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1

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. The cost of construction for Phase 2 was 243 per gross ft 2 (excluding underground parking). Table 1 on page 3 shows a breakout by function. Building Schedule The campus is...

2

Dr. Fred Lipschultz  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Print E-mail alt Dr. Fred Lipschultz is the Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment, among other roles including close involvement writing the recent...

3

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home > FRED > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds FRED (1) FRED+free energy database (1) Free Energy Data (1) Map (1) OpenEI (1) Tool (1) Visualization (1)...

4

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > FRED > Posts by term > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: FRED Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry FRED Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Sfederspiel 20 May 2013 - 13:28 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (12) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Sylla Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

5

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > FRED > Posts by term > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: FRED+free energy database Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion FRED+free energy database Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Dbrodt 1 22 Jun 2012 - 08:39 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (11) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2084453922

6

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > FRED > Posts by term > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Free Energy Data Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Free Energy Data Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Sfederspiel 20 May 2013 - 13:28 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (12) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Sylla Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

7

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > FRED > Posts by term > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: OpenEI Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry OpenEI Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Sfederspiel 20 May 2013 - 13:28 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (12) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Sylla Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

8

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > FRED > Posts by term > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Visualization Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Visualization Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Sfederspiel 20 May 2013 - 13:28 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (12) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Sylla Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

9

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > FRED > Posts by term > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Tool Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Tool Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Sfederspiel 20 May 2013 - 13:28 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (11) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

10

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > FRED > Posts by term > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Map Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Map Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Sfederspiel 20 May 2013 - 13:28 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (12) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Sylla Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

11

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Sfederspiel Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Posted by: Sfederspiel 20 May 2013 - 13:28 The U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Planetary Skin Institute recently released a new open platform hosted... Tags: FRED, Free Energy Data, Map, OpenEI, Tool, Visualization Dbrodt FRED Overview Slides Posted by: Dbrodt 2 Jul 2012 - 10:43 2 comment(s) Dbrodt Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Posted by: Dbrodt 22 Jun 2012 - 08:35 I created this group so our FRED team can collaborate. I would also hope

12

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED FRED Home > Groups > Groups > FRED Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds There are no feeds from external sites for this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Group members (11) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel Recent content Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Overview Slides Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Group members (11) Managers: Dbrodt Recent members: Gdavis Sfederspiel NickL Ads15 L S Hub Limited Marklane Satish Payne Orianalove Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

13

OpenEI Community - FRED  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introducing FRED, Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales http://en.openei.org/community/blog/introducing-fred-enabling-unique-visualization-and-manipulation-energy-data-multiple-scales The U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Planetary Skin Institute recently released a fred" target="_blank">new open platform hosted by OpenEI which enables state and local governments, agencies, corporations, and other energy analysts to effectively visualize energy use data and make energy data more useful for decision-making processes.fred-enabling-unique-visualization-and-manipulation-energy-data-multiple-scales"

14

FRED | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales FRED Free Energy Data Map OpenEI Tool Visualization The U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific...

15

FRee Energy Data (FRED) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRee Energy Data (FRED) FRee Energy Data (FRED) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Free Energy Data (FRED) Agency/Company /Organization: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, The Climate Group, Planetary Skin Institute Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Web Application Link: en.openei.org/apps/FRED/web/ Cost: Free Language: English Free Energy Data (FRED) is an open-access tool designed to assist government and corporate energy planners to set long-term goals, identify lessons learned from other organizations, and track progress by making energy information more accessible, consistent, and transparent across organizations. FRee Energy Data (FRED) graphic.jpg Launch FRED Free Energy Data (FRED) is an open-access tool designed to assist

16

OpenEI Community - FRED+free energy database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

p> http:en.openei.orgcommunitydiscussionhi-fred-team-welcome-our-community-areacomments FRED+free energy database FRED Fri, 22 Jun 2012 15:35:00 +0000 Dbrodt 35 at http...

17

FRED Overview Slides | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRED Overview Slides FRED Overview Slides Home > Groups > FRED Dbrodt's picture Submitted by Dbrodt(72) Contributor 2 July, 2012 - 10:43 Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.presentationml.presentation icon fred_overview_slides_v11.pptx Groups: FRED Login to post comments Comments Amirsaedlou Amirsaedlou1 year 17 weeks ago hi how can i get wind data hi how can i get wind data for specific point with google earth data, do you know a tool to design wind sola hybrid power plants? Login to post comments NickL NickL39 weeks 3 days ago Wind Data Hello- There are various types of wind data available. These can be searched for on OpenEI using the Search tool with keyword wind and filtering the content to only display datasets. Depending on the global region you are

18

Fred L. Brown | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fred L. Brown Fred L. Brown About Us Fred L. Brown - Deputy Director of Office of Hearings & Appeals Fred L. Brown Fred Brown is the Deputy Director of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). OHA is the quasi-judicial arm of DOE that conducts hearings and issues initial Departmental decisions with respect to any adjudicative proceedings which the Secretary may delegate. OHA's jurisdiction includes: deciding Freedom of Information and Privacy Act appeals; conducting administrative hearings and issuing Departmental decisions regarding personnel security clearance eligibility; conducting contractor employee "whistleblower" hearings and investigations; deciding applications for exception from DOE rules and regulations; and performing mediation services for the agency. Mr. Brown

19

Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Member 20 May, 2013 - 14:28 FRED Free Energy Data Map OpenEI Tool Visualization The U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Planetary...

20

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate 500 Program Info Expiration Date program offered until expiration of funding State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnaces: $150-$250, depending on efficiency Natural Gas Furnace Tune-up: $25 ECM Motor: $75 Natural Gas Boilers: $200 Central Air Conditioners: $250 Central Air Conditioner Tune-up: $25 Tankless Gas Water Heaters: $150 Storage Gas Water Heaters: $50 Air Source Heat Pumps: $75/ton

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

fred andreas | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fred andreas fred andreas Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid).

22

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $2,000 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: $300 per kW saved LED Exit Signs: $12 Occupancy Sensors: $20 - $40 Air Conditioning Systems: $20 - $40 per ton Air-Source Heat Pumps: $65 - $150 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $150 per ton Chillers: $3,000 - $4,000, depending on size Chilled Water Resets: $350 - $900, depending on type and size

23

Hutchinson Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hutchinson Utilities Comm Hutchinson Utilities Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hutchinson Utilities Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 9130 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png LARGE GENERAL ELECTRIC SERVICE Industrial LARGE GENERAL ELECTRIC SERVICE - PRIMARY VOLTAGE (CUSTOMER OWNED) Industrial

24

Chemical Sciences Division: News & Events: Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab chemical scientist Kenneth Raymond and colleagues at the University of Mississippi Medical Center the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, uncovered the trick while...

