to converge more quickly if the bandwidth of the X-rays were to be increased by a small amount or if a slight convergence angle were introduced into the incident beam.

  19. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    in Physics Research A Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-AC03-76SF00098 LBL-30418 Standing-Wave Free-Electron LaserNo. W-740S-ENG-48. Standing-wave free-electron laser two-

  20. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  1. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutton, Andrew (Yorktown, VA)

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  2. A Free-Electron Laser in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -K. Fung; J. Kuijpers

    2004-05-18

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radius ($ approx 10 :{km}$). For different sets of parameters, coherent emission is generated by bunches of beam electrons in the radio domain, with bandwidths of 3 GHz. Pulse power often reached $10^{13} :{W}$, which corresponds with brightness temperature of $10^{30} :{K}$. The duration of these pulses is of the order of nanoseconds. In the context of pulsar radio emission, our results indicate that the laser can produce elementary bursts of radiation which build up the observed microstructures of a few tens of microseconds duration. The process is sensitive mostly to the beam particles energy, number density and the background magnetic field, but much less so to the transverse wave parameters. We demonstrate that the operation of a free-electron laser with a transverse electromagnetic wiggler in the pulsar magnetosphere occurs preferably at moder ate Lorentz factors $ gamma geq 100$, high beam density $n gtrsim 0.1 n_{textrm{GJ}}(r_ ast)$ where $n_{textrm{GJ}}(r_ ast)$ is the Goldrei ch-Julian density at a stellar radius $r_ ast$, and finally, at large altitude where the background magnetic field is low $B_0 leq 10^{-2} textrm{T}$.

  3. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongxiu (Williamsburg, VA); Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  4. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  5. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter, E. Endler, A. Rizzato, F. B.

    2014-11-15

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12?3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compressibilites and the associated divergent densities are absent in warm models, a series of discontinuities in the electron density precede the saturation process. We show that full wave-particle simulations agree well with the predictions of the model.

  6. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01

    Proceedings of Intense Microwave Pulses (SPIE, Los Angeles,Physics An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-Electron4 UC-414 An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron

  7. 5 (Upgradable to 25 keV) Free Electron Laser (FEL) Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, R C

    2013-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility utilizing a recirculated Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) provides the opportunity to achieve about five times greater photon energy than an unrecirculated linac of similar cost. > A 4 GeV SRF, cw, electron linac can be used to drive an FEL producing 5 keV photons. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) laboratory, proposes to utilize a 4 GeV unrecirculated, SRF, linac in a segment of existing linac tunnel. > For an initial investment similar to that of the proposed SLAC strategy, a recirculated SRF linac system could deliver the 4 GeV electrons for photon energies of 5 keV and provide an upgrade path to photon energies of 25 keV. > Further support amounting to about a third of the initial investment would provide upgrade funds for additional SRF linac and cryogenic capacity sufficient to provide electron energies appropriate for 25 keV photons matching the European XFEL.

  8. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A. . Center for Advanced Accelerators Physics Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Atac, M.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J. . Center for Advanced Accelerators Physics); Bhowmik, A.; Bobbs, B.; Cover, R.A.; Dixon, F.P.; Rakowsky, G. . Rocketdyne Div.); Gallardo

    1988-01-01

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be converted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high field strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitablee for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. following an electron bunch for free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    A video artist's ultra-slow-motion impression of an APEX-style electron gun firing a continuous train of electron bunches into a superconducting linear accelerator (in reality this would happen a million times a second). As they approach the speed of light the bunches contract, maintaining beam quality. After acceleration, the electron bunches are diverted into one or more undulators, the key components of free electron lasers. Oscillating back and forth in the changing magnetic field, they create beams of structured x-ray pulses. Before entering the experimental areas the electron bunches are diverted to a beam dump. (Animation created by Illumina Visual, http://www.illuminavisual.com/, for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Music for this excerpt, "Feeling Dark (Behind The Mask)" is by 7OOP3D http://ccmixter.org/files/7OOP3D/29126 and is licensed under a Creative Commons license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

  10. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-08-15

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  11. A wide bandwidth free-electron laser with mode locking using current modulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kur, E.; Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A. A. )

    2011-01-20

    A new scheme for mode locking a free-electron laser amplifier is proposed based on electron beam current modulation. It is found that certain properties of the original concept, based on the energy modulation of electrons, are improved including the spectral brightness of the source and the purity of the series of short pulses. Numerical comparisons are made between the new and old schemes and between a mode-locked free-electron laser and self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser. Illustrative examples using a hypothetical mode-locked free-electron laser amplifier are provided. The ability to generate intense coherent radiation with a large bandwidth is demonstrated.

  12. George Neil Named to Lead JLab's Free-Electron Laser Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility (Jefferson Lab). Neil is responsible for managing the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operations and research programs. The machine uses superconducting radiofrequency...

  13. Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications...

  14. Using the X-FEL to photo-pump X-ray laser transitions in He-like Ne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Rohringer, N

    2011-08-30

    Nearly four decades ago H-like and He-like resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. However, demonstrating these schemes in the laboratory has proved to be elusive because of the difficulty of finding a strong resonant pump line. With the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) we now have a tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow researchers to study the physics and feasibility of resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we use the X-FEL at 1174 eV to photo-pump the singly excited 1s2p state of He-like Ne to the doubly excited 2p3p state and model gain on the 2p3p-2p2s transition at 175 eV and the 2p3p-1s3p transition at 1017 eV. One motivation for studying this scheme is to explore possible quenching of the gain due to strong non-linear coupling effects from the intense X-FEL beam We compare this scheme with photo-pumping the He-like Ne ground state to the 1s3p singly excited state followed by lasing on the 3p-2s and 3d-2p transitions at 158 and 151 eV. Experiments are being planned at LCLS to study these laser processes and coherent quantum effects.

  15. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  16. A Free-Electron Laser in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuijpers, P K F J

    2004-01-01

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radius ($ approx 10 :{km}$). For different sets of parameters, coherent emission is generated by bunches of beam electrons in the radio domain, with bandwidths of 3 GHz. Pulse power often reached $10^{13} :{W}$, which corresponds with brightness temperature of $10^{30} :{K}$. The duration of these pulses is of the order of nanoseconds. In the context of pulsar radio emission, our results indicate that the laser can produce elementary bursts of radiation which build up the observed microstructures of a few tens of microseconds duration. The process is sensitive mostly to the beam particles energy, number density and the background magnetic field, but much less so to the transverse wave parameters. We demonstrate that th...

  17. FREE ELECTRON LASER FOR SIBERIAN CENTRE FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL RESEARCH: THE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    FREE ELECTRON LASER FOR SIBERIAN CENTRE FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL RESEARCH: THE CONTROL SYSTEM of the Siberian Branch of RAS. Abstract. A control system for the magnetic system of the free electron laser (FEL) is described. The characteristics and structure of the power supply system are presented. The control system

  18. TESLA-FEL Report 2004-08 LINAC BASED FREE-ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA-FEL Report 2004-08 1 LINAC BASED FREE-ELECTRON LASER J. Rossbach Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany Abstract A basic treatment of the principle of the linac-driven free-electron laser (FEL) is given. The first part of the paper describes the FEL in low-gain approximation, and in the second part the high

  19. Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond pulses with high repetition rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Anne

    Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond 2002 We have conducted experiments exploring pulsed laser deposition of thin films using the high average power Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser. The combination

  20. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; ,

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  1. Efficiency enhancement of a harmonic lasing free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2015-03-15

    The harmonic lasing free-electron laser amplifier, in which two wigglers is employed in order for the fundamental resonance of the second wiggler to coincide with the third harmonic of the first wiggler to generate ultraviolet radiation, is studied. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the system, for a long electron bunch, is solved numerically by CYRUS code. Solutions for the non-averaged and averaged equations are compared. Remarkable agreement is found between the averaged and non-averaged simulations for the evolution of the third harmonic. Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are also investigated. For efficiency enhancement, the second wiggler field is set to decrease linearly and nonlinearly at the point where the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of the tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It is found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, the prebunched electron beam is considered.

  2. Using X-ray free-electron lasers for probing of complex interaction dynamics of ultra-intense lasers with solid matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluge, T., E-mail: t.kluge@hzdr.de; Huang, L. G.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Gutt, C. [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)] [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advance the understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. In this paper, we focus on XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions based on quantitative calculations using synthesized data and evaluate the feasibility of various imaging and scattering techniques with special focus on the small angle X-ray scattering technique.

  3. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; et al

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarilymore »by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.« less

  4. Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser based on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser based on a transverse gradient undulator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain...

  5. THE SYSTEM OF POWER SUPPLIES, CONTROL AND MODULATION OF ELECTRON GUN FOR FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    THE SYSTEM OF POWER SUPPLIES, CONTROL AND MODULATION OF ELECTRON GUN FOR FREE ELECTRON LASER E of the system. Proceedings of RUPAC2012, Saint|-|Petersburg, Russia TUPPB050 Ion sources and electron guns ISBN

  6. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baptiste, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Todd, State-of-the art electron guns and injector de- signs,7] Summary of working group on guns and injectors, 41st Ad-A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and

  7. Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser Joins With Others in New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Joins With Others in New Research Venture NEWPORT NEWS, VA, April 29, 2009 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will...

  8. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-05-23

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definitionmore »of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating theRsplitvalue) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.« less

  9. Free Electron Lasers Seeded by ir Laser Driven High-order Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Juhao; Bolton, Paul R.; /SLAC; Murphy, James B.; /BNL, NSLS; Zhong, Xinming; /Beijing Normal U.

    2007-03-12

    Coherent x-ray production by a seeded free electron laser (FEL) is important for next generation synchrotron light sources. We examine the feasibility and features of FEL emission seeded by a high-order harmonic of an infrared laser (HHG). In addition to the intrinsic FEL chirp, the longitudinal profile and spectral bandwidth of the HHG seed are modified significantly by the FEL interaction well before saturation. This smears out the original attosecond pulselet structure. We introduce criteria for this smearing effect on the pulselet and the stretching effect on the entire pulse. We discuss the noise issue in such a seeded FEL.

  10. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  11. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  12. Navy Breaks World Record With Futuristic Free-Electron Laser...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    foxnews.comscitech20110218navy-breaks-world-record-futuristic-laser-getting-real Submitted: Sunday, February 20, 2011...

  13. Photon Statistics of a Free-Electron Laser 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, W.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    1982-01-01

    High-order above-threshold ionization by few-cycle laser pulses is analyzed in terms of quantum orbits. For a given carrier-envelope phase, the number of contributing orbits and their ionization and rescattering times ...

  14. High Average Power Operation of a Scraper-Outcoupled Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle D. Shinn; Chris Behre; Stephen Vincent Benson; Michael Bevins; Don Bullard; James Coleman; L. Dillon-Townes; Tom Elliott; Joe Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; Ronald Lassiter; George Neil; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a high average power free-electron laser using scraper outcoupling. Using the FEL in this all-reflective configuration, we achieved approximately 2 kW of stable output at 10 um. Measurements of gain, loss, and output mode will be compared with our models.

  15. Title of Document: EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS OF THE JEFFERSON LAB FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    to be a quality diagnostic that is especially useful for high brightness electron beams such as Jefferson Labs FEL, such as the ones that power Free Electron Lasers (FEL), require high quality (low emittance) beams for efficient operation. Accurate and reliable beam diagnostics are essential to monitoring beam parameters in order

  16. Compact free-electron laser at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Meier, K.L.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Warren, R.W.; Wilson, W.L.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    The design and construction of second-generation free-electron laser (FEL) system at Los Alamos will be described. comprising state-of-the art components, this FEL system will be sufficiently compact, robust and user-friendly for application in industry, medicine, and research. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods A. Wolski, G. Penn, A. Sessler, and J. Wurtele*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods A. Wolski, G. Penn, A. Sessler short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) demands electron beams with very small transverse emittance operation with larger electron beam emit- tances than would otherwise be possible. The analysis in Ref. [1

  18. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  19. Status of the visible Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fisher, A.S.; Friedman, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Kirk, H.; Kramer, S.; Lin, L.; Rogers, J.T.; Sheehan, J.F.; van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Xie, J.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, R. ); Bhowmik, A. . Rocketdyne Div.)

    1991-01-01

    The 500 nm Free-Electron Laser (ATF) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. We present an overview of the ATF, a high-brightness, 50-MeV, electron accelerator and laser complex which is a users' facility for accelerator and beam physics. A number of laser acceleration and FEL experiments are under construction at the ATF. The visible FEL experiment is based on a novel superferric 8.8 mm period undulator. The electron beam parameters, the undulator, the optical resonator, optical and electron beam diagnostics are discussed. The operational status of the experiment is presented. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwa?niewski, Pawe?; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; et al

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shotmore »based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.« less

  1. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-12-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  2. Time-dependent simulation of prebunched one and two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2014-04-15

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the slippage effects on prebunched free electron laser. A technique for the simulation of time dependent free electron lasers (FEL) to model the slippage effects is introduced, and the slowly varying envelope approximation in both z and t is used to illustrate the temporal behaviour in the prebunched FEL. Slippage effect on prebunched two-beam FEL is compared with the one-beam modeling. The evaluation of the radiation pulse energy, thermal and phase distribution, and radiation pulse shape in one-beam and two-beam modeling is studied. It was shown that the performance is considerably undermined when the slippage time is comparable to the pulse duration. However, prebunching reduces the slippage. Prebunching also leads to the radiation pulse with a single smooth spike.

  3. Chorus wave amplification: A free electron laser in the Earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soto-Chavez, A. R.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Ng, C. S.

    2012-01-15

    A new theoretical model for whistler-mode chorus amplification in the Earth's magnetosphere is presented. We derive, based on the free-electron laser mechanism in a high-gain amplifier, a new closed set of self-consistent relativistic equations that couple the Hamiltonian equations for particles with Maxwell's equations. We demonstrate that these equations predict, through a cubic equation, whistler amplification levels in good agreement with those observed in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  4. High harmonic attosecond pulse train amplification in a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, B.W.; Sheehy, B.; Thompson, N.R.; Dunning, D.J.

    2011-03-04

    It is shown using three-dimensional simulations that the temporal structure of an attosecond pulse train, such as that generated via high harmonic generation in noble gases, may be retained in a free electron laser amplifier through to saturation using a mode-locked optical klystron configuration. At wavelengths of {approx}12 nm, a train of attosecond pulses of widths {approx}300 as with peak powers in excess of 1 GW are predicted.

  5. International Congeress on Plasma Physics, Nice, France, 25-29 October 2004 Chaotic particle dynamics in free-electron lasers with coaxial wiggler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    University of Arak, Arak, Iran The motion of a relativistic test electron in a free-electron laser dynamics in free-electron lasers with coaxial wiggler B. Farokhi and S. Mobarakabadi Islamic Azad orbits. Earlier investigations of chaos in free ­ electron lasers have focused on chaotic behavior

  6. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hattne, Hattne

    Diffraction patterns from thermolysin microcrystals and one dark run, collected in December 2011. This data was used for metrology calibration and general cctbx.xfel development.

  7. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hattne, Hattne

    2014-03-04

    Diffraction patterns from thermolysin microcrystals and one dark run, collected in December 2011. This data was used for metrology calibration and general cctbx.xfel development.

  8. Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) Laser Sources Used as Drive Lasers for Photoinjectors for High-Gain, Free Electron Lasers (FELs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) Laser Sources Used as Drive Lasers for Photoinjectors Milchberg #12;- 1 - Abstract The realization of extremely high gain, and high power in Free Electron Lasers critically on the power and phase stability of the cathode drive laser, and conversely the type of FEL output

  9. Mixing and space-charge effects in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter, E.; Endler, A.; Rizzato, F. B.; Serbeto, A.

    2013-12-15

    The present work revisits the subjects of mixing, saturation, and space-charge effects in free-electron lasers. Use is made of the compressibility factor, which proves to be a helpful tool in the related systems of charged beams confined by static magnetic fields. The compressibility allows to perform analytical estimates of the elapsed time until the onset of mixing, which in turn allows to estimate the saturated amplitude of the radiation field. In addition, the compressibility helps to pinpoint space-charge effects and the corresponding transition from Compton to Raman regimes.

  10. Single-shot measurement of free-electron laser polarization at SDUV-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Lie; Zhang, Tong; Feng, Chao; Chen, Jianhui; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Shen, Lei; Zhang, Wenyan; Yao, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter (DOAP) for measuring the polarization state of free-electron laser (FEL) pulse is described. The incident FEL beam is divided into four separate beams, and four Stokes parameters can be measured in a single-shot. In the crossed-planar undulators experiment at Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL test facility, this DOAP instrument constructed in house responses accurately and timely while the polarization-state of fully coherent FEL pulses are switched, which is helpful for confirming the crossed-planar undulators technique for short-wavelength FELs.

  11. Strongly aligned gas-phase molecules at Free-Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kierspel, Thomas; Mullins, Terry; Robinson, Joseph; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard; Boll, Rebecca; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucksbaum, Philip; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Fry, Alan; Hunter, Mark; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Natan, Adi; Petrovic, Vladimir; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Schnorr, Kirsten; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Stern, Stephan; Thøgersen, Jan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Wang, Fenglin; Trippel, Sebastian; Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel experimental implementation to strongly align molecules at full repetition rates of free-electron lasers. We utilized the available in-house laser system at the coherent x-ray imaging beamline at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Chirped laser pulses, i. e., the direct output from the regenerative amplifier of the Ti:Sa chirped pulse amplification laser system, were used to strongly align 2,5-diiodothiophene molecules in a molecular beam. The alignment laser pulses had pulse energies of a few mJ and a pulse duration of 94 ps. A degree of alignment of $\\left$ = 0.85 was measured, limited by the intrinsic temperature of the molecular beam rather than by the available laser system. With the general availability of synchronized chirped-pulse-amplified near-infrared laser systems at short-wavelength laser facilities, our approach allows for the universal preparation of molecules tightly fixed in space for experiments with x-ray pulses.

  12. Direct and secondary nuclear excitation with x-ray free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunst, Jonas; Kumar, Naveen; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The direct and secondary nuclear excitation produced by an x-ray free electron laser when interacting with a solid-state nuclear target is investigated theoretically. When driven at the resonance energy, the x-ray free electron laser can produce direct photoexcitation. However, the dominant process in that interaction is the photoelectric effect producing a cold and very dense plasma in which also secondary processes such as nuclear excitation by electron capture may occur. We develop a realistic model to quantify the temporal dynamics of the plasma and the magnitude of the secondary excitation therein. Numerical results show that depending on the nuclear transition energy and the temperature and charge states reached in the plasma, secondary nuclear excitation by electron capture may dominate the direct photoexcitation by several orders of magnitude, as it is the case for the 4.8 keV transition from the isomeric state of $^{93}$Mo, or it can be negligible, as it is the case for the 14.4 keV M\\"ossbauer trans...

  13. Spectro-temporal shaping of seeded free-electron laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauthier, David; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca; Mahieu, Benoît; Penco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control and shape the spectro-temporal content of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses produced by a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). The control over the spectro-temporal properties of XUV light was achieved by precisely manipulating the linear frequency chirp of the seed laser. Our results agree with existing theory, which allows retrieving the temporal properties (amplitude and phase) of the FEL pulse from measurements of the spectra as a function of the FEL operating parameters. Furthermore, we show the first direct evidence of the full temporal coherence of FEL light and generate Fourier limited pulses by fine-tuning the FEL temporal phase. The possibility to tailor the spectro-temporal content of intense short-wavelength pulses represents the first step towards efficient nonlinear optics in the XUV to X-ray spectral region and will enable precise manipulation of core-electron excitations using the methods of coherent quantum control.