25

Federal Energy Management Program: Laboratories for the 21st...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Donald Bren Hall at the University of California, Santa Barbara Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise Pharmacia Building Q...

26

NIAID: Programs in HIV/AIDS Therapeutics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

made in the area of HIV/AIDS research has been to give its full support to the .... Site: The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. r International Maternal...

27

Biological Sciences: Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genotype Versus Phenotype Biomarker Discovery Initiative with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center High-Throughput Proteomics for Trauma Research with the...

28

Microsoft PowerPoint - Fred Starr.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ODS Alloy High Temperature Heat Exchanger and Associated Work Fred Starr : Project Leader and Senior Principal Scientist British Gas 1966-96 Presentation The ODS Heat Exchanger...

29

FRED+free energy database | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91 91 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234691 Varnish cache server FRED+free energy database Home Dbrodt's picture Submitted by Dbrodt(72) Contributor 22 June, 2012 - 08:35 Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area FRED+free energy database I created this group so our FRED team can collaborate. I would also hope that potential users would join this community to provide input on data and functionality they would like to see. Please join in the discussion!

30

Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs Hutchinson, Kansas Revitalized by Clean Energy Jobs April 6, 2011 - 12:20pm Addthis Employees speak about the changes happening in their lives since a wind turbine component manufacturing facility came to Hutchinson, Kansas. | Video courtesy of Siemens April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Like many communities across the country in 2009, the town of Hutchinson, Kansas, was tightening its belt in order to deal with the effects of the recession. As one resident says, Hutch (as the central Kansas community is known to locals) needed a "shot in the arm." Thanks to the Recovery Act, that's exactly what the town of approximately 42,000 got when the U.S. Economic Development Administration (or EDA --

31

Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Sfederspiel's picture Submitted by Sfederspiel(5) Member 20 May, 2013 - 13:28 FRED Free Energy Data Map OpenEI Tool Visualization The U.S. Department of Energy, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Planetary Skin Institute recently released a new open platform hosted by OpenEI which enables state and local governments, agencies, corporations, and other energy analysts to effectively visualize energy use data and make energy data more useful for decision-making processes. The Free Energy Data (FRED) platform will contribute to the Energy Data Initiative to make energy data more transparent and adaptable for

32

The theory of relaxation oscillations for Hutchinson's equation  

SciTech Connect

Hutchinson's equation is a scalar equation with time delay which is well known in ecology. In this paper a complete asymptotic representation is constructed for a stable relaxation cycle of this equation, in the form of series in integer powers of a certain small parameter. The techniques of asymptotic integration developed on the way are then applied to analyse the question of attractors for a system of circularly interrelated Hutchinson equations. Bibliography: 8 titles.

Kolesov, Andrei Yu; Rozov, Nikolai Kh

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Home > Groups > FRED Dbrodt's picture Submitted by Dbrodt(72) Contributor 22 June, 2012 - 08:35 FRED+free energy database I created this group so our FRED team can collaborate. I would also hope that potential users would join this community to provide input on data and functionality they would like to see. Please join in the discussion! Thanks! Groups: FRED Login to post comments Comments Rmckeel Rmckeel1 year 28 weeks ago Great Great to see this new community, Debbie. Thanks for creating and I'm excited to see the collaboration here! Login to post comments Latest discussions Dbrodt Hi FRED Team! Welcome to our community area Posted: 22 Jun 2012 - 08:35 by Dbrodt 1 comment(s) Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

34

Mr. Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fred Steinkuehler Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation 20th and State Streets Granite City, Illinois 62040 Dear Mr. Steinkuehler: Enclosed please find your copy of the signed consent forms for the radiological survey of the South Plant Betatron Building. In your letter to me of July 21, 1988, you identified several issues regarding the survey and the consent. I would like to address these concerns below. As noted in the consent form, the purpose of our surveys are only to determine if there is any residual radioactive material on the site that is derived from Department of Energy (DOE) predecessor operations. All data collected during the designation survey is to determine the radiological condition of the portion of the site involved in the predecessor work. No

35

FredL. Eiselel CeorgaTechResearchns|rute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

!anining ihe stateofthis science{ll. The list ofreactionsknown ro be rDportani in the artuos!herc has groi .' .; ',. !i i {\\1 \\r r*$fh.\\ul FredL. Eiselel CeorgaTechResearchns|rute ee.rga nsrtuleolTe.hnooo! A1.1racA 30:!2 John D. Bradshaw S.i.olorEadhardArmosphericScences.r.J: .ejiuleojTechnooov- rlra GA

Short, Daniel

36

South Hutchinson, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hutchinson, Kansas: Energy Resources Hutchinson, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.0280671°, -97.9403303° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.0280671,"lon":-97.9403303,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Microsoft PowerPoint - FredGlaser.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at San Diego, California at San Diego, California November 17, 2010 Workshop on Fe-Based ODS Alloys - Role and Future Applications - Fred M. Glaser Advanced Research Program Manager 2 Materials Program Goals * Development of a technology base in the synthesis, processing, life-cycle analysis, and performance characterization of advanced materials. * Development of new materials that have the potential to improve the performance and/or reduce the cost of existing fossil fuel technologies. * Development of materials for new systems and capabilities. 3 A Disciplined Approach is Being Used to Systematically Address Materials Issues * Commitment to long-range R&D * Cross-cutting approach * Extend the Envelope of Materials Performance * Team where possible with Other DOE Programs * BES * EERE

38

Fred N. Mortensen, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fred N. Mortensen, 2004 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life...

39

ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott September 9, 2011 - 9:25am Addthis New York, NY - The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) Director, Arun Majumdar, announced yesterday that the Agency will hold its third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit from February 27 - 29, 2012 at the Gaylord Convention Center just outside Washington, D.C. Bill Gates, founder and chairman of Microsoft; Fred Smith, chairman, president and CEO of FedEx; and Lee Scott, former CEO of Wal-Mart; will join Secretary Chu and Director Majumdar as distinguished keynote speakers. "After two successful Summits, I'm excited to once again bring some of

40

Passive solar water heating: breadbox design for the Fred Young Farm Labor Center in Indio  

SciTech Connect

An appropriate passive solar preheater for multifamily housing units in the Fred Young Farm Labor Center in Indio, California, was designed and analyzed. A brief summary of passive preheater systems and the key design features used in current designs is presented. The design features necessary for the site requirements are described. The eight preliminary preheater designs reviewed for the project are presented. The results of thermal performance simulation for the eight prototype systems are discussed. Alternative monitoring systems for the installation are described and evaluated. The consultants' recommendations, working drawings, and performance estimates of the system selected are presented. (MHR)

Melzer, B; Maeda, B

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fred Bernthal,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bernthal, Bernthal, president of URA, and Cherri Langenfeld, head of DOE's Chicago Operations Office, sign the new five-year contract for Fermilab management. Photo by Reidar Hahn by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs In a formal ceremony at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on December 18, Universities Research Association, Inc. renewed its contract to manage Fermilab for the U.S. Department of Energy. The five-year deal con- tains performance-based incentives for the first time and shifts more liability from the govern- ment to the contractor and the Lab, as a part of sweeping contract reform efforts in DOE. "This contract is a good example of gov- ernment that works better and costs less," said Volume 20 Friday, January 10, 1997 Number 1 f URA Renews Contract to

42

Fred Meisenkothen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SEM), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EPMA), energy dispersive spectroscopy ... Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fred Sharifi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... San Diego, studying electronic transport in one-dimensional superconductors and tunneling spectroscopy of unconventional superconductors. ...

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fred Phelan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Computational tools play an important role at ... Dispersion and Length," ADVANCED MATERIALS, 23(3 ... FFF)", Chemical Engineering Science, 62, ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGYDISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS Dr. Mihran S. Agbabian MS 1948 CE Fred Champion Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering, University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGYDISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS Dr. Mihran S. Agbabian MS 1948 CE Fred Champion Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering, University of Southern California 2000 Dr. Bruce N. Ames PhD 1953 BI Professor/Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley 1977 Dr. John P

Greer, Julia R.

46

Fred B. Bateman  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... graphite calorimeters to measure electron beam doses in high-energy electron beams ... Nuclear Physics Radiation Physics Division Dosimetry Group. ...

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

47

Shamanth Kumar Fred Morstatter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the subject of an interesting article by Chris Delp, Cin-young Lee, Chelsea Dutenhoffer, and Roli Gostelow

48

INTUITIONISM AS GENERALIZATION Fred Richman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

esoteric varieties of intuitionistic mathematics. Most analyses dwell on the relative merits of classical

Richman, Fred

49

ROBERTS, FRED S. Birthdate: 19 June 1943  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humboldt Fellowship (declined), 1984 Elected Vice President of SIAM, 1984, 1986 ACM/SIGACT Distinguished Service Prize, 1999 University Research Initiative Award, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, 1989

50

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

51

Hutchinson, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

608445°, -97.9297743° 608445°, -97.9297743° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.0608445,"lon":-97.9297743,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

STARTLINK COMPOSITE HOUSING J. A. Hutchinson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only the addition of insulation to build houses. With appropriate insulation, a Startlink house has that link together using bolts and snap-fit connection to build houses rapidly. The material is almost unknown in the industry yet has remarkable properties well suited to house building: lower thermal

Mottram, Toby

53

99thth Annual Proceedings of the Fred S. GrodinsFred S. Grodins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10:00 Lo, Joe Piezoelectric Optical MEMS Scanning Fluorescence Biosensor 10:15 Butte, Pramod Intra-Operative Time-Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Human Glial Tumors 10:30 Givrad, Tina-Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Human Glial Tumors 2 Chatterjee, Susmita Stimulus

Southern California, University of

54

ROBERTS, FRED S. Professor II Birthdate: 19 June 1943  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.) (pp. 165-184), Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes, 2008. Representative awards: Outstanding Ph.D. student-principal investigator and executive director, Exxon Mobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp ($80,000), 2009 Science. Ph.D., University of Nebraska, 1978; M.S., Kansas State, 1975; B.S., Kansas State, 1973. Area

55

Experience Curves and Solar PV Fred Heutte, Senior Policy Associate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the historical advantage fossil based electricity has had will reverse, with significant consequences for future Electricity Coordinating Council's transmission planning for the 10-year Common Case based plan, and even more of evidence suggests staying with the consensus experience curve estimate ­ a Learning Rate of 20% for solar

56

PESTICIDES AND PERSONAL SAFETY Fred Whitford, Purdue Pesticide Programs Coordinator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fiber crops, or otherwise detract from our quality of life. Pesticides are natural or synthetic directions is essential to safe, effective, and environmentally sound pesticide application. It is imperative precautions are necessary (see sec- tion on Pesticide Exposure, page 8). Toxic effects from pesticides may

57

showcase scheduling at fred astaire east side dance studio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a great deal of time and effort on the part of the management. ... programming optimization models and is very user-friendly since it is spreadsheet-based and runs ... training, dance instruction, sales, marketing, and communication with clients.

58

Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Parameters used in the environmental pathways (DESCARTES) and radiological dose (CIDER) modules of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC) for the air pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report is a description of work performed for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation doses to individuals resulting from releases of radionuclides from the Hanford Site since 1944. This work is being done by staff at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle) under a contract with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) with technical direction provided by an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The objective of this report is to-document the environmental accumulation and dose-assessment parameters that will be used to estimate the impacts of past Hanford Site airborne releases. During 1993, dose estimates made by staff at Battelle will be used by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as part of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). This document contains information on parameters that are specific to the airborne release of the radionuclide iodine-131. Future versions of this document will include parameter information pertinent to other pathways and radionuclides.