  14. Experiments in sideband suppression on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, C.J.; Coyle, M.R.; Paxton, A.H. (Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Laser and Optical R and D Group); O'Shea, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Byrd, D.A.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.: Pitcher, E.J.; Zaugg, T.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Two versions of the Phase-Step Mirror'' (PSM), a novel optical component that prevents the formation of sidebands in a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) were tested on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) APEX FEL. Sideband suppression and frequency control with high extraction efficiency and single line, transform limited operation were demonstrated. The results of our LANL experiments and computer simulations showed that for very high gain applications, the first-order sideband is completely suppressed, but the laser gain is so strong that on about pass 300 the sideband at the second-order or next free spectral range of the PSM appears. This second-order sideband may be suppressed by designing a PSM with grooves having two alternating depths, one chosen to suppress the first-order sideband, and the other, the second-order sideband.

  15. Experiments in sideband suppression on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, C.J.; Coyle, M.R.; Paxton, A.H. [Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Laser and Optical R and D Group; O`Shea, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Byrd, D.A.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.: Pitcher, E.J.; Zaugg, T.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Two versions of the ``Phase-Step Mirror`` (PSM), a novel optical component that prevents the formation of sidebands in a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) were tested on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) APEX FEL. Sideband suppression and frequency control with high extraction efficiency and single line, transform limited operation were demonstrated. The results of our LANL experiments and computer simulations showed that for very high gain applications, the first-order sideband is completely suppressed, but the laser gain is so strong that on about pass 300 the sideband at the second-order or next free spectral range of the PSM appears. This second-order sideband may be suppressed by designing a PSM with grooves having two alternating depths, one chosen to suppress the first-order sideband, and the other, the second-order sideband.

  16. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Höppner, H.; Hage, A.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Prandolini, M. J.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to manymore »hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.« less

  17. Start-to-end modelling of a mode-locked optical klystron free electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunning, D. J.; Thompson, N. R. [University of Strathclyde (SUPA), Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Mc Neil, B. W. J. [University of Strathclyde (SUPA), Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Williams, P. H. [ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    A free electron laser (FEL) in a mode-locked optical klystron (MLOK) configuration is modelled using start-to-end simulations that simulate realistic electron beam acceleration and transport before input into a full three-dimensional FEL simulation code. These simulations demonstrate that the MLOK scheme is compatible with the present generation of radiofrequency accelerator designs. A train of few-optical cycle pulses is predicted with peak powers similar to those of the equivalent conventional FEL amplifier. The role of electron beam energy modulation in these results is explained and the limitations of some simulation codes discussed. It is shown how seeding the FEL interaction using a High Harmonic seed laser can improve the coherence properties of the output.

  18. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  19. High-power beam injectors for 100 KW free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, A. M.; Wood R. L.; Bluem, H.; Young, L. M.; Wiseman, M.; Schultheiss, T.; Schrage, D. L.; Russell, S. J.; Rode, C. H.; Rimmer, R.; Nguyen, D. C.; Kelley, J. P.; Kurennoy, S.; wood, r

    2003-01-01

    A key technology issue on the path to high-power FEL operation is the demonstration of reliable, high-brightness, high-power injector operation. We describe two ongoing programs to produce 100 mA injectors as drivers for 100 kW free-electron lasers. In one approach, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, we are fabricating a 750 MHz superconducting RF cryomodule that will be integrated with a room-temperature DC photocathode gun and tested at the Laboratory. In the other approach, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, a high-current 700 MHz, normal-conducting, RF photoinjector is being designed and will undergo thermal management testing at the Laboratory. We describe the design, the projected performance and the status of both injectors.

  20. Applications of free electron lasers and synchrotrons in industry and research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, William A. [Dept. of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Synchrotron radiation sources have had a profound effect on both science and technology from their beginnings decades ago as parasitic operations on accelerators for high energy physics. Now the general area of photon science has opened up new experimental techniques which have become the mainstay tools of materials science, surface physics, protein crystallography, and nanotechnology. With the promise of ultra-bright beams from the latest generation of storage rings and free electron lasers with full coherence, the tools of photon science promise to open a new area of mesoscale science and technology as well as prove to be a disruptive wildcard in the search for sustainable energy technologies. This review will survey a range of applications and explore in greater depth the potential applications to EUV lithography and to technologies for solar energy.

  1. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); INSTM UdR Trieste-ST, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lupi, S. [CNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  2. Spatial and temporal coherence properties of single free-electron laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, A; Mancuso, A P; Gerasimova, N; Yefanov, O M; Gulden, J; Gorniak, T; Senkbeil, T; Sakdinawat, A; Liu, Y; Attwood, D; Dziarzhytski, S; Mai, D D; Treusch, R; Weckert, E; Salditt, T; Rosenhahn, A; Wurth, W; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-01-01

    The experimental characterization of the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at a wavelength of 8.0 nm is presented. Double pinhole diffraction patterns of single femtosecond pulses focused to a size of about 10 microns by 10 microns were measured. A transverse coherence length of 6.2 microns in the horizontal and 8.7 microns in the vertical direction was determined from the most coherent pulses. Using a split and delay unit the coherence time of the pulses produced in the same operation conditions of FLASH was measured to be 1.75 fs. From our experiment we estimated the degeneracy parameter of the FLASH beam to be on the order of $10^{10}$ to $10^{11}$, which exceeds the values of this parameter at any other source in the same energy range by many orders of magnitude.

  3. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; KAIST, Daejeon; Cupane, Antonio; et al

    2015-04-02

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations withmore »a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.« less

  4. High Efficiency, Multi-Terawatt X-ray free electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emma, Claudio; Wu, Juhao; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We study high efficiency, multi-terawatt peak power, few angstrom wavelength, X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-ray FELs). To obtain these characteristics we consider an optimized undulator design: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. The peak power and efficiency depend on the transverse electron beam distribution and on time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. The last effect is identified as the main cause for reduction of electron beam microbunching and FEL peak power. We show that the optimal functional form for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile, yielding the maximum output power, depends significantly on these effects. The output power achieved when neglecting time dependent effects for an LCLS-like X-ray FEL with a 100 m lo...

  5. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, N.Duane; Starodub, Dimitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y.; Martin, Andrew V.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz

    2014-04-22

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10 21 W/m2 can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wave-front sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, the paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging.

  6. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P. [CNR - Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), via Trasea 7, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F. [Physics Division, School of Science and Technology, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Finetti, P. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Kivimäki, A. [CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Stagira, S. [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Physics, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Coreno, M. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); CNR – Istituto di Struttura della Materia (CNR-ISM), UOS Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  7. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  8. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  9. 1578 IEEEJOURNAL OF QUANTUMELECTRONICS.VOL.QE-23, NO. 9. SEPTEMBER 1987 Free-Electron Lasers with Electromagnetic Standing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    with Electromagnetic Standing Wave Wimlers T. M. TRAN, BRUCE G. DANLY, Abstrucf-A detailed analysis of the electroniagnetic standing wave wiggler for free-electron lasers (FEL's) is conducted for both circular and linear is that the elec- tromagnetic standing wave wiggler FEL, under certain circumstances, exhibits a rich harmonic

  10. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, Christopher; /DESY; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  11. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 528 (2004) 1518 First lasing at the high-power free electron laser at Siberian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    2004-01-01

    in April 2003 on a high-power free electron laser (FEL) constructed at the Siberian CenterNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 528 (2004) 15­18 First lasing at the high-power free electron laser at Siberian center for photochemistry research E.A. Antokhin, R.R. Akberdin, V

  12. Soft x-ray free-electron laser induced damage to inorganic scintillators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, V?ra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Vyšín, Lud?k; Bohá?ek, Pavel; P?e?ek, Martin; Wild, Jan; Özkan, Cigdem; Coppola, Nicola; Farahani, Shafagh Dastjani; et al

    2015-01-07

    An irreversible response of inorganic scintillators to intense soft x-ray laser radiation was investigated at the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) facility. Three ionic crystals, namely, Ce:YAG (cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet), PbWO4 (lead tungstate), and ZnO (zinc oxide), were exposed to single 4.6 nm ultra-short laser pulses of variable pulse energy (up to 12 ?J) under normal incidence conditions with tight focus. Damaged areas produced with various levels of pulse fluences, were analyzed on the surface of irradiated samples using differential interference contrast (DIC) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effective beam area of 22.2 ± 2.2 ?m2 was determinedmore »by means of the ablation imprints method with the use of poly(methyl methacrylate) - PMMA. Applied to the three inorganic materials, this procedure gave almost the same values of an effective area. The single-shot damage threshold fluence was determined for each of these inorganic materials. The Ce:YAG sample seems to be the most radiation resistant under the given irradiation conditions, its damage threshold was determined to be as high as 660.8 ± 71.2 mJ/cm2. Contrary to that, the PbWO4 sample exhibited the lowest radiation resistance with a threshold fluence of 62.6 ± 11.9 mJ/cm2. The threshold for ZnO was found to be 167.8 ± 30.8 mJ/cm2. Both interaction and material characteristics responsible for the damage threshold difference are discussed in the article.« less

  13. A tapered undulator experiment at the ELBE far infrared hybrid-resonator oscillator free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgekar, V.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.

    2012-01-15

    A tapered undulator experiment was carried out at the ELBE far-infrared free electron laser (FEL). The oscillator FEL makes use of a hybrid optical resonator. The main motivation was to see whether the presence of a dispersive medium in the form of a waveguide in the resonator has any effect on the outcome. The FEL saturated power and the wavelength shifts have been measured as a function of both positive as well as negative undulator field amplitude tapering. In contrast to the typical high-gain FELs where positive tapering proves beneficial for the output power we observed an improvement of performance at negative taper. During the same experiments we studied the characteristics of the detuning curves. The width of the curves indicates a maximum small signal gain for zero taper while the output peak power increases with negative taper. The saturated power output, the detuning curve characteristics, and the wavelength shifts agrees with the theoretical predictions. Details of the experiment are presented.

  14. Control of the polarization of a vacuum-ultraviolet, high-gain, free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allaria, Enrico; Diviacco, Bruno; Callegari, Carlo; Finetti, Paola; Mahieu, Benoît; Viefhaus, Jens; Zangrando, Marco; De Ninno, Giovanni; Lambert, Guillaume; Ferrari, Eugenio; Buck, Jens; Ilchen, Markus; Vodungbo, Boris; Mahne, Nicola; Svetina, Cristian; Spezzani, Carlo; Di Mitri, Simone; Penco, Giuseppe; Trovó, Mauro; Fawley, William M.; Rebernik, Primoz R.; Gauthier, David; Grazioli, Cesare; Coreno, Marcello; Ressel, Barbara; Kivimäki, Antti; Mazza, Tommaso; Glaser, Leif; Scholz, Frank; Seltmann, Joern; Gessler, Patrick; Grünert, Jan; De Fanis, Alberto; Meyer, Michael; Knie, André; Moeller, Stefan P.; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Plekan, Oksana; Danailov, Miltcho B.; Demidovich, Alexander; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Abrami, Alessandro; Gautier, Julien; Lüning, Jan; Zeitoun, Philippe; Giannessi, Luca

    2014-12-02

    The two single-pass, externally seeded free-electron lasers (FELs) of the FERMI user facility are designed around Apple-II-type undulators that can operate at arbitrary polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet-to-soft x-ray spectral range. Furthermore, within each FEL tuning range, any output wavelength and polarization can be set in less than a minute of routine operations. We report the first demonstration of the full output polarization capabilities of FERMI FEL-1 in a campaign of experiments where the wavelength and nominal polarization are set to a series of representative values, and the polarization of the emitted intense pulses is thoroughly characterized by three independent instruments and methods, expressly developed for the task. The measured radiation polarization is consistently >90% and is not significantly spoiled by the transport optics; differing, relative transport losses for horizontal and vertical polarization become more prominent at longer wavelengths and lead to a non-negligible ellipticity for an originally circularly polarized state. The results from the different polarimeter setups validate each other, allow a cross-calibration of the instruments, and constitute a benchmark for user experiments.

  15. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  16. Control of the polarization of a vacuum-ultraviolet, high-gain, free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allaria, Enrico; Diviacco, Bruno; Callegari, Carlo; Finetti, Paola; Mahieu, Benoît; Viefhaus, Jens; Zangrando, Marco; De Ninno, Giovanni; Lambert, Guillaume; Ferrari, Eugenio; et al

    2014-12-02

    The two single-pass, externally seeded free-electron lasers (FELs) of the FERMI user facility are designed around Apple-II-type undulators that can operate at arbitrary polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet-to-soft x-ray spectral range. Furthermore, within each FEL tuning range, any output wavelength and polarization can be set in less than a minute of routine operations. We report the first demonstration of the full output polarization capabilities of FERMI FEL-1 in a campaign of experiments where the wavelength and nominal polarization are set to a series of representative values, and the polarization of the emitted intense pulses is thoroughly characterized by three independentmore »instruments and methods, expressly developed for the task. The measured radiation polarization is consistently >90% and is not significantly spoiled by the transport optics; differing, relative transport losses for horizontal and vertical polarization become more prominent at longer wavelengths and lead to a non-negligible ellipticity for an originally circularly polarized state. The results from the different polarimeter setups validate each other, allow a cross-calibration of the instruments, and constitute a benchmark for user experiments.« less

  17. Investigation of the electron trajectories and gain regimes of the whistler pumped free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafarinia, F.; Jafari, S. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    A free-electron laser (FEL) scheme, which employs the whistler wave as a slow electromagnetic wave wiggler, was studied theoretically. Subjected to the transverse fields of whistler wave wiggler, the beam electrons are the source of the energy needed to produce electromagnetic radiation. The strength and the period of the wiggler field depend on the parameters of the magnetoplasma medium. This configuration has a higher tunability by controlling the plasma density, on top of the {gamma}-tunability of the conventional FELs. The theory of linear gain and electron trajectories was presented and four groups (I, II, III, and IV) of electron orbits were found in the presence of an axial guide magnetic field. Using perturbation analysis, it is found that these groups of orbits were stable except small regions of group I and IV orbits. The function {Phi} which determines the rate of change of axial velocity with beam energy was also derived. In the case in which {Phi}<0 represents a negative-mass regime in which the axial velocity accelerates as the electrons lose energy. Numerical solutions showed that by increasing the cyclotron frequency, the gain for group I and III orbits increased, while a gain decrement was obtained for group II and IV orbits.

  18. Performance of the accelerator driver of Jefferson Laboratory's free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, C.L.; Benson, S.; Biallas, G.

    1999-04-01

    The driver of Jefferson Lab's kW-level infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a superconducting, recirculating accelerator that recovers about 75% of the electron-beam power and converts it to radiofrequency power. In achieving first lasing, the accelerator operated straight-ahead to deliver 38 MeV, 1.1 mA cw current through the wiggler for lasing at wavelengths in the vicinity of 5 {mu}m. Just prior to first lasing, measured rms beam properties at the wiggler were 7.5{+-}1.5 mm-mr normalized transverse emittance, 26{+-}7 keV-deg longitudinal emittance, and 0.4{+-}0.1 ps bunch length which yielded a peak current of 60{+-}15A. The waste beam was then sent directly to a dump, bypassing the recirculation loop. Stable operation at up to 311 W cw was achieved in this mode. Commissioning the recirculation loop then proceeded. As of this Conference, the machine has recirculated cw average current up to 4 mA, and has lased cw with energy recover up to 710 W.

  19. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  20. Three-dimensional simulation of efficiency enhancement in free-electron laser with prebunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitsazi, Mahboobeh; Maraghechi, B.; Rouhani, M. H.

    2010-10-15

    The effect of prebunching of the electron beam and tapering of the wiggler amplitude on the harmonic upconversion in free-electron laser amplifier is studied in three dimensions. A set of coupled nonlinear first-order differential equations that describe the three-dimensional simulation of the system is solved numerically. This set of equation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The analysis is related to extreme ultraviolet and x-ray emission. In addition to uniform beam, prebunched electron beam has also been studied. The effect of sinusoidal distribution of entry times for the electron beam on the evolution of radiation is compared with uniform distribution. It is shown that prebunching reduces the saturation length substantially. For efficiency enhancement, the wiggler is set to decrease linearly when the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point and the slope of tapering of the amplitude of the wiggler are found by a successive run of the code. It was found that tapering can increase the saturated power of the third harmonic considerably.

  1. Microstructure-based laser-driven free-electron laser T. Plettner , R.L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Keywords: Dielectric-structure undulator Laser-driven particle acceleration Phase-synchronous deflection with future structure-loaded laser-driven particle accelerators. These accelerators are expected to operate-tabletop system that is based on this accelerator, a matching compact undulator is highly desirable. To this end

  2. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stöhr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating structure. Demonstration experiments in advanced seeding techniques, such as EEHG, and other optical manipulations to enhance the FEL process are required to reduce technical risk in producing temporally coherent and ultrashort x-ray output using optical seed lasers. Success of EEHG in particular would result in reduced development and cost of laser systems and accelerator hardware for seeded FELs. With a 1.5-2.5 GeV linac, FELs could operate in the VUV-soft x-ray range, where the actual beam energy will be determined by undulator technology; for example, to use the lower energy would require the use of advanced designs for which undulator R&D is needed. Significant reductions in both unit costs and accelerator costs resulting from the lower electron beam energy required to achieve lasing at a particular wavelength could be obtained with undulator development. Characterization of the wakefields of the vacuum chambers in narrow-gap undulators will be needed to minimize risk in ability to deliver close to transform limited pulses. CW superconducting RF technology for an FEL facility with short bunches at MHz rate and up to mA average current will require selection of design choices in cavity frequency and geometry, higher order mode suppression and power dissipation, RF power supply and distribution, accelerating gradient, and cryogenics systems. R&D is needed to define a cost and performance optimum. Developments in laser technology are proceeding at rapid pace, and progress in high-power lasers, harmonic generation, and tunable sources will need to be tracked.

  3. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak current.

  4. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent scattering and speckle analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Schropp, Andreas; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg; Seiboth, Frank; Feng, Yiping; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik T.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-04-14

    X-ray focus optimization and characterization based on coherent scattering and quantitative speckle size measurements was demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Its performance as a single-pulse free-electron laser beam diagnostic was tested for two typical focusing configurations. The results derived from the speckle size/shape analysis show the effectiveness of this technique in finding the focus' location, size and shape. In addition, its single-pulse compatibility enables users to capture pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in focus properties compared with other techniques that require scanning and averaging.

  5. A camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-X-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Alameda, J; Woods, B; Frank, M; Bogan, M J; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Hajdu, J; Shapiro, D

    2007-09-24

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser. The camera consists of a laterally-graded multilayer mirror which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter both for wavelength and angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from non-sample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates on to a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beamstop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the FLASH FEL (i.e. between 6 nm and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32 nm, 16 nm, 13.5 nm, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH free-electron laser with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance.

  6. Electron bunch energy and phase feed-forward stabilization system for the Mark V RF-linac free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadmack, M. R.; Kowalczyk, J. M. D.; Lienert, B. R.; Madey, J. M. J.; Szarmes, E. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Jacobson, B. T. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, California 90404 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    An amplitude and phase compensation system has been developed and tested at the University of Hawai'i for the optimization of the RF drive system to the Mark V free-electron laser. Temporal uniformity of the RF drive is essential to the generation of an electron beam suitable for optimal free-electron laser performance and the operation of an inverse Compton scattering x-ray source. The design of the RF measurement and compensation system is described in detail and the results of RF phase compensation are presented. Performance of the free-electron laser was evaluated by comparing the measured effects of phase compensation with the results of a computer simulation. Finally, preliminary results are presented for the effects of amplitude compensation on the performance of the complete system.

  7. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    laser beam diagnostic was tested for two typical focusing configurations. The results derived from the speckle sizeshape analysis show the effectiveness of this technique in...

  8. Imaging shock waves in diamond with both high temporal and spatial resolution at an XFEL

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G.; Beckwith, Martha A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Higginbotham, Andrew; et al

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnifiedmore »x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.« less

  9. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

    2011-06-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  10. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director] [SLAC Director

    2011-03-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  11. VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Guenter

    VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers. For FEL visitors, this generally means covering the basic guidelines/tasks below. The FEL management loosely defines a "visitor

  12. The effect of shot noise on the start up of the fundamental and harmonics in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freund, H. P.; Miner, W. H. Jr.; Giannessi, L.

    2008-12-15

    The problem of radiation start up in free-electron lasers (FELs) is important in the simulation of virtually all FEL configurations including oscillators and amplifiers in both seeded master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) modes. Both oscillators and SASE FELs start up from spontaneous emission due to shot noise on the electron beam, which arises from the random fluctuations in the phase distribution of the electrons. The injected power in a MOPA is usually large enough to overwhelm the shot noise. However, this noise must be treated correctly in order to model the initial start up of the harmonics. In this paper, we discuss and compare two different shot noise models that are implemented in both one-dimensional wiggler-averaged (PERSEO) and non-wiggler-averaged (MEDUSA1D) simulation codes, and a three-dimensional non-wiggler-averaged (MEDUSA) formulation. These models are compared for examples describing both SASE and MOPA configurations in one dimension, in steady-state, and time-dependent simulations. Remarkable agreement is found between PERSEO and MEDUSA1D for the evolution of the fundamental and harmonics. In addition, three-dimensional correction factors have been included in the MEDUSA1D and PERSEO, which show reasonable agreement with MEDUSA for a sample MOPA in steady-state and time-dependent simulations.

  13. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zastrau, Ulf; Fletcher, Luke B.; Galtier, Eric Ch.; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Heimann, Philipp; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Förster, Eckhart; Marschner, Heike; Wehrhan, Ortrud

    2014-09-15

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution ?E/E = 1.1 ×?10{sup ?4} and wave-number resolution of ?k/k = 3 ×?10{sup ?3}, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to 5.2/Å in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418 eV/13.5??m agrees with predictions within 1.3%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic highly annealed pyrolytic graphite spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1 eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  14. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Galtier, Eric Ch; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Heimann, Philipp; Marschner, Heike; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Wehrhan, Ortrud; Lee, Hae Ja

    2014-01-01

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution $\\Delta E/E = 1.1\\cdot 10^{-4}$ and wave-number resolution of $\\Delta k/k = 3\\cdot 10^{-3}$, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to $5.2/$\\AA\\ in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34\\% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418~eV/$13.5\\,\\mu$m agrees with predictions within 1.3\\%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic HAPG spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1~eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  15. Study of beam transverse properties of a thermionic electron gun for application to a compact THz free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Tongning E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Chen, Qushan; Yang, Lei; Pei, Yuanji E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Ji

    2014-10-15

    A novel thermionic electron gun adopted for use in a high power THz free electron laser (FEL) is proposed in this paper. By optimization of the structural and radiofrequency (RF) parameters, the physical design of the gun is performed using dynamic calculations. Velocity bunching is used to minimize the bunch's energy spread, and the dynamic calculation results indicate that high quality beams can be provided. The transverse properties of the beams generated by the gun are also analyzed. The novel RF focusing effects of the resonance cavity are investigated precisely and are used to establish emittance compensation, which enables the injector length to be reduced. In addition, the causes of the extrema of the beam radius and the normalized transverse emittance are analyzed and interpreted, respectively, and slice simulations are performed to illustrate how the RF focusing varies along the bunch length and to determine the effects of that variation on the emittance compensation. Finally, by observation of the variations of the beam properties in the drift tube behind the electron gun, prospective assembly scenarios for the complete THz-FEL injector are discussed, and a joint-debugging process for the injector is implemented.

  16. A Single-Shot Method for Measuring Femtosecond Bunch Length in Linac-Based Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Z.; Bane, K.; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    There is growing interest in the generation and characterization of femtosecond and subfemtosecond pulses from linac-based free-electron lasers (FELs). In this report, following the method of Ricci and Smith [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 3, 032801 (2000)], we investigate the measurement of the longitudinal bunch profile of an ultrashort electron bunch produced by these FELs. We show that this method can be applied in a straightforward manner at x-ray FEL facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source by slightly adjusting the second bunch compressor followed by running the bunch on an rf zero-crossing phase of the final linac. We find that the linac wakefield strongly perturbs the measurement, and through analysis show that it can be compensated in a simple way. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and wakefield compensation through numerical simulations, including effects of coherent synchrotron radiation and longitudinal space charge. When used in conjunction with a high-resolution electron spectrometer, this method potentially reveals the temporal profile of the electron beam down to the femtosecond and subfemotsecond scale.

  17. Damage Threshold of Platinum Coating used for Optics for Self-Seeding of Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Cocco, Daniele; Moeller, Stefan; Ratner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the experimental damage threshold of platinum coating on a silicon substrate illuminated by soft x-ray radiation at grazing incidence angle of 2.1 deg. The coating was the same as the blazed grating used for the soft X-ray self-seeding optics of the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The irradiation condition was chosen such that the absorbed dose was similar to the maximum dose expected for the grating. The expected dose was simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation in non-homogenous media. The experiment was performed at 900 eV photon energy for both single pulse and multi-shot conditions. We have not observed single shot damage. This corresponds to a single shot damage threshold being higher than 3 J/cm2. The multiple shot damage threshold measured for 10 shots and about 600 shots was determined to be 0.95 J/cm2 and 0.75 J/cm2 respectively. The damage threshold occurred at an instantaneous dose which is higher that the melt dose of platinum.

  18. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D.; Markvardsen, Anders J.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L.; Doak, R. Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; et al

    2015-06-11

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport ofe.g.ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data revealmore »the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins.« less

  19. Structural studies of P-type ATPase–ligand complexes using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bublitz, Maike; Nass, Karol; Drachmann, Nikolaj D.; Markvardsen, Anders J.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Mattle, Daniel; Shoeman, Robert L.; Doak, R. Bruce; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin M.; Williams, Garth J.; Foucar, Lutz; Reinhard, Linda; Sitsel, Oleg; Gregersen, Jonas L.; Clausen, Johannes D.; Boesen, Thomas; Gotfryd, Kamil; Wang, Kai -Tuo; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V.; Nissen, Poul; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-06-11

    Membrane proteins are key players in biological systems, mediating signalling events and the specific transport ofe.g.ions and metabolites. Consequently, membrane proteins are targeted by a large number of currently approved drugs. Understanding their functions and molecular mechanisms is greatly dependent on structural information, not least on complexes with functionally or medically important ligands. Structure determination, however, is hampered by the difficulty of obtaining well diffracting, macroscopic crystals. Here, the feasibility of X-ray free-electron-laser-based serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for the structure determination of membrane protein–ligand complexes using microcrystals of various native-source and recombinant P-type ATPase complexes is demonstrated. The data reveal the binding sites of a variety of ligands, including lipids and inhibitors such as the hallmark P-type ATPase inhibitor orthovanadate. By analyzing the resolution dependence of ligand densities and overall model qualities, SFX data quality metrics as well as suitable refinement procedures are discussed. Even at relatively low resolution and multiplicity, the identification of ligands can be demonstrated. This makes SFX a useful tool for ligand screening and thus for unravelling the molecular mechanisms of biologically active proteins.

  20. Damage Threshold of Platinum Coating used for Optics for Self-Seeding of Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Cocco, Daniele; Moeller, Stefan; Ratner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the experimental damage threshold of platinum coating on a silicon substrate illuminated by soft x-ray radiation at grazing incidence angle of 2.1 deg. The coating was the same as the blazed grating used for the soft X-ray self-seeding optics of the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The irradiation condition was chosen such that the absorbed dose was similar to the maximum dose expected for the grating. The expected dose was simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation in non-homogenous media. The experiment was performed at 900 eV photon energy for both single pulse and multi-shot conditions. We have not observed single shot damage. This corresponds to a single shot damage threshold being higher than 3 J/cm2. The multiple shot damage threshold measured for 10 shots and about 600 shots was determined to be 0.95 J/cm2 and 0.75 J/cm2 respectively. The damage threshold occurred at an instantaneous dose which is higher that the melt dose of platinum.

  1. Damage Threshold of Platinum Coating used for Optics for Self-Seeding of Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Cocco, Daniele; Moeller, Stefan; Ratner, Daniel

    2015-02-23

    We investigated the experimental damage threshold of platinum coating on a silicon substrate illuminated by soft x-ray radiation at grazing incidence angle of 2.1 deg. The coating was the same as the blazed grating used for the soft X-ray self-seeding optics of the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The irradiation condition was chosen such that the absorbed dose was similar to the maximum dose expected for the grating. The expected dose was simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation in non-homogenous media. The experiment was performed at 900 eV photon energy for both single pulse and multi-shot conditions. Wemore »have not observed single shot damage. This corresponds to a single shot damage threshold being higher than 3 J/cm2. The multiple shot damage threshold measured for 10 shots and about 600 shots was determined to be 0.95 J/cm2 and 0.75 J/cm2 respectively. The damage threshold occurred at an instantaneous dose which is higher that the melt dose of platinum.« less

  2. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lal, Shankar Pant, K. K.

    2014-12-15

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  3. Mode couplings in a two-stream free-electron laser with a helical wiggler and an ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi Alirezaee, Hajar

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the method of perturbation has been applied to obtain the dispersion relation (DR) of a two-stream free-electron laser (FEL) with a helical wiggler and an ion-channel with all relativistic effects on waves. This DR has been solved numerically to find the unstable modes and their growth rate. Numerical solutions of DR show that the growth rate is considerably enhanced in comparison with single-stream free-electron laser. In group II orbits, with relatively large wiggler induced velocities, new couplings are found. The effect of the velocity difference of the two electron beams on the instabilities has also been investigated in this study. Moreover, the effect of the ion-channel density on the maximum growth rate of FEL resonance has been analyzed.

  4. Self-field effects on instability of wave modes in a two-stream free-electron laser with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi Rezaee Rami, Omme Kolsoum

    2014-07-15

    Free electron lasers (FEL) play major roles in the Raman Regime, due to the charge and current densities of the beam self-field. The method of perturbation has been applied to study the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. A dispersion relation for two-stream free electron lasers with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field has been found. This dispersion relation is solved numerically to investigate the influence of self-fields on the FEL coupling and the two-stream instability. It was found that self-fields can produce very large effects on the FEL coupling, but they have almost negligible effects on two-stream instability.

  5. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Vinokurov and Shrinsky is the klystron FEL (sometimes calleda transverse optical klystron FEL, or TOK) where themore they devised an optical klystron so the multicomponent

  6. Improved crystal orientation and physical properties from single-shot XFEL stills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauter, Nicholas K., E-mail: nksauter@lbl.gov; Hattne, Johan; Brewster, Aaron S.; Echols, Nathaniel; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    X-ray free-electron laser crystallography relies on the collection of still-shot diffraction patterns. New methods are developed for optimal modeling of the crystals’ orientations and mosaic block properties. X-ray diffraction patterns from still crystals are inherently difficult to process because the crystal orientation is not uniquely determined by measuring the Bragg spot positions. Only one of the three rotational degrees of freedom is directly coupled to spot positions; the other two rotations move Bragg spots in and out of the reflecting condition but do not change the direction of the diffracted rays. This hinders the ability to recover accurate structure factors from experiments that are dependent on single-shot exposures, such as femtosecond diffract-and-destroy protocols at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Here, additional methods are introduced to optimally model the diffraction. The best orientation is obtained by requiring, for the brightest observed spots, that each reciprocal-lattice point be placed into the exact reflecting condition implied by Bragg’s law with a minimal rotation. This approach reduces the experimental uncertainties in noisy XFEL data, improving the crystallographic R factors and sharpening anomalous differences that are near the level of the noise.

  7. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaria, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    49625-Rev. 1 (also SLAC Rpt. LCLS-TN-04-3) Fawley W M 2006wavelength FELs (e.g. , FLASH, LCLS, SCSS, XFEL, SPARX) have

  8. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimei Wang

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam energy at ~5MeV. Simulation shows that in the 3+1/2 DC- C injector, there is a region the beam could be over focused by RF electromagnetic field and the transverse emittance in the transport line up to linac will increase instantly due to over focusing. In order to eliminate this effect on beam emittance, several solutions are investigated to avoid over focusing. This result is very important for beam loading experiment for low bunch charge operation. Meanwhile, different merger structures are compared in terms of error sensitivity and emittance increase with space charge effect. In recirculation beam line, a new symmetric 180{degree} arc structure is designed. It fulfills the achromatic condition and adjustable bunch compression. These two parameters are controlled by different Quads knob. With this novel structure, the recirculation lattice can achieve path length adjustment, bunch compression and decompression in a large range. With beamline error, the beam central orbit will deviate from the designed trajectory. An orbit correction system is optimized, which balances between cost and performance of orbit after correction at design level. Different methods are used to estimate its robustness. The BBU instability, especially multi-pass BBU imposed a potentially severe limitation to the average current that can be accelerated in an ERL. Simulation gives the harmful HOMs and predicts that the threshold average current in this machine is much higher than the possible operation current. This work is based on the existing facility in PKU, so it provides guidelines for the facility operation and upgrade in the future. The theoretical analysis of ERL requirement and FEL requirement on beam transport line and beam property paves the way for future ERL research.

  9. Wavefront Analysis of Nonlinear Self-Amplified Spontaneous-Emission Free-Electron Laser Harmonics in the Single-Shot Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachelard, R.; Chubar, O.; Mercere, P.; Idir, M.; Couprie, M.E.; Lambert, G.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Kimura, H.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.; Nagasono, M.; Hara, T. and Ishikawa, T.

    2011-06-08

    The single-shot spatial characteristics of the vacuum ultraviolet self-amplified spontaneous emission of a free electron laser (FEL) is measured at different stages of amplification up to saturation with a Hartmann wavefront sensor. We show that the fundamental radiation at 61.5 nm tends towards a single-mode behavior as getting closer to saturation. The measurements are found in good agreement with simulations and theory. A near diffraction limited wavefront was measured. The analysis of Fresnel diffraction through the Hartmann wavefront sensor hole array also provides some further insight for the evaluation of the FEL transverse coherence, of high importance for various applications.

  10. X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gorkhover, T. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. med. Forschung, Jahnstr. 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rouzee, A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-19

    X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

  11. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Hatsui, Takaki; RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 ; Horigome, Toshio; Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen; Burt, David; Murao, Hajime

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 10{sup 14} photon/mm{sup 2}. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 ?m square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  12. Instability of wave modes in a two-stream free-electron laser with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi; Mehrabi, Narges [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    The dispersion relation of a two-stream free-electron laser (TSFEL) with a one-dimensional helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field is studied. Also, all relativistic effects on the space-charge wave and radiation are considered. This dispersion relation is solved numerically to find the unstable interaction among the all wave modes. Numerical calculations show that the growth rate is considerably enhanced in comparison with single-stream FEL. The effect of the velocity difference of the two electron beams on the two-stream instability and the FEL resonance is investigated. The maximum growth rate of FEL resonance is investigated numerically as a function of the axial magnetic field.

  13. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  14. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01

    and Phase Diagnostics, SLAC Report LCLS-TN-00-12. Emma P.al. 2009, First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater System, PACLinac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report,

  15. DarkLight: A Search for Dark Forces at the Jefferson Laboratory Free-Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balewski, Jan; Bernauer, J.; Bertozzi, William; Bessuille, Jason; Buck, B.; Cowan, Ray; Dow, K.; Epstein, C.; Fisher, Peter; Gilad, Shalev; Ihloff, Ernest; Kahn, Yonatan; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelsey, J.; Milner, Richard; Moran, C.; Ou, Longwu; Russell, R.; Schmookler, Barak; Thaler, J.; Tschalar, C.; Vidal, Christopher; Winnebeck, A.; Benson, Stephen [JLAB; Gould, Christopher [JLAB; Biallas, George [JLAB; Boyce, James [JLAB; Coleman, James [JLAB; Douglas, David [JLAB; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Fenker, Howard [JLAB; Gubeli, Joseph [JLAB; Hannon, Fay [JLAB; Huang, Jia [JLAB; Jordan, Kevin [JLAB; Legg, Robert [JLAB; Marchlik, Matthew [JLAB; Moore, Steven [JLAB; Neil, George [JLAB; Shinn, Michelle D [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher [JLAB; Walker, Richard [JLAB; Williams, Gwyn [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Freytsis, M.; Fiorito, Ralph; O'Shea, P.; Alarcon, Ricardo; Dipert, R.; Ovanesyan, G.; Gunter, Thoth; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kohl, M.; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Gunarathne, D. S.; Martoff, C. J.; Olvitt, D. L.; Surrow, Bernd; Lia, X.; Beck, Reinhard; Schmitz, R.; Walther, D.; Brinkmann, K.; Zaunig, H.

    2014-05-01

    We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays.

  16. Multiphoton above-threshold ionization in superintense free-electron x-ray laser fields: Beyond the dipole approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zhongyuan; Chu, Shih-I

    2013-02-13

    maximum value kM , and the probability of the electron is negligible when the electron momentum is greater than kM . Thus the wave function of an electron can be calculated within a finite P space with a simple zero-boundary condition as long... as the boundary is set at a properly large kM . *zyzhou@uga.edu †sichu@ku.edu This approximation has been successfully used to study the multiphoton above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra of a hydrogen atom in longer-wavelength and shorter-pulse laser fields...

  17. Improved crystal orientation and physical properties from single-shot XFEL stills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauter, Nicholas K.; Hattne, Johan; Brewster, Aaron S.; Echols, Nathaniel; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-11-28

    X-ray diffraction patterns from still crystals are inherently difficult to process because the crystal orientation is not uniquely determined by measuring the Bragg spot positions. Only one of the three rotational degrees of freedom is directly coupled to spot positions; the other two rotations move Bragg spots in and out of the reflecting condition but do not change the direction of the diffracted rays. This hinders the ability to recover accurate structure factors from experiments that are dependent on single-shot exposures, such as femtosecond diffract-and-destroy protocols at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Here, additional methods are introduced to optimally model the diffraction. The best orientation is obtained by requiring, for the brightest observed spots, that each reciprocal-lattice point be placed into the exact reflecting condition implied by Bragg's law with a minimal rotation. This approach reduces the experimental uncertainties in noisy XFEL data, improving the crystallographic R factors and sharpening anomalous differences that are near the level of the noise.

  18. Improved crystal orientation and physical properties from single-shot XFEL stills

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sauter, Nicholas K.; Hattne, Johan; Brewster, Aaron S.; Echols, Nathaniel; Zwart, Petrus H.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-11-28

    X-ray diffraction patterns from still crystals are inherently difficult to process because the crystal orientation is not uniquely determined by measuring the Bragg spot positions. Only one of the three rotational degrees of freedom is directly coupled to spot positions; the other two rotations move Bragg spots in and out of the reflecting condition but do not change the direction of the diffracted rays. This hinders the ability to recover accurate structure factors from experiments that are dependent on single-shot exposures, such as femtosecond diffract-and-destroy protocols at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Here, additional methods are introduced to optimally model themore »diffraction. The best orientation is obtained by requiring, for the brightest observed spots, that each reciprocal-lattice point be placed into the exact reflecting condition implied by Bragg's law with a minimal rotation. This approach reduces the experimental uncertainties in noisy XFEL data, improving the crystallographic R factors and sharpening anomalous differences that are near the level of the noise.« less

  19. Impedance-Based Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    of the relativistic klystron. REFERENCES 1. A.M. Sessler, inof both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wavethrough a Relativistic Klystron (RK) or a Free-Electron

  20. Theoretical study of electronic damage in single particle imaging experiments at XFELs for pulse durations 0.1 - 10 fs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorobtsov, O Yu; Kabachnik, N M; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) may allow to employ the single particle imaging (SPI) method to determine the structure of macromolecules that do not form stable crystals. Ultrashort pulses of 10 fs and less allow to outrun complete disintegration by Coulomb explosion and minimize radiation damage due to nuclear motion, but electronic damage is still present. The major contribution to the electronic damage comes from the plasma generated in the sample that is strongly dependent on the amount of Auger ionization. Since the Auger process has a characteristic time scale on the order of femtoseconds, one may expect that its contribution will be significantly reduced for attosecond pulses. Here, we study the effect of electronic damage on the SPI at pulse durations from 0.1 fs to 10 fs and in a large range of XFEL fluences to determine optimal conditions for imaging of biological samples. We analyzed the contribution of different electronic excitation processes and found that at fluences higher than $10^{13}$-$...