Snyder, S.F.; Farris, W.T.; Napier, B.A.; Ikenberry, T.A.; Gilbert, R.O.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Dallam Sherman Hansford Ochiltree Lipscomb Hartley Moore Hutchinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gaines Dawson Borden Scurry Fisher Jones Shackelford Stephens Andrews Martin Howard Mitchell Nolan Taylor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hutchinson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9°, -101.4339148° 9°, -101.4339148° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8031909,"lon":-101.4339148,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Hutchinson County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7202°, -97.6982272° 7202°, -97.6982272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.3017202,"lon":-97.6982272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

Cancer in Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

statistics and information agency. The Institutes mission is better health and wellbeing for Australians through better health and welfare statistics and information. The Australasian Association of Cancer Registries (AACR) is a collaborative body representing state and territory cancer registries in Australia and New Zealand. Most are members of the International Association of Cancer Registries. The AACR was formed in November 1982 to provide a formal mechanism for promoting uniformity of collection, classification and collation of cancer data. The objectives of the AACR are to: Achieve national agreement on cancer-specific data definitions and coding and to encourage compliance with such agreements. As far as possible, data definitions and coding should be consistent with existing International Association of Cancer Registries (IACR) protocols and conventions. Facilitate the production of Australian, state and territory and national statistical publications on cancer that are comparable with each other and with international statistical publications. Improve the operational efficiency, and data completeness and quality, of the state and territory and New Zealand cancer registries through collaborative sharing of information. Contribute to national cancer control development in Australia and New Zealand through the regular and timely publication of local and national cancer statistics and the provision of data for cancer control research and health promotion. Contribute national data to international publications of the IACR. Contribute to international cancer coding and statistical analysis developments via members involvement with IACR. Facilitate national epidemiological research projects on cancer (given appropriate local and AIHW ethics committee approvals).CANCER SERIES Number 28

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cancer Due to Prolonged Inflammation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development. Molecular Cancer Research 4.221 (2006): 5-261.direction of future cancer research is to better understand

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Shark cartilage and cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

speculation in the past that there may be some factor in shark's cartilage that prevents cancer, recent research by the National Cancer Institute could not confirm this, and there...

66

Soy and breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Are soy foods safe for breast cancer patients? Soy is a rich source of isoflavones (primarily genistein, daidzein, and glycitein). The standard oral therapy undertaken after initial treatment (known as adjuvant therapy) for estrogen-sensitive cancers is

67

ENVIRONMENTAL CANCER RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is submitted to the President of the United States in fulfillment of the obligations of the Presidents Cancer Panel to appraise the National Cancer Program as established in accordance with the National Cancer Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-218), the

Margaret L. Kripke, Ph.D.; Abby B. S, Ph.D.; Suzanne H. Reuben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Defining the Critical Hurdles in Cancer Immunotherapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australia. Ovarian Cancer Research Center, University ofal: New models for cancer research: human cancer stem cellAmerican Association for Cancer Research 2010, 16:2861-71.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Cancer survivorship : understanding the issues faced by cancer survivors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??International research on cancer survivorship has started to identify a range of issues that affect cancer survivors physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. These issues can (more)

Hayward, Penelope Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research Ontario CancerInternational Agency for Research on Cancer, 2000. CancerThe Canadian Cancer Registries Epidemiology Research Group,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

TBU-0078 - In the Matter of Fred Hua | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

denied. tbu0078.pdf More Documents & Publications TBU-0114 - In the Matter of Dennis Rehmeier TBU-0061 - In the Matter of Misti Wall TBH-0111 - In the Matter of Eugene N. Kilmer...

72

TBU-0078 - In the Matter of Fred Hua | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the appeal denied. tbu0078.pdf More Documents & Publications TBU-0061 - In the Matter of Misti Wall TBU-0114 - In the Matter of Dennis Rehmeier TBZ-0034 - In the Matter of Casey...

73

Fred Wagner: Blacksmithing and Life in the Santa Cruz Area, 1890-1930  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1878, he became an apprentice blacksmith at the age of 171895 that I hired out as an apprentice in a blacksmith shop.a young man have to be an apprentice before he could be a

Wagner, Fred; Calciano, Elizabeth Spedding

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fred Richard Mynatt, 1981 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

recognized discrete-ordinate methods and generalized perturbation theory for radiation-shielding analysis and for leadership in the broad application of these methods to...

75

[3] Fred Douglis and Brian Marsh. Low power disk management for mobile computers. Technical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In Pro­ ceedings ACM SIGMOD, 1994. [6] Ravi Jain and John Werth. Airdisks and air­ raid, November 1996. [5] T. Imielinski, S. Viswanathan, , and B.R. Badri­ nath. Energy efficient indexing on air 1996. [11] Stanley Zdonik, Michael Franklin, Rafael Alonso, and Swarup Acharya. Are ``Disks in the Air

California at Berkeley, University of

76

[3] Fred Douglis and Brian Marsh. Low power disk management for mobile computers. Technical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In Pro- ceedings ACM SIGMOD, 1994. [6] Ravi Jain and John Werth. Airdisks and air- raid, November 1996. [5] T. Imielinski, S. Viswanathan, , and B.R. Badri- nath. Energy efficient indexing on air 1996. [11] Stanley Zdonik, Michael Franklin, Rafael Alonso, and Swarup Acharya. Are "Disks in the Air

Han, Richard Y.

77

Fred Wagner: Blacksmithing and Life in the Santa Cruz Area, 1890-1930  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

you believe that we had a flour mill down on lower Pacificmill was the Centennial flour mill. Calciano: Who ran that?old mill's threshing machine to make the flour. Calciano:

Wagner, Fred; Calciano, Elizabeth Spedding

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fred Wagner: Blacksmithing and Life in the Santa Cruz Area, 1890-1930  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

out a deep freeze or a Frigidaire, wouldn't we? Calciano: Wea deep freeze or a Frigidaire. 'Course in them days theyand keep it there in the Frigidaire. I wouldn't be afraid to

Wagner, Fred; Calciano, Elizabeth Spedding

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institutes research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institutes population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCIs SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US. For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

Lesko, Samuel M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Proteomics for cancer biomarker discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: If we are to successfully treat cancer, we must understand the biologic underpinnings in conjunction with early diagnosis. Genome-wide expression studies have advanced the research of many cancers. Nevertheless, ...

Volchenboum, Samuel Louis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Animal Models in Cancer Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer is a disorder that results in inappropriate growth of cells in the wrong place and at the wrong time. Most frequently cancer arises in older individuals and becomes problematic as it grows large enough to interrupt normal organ function, invades adjacent normal tissues disrupting their function, and spreads to other sites in the body, metastatic sites, where it causes further disabilities. Cancer arises in normal cells of our body. The environmental causes of cancer include numerous, disparate fac...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Texas Regional Fire Coordinators Revised: June 11, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robertson Waller Hutchinson Shackelford Childress Nacogdoches Aransas Lampasas Collingsworth Hardeman

84

Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependent Breast Cancers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cancer Interface. Cancer Research 2007, Geigl JB, LangerBreast Cancer Research This Provisional PDF corresponds tobreast cancers Breast Cancer Research 2007, 9:R59 doi:

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Accelerators for Cancer Therapy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

Lennox, Arlene J.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding among younger breast cancer survivors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the California Breast Cancer Research Program, who awardedthe California Breast Cancer Research Program, dissertationquality of life. Breast cancer Research and Treatment. 1996;

Gorman, Jessica Lynn Rickard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Physics and Cancer Student Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tests. He had an MRI that showed a growth in the area of swelling around his salivary gland and, after a biopsy, was diagnosed with salivary gland cancer and has been recommended...

88

Steps to Preventing Colon Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

watch out for belly fat. One of the key findings from the CUP report is that excess body fat is linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer. The report also concludes that...

89

EPS Global International Cancer Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept.10-12th, 2010 Suzhou, China Welcome Message Dear Colleagues and Friends, It is my pleasure to announce that EPS Global International Cancer Conference will be held on...

90

Identifying and Understanding the Functional Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Chemoresistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prostate tumorigenesis. Cancer Research, 71: 3459-3470. Kongprogenitor cells. Cancer Research, 72: 1878-89. Murtaughin human brain tumors. Cancer Research, 63: 5821-5828. Steer

Hindoyan, Antreas Agop

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Study of familial breast cancer: identifying additional breast cancer susceptibility loci;.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Breast cancer is a serious public health concern and despite intensive research, the etiology of breast cancer is poorly understood. Known risk factors explain only (more)

Allen-Brady, Kristina Lisa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11. KatohM. CancergenomicsandgeneticsofFGFR2[Chapter27 BreastCancerGenomics PaulT. Spellman,

Spellman, Paul T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

) United states Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and vlildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Cormnissioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

articles and retailers excise taxes on special motor fuels shall not be imposed lIupon a~ article sold; matches j gasoline; lubricating oUs. 2. Retailers Excise Tax (see Section 4041 (b), Chapter 31 Gasoline supplies in marine uses are exempt from the tax bur- den in a substantial number of States

94

Microchip Technology for High-Throughput Cancer Pathology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sequencing in Cancer Research . . . . 80 Appendix A: High-the Warburg Effect. Cancer Research, 2006. 66(18): p. 8927-Breast Cancer Risk. Cancer Research, 2007. 67(10): p. 4687-

Duberow, Jr, David Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analysis of Senate Bill 1245: Cervical Cancer Screening Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cervical cancer mortality by race/ethnicity Other researchCancer: Recommendations and Rationale. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research

California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Targeting cancer metabolism: a therapeutic window opens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic events in cancer activate signalling pathways that alter cell metabolism. Clinical evidence has linked cell metabolism with cancer outcomes. Together, these observations have raised interest in targeting metabolic ...

Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

98

Differential expression of anterior gradient gene AGR2 in prostate cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circulating tumor cells. Cancer research 2005, 48. Kovalev2 in prostate cancer. Cancer research 2010, 19. Zhang Y,cellular transformation. Cancer research 2008, 68(2):492-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

Radiation carcinogenesis was first noted in studies of individuals with occupational or therapeutic exposure to radiation. Data from long-term follow-up studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have greatly enhanced our knowledge of radiation carcinogenesis. This book presents current results obtained from epidemiological studies and pathological studies on cancer among atomic bomb survivors. It includes a description of the dosimetry system which is currently being revised. Although many of the details about radiation carcinogenesis remain unknown or uncertain, it is clear that the incidence of radiation-induced cancer among atomic bomb survivors continues unabated 40 years after exposure. Recent increases in occupational and environmental exposure to radiation together with the need for a thorough review of radiation protection standards have led to increased recognition of the importance of research on radiation carcinogenesis and risk assessment.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Air pollution and lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro research (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

Boehm, G.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nanomaterials for the detection of cancer-associated biomarkers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prostate cancer persists as a major public health issue in the United States and remains the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Early detection and disease monitoring in prostate cancer can significantly improve ...

Mu, Chunyao Jenny

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Perspectives on the mesenchymal origin of metastatic cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microenvironments. Cancer Research, 39. Pollard, J. W. (host tumor hybrids. Cancer Research, 60(9), 25122519. 98.program. Clinical Cancer Research, 14(12), 36433645. 17.

Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; Seyfried, Thomas N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

An MRI compatible manipulator for prostate cancer detection and treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and the second most common cause of cancer related death in men. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood tests and digital rectal exams (DRE) are preliminary ...

DeVita, Lauren M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Available Technologies: High Selectivity Peptides for Cancer ...  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. Diagnostics and Therapeutics; Medical Devices; ... Rac1b: A Highly Selective Marker and Target for Cancer, IB-2167 ;

106

Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

treatment Laser research shows promise for cancer treatment Scientists have observed for the first time how a laser penetrates dense, electron-rich plasma to generate ions. August...

107

HIV/Cancer DB Match Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Angeles Massachusetts New York New Jersey San Diego San Francisco Seattle METHODS Matching The Cancer and HIVAIDS records were linked using the commercially...

108

BMC Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Genistein inhibits radiation-induced activation of NF-?B in prostate cancer cells promoting apoptosis and G2 /M cell cycle arrest

Julian J Raffoul; Yu Wang; Omer Kucuk; Jeffrey D Forman; Fazlul H Sarkar; Gilda G Hillman; Jeffrey D Forman; Fazlul H Sarkar; Gilda G Hillman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Improving Screening Strategies for Prostate Cancer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Th is thesis describes research on screening for prostate cancer. To improve understanding of the thesis, some background information will be provided in this introduction. (more)

Wolters, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Aligned Nanofiber Multiwell Plates for Cancer Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aligned Nanofiber Multiwell Plates for Cancer Research. Author(s), John Lannutti, Jed Johnson. On-Site Speaker (Planned), John Lannutti

111

Boron Nanotechnology-driven Cancer Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Boron Nanotechnology-driven Cancer Therapy ... Current research focuses on both the design and synthesis of high boron containing...

112

Molecular Epidemiology of Human Cancer Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiology has identified several etiological factors in lung cancer, of which the most ... Finally, most molecular epidemiology studies include genetic research.