  1. Novel opportunities for sub-meV inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chubar, Oleg; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6~meV and 0.25~nm$^{-1}$ spectral and momentum transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1~meV and 0.02~nm$^{-1}$ are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high and low frequency probes. We show that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a hundred-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than possible with storage-ring based radiation sources. Wave-optics propagation shows that about $7\\times 10^{12}$~ph/s in a $90$-$\\mu$e...

  2. Covariance mapping of two-photon double core hole states in C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 6 produced by an x-ray free electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mucke, M; Zhaunerchyk, V; Frasinski, L J; Squibb, R J; Siano, M; Eland, J H D; Linusson, P; Salén, P; Meulen, P v d; Thomas, R D; et al

    2015-07-01

    Few-photon ionization and relaxation processes in acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) were investigated at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at SLAC, Stanford using a highly efficient multi-particle correlation spectroscopy technique based on a magnetic bottle. The analysis method of covariance mapping has been applied and enhanced, allowing us to identify electron pairs associated with double core hole (DCH) production and competing multiple ionization processes including Auger decay sequences. The experimental technique and the analysis procedure are discussed in the light of earlier investigations of DCH studies carried out at the same FEL and at thirdmore »generation synchrotron radiation sources. In particular, we demonstrate the capability of the covariance mapping technique to disentangle the formation of molecular DCH states which is barely feasible with conventional electron spectroscopy methods.« less

  3. 9/16/11 11:18 PMAPS -53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics -Event ...stler amplification: a free electron laser in the Earth's magnetosphere Page 1 of 2http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DPP11/Event/153292

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    9/16/11 11:18 PMAPS -53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics - Event ...stler.org/Meeting/DPP11/Event/153292 Bulletin of the American Physical Society 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics - Event ...stler amplification: a free electron laser

  4. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th.; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  5. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; et al

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level ofmore »the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.« less

  6. XFEL diffraction: Developing processing methods to optimize data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XFEL diffraction: Developing processing methods to optimize data quality Citation Details In-Document Search Title: XFEL diffraction: Developing processing methods to optimize data...

  7. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Proof-of-Principle...

  8. Isochronous Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berz, M.

    2010-01-01

    and A. H. Lumpkin. Electron-beam diagnostics and results forDiagnostics and Transport to the Beam Dump After the electron

  9. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Individual steps of the Dowell-Spicer Three Step Model oftotal quantum yield of the Dowell-Spicer Three step model ofof Photocathodes. [3] D. H. Dowell. “Modeling the QE and

  10. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  11. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (3) xfel (3) free electron lasers (2) oscillators (2) pulses (2) resolution (2) x radiation (2) x-ray diffraction (2) xfel, inst (2) advanced photon source (1) alignment (1)...

  13. W-band free-electron masers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freund, H. P. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, Virginia 22102 (United States); Jackson, R. H.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    Theoretical analyses of high power W-band (i.e., {approx_equal}94 GHz) free-electron maser amplifiers are presented for a helical wiggler/cylindrical waveguide configuration using the three-dimensional slow-time-scale ARACHNE simulation code [9]. The geometry treated by ARACHNE is that of an electron beam propagating through the cylindrical waveguide subject to a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field. Two configurations are discussed. The first is the case of a reversed-guide field geometry where the guide field is oriented antiparallel to the helicity of the wiggler field. Using a 330 kV/20 A electron beam, efficiencies of the order of 7% are calculated with a bandwidth (FWHM) of 5 GHz. The second example employs a strong guide field of 20 kG oriented parallel to the helicity of the wiggler. Here, efficiencies of greater than 8% are possible with a FWHM bandwidth of 4.5 GHz using a 300 kV/20 A electron beam. A normalized emittance of 95 mm-mrad is assumed in both cases, and no beam losses are observed for either case. Both cases assume interaction with the fundamental TE{sub 11} mode, which has acceptably low losses in the W-band.

  14. Optical gating and streaking of free-electrons with attosecond precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Martin; Leedle, Kenneth J; Schoenenberger, Norbert; Ruehl, Alex; Hartl, Ingmar; Harris, James S; Byer, Robert L; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present proof of principle experiments of an optical gating concept for free electrons. We demonstrate a temporal resolution of 1.2+-0.3 fs via energy and transverse momentum modulation as a function of time. The scheme is based on the synchronous interaction between electrons and the near-field mode of a dielectric nano-grating excited by a femtosecond laser pulse with an optical period duration of 6.5 fs. The sub-optical cycle resolution demonstrated here is promising for use in laser-driven streak cameras for attosecond temporal characterization of bunched particle beams as well as time-resolved experiments with free-electron beams. We expect that 10 as temporal resolution will be achieved in the near future using such a scheme.

  15. Microsoft Word - SPPS_report05.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Stanford, CA, USA The ultrafast, high brightness x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources of the future have the potential to revolutionize the study of time...

  16. Part 2: Coherent emission from Free Electron Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. Introduction The importance of the time-resolved studies...

  17. Spreader Design for FERMI@Elettra Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    emittance diagnostic section, the electron beam switchyarddiagnostic using optical transition radiation from the screens that can be inserted into the electron beam

  18. A Plasma Channel Beam Conditioner for a Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, G.; Sessler, A.M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Nature 445, 6741 (2007). [7] LCLS Design Study Group, SLACLinac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) [7]. One example has thefunction in the FEL. For LCLS parameters, the corresponding

  19. A PLASMA CHANNEL BEAM CONDITIONER FOR A FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    . In this paper, we give examples of conditioners that might be employed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS is the output wavelength, and is the average beta function in the FEL. For LCLS parameters, the corresponding

  20. The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnagopal, S.

    2008-01-01

    A. Vinokurov, "The Optical Klystron Theory and Experiment",One is reminded of an optical klystron [2] or of the "cavities" in a regular klystron. In fact, in our numerical

  1. Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser explores promise of carbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and quantum computing and as components for microelectromechanical sensors, or MEMS. The tubes could also function as a "lab on a chip," with attached microelectronics and...

  2. Applications of free electron lasers and synchrotrons in industry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in greater depth the potential applications to EUV lithography and to technologies for solar energy. Authors: Barletta, William A. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Dept. of...

  3. Correspondence Principle in Free-Electron Lasers - Comment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BECKER, W.; McIver, J. K.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    1985-01-01

    Optimization of the machine and line level issues in an electronic assembly system (EAS) is imperative for the efficient use of resources in the system. This research considers the joint optimization of machine and line ...

  4. Applications of free electron lasers and synchrotrons in industry and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563AbuseConnectJournal Article:(Journalthedefectsresearch

  5. Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative Activity on Fateof Star

  6. fel 2005 :: Free Electron Laser Conference and Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual Conference on FossilFateOctober 2013 Home | Attendee

  7. Lasers Used to Make First Boron-Nitride Nanotube Yarn | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser and later perfected using a commercial welding laser. In this technique, the laser beam strikes a target inside a chamber filled...

  8. nova.tex, 781996. SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY FREE ELECTRONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    nova.tex, 7­8­1996. SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY FREE ELECTRONS as a Test of Quantum Theory \\Lambda E. T. RELATIVISTIC BASIS OF THE SCHR ¨ ODINGER EQUATION 9 8. NON--ARISTOTELIAN SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY ELECTRONS 10 9 dominates every home and office. But on the other hand, this very fact makes it seem strange that a meeting

  9. XFEL diffraction: Developing processing methods to optimize data quality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-29

    Serial crystallography, using either femtosecond X-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources or short synchrotron-radiation exposures, has the potential to reveal metalloprotein structural details while minimizing damage processes. However, deriving a self-consistent set of Bragg intensities from numerous still-crystal exposures remains a difficult problem, with optimal protocols likely to be quite different from those well established for rotation photography. Here several data processing issues unique to serial crystallography are examined. It is found that the limiting resolution differs for each shot, an effect that is likely to be due to both the sample heterogeneity and pulse-to-pulse variation in experimental conditions. Shotsmore »with lower resolution limits produce lower-quality models for predicting Bragg spot positions during the integration step. Also, still shots by their nature record only partial measurements of the Bragg intensity. An approximate model that corrects to the full-spot equivalent (with the simplifying assumption that the X-rays are monochromatic) brings the distribution of intensities closer to that expected from an ideal crystal, and improves the sharpness of anomalous difference Fourier peaks indicating metal positions.« less

  10. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, C.G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider,"E.Esarey, and W.P.Leemans, "Free-electron laser driven bythe LBNL laser-plasma accelerator," in Proc. Adv. Acc. Con.

  11. Energy of the quasi-free electron in xenon Xianbo Shi a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in xenon Xianbo Shi a , Luxi Li a , C.M. Evans a,, G.L. Findley b critical point. The energy of the quasi-free electron, arising from dopant field ionization, in xenon and for the critical isotherm. Key words: supercritical xenon, field ionization, quasi-free electron energy, electron

  12. New Laser's "First Light" Shatters Record | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Accelerator Facility have delivered first light from their Free Electron Laser (FEL). Only 2 years after ground was broken for the FEL, infrared light of more than...

  13. SOLVING VIRUS STRUCTURES FROM XFEL DIFFRACTION PATTERNS OF RANDOM PARTICLE ORIENTATIONS USING ANGULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    SOLVING VIRUS STRUCTURES FROM XFEL DIFFRACTION PATTERNS OF RANDOM PARTICLE ORIENTATIONS USING August 2013 #12;ABSTRACT SOLVING VIRUS STRUCTURES FROM XFEL DIFFRACTION PATTERNS OF RANDOM PARTICLE such as viruses. To quote from Caspar and Klug [2] "there are only a limited number of efficient designs possible

  14. Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Argon and Krypton C. M. Evans1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Argon and Krypton C. M. Evans1, and G. L. Findley2, 1 these data, a new local Wigner- Seitz model for the density dependent energy V0(P) of a quasi-free electron/medium polarization energy, and includes the thermal kinetic energy of the quasi-free electron. Using this model, V0(P

  15. CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 1. Lasers and masers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes various types of lasers and masers. The following topics are discussed in detail: types and comparisons of laser sources, crystal and glass lasers, semiconductor lasers, organic dye and other liquid lasers, free-electron and x-ray lasers, masers and laser safety.

  16. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROMSciDACReport) |Transverse Gradient

  17. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of the LittleJournal Article:in

  18. Compact X-ray Free-Electron Laser from a Laser-Plasma Accelerator Using a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of the LittleJournal Article:inTransverse-Gradient

  19. Compact x-ray free electron laser from a laser-plasma accelerator using a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of the LittleJournal

  20. Compact x-ray free electron laser from a laser-plasma accelerator using a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of the LittleJournaltransverse gradient undulator

  1. Latest developments on the Dutch 1MW free electron maser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, L-637 Livermore California, 94551 (United States); Verhoeven, A.G.; Urbanus, W. [FOM Instituut voor Plasma Fysica, Rijnhuizen, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)

    1999-05-01

    The FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen, Netherlands), as part of their fusion technology program, has undertaken the development of a Free Electron Maser with the goal of producing 1MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz{endash}250GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60{percent}. This project has been carried out as a collaborative effort with Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod Russia, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow Russia, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, U.S.A and CPI, U.S.A. The key design features of this FEM consists first of a conventional DC acceleration system at high voltage (2MV) which supplies only the unwanted beam interception current and a depressed collector system at 250kV which provides the main beam power. Low body current interception ({lt}25mA) is ensured by using robust inline beam focussing, a low emittance electron gun with halo suppression and periodic magnet side array focussing in the wiggler. The second key feature is use of a low-loss step corrugated waveguide circuit for broad band CW power handling and beam/RF separation. Finally, the required interaction efficiency and mode control is provided by a two stage stepped wiggler. The FEM has been constructed and recently undergone initial short pulse ({lt}10 usec) testing in an inverted mode with the depressed collector absent. Results to date have demonstrated 98.8{percent} beam transmission (over 5 Meters) at currents as high as 8.4 Amps, with 200GHz microwave output at 700kW. There has been good agreement between theory and experiment at the beam current levels tested so far. Details of the most recent experimental results will be presented, in particular the output frequency characteristics with detailed comparisons to theory. The immediate future plans are to operate the system at the design value of 12 Amps with at least 1MW output. The system will then be reconfigured with a 3 stage depressed collector to demonstrate, in the next year, long pulse operation (100 msec) and high wall plug efficiency. Long term future plans call for upgrading the FEM to 2MW and extrapolations up to 5MW are shown to be theoretically possible. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Supercritical Krypton near the Critical Point Luxi Li and C. M. Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Supercritical Krypton near the Critical Point Luxi Li and C. M by the quasi-free electron that arises from field ionization of the dopant, and the zero point kinetic energy of the free electron. The overall decrease in the shift of the dopant ionization energy near the critical

  3. Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1 to the interaction between argon and the quasi-free electron arising from field ionization of the dopant. The energy by the ionic core, V0(P) is the quasi-free electron energy in the perturbing medium, and P is the perturber

  4. Manufacturing Considerations of the Magnetic Structures for the Undulators for the X-FEL at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Manufacturing Considerations of the Magnetic Structures for the Undulators for the X-FEL at TESLA DESY / HASYLAB Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany TESLA-FEL 2000-10 Abstract A study is presented FELs. The total magnetic length of the magnet structures is 1405m. It is proposed to produce these huge

  5. X-FEL Report 2004-04 DSP Integrated, Parameterized, FPGA Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-FEL Report 2004-04 DSP Integrated, Parameterized, FPGA Based Cavity Simulator & Controller for UV-FEL and X-Ray FEL). The controller bases on a programmable circuit Xilinx VirtexII V3000 embedded on a PCB, VHDL, FEL, TESLA, TTF, UV-FEL, Xilinx, FPGA based systems, LLRF control system of third generation

  6. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit-Wheeler process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nousch, T; Kämpfer, B; Titov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  7. Spectral caustics in laser assisted Breit-Wheeler process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Nousch; D. Seipt; B. Kämpfer; A. I. Titov

    2015-09-07

    Electron-positron pair production by the Breit-Wheeler process embedded in a strong laser pulse is analyzed. The transverse momentum spectrum displays prominent peaks which are interpreted as caustics, the positions of which are accessible by the stationary phases. Examples are given for the superposition of an XFEL beam with an optical high-intensity laser beam. Such a configuration is available, e.g., at LCLS at present and at European XFEL in near future. It requires a counter propagating probe photon beam with high energy which can be generated by synchronized inverse Compton backscattering.

  8. Modeling of free electronic state density in hydrogenic plasmas based on nearest neighbor approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2014-07-15

    Most conventional atomic models in a plasma do not treat the effect of the plasma on the free-electron state density. Using a nearest neighbor approximation, the state densities in hydrogenic plasmas for both bound and free electrons were evaluated and the effect of the plasma on the atomic model (especially for the state density of the free electron) was studied. The model evaluates the electron-state densities using the potential distribution formed by the superposition of the Coulomb potentials of two ions. The potential from one ion perturbs the electronic state density on the other. Using this new model, one can evaluate the free-state density without making any ad-hoc assumptions. The resulting contours of the average ionization degree, given as a function of the plasma temperature and density, are shifted slightly to lower temperatures because of the effect of the increasing free-state density.

  9. Performance study of a soft X-ray harmonic generation FEL seeded with an EUV laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullans, M.; Wurtele, J.S.; Penn, G.; Zholents, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray Harmonic Generation FEL Seeded with an EUV Laser PulseX-ray harmonic generation FEL seeded with an EUV laser pulseof a free electron laser (FEL) using a low-power extreme

  10. Comments on : Proposal for Raman x-ray free electron laser.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zholents, A.; Zolotorev, M. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); (LBNL)

    2011-05-01

    Equation 13 in this paper defines the force experienced by the electron moving in z direction with velocity v{sub z} due to the X-ray wave propagating in z direction with electric field E{sub 1} pointing in y direction and magnetic field B{sub 1} pointing in x direction as {rvec F}{sub 1}(t) = -eE{sub 1} cos({omega}{sub 1}t - k{sub 1}z){rvec e}{sub y}. In our opinion calculating this force one should also include the impact of the X-ray wave's magnetic field and obtain {rvec F}{sub 1}(t) = -e E{sub 1} = v{sub z}/c B{sub 1} cos({omega}{sub 1}t - k{sub 1}z){rvec e}{sub y} {approx} - eE{sub 1}/2{gamma}{sup 2} cos({omega}{sub 1}t - k{sub 1}z){rvec e}{sub y}. Here c is the speed of light and {gamma} is the electron relativistic factor. In result one would need to change E{sub 1} to E{sub 1}/2{gamma}{sup 2} in all the following equations in the cited paper (except wave propagation equations, Eqs. (23) and (34)). They believe that similar omission in the impact of the magnetic field appears in equation (28). Consequently, the formula for the gaion (Eq. (37) in the cited paper) should also include the factor 1/2{gamma}{sup 2}. This is a rather significant modification considering that relativistic electrons with values of {gamma} ranging from approximately 20 to approximately 300 are used in the numerical examples.

  11. VISA: A Milestone on the Path towards X-Ray Free Electron Lasers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and saturation regime. Both, simulation and theory predict the intensity of the 3rd harmonic to be about 1% of the fundamental for an x-ray SASE FEL. This is about 8 orders of...

  12. Inverse Free Electron Laser Interactions with Sub-Picosecond High Brightness Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Joshua Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated Electron Beam Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . .2 High Brightness Electron Beams Produced in thetion of Uniformly Filled Ellipsoidal Electron Beam: Method-

  13. Cyclotron-undulator cooling of a free-electron-laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kuzikov, S. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Savilov, A. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-18

    We propose methods of fast cooling of an electron beam, which are based on wiggling of particles in an undulator in the presence of an axial magnetic field. We use a strong dependence of the axial electron velocity on the oscillatory velocity, when the electron cyclotron frequency is close to the frequency of electron wiggling in the undulator field. The abnormal character of this dependence (when the oscillatory velocity increases with the increase of the input axial velocity) can be a basis of various methods for fast cooling of moderately relativistic (several MeV) electron beams.

  14. Three-dimensional theory of Smith-Purcell free-electron laser with dielectric loaded grating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Miaomiao, E-mail: mona486@yeah.net; Li, Ke, E-mail: like3714@163.com [Key Laboratory of High Power Microwave Sources and Technologies, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Electronic Science and Technology, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Wenxin, E-mail: lwenxin@mail.ie.ac.cn; Wang, Yong, E-mail: wangyong3845@sina.com [Key Laboratory of High Power Microwave Sources and Technologies, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-09-14

    A dielectric loaded rectangular grating for Smith-Purcell devices is proposed in this paper. Regarding the electron beam as a moving plasma dielectric, a three dimensional (3D) linear theory of beam-wave interaction is developed. The first and second order growth rates are calculated, which are obtained by expanding hot dispersion equation at synchronous point. The results show that the cutoff frequency is affected by grating width. The dispersion curve becomes flatter and shifts towards lower frequency by loading dielectric in grooves. The simulation results, which are obtained by a 3D particle-in-cell code, are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. Compared the first and second order growth rate, it shows that the discrepancy is large when beam parameters are selected with high values. In this case, it is necessary to apply the second order growth rate, which can accurately describe the process of beam-wave interaction.

  15. A high thermal conductivity waveguide window for use in a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Elliott; V. Nguyen; L. Phillips; J. Preble (Jefferson Lab); T. Schultheiss; V. Christina; M. Cole; J. Rathke (Northrop Grumman Corp.)