113

Molecular Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A doxycycline-inducible urokinase receptor (uPAR) upregulates uPAR activities including resistance to anoikis in human prostate cancer cell lines

Mohammad Hasanuzzaman; Robert Kutner; Siamak Agha-mohammadi; Jakob Reiser; Inder Sehgal

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Biocompatible Nanoparticle Materials in Cancer Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges and future perspectives of nanomedicine in cancer research will .... Self-Adaptive, Ultra-Compliant Shape Memory Alloys for Medical Implant...

115

BMC Cancer BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase gene and susceptibility to breast cancer in a Chinese population: a case-control analysis

Xiangjun Zhai; Jun Gao; Zhibin Hu; Jinhai Tang; Jianwei Qin; Shui Wang; Xuechen Wang; Guangfu Jin; Jiyong Liu; Wenshen Chen; Feng Chen; Xinru Wang; Qingyi Wei; Hongbing Shen; Qingyi Wei; Hongbing Shen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

117

EA-0965: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine, Argonne, Illinois EA-0965: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine, Argonne, Illinois SUMMARY...

118

Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy Technology available for licensing: A successful and cost-effective means of treating cancer in previously inoperable or radiation-sensitive...

119

Development of Biomarker-based Systems for Cancer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the US. The cancer community has set a goal to eliminate cancer-related suffering and death by 2015. To achieve this ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Health Behaviors and Quality of Life of Cancer Survivors in Massachusetts, 2006: Data Use for Comprehensive Cancer Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pierre S. Health behaviors and quality of life of cancer survivors in Massachusetts, 2006: data use for comprehensive cancer control. Prev Chronic Dis 2010;7(1).

Temeika L. Fairley; Phd Helen Hawk; Phd Snaltze Pierre; Peer Reviewed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

A Geographic Information System (GIS) Analysis of Cancer Clinical Trial Locations in the State of Georgia by Major Cancer Type.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improving cancer care through clinical research is a major public health issue. However, in Georgia, the exact number of cancer clinical trials is unknown, indicating (more)

Parker, Shaunta Shanell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

124

Prediction of Breast Cancer Using Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) was developed to determine whether patients have breast cancer or not. Whether patients have cancer or not and if they have its type can be determined by using ANN and BI-RADS evaluation and based on ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, BI-RADS, Breast cancer, Breast cancer prediction

Ismail Saritas

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Manipulating electron beam cancer therapy so it can be used treat internal cancers and tumors has the potential to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure provides several new cancer therapies or treatments in previously inoperable or radiationManipulating electron beam cancer therapy so it can be used treat internal cancers and tumors has-effective means of treating cancer in previously inoperable or radiation-sensitive areas of the body. Technology

Kemner, Ken

126

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality  

SciTech Connect

This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Coping with Mom's breast cancer: impact of parental cancer on African-American adolescents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Parental breast cancer is an illness that affects the patient as well as the entire family. A review of literature shows that very limited research (more)

Dockery, Kimberley D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependent Breast Cancers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biological basis linking aging with sporadic breast cancerTranslational Research at the Aging and Cancer Interface.Changes Associated with Aging. Cancer Res 2004, 64:8550-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Combined diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and MRI system for cancer imaging in small animals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8, 2006 Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment, Volume 5,Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment, Volume 5, Number1161- Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment, Volume 5,

Gulsen, Gultekin; Birgul, Ozlem; Unlu, Mehmet Burcin; Shafiiha, Roshanak; Nalcioglu, Orhan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Economic Impact of the California Cancer Research Act Job Creation and Economic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the California Cancer Research Act | 3 Several healthinitiative, the California Cancer Research Act, on the Juneeducation and breast cancer research). This analysis uses

Glantz, Stanton A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Anti-cancer actions in commonly used drugs: epidemiology led by laboratory science.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite considerable research on cancer treatments and preventatives, poor outcomes in cancer patients are common. The vital search for effective cancer drugs often begins in (more)

Walker, Alex J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Renal cancer-selective Englerin A induces multiple mechanisms of cell death and autophagy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013 32:57.Stem Cell & Translational Cancer Research Center, Chang GungExperimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013, 32:57 http://

Williams, Richard T; Yu, Alice L; Diccianni, Mitchell B; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Batova, Ayse

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development, reagents, drugs and clinical protocols with potential to significantly improve cancer outcomes. Nowhere, China and North

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

Engineering persistent interleukin-2 for cancer immunotherapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobilizing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells is a promising strategy for treating cancer. In contrast to standard therapeutic approaches such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, immunotherapy ...

Gai, Shuning

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Nanoparticles in cancer imaging and therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoparticle contrast agents offer the potential to significantly improve existing methods of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advantages include biocompatibility, selective accumulation in tumor cells, and reduced toxicity. Considerable research is underway ...

Leon Smith; Zdenka Kuncic; Kostya Ostrikov; Shailesh Kumar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Stromal Endothelial Cells Directly Influence Cancer Progression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer growth and metastasis are regulated in part by stromal cells such as fibroblasts and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. Endothelial cells (ECs) are also ubiquitous within tumors because tumors are ...

Franses, Joseph Wang

137

National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has designated May as National Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month. In 1996, an estimated 1 million cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed, of which approximately 95 % will be squamous cell or basal cell carcinomas (1). Although the incidence of melanoma is lower than those of squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas, the case-fatality rate is highest for persons with melanoma. During 19731992, mortality from melanoma increased 34%the third highest increase of all cancers (2). CDC, in collaboration with the AAD, has initiated the National Skin Cancer Prevention Education Program (NSCPEP) to increase public awareness about skin cancer and to help reduce the occurrence of and deaths associated with skin cancer. Goals of this program are to develop and disseminate educational messages for children, their parents, and other caregivers; develop guidelines for school curricula; evaluate the utility and value of the ultraviolet (UV) index; and develop educational messages for health-care providers. Additional information about this month and the NSCPEP is available from

Among Children; Young Adults

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

malignant breast. Cancer Research 59 17571763s; discussionfactor withdrawal. Cancer Research 56 20392044. Bunone G,cancer cells. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 31 227

Hansen, R K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Polymorphisms in the stem cell pathway and esophageal cancer in a Chinese population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping 10K Array. Cancer research, 2005. 65(7): p. 2542-American Association for Cancer Research, 1997. 8(12): p.Colorectal Cancer. Cancer Research, 2010. 70(16): p. 6629-

Wallar, Gina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Early dissemination of bevacizumab for advanced colorectal cancer: a prospective cohort study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer Institute/Cancer Research Network (grant number U01in the NCI-funded Cancer Research Network, and fifteenOutcomes: The Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Multi-parametric numerical simulation of age-specific cancer rates in human populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CancerFit computer program allows cancer researchers to analyze epidemiologic data describing the age-specific risk of cancer in terms of hypotheses about historical environmental risks, the heritability of cancer, the ...