    1999-04-01

    Design, analysis, and testing of a waveguide window with a goal of propagating greater than 100 kW average power operating at 1500 Mhz has been performed. This is made possible by the favorable material properties of beryllia (BeO). Brazing the window to a soft copper frame and then brazing the frame to a KOVAR flange provides the vacuum seal. RF analysis combined with thermal/structural analysis shows the benefits of the material. The KOVAR flange with a CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion, that matches that of BeO enables a strong braze joint. RF testing to 35 kW has been successful. The basics of this design can be expanded to applications with lower frequencies and higher average power. A paper similar to this was presented at LINAC 98.

  16. Goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography with X-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; González, Ana; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brewster, Aaron S.; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Chang, Joseph F.; Chollet, Matthieu; Ehrensberger, Paul; Eriksson, Thomas L.; Feng, Yiping; Hattne, Johan; Hedman, Britt; Hollenbeck, Michael; Holton, James M.; Keable, Stephen; Kobilka, Brian K.; Kovaleva, Elena G.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Lemke, Henrik T.; Lin, Guowu; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Manglik, Aashish; Mathews, Irimpan I.; McPhillips, Scott E.; Nelson, Silke; Peters, John W.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Smith, Clyde A.; Song, Jinhu; Stevenson, Hilary P.; Tsai, Yingssu; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Vinetsky, Vladimir; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Weis, William I.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Zhu, Diling; Hodgson, Keith O.

    2014-10-31

    The emerging method of femtosecond crystallography (FX) may extend the diffraction resolution accessible from small radiation-sensitive crystals and provides a means to determine catalytically accurate structures of acutely radiation-sensitive metalloenzymes. Automated goniometer-based instrumentation developed for use at the Linac Coherent Light Source enabled efficient and flexible FX experiments to be performed on a variety of sample types. In the case of rod-shaped Cpl hydrogenase crystals, only five crystals and about 30 min of beam time were used to obtain the 125 still diffraction patterns used to produce a 1.6-Å resolution electron density map. With smaller crystals, high-density grids were used to increase sample throughput; 930 myoglobin crystals mounted at random orientation inside 32 grids were exposed, demonstrating the utility of this approach. Screening results from cryocooled crystals of ?2-adrenoreceptor and an RNA polymerase II complex indicate the potential to extend the diffraction resolution obtainable from very radiation-sensitive samples beyond that possible with undulator-based synchrotron sources.

  17. Femtosecond dark-field imaging with an X-ray free electron laser (CXIDB ID 19)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Martin, A. V.

    2012-08-25

    This data was collected as part of the same experiment as the data deposited in [ID16](id-16.html). Experiment details are given in [Loh, N.D. et al.](http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11222)

  18. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser (CXIDB ID 3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chapman, H. N.

    2011-02-23

    The diffraction pattern of this entry corresponds to the one shown in **figure 2a** of the corresponding citation.

  19. Inverse Free Electron Laser Interactions with Sub-Picosecond High Brightness Electron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Joshua Timothy

    2014-01-01

    the OAP chamber, goes through a periscope that preserves itsthe OAP chamber, goes through a periscope that preserves itsPolarization Preserving Periscope Periscope with Window 500

  20. Femtosecond dark-field imaging with an X-ray free electron laser (CXIDB ID 19)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Martin, A. V.

    This data was collected as part of the same experiment as the data deposited in [ID16](id-16.html). Experiment details are given in [Loh, N.D. et al.](http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11222)

  1. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser (CXIDB ID 3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chapman, H. N.

    The diffraction pattern of this entry corresponds to the one shown in **figure 2a** of the corresponding citation.

  2. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01

    resolution electron beam diagnostics. • Radiation protectionelectron source, beam instrumentation and diagnostics andand diagnostics equipment to characterize the electron beam.

  3. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01

    22(4): p. 1972. 23. D. H. Dowell, S.Z. Bethel, and K.D.2004) p. 330. 14. D. H. Dowell, et al. , Proc. of the 20071995). 10. E. Colby, D. Dowell, et al, “An Injector Test

  4. Exact and variational solutions of 3D Eigenmodes in high gain Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01

    Phys. Rev. A 41, 1662 [11] LCLS Design Study Report, SLAC-R-radial mode index. Consider LCLS nominal case as an exampleai/a r )2] (Ar/1f(Jx). For the LCLS example, the variational

  5. Design Studies for a VUV--Soft X-ray Free-Electron Laser Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.

    2010-01-01

    bunch arrival time in the LCLS, and another system that willFERMI@Elettra and 100 fs for LCLS, both requiring about 200-

  6. Three-dimensional analysis of free-electron laser performance using brightness scaled variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullans, M.

    2008-01-01

    to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) design, ESASEon the LCLS, and the optimal gain for a ?xed emittance.The parameters for LCLS used here are a beam energy of 13.64

  7. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01

    2007). 41. P. Emma for the LCLS commissioning team, PAC2009Test Facility for the LCLS”, SLAC-TN-07-005, (2007). John N.Professional/Academic Director, LCLS Strategic Projects

  8. Design Studies for a VUV--Soft X-ray Free-Electron Laser Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.

    2010-01-01

    0.75 MV at Q 0 (kW) Peak wall power density at 0.75 MV (W/cmlarge and the power density on the walls is small and

  9. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baptiste, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    RF power for 750 kV Peak wall power density Stored energyimpedance, to minimize the wall power density, to reduce theresulting modest power load on the walls is compatible with

  10. Goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography with X-ray free electron lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; González, Ana; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brewster, Aaron S.; Brunger, Axel T.; et al

    2014-10-31

    The emerging method of femtosecond crystallography (FX) may extend the diffraction resolution accessible from small radiation-sensitive crystals and provides a means to determine catalytically accurate structures of acutely radiation-sensitive metalloenzymes. Automated goniometer-based instrumentation developed for use at the Linac Coherent Light Source enabled efficient and flexible FX experiments to be performed on a variety of sample types. In the case of rod-shaped Cpl hydrogenase crystals, only five crystals and about 30 min of beam time were used to obtain the 125 still diffraction patterns used to produce a 1.6-Å resolution electron density map. With smaller crystals, high-density grids were usedmore »to increase sample throughput; 930 myoglobin crystals mounted at random orientation inside 32 grids were exposed, demonstrating the utility of this approach. Screening results from cryocooled crystals of ?2-adrenoreceptor and an RNA polymerase II complex indicate the potential to extend the diffraction resolution obtainable from very radiation-sensitive samples beyond that possible with undulator-based synchrotron sources.« less

  11. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01

    for Application to Inertial Confinement Fusion, 1998 SPIElaser systems for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Early

  12. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    RK configurations: (1) the method of extraction of microwaveseptum-couplers. Other extraction methods have been studiedwave FEL/TBA. The method of extraction is " beat-coupling"

  13. De novo protein crystal structure determination from X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Barends, Thomas, R.M.

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) data of microcrystals of a lysozyme gadolinium derivative. The data was used to demonstrate de-novo phasing by single anomalous dispersion.

  14. Experimental Demonstration of a Soft X-ray Self-seeded Free-electron Laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Abela, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Amann, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bohler, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bouchard, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bostedt, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Boyes, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chow, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cocco, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Decker, F. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Eckman, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Emma, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fairley, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Feng, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Field, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flechsig, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Gassner, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Heimann, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kelez, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krzywinski, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lutman, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marcus, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Moeller, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Morton, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nuhn, H. D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rodes, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Serkez, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Stevens, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Walz, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Welch, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wu, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has added self-seeding capability to the soft x-ray range using a grating monochromator system. We report demonstration of soft x-ray self-seeding with a measured resolving power of 2000-5000, wavelength stability of 10-4, and an increase in peak brightness by a factor of 2-5 across the photon energy range of 500-1000 eV. By avoiding the need for a monochromator at the experimental station, the self-seeded beam can deliver as much as 50 fold higher brightness to users.

  15. Design Overview of a Highly Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2011-01-01

    selected the modulating anode klystron for this purpose.In this device, the klystron beam is switched with a lowVoltage regulation of the klystron will be effective in

  16. A NEW VERSION OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER TWO BEAM ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    S. S. Yu, "Relativistic Klystron Version of the Two- BeamSubharmonic Drive Relativistic Klystron Work at LLNL", Proc.cavities -- a relativistic klystron (RK) as the microwave

  17. Macroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayama, K.

    2008-01-01

    those in a multi-stage klystron- like FEL (or a multi-stagestability in a multistage klystron-like FEL, the stability

  18. On the possible void decay in free-electron laser sase-fel experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Marciak-Kozlowska; M Pelc; M Kozlowski

    2007-05-21

    In this paper the motion of ultrahigh energy particles produced in sasefel is investigated. The critical field which opose the acceleration of the ultra high energy particles is calculated

  19. Free electron laser with bunched relativistic electron beam and electrostatic longitudinal wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri Javan, Nasser [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The system of the nonlinear nonstationary equations describing spatial-temporal dynamics of the amplitudes of an undulator radiation and a space charge wave of a relativistic electron beam in the resonator is obtained. The electrostatic longitudinal wiggler is considered. A bunch of the electron beam injects to the resonator, at the ends of which two mirrors are placed. After the interaction of electrons of bunch with radiation in the presence of wiggler and after amplifying electromagnetic pulse, a part of radiation is reflected back by semitransparent mirror. Then, it reaches to the initial of the system where the other mirror is placed. Synchronously, when the pulse is reflecting, the other electron bunch enters to the resonator and interacts with the pulse. This operation has simulated until saturation of growth of the electromagnetic pulse. The dynamics of the problem is simulated by the method of macro particles. The dynamics of pulse amplification, motion of the electrons, and spectra of output radiation in each stage are simulated.

  20. Frequency shifting in free-electron lasers G. Shvets and J. S. Wurtele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    in current and energy produce shifts in the detuning from FEL resonance and in the beam-wave coupling. We and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (Received 6 May in a microwave amplifier with time-dependent beam energy and current are derived and found to be in good

  1. De novo protein crystal structure determination from X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Barends, Thomas, R.M.

    2013-11-25

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) data of microcrystals of a lysozyme gadolinium derivative. The data was used to demonstrate de-novo phasing by single anomalous dispersion.

  2. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01

    efforts of the International Linear Collider Global Designfrom the International Linear Collider R&D program, the LCLSlinac of the International Linear Collider and the DOE-

  3. BUDKER INP FREE ELECTRON LASER FACILITY CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    of scientists including biologists, chemists and physicists. Its high peak and average powers are utilized possible options for the future upgrade. ACCELERATOR DESIGN The Novosibirsk FEL facility is based at the ceiling. At the common track there are two round magnets. By switching these magnets on and off one can

  4. Influence of finite radial geometry on the growth rate of ion-channel free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahmani, Mohammad; Hamzehpour, Hossein; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-11-15

    The influence of finite radial geometry on the instability of a tenuous relativistic electron beam propagating in an ion-channel in a waveguide is investigated. The instability analysis is based on the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the perturbation about a self-consistent beam equilibrium. With the help of characteristic method the dispersion relation for the TE-mode is derived and analyzed through the numerical solutions. It is found that the positioning of the beam radius R{sub b} relative to the waveguide radius R{sub c}, and the ion-channel frequency can have a large influence on the maximum growth rate and corresponding wave number.

  5. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    , STEFANO MARCHESINI1,2 , BRUCE W. WOODS1 , SASA BAJT1 , W. HENRY BENNER1 , RICHARD A. LONDON1,2 , ELKE PL Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park

  6. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01

    of Directors: Positive Light Incorporated, Los Gatos, CA.Light Incorporated, Los Gatos, CA. Consultant: Spectra-Light Incorporated, Los Gatos, CA. Involved in all aspects

  7. Design Considerations for the Free-Electron Laser with Self-Seeding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  8. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for development of imaging detectors, of instruments and of the ancillary facilities, with involvement of external laboratories and institutes in Europe, shall also be described...

  9. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name: Rm. Tel:Test1TheDaleThe End

  10. Design Considerations for the Free-Electron Laser with Self-Seeding and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City of Kansas City,

  11. Design Considerations for the Free-Electron Laser with Self-Seeding and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City of Kansas City,Current

  12. Distributed seeding for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron lasers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City ofNovelQ3:Q3:

  13. Distributed seeding for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron lasers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting Host Site: City

  14. Experimental demonstration of a soft x-ray self-seeded free-electron laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting HostDISCLAIMERlinac

  15. Maximizing spectral flux from self-seeding hard x-ray free electron lasers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _s - "U N C-

  16. DOE Science Showcase - Free-Electron Lasers | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01TechnicalScientific and TechnicalOffice ofOfficeEnergy,Office of

  17. A single-shot transmissive spectrometer for hard x-ray free electron lasers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministrationTechnicalTechnicalScience.govWSRC-MS-g8-00318 Heat(Journal Article) |

  18. A single-shot transmissive spectrometer for hard x-ray free electron lasers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technicalentanglements for linearAoffromGalerkin

  19. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) | SciTech Connectan oxide

  20. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) | SciTech Connectan oxideElectron Beam

  1. Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser based on a transverse

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal Article)gradient

  2. Experimental demonstration of a soft x-ray self-seeded free-electron laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent)pressure|the typEsilica

  3. Exploring the Wavefront of Hard X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at a linear collider (Conference) |

  4. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production atmeasurementComparisonArticle) |(Conference) |

  5. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production atmeasurementComparisonArticle) |(Conference) |scattering

  6. Purified self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron lasers with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy measurement at the SXRArticle) |

  7. Reabsorption of Soft X-Ray Emission at High X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect PulseSummary (ProgrambatteriesLi- and Mn-Rich

  8. Toward a Single Mode Free Electron Laser for Coherent Hard X-Ray

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and Pion

  9. Toward a Single Mode Free Electron Laser for Coherent Hard X-Ray

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and PionExperiments (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

  10. Free Electron Laser Program Program at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalterOptimizing(SC)Fermi NationalFermiFlorida

  11. VISA: A Milestone on the Path towards X-Ray Free Electron Lasers | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system forPortal.1 - March

  12. The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific Measures (April U.S.First

  13. In the OSTI Collections: Free-Electron Lasers | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,Impact AssessmentsImprovingIn CaseLaboratory |ofOffice of

  14. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtransScientificEnergyBattlefieldFemtosecond

  15. Science Driver Requirements for Seeded Soft X-ray Free Electron Lasers |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-Contest Sign56ScienceOpensStanford

  16. Energy of the quasi-free electron in argon, krypton and xenon Xianbo Shi a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in argon, krypton and xenon Xianbo Shi a,b , Luxi Li a,b , C. M ionization of the dopant, and (iii) the kinetic energy of the quasi-free electron. The polarization terms are determined by a standard statistical mechanical treatment. However, the kinetic energy of the quasi-free

  17. Ultra Stable Capacitor charging Power Supply of Klystron-Modulator for PAL XFEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Y. G.; Kwon, S. J.; Jang, S. D.; Suh, J. H.; Oh, J. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, San-31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784, S. (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-19

    The PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory) 2.5-GeV linac is planed to be converted to a SASE-XFEL facility (PAL XFEL) that supplies coherent X-rays down to 0.3-nm wavelength. The electron beams has to have an emittance of 1.0 mm-mrad, a peak current of 3 kA, and a low energy spread of 1.0 MeV. In order to provide reasonably stable SASE output, the RF stability of 0.02% rms is required for both RF phase and amplitude. This stability is mainly determined by a low level RF drive system and klystron-modulators. The stability level of the modulator has to be improved 10 times better to meet the pulse stability of 0.02%. This is a technologically challenging issue for PAL XFEL. An inverter technology is to be applied to charge the PFN of a new modulator. Therefore, a new inverter system should provide very stable charging performances. This paper presents the development of an ultra stable klystron-modulator with an inverter power.

  18. A unit vector for characterizing the spin polarization of free electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun-Fang Li; Yan Wang

    2010-08-05

    New degrees of freedom having the form of a unit vector are identified for characterizing the spin polarization of free electron. It is shown that when only the spin is considered, the non-commutativity of the Cartesian components of the Pauli vector allows us to use the azimuthal angle of a second direction, denoted by unit vector $\\mathbf I$, with respect to the quantization direction to characterize the spin polarization. The rotation of $\\mathbf I$ through an angle about the quantization axis leads to a rotation of the spin polarization vector through twice the angle about the same axis. Discussions are also made in Heisenberg picture as well. Upon utilizing this approach to a free electron and letting the quantization direction for each plane wave be the wave vector, we arrive at a representation in which the unit vector $\\mathbf I$ functions as an independent index to characterize the spin polarization.

  19. Free-electron maser driven by a two-stage ferroelectric electron gun M. Einat, E. Jerby,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    Free-electron maser driven by a two-stage ferroelectric electron gun M. Einat, E. Jerby,a) and G; accepted 25 November 2002 A two-stage ferroelectric electron gun is employed in a free-electron maser FEM oscillator experiment. This gun produces a pulsed electron beam of a 5­15 keV energy, 0.5 A current, and 3

  20. Peculiarities of the Light Absorption and Emission by Free Electrons in Multivalley Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Tomchuk

    2008-11-18

    General expressions are obtained for the coefficient of light absorption by free carriers as well as the intensity of the spontaneous light emission by hot electrons in multivalley semiconductors. These expressions depend on the electron concentration and electron temperature in the individual valleys. An anisotropy of the dispersion law and electron scattering mechanisms is taken into account. Impurity-related and acoustic scattering mechanisms are analyzed. Polarization dependence of the spontaneous emission by hot electrons is found out. At unidirectional pressure applied or high irradiation intensities, the polarization dependence also appears in the coefficient of light absorption by free electrons.

  1. Fully QED/relativistic theory of light pressure on free electrons by isotropic radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Kaplan

    2015-07-27

    A relativistic/QED theory of light pressure on electrons by an isotropic, in particular blackbody radiation predicts thermalization rates of free electrons over entire span of energies available in the lab and the nature. The calculations based on the QED Klein-Nishina theory of electron-photon scattering and relativistic Fokker-Planck equation, show that the transition from classical (Thompson) to QED (Compton) thermalization determined by the product of electron energy and radiation temperature, is reachable under conditions for controlled nuclear fusion, and predicts large acceleration of electron thermalization in the Compton domain and strong damping of plasma oscillations at the temperatures near plasma nuclear fusion.

  2. Propagation of gamma rays and production of free electrons in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Granatstein, V. L.; Sprangle, P.; Penano, J.

    2012-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of production of free electrons in air by gamma-rays leaking from radioactive materials. A model based on the Klein-Nishina scattering theory is used to calculate scattering cross sections and approximate the electron production rate. The model includes the effects of primary gamma-quanta radiated by the source as well as that scattered in air. Comparison of the model with the mcnpx kinetic code (http://mcnpx.lanl.gov/) in a sample problem shows excellent agreement. The motivation for this research comes from the recently proposed concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials [V. L. Granatstein and G. S. Nusinovich, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 063304 (2010)]. The concept is based on the breakdown in air at the focal point of a high-power beam of electromagnetic waves produced by a THz gyrotron with a 10-20 {mu}s pulse. The presence of a radioactive material can greatly exceed the production rate of free electrons over the natural background rate. Additional electrons act as seeds to initiate the breakdown and create sufficiently dense plasma at the focal region. The dense plasma can then be remotely detected as an unambiguous effect of the concealed radioactive material.

  3. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Elise; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, due to the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  4. Statistical properties of the radiation from SASE FEL operating in a post-saturation regime with and without undulator tapering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneidmiller, E A

    2015-01-01

    We describe statistical and coherence properties of the radiation from x-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) operating in the post-saturation regime. We consider practical case of the SASE3 FEL at the European XFEL. We perform comparison of the main characteristics of the X-ray FEL operating in the post-saturation regime with and without undulator tapering: efficiency, coherence time and degree of transverse coherence.