Kogel, John, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 XPD helicase is an enzyme...

144

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 4 Vitamin C and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 4 Vitamin C and Cancer Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Vitamin C and Cancer from ...

145

Impact of deleterious passenger mutations on cancer progression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer progression is driven by the accumulation of a small number of genetic alterations. However, these few driver alterations reside in a cancer genome alongside tens of thousands of additional mutations termed passengers. ...

Korolev, Kirill Sergeevich

146

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH | National Cancer Institute LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH | National Cancer Institute LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGY National Cancer Institute (NCI) The Laboratory of Pathology, based in the NCI, provides clinical service in anatomic-scientists DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute, Center

147

Graduate Program in Cancer Cell Biology CELL SHEDDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Program in Cancer Cell Biology CELL SHEDDING ANOIKIS CELL SHEDDING METASTASIS NORMAL CELLS) To the Cancer Cell Biology Program: As a Graduate Student in the Cancer Cell Biology Program, I acknowledge account of my laboratory work, commit to ethics before science and devote my full and undivided time

Mohaghegh, Shahab

148

Usability of mobile computing technologies to assist cancer patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical researchers are constantly looking for new methods for early detection and treatment of incurable diseases. Cancer can severely hinder the lives of patients if they are not constantly attended to. Cancer patients can be assisted with the aid ... Keywords: MARKS, TinyOS, cancer, chemotherapy, mote, pervasive health care, tmote sky, wellness monitor

Rezwan Islam; Sheikh I. Ahamed; Nilothpal Talukder; Ian Obermiller

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

PeStIcIde PolIcIeS & ProcedUreS Dr. Fred Fishel, Associate Professor, Dept. of Agronomy and Pesticide Information Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- comprising 99.2% of all crops grown in the state #12;BackgroundBackground Agricultural pesticide exposure blood and urine concentration levels for biomarkers HEALTH EFFECT Incidence of pesticide- related grown Total Crops by CountyTotal Crops by County #12;MethodsMethods Narrow list of pesticidesNarrow list

Choate, Paul M.

151

Catalyzing social support for breast cancer patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Social support is a critical, yet underutilized resource when undergoing cancer care. Underutilization occurs in two conditions: (a) when patients fail to seek out information, material assistance, and emotional support from family and friends or (b) ... Keywords: health consumers, participatory design, social network

Meredith M. Skeels; Kenton T. Unruh; Christopher Powell; Wanda Pratt

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Modern breast cancer detection: a technological review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breast cancer is a serious threat worldwide and is the number two killer of women in the United States. The key to successful management is screening and early detection. What follows is a description of the state of the art in screening and detection ...

Adam B. Nover; Shami Jagtap; Waqas Anjum; Hakki Yegingil; Wan Y. Shih; Wei-Heng Shih; Ari D. Brooks

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Toward Early Diagnosis of Lung Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our long term research goal is to develop a fully automated, image-based diagnostic system for early diagnosis of pulmonary nodules that may lead to lung cancer. In this paper, we focus on generating new probabilistic models for the estimated growth ...

Ayman El-Baz; Georgy Gimel'Farb; Robert Falk; Mohamed Abou El-Ghar; Sabrina Rainey; David Heredia; Teresa Shaffer

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 50,000 people per year will be diagnosed with skin cancer in one of its various forms, making it the seventh most common form of cancer in the United States. Currently the only method to diagnose suspicious lesions is visual inspection and subsequent biopsy of suspicious lesions. Many cancerous lesions are missed and many benign lesions are biopsied using these techniques. This process is painful and expensive. The proposed research is driven by the need for a non-invasive skin cancer detection system. Presented here is a method for the optical determination of cancerous tissue using polarized light. This thesis describes the development of a polarimetric imaging system including its calibration and testing. In addition, experiments are performed to simulate changes in tissue, such as increased size of scatterers and increased scattering and absorption coefficients that often accompany tissue changes as it becomes cancerous. The effects of these simulated changes are tested on the Polarimetric imaging system in order to quantify changes in the Mueller matrix caused by the perturbations, and ultimately to relate them to observed changes in the Mueller matrices of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue. Finally, the Polarimetric imaging system is used to determine the Mueller matrix of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue to assess the system's capabilities for skin cancer diagnosis.

DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

doi:10.5402/2011/617082 Research Article Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and the Occurrence of Skin Cancer in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2011 Catharina C. van Niekerk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large populationbased dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7 % (95 % CI: 2.33.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset. The odds ratio (OR) for endometrioid cancer in the ovary to skin cancer in the under 50 age group was 8.9 (95 % CI: 3.225.0). The OR decreased in older patients to 1.2. Conclusions. Patients with epithelial ovarian malignancies show an increased risk of skin cancer. A significantly increased risk (4.3%) for endometrioid ovarian cancer was found in the group aged under 50. 1.

Isrn Obstetrics; Catharina C. Van Niekerk; Johan Bulten; Andrl. M. Verbeek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Organization Chart and Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Analyst and International Activities: Fred Joseck. Under Fred Joseck, Tien Nguyen (Systems Analysis), and Joe Stanford (Budget, International, and Policy). Supervisory...

157

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Risk Analysis in Support of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOEEEREHFCIT Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Website: http:...

158

OpenEI Community - Free Energy Data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

term2800 en Introducing FRED, Enabling Unique Visualization and Manipulation of Energy Data at Multiple Scales http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogintroducing-fred-enabli...