  5. Proceedings of the 2007 Aging Aircraft Conference Cost Model for Assessing the Transition to Lead-Free Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    Proceedings of the 2007 Aging Aircraft Conference Cost Model for Assessing the Transition to Lead the cost ramifications of the transition from tin- lead to lead-free electronic parts. All tin-lead, all lead-free and mixed assembly approaches are considered. The model makes basic assumptions of a fixed

  6. Energy of the quasi-free electron in low density Ar and Kr: Extension of the local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in low density Ar and Kr: Extension of the local Wigner induced shift of the CH3I ion- ization energy at low perturber number densities and analyze these data­15]. In both regions, the perturber-induced energy shift (P), where P is the perturber number density

  7. Development of uTCA Hardware for BAM system at FLASH and XFEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, S B; Szewinski, J; Korolczuk, S

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a uTCA modular card system suited for conversion, sampling and processing of optical pulses. The system consists of a uTCA carrier card along with a double width FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) with a changeable optical frontend. The cards were designed for the needs of the BAM system of the FLASH and XFEL accelerators at the DESY facility in Hamburg. The carrier board contains a very powerful FPGA, all required uTCA circuits along with digital interfaces. The FMC card mainly contains four 16-bit fast Analog-to-digital converters (up to 250 MSPS), ADC clock generation and distribution modules, two SFP connectors and a specialized dual RS-485 connection. This paper describes such issues as system organization into universal digital circuits and specialized analog and clock circuits to allow high speed real-time analysis of the properties of thehigh-bandwidth optical signals of the BAM system and better control of the accelerator beam.

  8. Structure of CPV17 polyhedrin determined by the improved analysis of serial femtosecond crystallographic data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ginn, Helen M.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ji, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Hanwen; Axford, Danny; Gildea, Richard J.; Winter, Graeme; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Wagner, Armin; et al

    2015-03-09

    The X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) allows the analysis of small weakly diffracting protein crystals, but has required very many crystals to obtain good data. Here we use an XFEL to determine the room temperature atomic structure for the smallest cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus polyhedra yet characterized, which we failed to solve at a synchrotron. These protein microcrystals, roughly a micron across, accrue within infected cells. We use a new physical model for XFEL diffraction, which better estimates the experimental signal, delivering a high-resolution XFEL structure (1.75 Å), using fewer crystals than previously required for this resolution. The crystal lattice and proteinmore »core are conserved compared with a ?polyhedrin with less than 10% sequence identity. We explain how the conserved biological phenotype, the crystal lattice, is maintained in the face of extreme environmental challenge and massive evolutionary divergence. Our improved methods should open up more challenging biological samples to XFEL analysis.« less

  9. Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The scope of our research in laser and related technologies has grown over the years and has attracted a broad user base for applications within DOE, DOD, and private industry. Within the next few years, we expect to begin constructing the National Ignition Facility, to make substantial progress in deploying AVLIS technology for uranium and gadolinium enrichment, and to develop new radar sensing techniques to detect underwater objects. Further, we expect to translate LLNL patent ideas in microlithography into useful industrial products and to successfully apply high-power, diode-based laser technology to industrial and government applications.

  10. Design, analysis, and testing of a high thermal conductivity waveguide window for use in a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Schultheiss; V. Christina; M. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Elliott; V. Nguyen; L. Phillips; J. Preble

    1998-08-01

    Design, analysis and testing of a waveguide window with a goal of propagating greater than 100 kW average power operating at 1500 Mhz has been performed. This is made possible by the favorable material properties of Beryllia (BeO). Brazing the window to a soft copper frame and then brazing the frame to a KOVAR flange provides the vacuum seal. RF analysis combined with thermal/structural analysis shows the benefits of the material. The KOVAR flange with a CTE,coefficient of thermal expansion, that matches that of BeO enables a strong braze joint. RF testing to 35 kW has been successful, and higher powers will be tested in the near future. The basics of this design can be expanded to applications with lower frequencies and higher average power.

  11. Longitudinally Coherent Single-Spike Radiation from a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Gabriel Andrew

    2012-01-01

    power supplies, electron beam diagnostics, and FEL radiationbeen reported. Electron Beam Characterization The diagnosticelectron beams. In addition, nonlinear optics, the foundation upon which all FROG diagnostics

  12. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01

    Newsletter, N38, Ed. I.S. Ko. Dowell D. H. , Hayward T. D. ,compression can be achieved [Dowell et al. ] by correcting

  13. Longitudinally Coherent Single-Spike Radiation from a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Gabriel Andrew

    2012-01-01

    light at saturation for the LCLS FEL case with a 4.5 GeV e-light at saturation for the LCLS FEL case with a 4.5 GeV e-along the undulator for the LCLS FEL case with a 4.5 GeV e-

  14. Multicolor operation and spectral control in a gain-modulated x-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Coherent Light Source (LCLS, at SLAC) [1], SACLA (RIKEN) [experimental demonstration at LCLS. FIG. 1 (color online).demonstrated experimentally at LCLS. The experimental beam

  15. Pixel array detector for X-ray free electron laser experiments Hugh T. Philipp a,, Marianne Hromalik c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Laboratory [3]. The detector features 14-bit in-pixel digitization Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The PAD was made by fabricating custom CMOS electronics using a commercial 0

  16. Common Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    Powered by a Relativistic Klystron", Phys. Rev. Lett. 11.Analysis the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-WaveANALYSIS OF THE RELATIVISTIC KLYSTRON AND THE STANDING-WAVE

  17. Theoretical Examination of Transfer Cavities in a Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govil, R.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-Waveboth in the relativistic klystron version (RK/TBA) and thewith a relativistic klystron (RK) or a standing-wave free-

  18. Two-Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01

    and S. Yu, "Relativistic klystron simulations using RKTW2D,"dimensional relativistic klystron code, developed by Ryneand the relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator. In this

  19. Modern problems in Statistical Physics of Bose-Einstein Condensation and in Electrodynamics of Free Electron Lasers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.

    2010-07-14

    In this dissertation, I have studied theoretical problems in statistical physics and electrodynamics of Bose particles, namely, mesoscopic effects in statistics of Bose- Einstein condensate (BEC) of atoms and electromagnetic ...

  20. Two-Bunch Self-Seeding for Narrow-Bandwidth Hard X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation FederatedInformationTITLE:Connect Transportation(Journal

  1. Two-Bunch Self-Seeding for Narrow-Bandwidth Hard X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation FederatedInformationTITLE:Connect

  2. X-FEL: Prinzip und Anwendungen eines freien Elektronenlasers zur Erzeugung koharenter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Achim

    -Elektronen Laser im IR bis UV-VIS Bereich · 2009 - Inbetriebnahme des LCLS in Stanford 4. Generation: Freie · 2009 - Inbetriebnahme des LCLS in Stanford 4. Generation: Freie Elektronen Laser im R

  3. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at aSciTech Connect Fe AtomicSciTechLaser: Application

  4. Goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography with X-ray free electron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect González, Ana ; Aguila,

  5. Goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography with X-ray free electron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect González, Ana ;

  6. Scheme to increase the output average spectral flux of the European XFEL at $14.4$ keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    Techniques like inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) are currently limited by the photon flux available at X-ray sources. At $14.4$ keV, third generation synchrotron radiation sources produce a maximum of $10^{10}$ photons per second in a meV bandwidth. In this work we discuss about the possibility of increasing this flux a thousand-fold by exploiting high repetition rate self-seeded pulses at the European XFEL. Here we report on a feasibility study for an optimized configuration of the SASE2 beamline at the European XFEL which combines self-seeding and undulator tapering techniques in order to increase the average spectral flux at $14.4$ keV. In particular, we propose to perform monochromatization at $7.2$ keV with the help of self-seeding, and amplify the seed in the first part of output undulator. The amplification process can be stopped at a position well before saturation, where the electron beam gets considerable bunching at the 2nd harmonic of the coherent radiation. ...

  7. Pulse energy measurement at the hard x-ray laser in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Saito, N.; Kurosawa, T.; Richter, M.; Sorokin, A. A.; Tiedtke, K.; Kudo, T.; Yabashi, M.; Tono, K.; Ishikawa, T.

    2012-07-09

    The pulse energies of a free electron laser have accurately been measured in the hard x-ray spectral range. In the photon energy regime from 4.4 keV to 16.8 keV, pulse energies up to 100 {mu}J were obtained at the hard x-ray laser facility SACLA (SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser). Two independent methods, using a cryogenic radiometer and a gas monitor detector, were applied and agreement within 3.3% was achieved. Based on our validated pulse energy measurement, a SACLA online monitor detector could be calibrated for all future experiments.

  8. Quantum field theory treatment of magnetic effects on the spin and orbital angular momentum of a free electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kurian; C. Verzegnassi

    2015-08-01

    We consider in a quantum field theory framework the effects of a classical magnetic field on the spin and orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a free electron. We derive formulae for the changes in the spin and OAM due to the introduction of a general classical background field. We consider then a constant magnetic field, in which case the relevant expressions of the effects become much simpler and conversions between spin and OAM become readily apparent. An estimate of the expectation values for a realistic electron state is also given. Our findings may be of interest to researchers in spintronics and the field of quantum biology, where electron spin has been implicated on macroscopic time and energy scales.

  9. Ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium electrons in metals under femtosecond laser irradiation B. Rethfeld*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    Ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium electrons in metals under femtosecond laser irradiation B with an ultrashort laser pulse leads to a disturbance of the free-electron gas out of thermal equilibrium. We investigate theoretically the transient evolution of the distribution function of the electron gas in a metal

  10. SEEDED VISA: A 1064nm LASER-SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE M. Dunning, G. Andonian, E. Hemsing, S. Reiche, J. Rosenzweig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SEEDED VISA: A 1064nm LASER-SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE BNL ATF M. Dunning, G. Andonian, E. Hemsing Free Electron Laser (FEL) using the VISA undulator and a Nd:YAG seed laser will be performed for a short Rayleigh length FEL amplifier at 1 micron to allow for high power transmission with min- imal

  11. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilson, Verle A. (Livermore, CA); Schriever, Richard L. (Livermore, CA); Shearer, James W. (Livermore, CA)

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  12. Rontgen-Freie-Elektronen-Laser European XFEL Abbildung 119: Modul Nr. 8 bei der Verladung zum Transport nach Saclay.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨anemark, Deutschland, Frankreich, Griechen- land, Großbritannien, Italien, Polen, Russland, Schwe- den, Schweiz

  13. Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip G. Adamo,1 K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2 metal-dielectric structure creates a new type of tunable, nanoscale radiation source--a ``light well''. In the reported demonstration, tunable light is generated at an intensity of $200 W=cm2 as electrons with energies

  14. Development of Control System for Fast Frequency Tuners of Superconducting Resonant Cavities for FLASH and XFEL Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Przygoda, K

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation covers the recent research and development (R&D) activities of control systems for the fast frequency tuners of TESLA cavities and predicts the implications foreseen for large scale machines such as the FLASH and the planned XFEL. In particular, the framework of the presented activities is the effort toward the: 1. R&D of the driving circuit, 2. R&D of the control algorithm, 3. R&D of the control system. The main result of these activities is the permanent installation of the target piezo control system and its commissioning for 40 cavities divided into 5 accelerating modules at the DESY FLASH facility. The author’s contribution was the study of possible designs of high-voltage, high-current power amplifiers, used for driving the fast frequency tuners, shows that several parameters of such a device needs to be considered. The most important parameter is the input and output power estimation. This arises from the fact that the estimation is the most crucial issue for both po...

  15. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  16. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Yajiang; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  17. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Pei [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter [Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  18. Inner-Shell Multiple Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules With an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Studied By Coincident Ion Momentum Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erk, B. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Foucar, L. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Rudek, B. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Epp, S. W. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Cryle, M. [Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Bostedt, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Schorb, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Technical Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Optic and Atomic Physics; Bozek, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Rouzee, A. [Max Born Inst., Berlin (Germany); Hundertmark, A. [Max Born Inst., Berlin (Germany); Marchenko, T. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Paris (France); Simon, M. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Paris (France); Filsinger, F. [Fritz Haber Inst. for Max Planck Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany); Christensen, L. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; De, S. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Trippel, S. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Hamburg (Germany); Küpper, J. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) and Univ. of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Physics, Center for Ultrafast Imaging; Stapelfeldt, H. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Wada, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan), Dept. of Physical Science; Ueda, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). IMRAM; Swiggers, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Messerschmidt, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Schröter, C. D. [Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Moshammer, R. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schlichting, I. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Ullrich, J. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); National Institute for Physics and Technology, Braunschweig (Germany); Rudenko, A. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-08-28

    The ionization and fragmentation of two selenium containing hydrocarbon molecules, methylselenol (CH3SeH) and ethylselenol (C2H5SeH), by intense (>1017 W cm-2 ) 5 fs x-ray pulses with photon energies of 1.7 and 2 keV has been studied by means of coincident ion momentum spectroscopy. Measuring charge states and ion kinetic energies, we find signatures of charge redistribution within the molecular environment. Furthermore, by analyzing fragment ion angular correlations, we can determine the laboratory-frame orientation of individual molecules and thus investigate the fragmentation dynamics in the molecular frame. This allows distinguishing protons originating from different molecular sites along with identifying the reaction channels that lead to their emission.

  19. Inner-Shell Multiple Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules With an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Studied By Coincident Ion Momentum Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erk, B.; Rolles, D.; Foucar, L.; Rudek, B.; Epp, S. W.; Cryle, M.; Bostedt, C.; Schorb, S.; Bozek, J.; Rouzee, A.; et al

    2013-08-28

    The ionization and fragmentation of two selenium containing hydrocarbon molecules, methylselenol (CH3SeH) and ethylselenol (C2H5SeH), by intense (>1017 W cm-2 ) 5 fs x-ray pulses with photon energies of 1.7 and 2 keV has been studied by means of coincident ion momentum spectroscopy. Measuring charge states and ion kinetic energies, we find signatures of charge redistribution within the molecular environment. Furthermore, by analyzing fragment ion angular correlations, we can determine the laboratory-frame orientation of individual molecules and thus investigate the fragmentation dynamics in the molecular frame. This allows distinguishing protons originating from different molecular sites along with identifying the reactionmore »channels that lead to their emission.« less

  20. Two-gigawatt burst-mode operation of the intense microwave prototype (IMP) free-electron laser (FEL) for the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, B.; Allen, S.; Bell, H.

    1993-10-06

    The MTX explored the plasma heating effects of 140 GHz microwaves from both Gyrotrons and from the IMP FEL wiggler. The Gyrotron was long pulse length (0.5 seconds maximum) and the FEL produced short-pulse length, high-peak power, single and burst modes of 140 GHZ microwaves. Full-power operations of the IMP FEL wiggler were commenced in April of 1992 and continued into October of 1992. The Experimental Test Accelerator H (ETA-II) provided a 50-nanosecond, 6-MeV, 2--3 kAmp electron beam that was introduced co-linear into the IMP FEL with a 140 GHz Gyrotron master oscillator (MO). The FEL was able to amplify the MO signal from approximately 7 kW to peaks consistently in the range of 1--2 GW. This microwave pulse was transmitted into the MTX and allowed the exploration of the linear and non-linear effects of short pulse, intense power in the MTX plasma. Single pulses were used to explore and gain operating experience in the parameter space of the IMP FEL, and finally evaluate transmission and absorption in the MTX. Single-pulse operations were repeatable. After the MTX was shut down burst-mode operations were successful at 2 kHz. This paper will describe the IMP FEL, Microwave Transmission System to MTX, the diagnostics used for calorimetric measurements, and the operations of the entire Microwave system. A discussion of correlated and uncorrelated errors that affect FEL performance will be made Linear and non-linear absorption data of the microwaves in the MTX plasma will be presented.

  1. XFEL 2004 - Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single Micropulse lidar cloudZCSPDFor

  2. Laser ablative synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

    2010-03-02

    An improved method for the production of single walled carbon nanotubes that utilizes an RF-induction heated side-pumped synthesis chamber for the production of such. Such a method, while capable of producing large volumes of carbon nanotubes, concurrently permits the use of a simplified apparatus that allows for greatly reduced heat up and cool down times and flexible flowpaths that can be readily modified for production efficiency optimization. The method of the present invention utilizes a free electron laser operating at high average and peak fluence to illuminate a rotating and translating graphite/catalyst target to obtain high yields of SWNTs without the use of a vacuum chamber.

  3. Imaging of free carriers in semiconductors via optical feedback in terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezzapesa, F. P. Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Vitiello, M. S.

    2014-01-27

    To monitor the density of photo-generated charge carriers on a semiconductor surface, we demonstrate a detectorless imaging system based on the analysis of the optical feedback in terahertz quantum cascade lasers. Photo-excited free electron carriers are created in high resistivity n-type silicon wafers via low power (?40 mW/cm{sup 2}) continuous wave pump laser in the near infrared spectral range. A spatial light modulator allows to directly reconfigure and control the photo-patterned intensity and the associated free-carrier density distribution. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  4. Serial femtosecond crystallography of soluble proteins in lipidic cubic phase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fromme, Raimund; Ishchenko, Andrii; Metz, Markus; Chowdhury, Shatabdi Roy; Basu, Shibom; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2015-08-04

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) enables high-resolution protein structure determination using micrometre-sized crystals at room temperature with minimal effects from radiation damage. SFX requires a steady supply of microcrystals intersecting the XFEL beam at random orientations. An LCP–SFX method has recently been introduced in which microcrystals of membrane proteins are grown and delivered for SFX data collection inside a gel-like membrane-mimetic matrix, known as lipidic cubic phase (LCP), using a special LCP microextrusion injector. Here, it is shown enabling a dramatic reduction in the amount of crystallized protein required for data collection compared with crystals deliveredmore »by liquid injectors. High-quality LCP–SFX data sets were collected for two soluble proteins, lysozyme and phycocyanin, using less than 0.1 mg of each protein.« less

  5. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  6. Data Exploration Toolkit for serial diffraction experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zeldin, Oliver B.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Zhou, Qiangjun; Zhao, Minglei; Weis, William I.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2015-01-23

    Ultrafast diffraction at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has the potential to yield new insights into important biological systems that produce radiation-sensitive crystals. An unavoidable feature of the 'diffraction before destruction' nature of these experiments is that images are obtained from many distinct crystals and/or different regions of the same crystal. Combined with other sources of XFEL shot-to-shot variation, this introduces significant heterogeneity into the diffraction data, complicating processing and interpretation. To enable researchers to get the most from their collected data, a toolkit is presented that provides insights into the quality of, and the variation present in, serial crystallography datamore »sets. These tools operate on the unmerged, partial intensity integration results from many individual crystals, and can be used on two levels: firstly to guide the experimental strategy during data collection, and secondly to help users make informed choices during data processing.« less

  7. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; et al

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting schememore »is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.« less

  8. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; Zhong, Y.; Kuo, A.; Balo, A. R.; Soman, J.; Schotte, F.; Lemke, H. T.; Owen, R. L.; et al

    2015-08-18

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linacmore »Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). As a result, the chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.« less

  9. Nonlinear Thomson scattering of an ultrashort laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovinski, P. A., E-mail: golovinski@bk.ru; Mikhin, E. A. [Voronezh State Architectural-Building University (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15

    The nonlinear scattering of an ultrashort laser pulse by free electrons is considered. The pulse is described in the 'Mexican hat' wavelet basis. The equation of motion for a charged particle in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave has an exact solution allowing, together with the instant spectrum approximation, the calculation of the intensity of nonlinear Thomson scattering for a high-intensity laser pulse. The spectral distribution of scattered radiation for the entire pulse duration is found by integrating with respect to time. The maximum of the emission spectrum of a free electron calculated in 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} fields lies in the UV spectral region between 3 and 12 eV. A part of the continuous spectrum achieves high photon energies. One percent of the scattered energy for the field intensity 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} is concentrated in the range h{omega} > 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2} eV, for a field intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} in the range h{Omega} > 7.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2} eV, and for an intensity of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} in the range h{Omega} > 2.45 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} eV. These results allow us to estimate nonlinear scattering as a source of hard X-rays.

  10. Software for Data Acquisition AMC Module with PCI Express Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szachowalow, S; Makowski, D; Butkowski, L

    2010-01-01

    Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and XRay Free Electron Laser (XFEL) are linear accelerators that require a complex and accurate Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) control system. Currently working systems are based on aged Versa Module Eurocard (VME) architecture. One of the alternatives for the VME bus is the Advanced Telecommunications and Computing Architecture (ATCA) standard. The ATCA based LLRF controller mainly consists of a few ATCA carrier boards and several Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMC). AMC modules are available in variety of functions such as: ADC, DAC, data storage, data links and even CPU cards. This paper focuses on the software that allows user to collect and plot the data from commercially available TAMC900 board.

  11. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluge, Thomas; Chung, H -K; Gutt, C; Huang, L G; Zacharias, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T E

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (Resonant coherent X-ray diffraction, RCXD). In this case the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribu...

  12. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Frank R., E-mail: frank.wagner@fresnel.fr; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille [Institut Fresnel, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Ecole Centrale Marseille, Campus de St Jérôme, 13013 Marseille (France); Duchateau, Guillaume [CELIA, UMR 5107 Université Bordeaux 1-CNRS-CEA, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064?nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532?nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  13. Laser microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  14. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  15. Second user workshop on high-power lasers at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heimann, Phil; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-05-28

    The second international workshop on the physics enabled by the unique combination of high-power lasers with the world-class Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser beam was held in Stanford, CA, on October 7–8, 2014. The workshop was co-organized by UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratories. More than 120 scientists, including 40 students and postdoctoral scientists who are working in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, fusion research, and dynamic high-pressure science came together from North America, Europe, and Asia. The focus of the second workshop was on scientific highlights and the lessons learned from 16 newmore »experiments that were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument since the first workshop was held one year ago.« less

  16. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  17. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  18. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  19. Laser Wire and Beam Position Monitor tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, S T; Lyapin, A; Nevay, L; Snuverink, J

    2013-01-01

    This subtask involved two main activities; Firstly the development and subsequent usage of high resolution beam position monitors (BPM) for the International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider projects (CLIC); and secondly the development of a laser-wire (LW) transverse beam size measurement systems. This report describes the technical progress achieved at a large-scale test ILC compatible BPM system installed at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2). The ATF2 is an energy-scaled demonstration system for the final focus systems required to deliver the particle beams to collision at the ILC and CLIC. The ATF2 cavity beam position monitor system is one of the largest of its kind and rivals systems used at free electron lasers. The ATF2 cavity beam position system has achieved a position resolutionof 250 nm (with signal attuenation) and 27 nm (without attenuation). The BPM system has been used routinely for lattice diagnostics, beam based alignment and wakefield measurements. Extensive experience...

  20. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  1. Femtosecond resolution timing jitter correction on a TW scale Ti:sapphire laser system for FEL pump-probe experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divall, Marta Csatari; Divall, Edwin J; Hauri, Christoph P

    2015-01-01

    Intense ultrashort pulse lasers are used for fs resolution pumpprobe experiments more and more at large scale facilities, such as free electron lasers (FEL). Measurement of the arrival time of the laser pulses and stabilization to the machine or other sub-systems on the target, is crucial for high time-resolution measurements. In this work we report on a single shot, spectrally resolved, non-collinear cross-correlator with sub-fs resolution. With a feedback applied we keep the output of the TW class Ti:sapphire amplifier chain in time with the seed oscillator to ~3 fs RMS level for several hours. This is well below the typical pulse duration used at FELs and supports fs resolution pump-probe experiments. Short term jitter and long term timing drift measurements are presented. Applicability to other wavelengths and integration into the timing infrastructure of the FEL are also covered to show the full potential of the device.

  2. Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

  3. Improvements in serial femtosecond crystallography of photosystem II by optimizing crystal uniformity using microseeding procedures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Bommer, Martin; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina

    2015-07-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) is the multi-subunit membrane protein complex that catalyzes photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). To understand the water oxidation reaction, it is important to get structural information about the transient and intermediate states of the OEC in the dimeric PSII core complex (dPSIIcc). In recent times, femtosecond X-ray pulses from the free electron laser (XFEL) are being used to obtain X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of dPSIIcc microcrystals at room temperature that are free of radiation damage. In our experiments at the XFEL, we used an electrospun liquid microjet setup thatmore »requires microcrystals less than 40 ?m in size. In this study, we explored various microseeding techniques to get a high yield of monodisperse uniform-sized microcrystals. Monodisperse microcrystals of dPSIIcc of uniform size were a key to improve the stability of the jet and the quality of XRD data obtained at the XFEL. This was evident by an improvement of the quality of the datasets obtained, from 6.5 Å, using crystals grown without the micro seeding approach, to 4.5 Å using crystals generated with the new method.« less

  4. Maximizing Spectral Flux from Self-Seeding Hard X-ray FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Fully coherent x-rays can be generated by self-seeding x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). Self-seeding by a forward Bragg diffraction (FBD) monochromator has been recently proposed [1] and demonstrated [2]. Characteristic time To of FBD determines the power, spectral, and time characteristics of the FBD seed [3]. Here we show that for a given electron bunch with duration sigma_e the spectral flux of the self-seeding XFEL can be maximized, and the spectral bandwidth can be respectively minimized by choosing To ~ sigma_e/pi and by optimizing the electron bunch delay tau_e. The choices of To and tau_e are not unique. In all cases, the maximum value of the spectral flux and the minimum bandwidth are primarily determined by sigma_e. Two-color seeding takes place To >> sigma_e/\\pi. The studies are performed, for a Gaussian electron bunch distribution with the parameters, close to those used in the short-bunch (sigma_e ~ 5 fs) and long-bunch (sigma_e ~ 20 fs) operation modes of the LCLS XFEL.

  5. Laser Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weijian; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, greatly enhancing the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we used an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror in a VCSEL, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity with > 550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micro-mechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical. This new scheme not only offers an efficient approach for high-...

  6. Laser applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelson, M.C. )

    1989-11-01

    The breadth of current applications of laser technology is described. It is used as the basis for extrapolating to future application in such activities as AVLIS, SIS, ICP-MS, and RIMs.

  7. Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers Michael Hutchins #12;The PROBLEM opia - near sightedness - Laser Assisted in SItu Keratomileusis atomileusis is the procedure of opening the eye and ring the cornea. SIK uses an excimer laser to perform the alterations an er a knife or a femtosecond laser

  8. Sandia Energy - Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Diagnostics Gas-Phase Diagnostics Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy Nonlinear Laser...

  9. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowell, David H; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling

    2015-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL). In addition to many other stringent requirements, the LCLS XFEL requires extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. This paper describes the analysis and design improvements of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA s-band gun leading to achievement of the LCLS performance goals.

  10. GeV electron beams from a cm-scale accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    radiation facilities and free electron lasers, and as modules for high-energy particle physics. Radiofrequency-

  11. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen, E-mail: xwli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000?ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ?600?ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  12. System and method of infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in polyacrylamide gels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haglund, Jr., Richard F.; Ermer, David R.; Baltz-Knorr, Michelle Lee

    2004-11-30

    A system and method for desorption and ionization of analytes in an ablation medium. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of preparing a sample having analytes in a medium including at least one component, freezing the sample at a sufficiently low temperature so that at least part of the sample has a phase transition, and irradiating the frozen sample with short-pulse radiation to cause medium ablation and desorption and ionization of the analytes. The method further includes the steps of selecting a resonant vibrational mode of at least one component of the medium and selecting an energy source tuned to emit radiation substantially at the wavelength of the selected resonant vibrational mode. The medium is an electrophoresis medium having polyacrylamide. In one embodiment, the energy source is a laser, where the laser can be a free electron laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. Alternatively, the laser can be a solid state laser tunable to generate short-pulse radiation. The laser can emit light at various ranges of wavelength.

  13. Jefferson Lab: Laser gun to eventually shoot down missiles (Daily...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    articles.dailypress.com2011-02-21newsdp-nws-jefferson-lab-201102211jefferson-lab-researchers-free-electron-l... Submitted: Monday, February 21, 2011...

  14. Heterodyne laser diagnostic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Globig, Michael A. (Antioch, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

  15. Frequency comb swept lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Tsung-Han

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep ...

  16. High-intracavity-power thin-disk laser for the alignment of molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppe, Bastian; Kränkel, Christian; Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for strong alignment of gas-phase molecules for experiments at arbitrary repetition rates. A high-intracavity-power continuous-wave laser will provide the necessary ac electric field of $\\!10^{10}$- $10^{11}~\\text{W}/\\text{cm}^2$. We demonstrate thin-disk lasers based on Yb:YAG and Yb:Lu$_2$O$_3$ in a linear high-finesse resonator providing intracavity power levels in excess of 100~kW at pump power levels on the order of 50~W. The multi-longitudinal-mode operation of this laser avoids spatial-hole burning even in a linear standing-wave resonator. The system will be scaled up as in-vacuum system to allow for the generation of fields of $10^{11}~\\text{W}/\\text{cm}^2$. This system will be directly applicable for experiments at modern X-ray light sources, such as synchrotrons or free-electron lasers, which operate at various very high repetition rates. This would allow to record molecular movies through temporally resolved diffractive imaging of fixed-in-space molecules, as well as the...

  17. ON THE RE-ACCELERTION OF BUNCHED BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittum, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    S. S. Yu, "Relativistic Klystron Version of the Two- Beamfor a Relatiyistic Klystron or Free Electron Laser (FEL)INTRODUCTION The Relativistic Klystron} and Free Electron

  18. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  19. Simulation studies on laser pulse stability for Dalian Coherent Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixiao; Gu, Duan; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Dalian Coherent Light Source will use a 300MeV LINAC to produce fully coherent photon pulses in the wavelength range between 150-50nm by high gain harmonic generation free electron laser (FEL) scheme. To generate stable FEL pulses, stringent tolerance budget is required for the LINAC output parameters, such as the mean beam energy stability, electron bunch arrival time jitter, peak current variation and the transverse beam position offset. In order to provide guidance for the design of the Dalian Coherent Light Source, in this paper, the sensitivity of FEL pulse energy fluctuation to various error sources of the electron bunch was performed using intensive start-to-end FEL simulations.

  20. Laser Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, John L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter covers the basics of the field of stabilizing lasers to optical frequency references such as optical cavities and molecular transitions via the application of servo control systems. These discussions are given with reference to the real-life frequency metrology experienced in Hall-Labs (now Ye-Labs), JILA, University of Colorado. The subjects covered include: the basics of control system stability, a discussion of both the theoretical and experimental limitations, an outline of optical cavity susceptibility to environmental noise, and a brief introduction to the use and limitations of molecular transitions as frequency references.

  1. Fiber Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photoTheory ChalkboardFiber Lasers NIF

  2. Laser Roadshow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratoryandBryanoutreach Laser Roadshow

  3. Transverse Gradient Undulator Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao;...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B.; LBL, Berkeley 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; LASERS; PERFORMANCE; PLASMA GUNS; RADIATIONS; WIGGLER MAGNETS...

  4. Laser Pointer Safety INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laser Pointer Safety INTRODUCTION The use of laser diode pointers that operate in the visible to the retractable, metal pointer, the laser pointer beam will produce a small dot of light on whatever object at which it is aimed. It can draw an audience¹s attention to a particular key point in a slide show. Laser

  5. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  6. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  7. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  8. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadwick, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear laser energydepletion in laser-plasma accelerators ? B. A. Shadwick,of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma

  9. Laser accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vescial, F.; Aronowitz, F.; Niguel, L.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a laser accelerometer. It comprises: an optical cavity characterizing a frame having an input axis (x), a cross axis (y) orthogonal to and co-planar with the input axis and a (z) axis passing through the intersection of the (x) and (y) axes, the (z) axis being orthogonal to the plane of the (x) and (y) axes; and (x) axis proof mass having a predetermined blanking surface; a flexible beam having a first end coupled to the (x) axis proof mass and a second end coupled to the frame, deflection of the flexible beams permitting a predetermined range of movement of the (x) proof mass on the input axis in a direction opposite to sensed acceleration of the frame; a laser light source having a mirror means within the cavity for providing a light ray coaxially aligned with the (z) axis; detector means having at least a first detector on a sensitive plane, the plane being normal to the (z) axis; bias and amplifier means coupled to the detector means for providing a bias current to the first detector and for amplifying the intensity signal; the (x) axis proof mass blanking surface being centrally positioned within and normal to the light ray null intensity region to provide increased blanking of the light ray in response to transverse movement of the mass on the input axis; control means responsive to the intensity signal for applying an (x) axis restoring force to restore the (x) axis proof mass to the central position and for providing an (x) axis output signal proportional to the restoring force.

  10. Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamato, H.

    2008-01-01

    Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling H. Okamoto, A.M. Sessler,effective transverse laser cooling simultaneously withlongitudinal laser cooling, two possibilities are

  11. Lasers, stem cells, and COPD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    H: Cytokine production after helium-neon laser irradiationpower helium: neon laser irradiation enhances production ofHelium-neon laser irradiation induces effects on cytokine production

  12. Learn More about Fusion & Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learn More about Fusion & Lasers How Lasers Work Learn how lasers were developed and how they work. Outreach NIF & Photon Science researchers take learning opportunities on the...

  13. GUI Application for ATCA-based LLRF Carrier Board Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wychowaniak, Jan; Predki, Pawel; Napieralski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) standard describes an efficient and powerful platform, implementation of which was adopted to be used as a base for control systems in high energy physics. The ATCA platform is considered to be applied for the X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL), being built at Deutsches Electronen- Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. The Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) control system is composed of a few ATCA Carrier Boards. Carrier Board hosts Intelligent Platform Management Controller (IPMC), which is developed in compliance with the PICMG specifications. IPMC is responsible for management and monitoring of sub-modules installed on Carrier Boards and pluggable Advanced Mezzanine Card (AMC) modules. The ATCA Shelf Manager is the main control unit of a single ATCA crate, responsible for all power and fan modules and Carrier Boards installed in ATCA shelf. The device provides a system administrator with a set of control and diagnostic capabilities regarding the ...

  14. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario, E-mail: mario@io.cfmac.csic.es; Siegel, Jan, E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-21

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550 fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  15. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miley, George H. (Champagne, IL); Wells, William E. (Urbana, IL); DeYoung, Russell J. (Hampton, VA)

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  16. Laser preheat enhanced ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

  17. Laser particle sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  18. Laser preheat enhanced ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, J.W.

    1999-03-02

    A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided. 11 figs.

  19. Laser induced chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orel, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    the simplest prototype chemical reaction, and since it is soLASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D. E.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

  20. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  1. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Max Wiedmann #12;What is TMR? · TMR is used to improve blood flow to heart muscle tissue (myocardial tissue). · This is done using a laser to create small with bypass surgery so no additional opening is required. · The surgeon uses the laser to create 20 to 40 1mm

  2. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  3. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  4. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  5. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  6. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; Zhong, Y.; Kuo, A.; Balo, A. R.; Soman, J.; Schotte, F.; Lemke, H. T.; Owen, R. L.; Pai, E. F.; Pearson, A. R.; Olson, J. S.; Anfinrud, P. A.; Ernst, O. P.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-08-18

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). As a result, the chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.

  7. FMC-based Neutron and Gamma Radiation Monitoring Module for xTCA Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, T; Napieralski, A

    2012-01-01

    The machines used in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, such as accelerators or tokamaks, are sources of gamma and neutron radiation fields. The radiation has a negative influence on electronics and can lead to the incorrect functioning of complex control and diagnostic system designed for HEP machines. Therefore, in most cases the electronic equipments is installed in radiation-safe areas, but in some cases this rule is omitted to decrease costs of the project. The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL), being under construction at DESY research center, is a good example. The E-XFEL uses single tunnel and part of the electronic system will be installed next to main beam pipe and exposed to radiation. The modern Advanced/Micro Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA/?TCA) standards are foreseen as a base for control and diagnostic system for this new project. These flexible standards provide high reliability, availability and usability for the system which can be decreased by negative influe...

  8. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of datamore »can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.« less

  9. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; et al

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (more »conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  10. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  11. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/?I) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ?F,more »in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.« less

  12. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/?I) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ?F, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  13. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos (Okemos, MI); Lozovoy, Vadim V. (Okemos, MI); Comstock, Matthew (Milford, MI)

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  14. Synthetic laser medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  15. Fluorinated laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Feeman, James F. (Wyomissing, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A novel class of dye is disclosed which is particularly efficient and stable for dye laser applications, lasing between 540 and 570 nm.

  16. Laser Compression of Tantalum /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chia-Hui

    2013-01-01

    of this container was filled with aerogel, which acts as aafter laser compression. Aerogel was designed to deceleratein this geometry. The aerogel did not introduce any

  17. Novel fluorinated laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Feeman, James F. (Wyomissing, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A novel class of dye is disclosed which is particularly efficient and stable for dye laser applications, lasing between 540 and 570 nm.

  18. Lasers for industrial chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.J.; Robinson, C.P.

    1980-04-01

    Three categories for application of laser technology to applied-photochemistry research are set forth as (1) laser-based analytical techniques, (2) studies of chemical-reaction dynamics, and (3) chemical reactions with primary energy or control provided by lasers. Specific systems being developed and chemical processes being monitored by laser-techniques are described. Studies of laser diagnostics for coal gasification now involving measurement of coal gases downstream of the scrubber are discussed, and potential applications of laser techniques to measurements of the hot-gas regions of the gasifier itself are forecast. A technique developed for the monitoring of gaseous UF/sub 6/ in process streams by measurement of its fluorescence after irradiation with short uv pulses from tunable lasers indicates that this same technique might be applied to many other molecules by proper choice of exciting laser wavelength and monitor. Special laser techniques for monitoring the presence of harmfurst-calf heifer performance was not affected by the feeding of an ensiled cattle waste-peanut hulls mixture compared to a conventional feeding program.

  19. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  20. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  1. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Joel Philip

    2013-01-01

    1.1 Laser ceramic basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.1 Advantages of laser ceramics . . . . . . . . . . .1.1.2 Challenges to laser ceramic green-body tailoring 1.2

  2. LASER Safety Manual August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UW LASER Safety Manual August 2007 Radiation Safety Office Environmental Health and Safety;Contents 1. Laser Basics 1.1 Laser Theory 1.2 Types of Lasers 2. Hazards and Safety Standards 2 2.6.4 Other Hazards 2.7 Hazard Classes 2.7.1 Introduction 2.7.2 Class 3B Lasers 2.7.3 Class 4 Lasers

  3. Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Enabling the next generation of intense particle accelerators Contact Juan Fernandez (505) 667-6575...

  4. Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Laser Micromachining: Advantages of Liquid Environments Marc J. Palmeri Princeton University Arnold Lab #12;Outline · Motivation ­ Applications of laser micromachining ­ Problems with laser micromachining · How do lasers work? · What is laser micromachining? · Micromachining assembly · Methods

  5. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  6. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  7. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  8. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  9. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  10. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, B

    2012-03-19

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a limited, defined region. Using this technique a 460 MeV electron beam was produced with an energy spread of 5%. This technique is directly scalable to multi-GeV electron beam generation with sub-percent energy spreads.

  11. Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond x-ray pulses in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers Abstract is...

  12. Laser controlled flame stabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Matthew E. (Huntsville, AL)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

  13. Influence of irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons on the photoluminescence of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te crystals preliminarily subjected to the intense radiation of a neodymium laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glinchuk, K. D.; Medvid', A. P.; Mychko, A. M.; Naseka, Yu. M.; Prokhorovich, A. V.; Strilchuk, O. M.

    2013-04-15

    The effect of the preliminary treatment of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te crystals with high-power pulses of neodymium laser radiation (the power density is {<=}1.8 MW/cm{sup 2}, at a wavelength of 532 nm) on the low-temperature (5 K) photoluminescence induced by {gamma}-ray radiation (the dose was {Phi}{sub {gamma}} = 5 kGy) is studied. The luminescence bands are related to radiation-stimulated donor-acceptor pairs, which include shallow neutral donors and neutral cadmium vacancies stimulated by {gamma}-ray irradiation, the transition of free electrons to neutral cadmium vacancies formed by radiation, and the annihilation of excitons bound to the above vacancies. It is shown that, in the crystals preliminarily treated with laser radiation, the intensity of the {gamma}-ray-stimulated luminescence bands is significantly lower than in crystals not subjected to laser radiation. This fact is accounted for by a decrease in the concentration of cadmium vacancies generated by the {gamma}-ray radiation as a result of their annihilation during the course of their interaction with laser-stimulated defects, in particular, as a consequence of their recombination at laser-stimulated interstitial cadmium atoms.

  14. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control G. R. Plateau, , C. G. R acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy

  15. The Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    The Theta Laser A Low Noise Chirped Pulse Laser Dimitrios Mandridis dmandrid@creol.ucf.edu April 29, 2011 CREOL Affiliates Day 2011 #12;2 Objective: Frequency Swept (FM) Mode-locked Laser · Develop a frequency swept laser, · linear f-sweep, · uniform-intensity, · low noise, · with long-term stability

  16. Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes C.G.R. Geddes , E. Cormier. Nevada, Reno and U.C. Berkeley Abstract. Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson

  17. Scientists | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committee (PAC) Experiments Proposals Research Highlights Publications Accelerator Science Experiment Research Free-Electron Laser Theory Center Jefferson Lab Library...

  18. Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION Laser cooling of neutral atoms in the past decades has been a breakthrough in the understanding of their dy- namics and led to the seminal proposals of laser cooling-Doppler and subrecoil cooling, as well as new technologies, such as semiconductor diode lasers. Most of those

  19. , 7 2011, 7 2011 : LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    : ­ ­ , 7 2011, 7 2011 `' #12; : ­ ­ , 7 2011 : LASER : : : & · : & (-) - - - . · : laser ­ · : ­ & · : > 50 & (---) · ­ : lidar (- ) ­ -3 lidar (WMO, ESA; : ­ ­ , 7 2011 : LASER : : : & · : · : laser · : ( 10 m) · : > 5

  20. 1982 laser program annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R.

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

  1. Ultra-fast laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V

    2014-01-21

    A laser system is provided which selectively excites Raman active vibrations in molecules. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and remote sensing.

  2. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1986-08-15

    The atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process for the enrichment of uranium is evaluated. (AIP)

  3. Piezoelectric measurement of laser power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method for measuring the energy of individual laser pulses or a series of laser pulses by reading the output of a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer which has received a known fraction of the total laser pulse beam. An apparatus is disclosed that reduces the incident energy on the PZ transducer by means of a beam splitter placed in the beam of the laser pulses.

  4. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  5. Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratoryandBryanoutreach LaserLaserLaser

  6. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th harmonic of 1054-nm) to probe a plasma volume. The Thomson scattered light is collected by a...

  7. Dynamical laser spike processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shastri, Bhavin J; Tait, Alexander N; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Wu, Ben; Prucnal, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Novel materials and devices in photonics have the potential to revolutionize optical information processing, beyond conventional binary-logic approaches. Laser systems offer a rich repertoire of useful dynamical behaviors, including the excitable dynamics also found in the time-resolved "spiking" of neurons. Spiking reconciles the expressiveness and efficiency of analog processing with the robustness and scalability of digital processing. We demonstrate that graphene-coupled laser systems offer a unified low-level spike optical processing paradigm that goes well beyond previously studied laser dynamics. We show that this platform can simultaneously exhibit logic-level restoration, cascadability and input-output isolation---fundamental challenges in optical information processing. We also implement low-level spike-processing tasks that are critical for higher level processing: temporal pattern detection and stable recurrent memory. We study these properties in the context of a fiber laser system, but the addit...

  8. Terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Benjamin S. (Benjamin Stanford), 1974-

    2003-01-01

    The development of the terahertz frequency range has long been impeded by the relative dearth of compact, coherent radiation sources of reasonable power. This thesis details the development of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) ...

  9. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  10. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  11. EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development

  12. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  13. Pulsed gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Louis W. (Madison, WI); Fitzsimmons, William A. (Madison, WI)

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  14. Dark Soliton Fiber Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Zhang; D. Y. Tang; L. M. Zhao; X. Wu; Q. L. Bao; K. P. Loh

    2009-05-08

    We report on the experimental observation of stable dark solitons in an all normal dispersion fiber laser. We found experimentally that dark soliton formation is a generic feature of the fiber laser under strong continuous wave (CW) emission. However, only under appropriate pump strength and negative cavity feedback, stable single or multiple dark soliton could be achieved. Furthermore, we show that the features of the observed dark solitons could be well understood based on the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE).

  15. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  16. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  17. Variable laser attenuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, S.R.

    1987-05-29

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

  18. Tunable dye laser amplifier chain for laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor' S; D'yachkov, Aleksei B; Labozin, Valerii P; Mironov, Sergei M; Nikulin, Sergei A; Firsov, Valerii A

    2004-05-31

    A tunable dye laser amplifier chain developed for experiments on atomic vapour laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is described. The system, pumped by copper vapour lasers, consists of a master oscillator and an amplifier stage including a preamplifier and three main amplifiers working in the saturation mode. The master oscillator of the stage is a dye laser with a grazing incidence diffraction grating. Longitudinal pumping of the amplifiers is used. The efficiency of the main amplifiers is 50 % - 55 %. The average power of laser radiation at the output of the last amplifier is 100 W. (lasers. amplifiers)

  19. Generation of very low energy-spread electron beams using low-intensity laser pulses in a low-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, Ajay K.; Samant, Sushil Arun; Sarkar, Deepangkar; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Jha, Pallavi

    2011-03-15

    The possibility of obtaining high-energy electron beams of high quality by using a low-density homogeneous plasma and a low-intensity laser (just above the self-injection threshold in the bubble regime) has been explored. Three-dimensional simulations are used to demonstrate, for the first time, an energy-spread of less than 1%, from self-trapping. More specifically, for a plasma density of 2x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a laser intensity of a{sub 0}=2, a high-energy (0.55 GeV), ultrashort (1.4 fs) electron beam with very low energy-spread (0.55%) and high current (3 kA) is obtained. These parameters satisfy the requirements for drivers of short-wavelength free-electron lasers. It is also found that the quality of the electron beam depends strongly on the plasma length, which therefore needs to be optimized carefully to get the best performance in the experiments.

  20. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  1. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Faulkner, George E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  2. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  3. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milner, Joseph R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  4. Controlling molecules with lasers and lasers with molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jason Matthew, 1977-

    2007-01-01

    I investigate quantum control of spin in molecules using shaped ultrafast lasers and the dynamics of those lasers when their cavities are modified to include programmable molecular masks. The ability to control quantum ...

  5. Antenna coupled photonic wire lasers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reno, John L.; Kao, Tsung-Kao; Cai, Xiaowei; Lee, Alan W. M.; Hu, Qing

    2015-06-22

    Slope efficiency (SE) is an important performance metric for lasers. In conventional semiconductor lasers, SE can be optimized by careful designs of the facet (or the modulation for DFB lasers) dimension and surface. However, photonic wire lasers intrinsically suffer low SE due to their deep sub-wavelength emitting facets. Inspired by microwave engineering techniques, we show a novel method to extract power from wire lasers using monolithically integrated antennas. These integrated antennas significantly increase the effective radiation area, and consequently enhance the power extraction efficiency. When applied to wire lasers at THz frequency, we achieved the highest single-side slope efficiency (~450more »mW/A) in pulsed mode for DFB lasers at 4 THz and a ~4x increase in output power at 3 THz compared with a similar structure without antennas. This work demonstrates the versatility of incorporating microwave engineering techniques into laser designs, enabling significant performance enhancements.« less

  6. Hybrid laser with CMOS photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Johanna S

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, an interesting approach for a photonic laser source is presented. By using integrated photonic resonators with an external gain medium, we are able to build a laser that offers a number of advantages including ...

  7. Solar Pumped Laser Microthruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A. M.; Beach, R.; Dawson, J.; Siders, C. W.

    2010-10-08

    The development of microsatellites requires the development of engines to modify their orbit. It is natural to use solar energy to drive such engines. For an unlimited energy source the optimal thruster must use a minimal amount of expendable material to minimize launch costs. This requires the ejected material to have the maximal velocity and, hence, the ejected atoms must be as light as possible and be ejected by as high an energy density source as possible. Such a propulsion can be induced by pulses from an ultra-short laser. The ultra-short laser provides the high-energy concentration and high-ejected velocity. We suggest a microthruster system comprised of an inflatable solar concentrator, a solar panel, and a diode-pumped fiber laser. We will describe the system design and give weight estimates.

  8. Laser isotope separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Munich, DE); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  9. Omega Laser Facility - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae model (JournalHearingsHuman CapitalOmega Laser

  10. Laser Users Eye Test Form University of Cambridge Laser Users Information for Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Laser Users Eye Test Form University of Cambridge Laser Users Information for Occupational Health supervisor or research group Department College Departmental Laser Safety Officer Tel: Information about the laser(s) you will be using Type of Laser Wavelength Laser Classification CW or Pulsed Power or Energy

  11. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  12. Laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2012-05-15

    This review article highlights the tremendous evolution of the research on laser plasma accelerators which has, in record time, led to the production of high quality electron beams at the GeV level, using compact laser systems. I will describe the path we followed to explore different injection schemes and I will present the most significant breakthrough which allowed us to generate stable, high peak current and high quality electron beams, with control of the charge, of the relative energy spread and of the electron energy.

  13. Laser amplifier chain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  14. Laser amplifier chain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  15. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    LIBS-1 Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;LIBS-2 Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) LIBS ANALYSIS OF METAL SURFACES of species at a distance or in hard­to­reach or hazardous environments. Laser­Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

  16. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  17. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  18. Laser-Material Interactions: A Study of Laser Energy Coupling with Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    1971) Effects of High-Power Laser Radiation, Academic Presin Effects of High-Power Laser Radiation, (Academic Press,for modeling gas discharge lasers", Boulder, Colo. : Univ.

  19. Laser Program annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1985-06-01

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  20. Ultranarrow linewidth waveguide excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, C.P. ); Feldman, B.J.; Huston, A.

    1989-09-01

    We have constructed a single longitudinal mode XeCl laser using microwave discharge waveguide laser technology. The pulse duration, repetition rate, and simplicity of construction associated with waveguide excimer lasers lend this system unique capabilities and a broad utility for interfacing with other excimer devices. The coherence length of the laser emission has been found to be {similar to}6 m with a corresponding bandwidth of {l brace}22 MHz that is near the transform limit. The laser has been used to demonstrate pulsed UV Doppler velocity measurement in a simple homodyne configuration.

  1. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Peter R. (Livermore, CA); Field, George F. (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  2. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator","Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; SLAC; Schroeder, Carl B.; LBL,...

  3. Jefferson Lab - Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80 en Free-Electron Laser https:www.jlab.orgfree-electron-laser

  4. 1 billion times brighter than the sun: Will Jeff Lab's beam lead...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    articles.dailypress.com2011-01-17newsdp-nws-cp-jlab-laser-201101161scientists-free-electron-laser-facility-p... Submitted: Thursday, January 20, 2011...

  5. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Schroeder Carl B LBL Berkeley PARTICLE ACCELERATORS ACCELERATORS ELECTRON BEAMS ELECTRONS FREE ELECTRON LASERS LASERS PERFORMANCE PLASMA GUNS RADIATIONS WIGGLER MAGNETS...

  6. Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron Laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser Authors: Jiao, Y. ; SLAC Beijing, Inst....

  7. 2 micron femtosecond fiber laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lihmei

    2014-07-29

    Methods and systems for generating femtosecond fiber laser pulses are disclose, including generating a signal laser pulse from a seed laser oscillator; using a first amplifier stage comprising an input and an output, wherein the signal laser pulse is coupled into the input of the first stage amplifier and the output of the first amplifier stage emits an amplified and stretched signal laser pulse; using an amplifier chain comprising an input and an output, wherein the amplified and stretched signal laser pulse from the output of the first amplifier stage is coupled into the input of the amplifier chain and the output of the amplifier chain emits a further amplified, stretched signal laser pulse. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  8. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  9. Fundamental Study on Laser Interaction with Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    laser welding and laser additive manufacturing. REFERENCES [Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing of Ti-Basedwelding and laser additive manufacturing where a minimal HAZ

  10. General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser. There are several procedures that will reduce the potential for exposure to laser beams. 1. The beam from Class IIIB and Class IV lasers should be terminated in highly absorbent, non specular

  11. Optics and Lasers in Engineering 46 (2008) 2733 Entropy generation rate during laser pulse heating: Effect of laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Qahtani, Hussain M.

    2008-01-01

    Optics and Lasers in Engineering 46 (2008) 27­33 Entropy generation rate during laser pulse heating generation rate attains high values in the early heating period due to large (1/T 2 ). Moreover, the laser reserved. Keywords: Laser; Pulse; Temperature; Entropy generation rate 1. Introduction Laser pulse heating

  12. Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

  13. Electron-Yield Enhancement in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Driven by Asymmetric Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Electron-Yield Enhancement in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator Driven by Asymmetric Laser Pulses W. P accelerator by using nonlinearly chirped laser pulses from a 10 Hz, Ti:Al2O3, CPA based laser system [8

  14. Laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbert, Gaylen V. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a laser frequency modulator for modulating a laser cavity. It is known in the prior art to utilize a PZT (piezoelectric transducer) element in combination with a mirror to change the cavity length of a laser cavity (which changes the laser frequency). Using a PZT element to drive the mirror directly is adequate at frequencies below 10 kHz. However, in high frequency applications (100 kHz and higher) PZT elements alone do not provide a sufficient change in the cavity length. The present invention utilizes an ultrasonic concentrator with a PZT element and mirror to provide modulation of the laser cavity. With an ultrasonic concentrator, the mirror element at the end of a laser cavity can move at larger amplitudes and higher frequencies.

  15. Laser beam temporal and spatial tailoring for laser shock processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Techniques are provided for formatting laser pulse spatial shape and for effectively and efficiently delivering the laser energy to a work surface in the laser shock process. An appropriately formatted pulse helps to eliminate breakdown and generate uniform shocks. The invention uses a high power laser technology capable of meeting the laser requirements for a high throughput process, that is, a laser which can treat many square centimeters of surface area per second. The shock process has a broad range of applications, especially in the aerospace industry, where treating parts to reduce or eliminate corrosion failure is very important. The invention may be used for treating metal components to improve strength and corrosion resistance. The invention has a broad range of applications for parts that are currently shot peened and/or require peening by means other than shot peening. Major applications for the invention are in the automotive and aerospace industries for components such as turbine blades, compressor components, gears, etc.

  16. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2015-07-07

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for advancing a borehole. High power laser drilling system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam through the electrical motor.

  17. Laser Fusion Energy The High Average Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laser Fusion Energy and The High Average Power Program John Sethian Naval Research Laboratory Dec for Inertial Fusion Energy with lasers, direct drive targets and solid wall chambers Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) Kr posters Snead Payne #12;Laser(s) Goals 1. Develop technologies that can meet the fusion energy

  18. Laser MicroChemical Shaping of Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Michael J.

    Laser MicroChemical Shaping of Silicon MURI Workshop Feb 28, 2005 Michael J. Burns, Ph.D. LMC Product Manager #12;FEI Copyright © 2005 Vectra LMC 9900 2 Laser Micro Chemical (LMC) ·Use of laser light to induce local chemical reactions. ·Both Laser Chemical Etching (LCE) and Laser Chemical Deposition (LCD

  19. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  20. Laser multiplexing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Steve A. (Tracy, CA); English, Jr., Ronald Edward (Tracy, CA); White, Ronald K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A plurality of copper lasers, as radiant power sources, emits a beam of power carrying radiation. A plurality of fiber injection assemblies receives power from the plurality of copper lasers and injects such power into a plurality of fibers for individually transmitting the received power to a plurality of power-receiving devices. The power-transmitting fibers of the system are so arranged that power is delivered therethrough to each of the power-receiving devices such that, even if a few of the radiant power sources and/or fibers fail, the power supply to any of the power receiving devices will not completely drop to zero but will drop by the same proportionate amount.

  1. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  2. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles (Fremont, CA)

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  3. Fusion pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  5. LCLS Laser (in Polish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The most powerful now in the world, American X-ray laser LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), has been working as a research and user facility since 2009. It is further developed to LCLSII machine at the Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC in Menlo Park CA. In a certain sense, LCLS is a response to the EXFEL machine and a logical extension of LCLS. All these machines are light sources of the fifth generation. EXFELis expected to open user facility in 2016, at a cost of over 1 bil Euro. LCLS II, which design started in 2010, will be operational in 2017. The lasers LCLS, LCLS II and EXFEL use SASE and SEED methods to generate light and are powered by electron liniacs, LCLS by a wrm one, and EXFEL by a cold one. The liniacs have energies approaching 20 GeV, and are around 2 - 3 km in length. EXFEL liniac uses SRF TESLA cavity technology at 1,3GHz. A prototype of EXFEL was FLASH laser. SLAC Laboratory uses effectively over 50 years experience in research, building and exploitation of linear electron acce...

  6. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, C.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wu, J.; /SLAC; Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics linearization of the longitudinal phase space in the first stage bunch compressor and can operate with either a high (250 pC) or low (20 pC) bunch charge; and the third (LCLS INJECTOR DESIGN) is similar to LCLS but uses an X-band linac after the first stage bunch compressor at 250 MeV to achieve a final beam energy up to 14 GeV. Compared with LCLS, these X-band linacs are at least a factor of three shorter.

  7. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  8. XFEL diffraction: Developing processing methods to optimize data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    expected from an ideal crystal, and improves the sharpness of anomalous difference Fourier peaks indicating metal positions. Authors: Sauter, Nicholas K. 1 + Show Author...

  9. Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

    2007-09-25

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

  10. Hybrid fiber-rod laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Messerly, Michael J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2012-12-18

    Single, or near single transverse mode waveguide definition is produced using a single homogeneous medium to transport both the pump excitation light and generated laser light. By properly configuring the pump deposition and resulting thermal power generation in the waveguide device, a thermal focusing power is established that supports perturbation-stable guided wave propagation of an appropriately configured single or near single transverse mode laser beam and/or laser pulse.

  11. Single-exciton nanocrystal laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Ivanov, Sergei A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-17

    A laser system employing amplification via a single exciton regime and to optical gain media having single exciton amplification is provided.

  12. Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects Laser-Based Nondestructive Testing High speed, non-contact NDT for bridging the gap between traditional nondestructive testing and embedded structural health...

  13. Uranium molecular laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.J.; Sullivan, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Molecular Laser Isotope Separation program is moving into the engineering phase, and it is possible to determine in some detail the plant cost terms involved in the process economics. A brief description of the MLIS process physics is given as a motivation to the engineering and economics discussion. Much of the plant cost arises from lasers and the overall optical system. In the paper, the authors discuss lasers as operating units and systems, along with temporal multiplexing and Raman shifting. Estimates of plant laser costs are given.

  14. Femtosecond laser-assisted lamellar keratoplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soong, Hunson Kaz; Malta, João Baptista Nigro Santiago; Mian, Shahzad Ihsan; Juhasz, Tibor

    2008-01-01

    601-6 606 Femtosecond laser-assisted lamellar keratoplastyRN, Suarez C, Juhasz T, Kurtz R. Femtose- cond laser flapcreation for laser in situ keratomileusis: six-month follow-

  15. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  16. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  17. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  18. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. In addition, the features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  19. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

  20. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.; Ault, E.R.; Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment. 2 figs.