159

Analyzing Geographic Patterns of Disease Incidence: Rates of Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer in Iowa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study, using geocodes of the locations of residence of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients from the Iowa Cancer Registry, computed continuous spatial patterns of late-stage rates of colorectal cancer in Iowa. Variations in rates in intrahospital ... Keywords: GIS, SEER, colorectal cancer, geocodes, late-stage cancer

Gerard Rushton; Ika Peleg; Aniruddha Banerjee; Geoffrey Smith; Michele West

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility New capability expands existing program, creates treatment product in quantity. April 13, 2012 Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward - Los Alamos scientist Meiring Nortier holds a thorium foil test target for the proof-of-concept production experiments. Research indicates that it will be possible to match current annual, worldwide production of Ac-225 in just two to five days of operations using the accelerator at Los Alamos and analogous facilities at Brookhaven. Alpha particles are energetic enough to destroy cancer cells but are unlikely to move beyond a tightly controlled target region and destroy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Editorial Breast Cancer Research the first ten years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breast Cancer Research was launched in 1999 with the aim of providing a home for translational research in breast cancer [1]. The field of translational research has advanced considerably over the past ten years, and the journal has evolved over this time to meet the changing needs of the breast cancer research community. As we celebrate Breast Cancer Researchs 10 th birthday, we take this opportunity to reflect on the journals growth over the last decade. Breast Cancer Research is committed to open access publication of research articles, and remains the only journal in the breast cancer field dedicated to open access. Open access means research is universally and freely available via the Internet. Authors retain their own copyright, allowing them to grant any third party the right to use, reproduce and disseminate the article. Open access has broad benefits both

Frances Mulvany; Bruce Aj Ponder

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Proteomic Study of Oral Cancer Stem-Like Cells and Bone Marrow Cell Treatment for Sjgren's Syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carcinoma. Clinical Cancer Research, 2008. 14(13): p. 4085-Cell Lung Cancer. Cancer Research, 2008. 68(15): p. 6065-Inducible Factor-1?. Cancer Research, 2006. 66(7): p. 3688-

Misuno, Kaori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A multigene predictor of metastatic outcome in early stage hormone receptor-negative and triple-negative breast cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer. Breast Cancer Research 2010 12:R85. SubmitYau et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R85 http://cited Yau et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R85 http://

Yau, Christina; Esserman, Laura; Moore, Dan H; Waldman, Fred; Sninsky, John; Benz, Christopher C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The morphologies of breast cancer cell lines in three-dimensional assays correlate with their profiles of gene expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

migration and invasion. Cancer Research 65, 11572- Hiraguri,cancer cell lines. Cancer Research 58, 1972-1977. Irie,of tumor cells. Cancer Research 47, 3239-3245. Ashburner,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Role of Non-Mutated Signaling Networks and Inflammatory Cytokines in the Initiation and Progression of Prostate Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the AACR Special Conference in Cancer Research: Advancesin Prostate Cancer Research, Orlando, FL. Smith DA, Zong Y,Cancer Cells. Clinical Cancer Research. 2003;9:3706. Smith

Smith, Daniel Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

WE?A?213AB?01: Second Cancers from Radiation Therapy Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Second Cancers are the most common late effect among long?term cancer survivors. Radiation has been a known risk factor for cancer induction based on atomic bomb survivor follow?up. Over the last few decades

S Kry; R Howell

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study cohort. Breast Cancer Research 2010 12:R4. Submit yourMarshall et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R4 http://Marshall et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R4 http://

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Separation of cancer cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using pH control and dielectrophoresis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System. Clinical Cancer Research, 2007. 13(3): p.920 928.Solid Tumors. Clinical Cancer Research, 1999. 5:p.1950-1960.Diseases. Clinical Cancer research, 2004. 10:p.6897-6904.

Pattanaik, Malisha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Can A Virus Cause Cancer: A Look Into The History And Significance Of Oncoviruses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tumor Virology. Cancer Research. 68(19): 7693-7706. deof the role of viruses in cancer, research on the subject2004. Conncecting Viruses to Cancer: How Research Moves from

Rwazavian, Niema

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

beta1 Integrin mediates an alternative survival pathway in breast cancer cells resistant to lapatinib  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistant to lapatinib. Breast Cancer Research 2011 13:R84.96. Huang et al. Breast Cancer Research 2011, 13:R84 http://Huang et al. Breast Cancer Research 2011, 13:R84 http://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Survival and self-renewing capacity of breast cancer initiating cells during fractionated radiation treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation treatment. Breast Cancer Research 2010 12:R13.Lagadec et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R13 http://Lagadec et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R13 http://

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of alternating amphiphilic copolymers for targeted delivery applications in cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 1,479,000 new cases of cancer were expected to be diagnosed, while 562,340 Americans were expected to die from cancer in 2009 alone. Even though advances in early ...

Brower, Kevin P. (Kevin Peter)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

6.21 Improving Neutron Beams for Cancer Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the most advanced epithermal neutron source in the world for cancer treatment. Social Impact: Preliminary trials of BNCT therapy supported by the Office of Science have shown...

175

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast tumor (black color in top image of monitor screen) using the software to visualize in color the various intensities of neutron transmissions through the breast tissue. ORNL and University of Tennessee collaboration now analyzing first results from neutron radiographs of cancerous tissue samples Today's range of techniques for detection of breast and other cancers include mammography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET), and optical imaging. Each technology has advantages and disadvantages, with limitations either

176

Former Worker Program - Early Lung Cancer Detection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former Worker Program (FWP) Former Worker Program (FWP) Home Covered Sites/Populations › Construction Worker Screening Projects › Production Worker Screening Projects › Supplemental Screening Program › Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Upcoming Events Program Implementation Outreach Medical Screening - Conventional Medical Screening - Early Lung Cancer Detection Communicating Results Protecting Participant Information Sharing De-identified Data Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) Worker Testimonials Contact Us FWP Scientific Publications FWP Documents Related Links Office of Health and Safety Home Page HSS Logo Early Lung Cancer Detection Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer. Through the FWP, DOE initiated the Early Lung Cancer Detection (ELCD) program using low-dose helical CT scans to detect lung cancers at an earlier, more treatable stage. Lung cancer results in about 160,000 deaths in the U.S. every year. The most common causes of lung cancer are long-term exposures to tobacco smoke and residential radon emissions, but occupational hazards, such as asbestos and ionizing radiation, also cause or contribute to the disease.

177

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease? Collagen is the main (and most abundant) protein in all mammalian connective tissues, including those of the heart, lungs,...

178

Progress on Production of Alpha-emitting Radioisotopes for Cancer...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Progress on Production of Alpha-emitting Radioisotopes for Cancer Therapy Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding...

179

Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a human thyroid cancer cell line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gland during the Chernobyl catastrophe. Environmental Healthradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Cancer 76,1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. In the twelve

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer ...  

... Oslo, Norway; cCancer Stem Cell Innovation Center, Oslo ... the above explanation always must be ... Fold change analysis of the miRNA microarray ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developmental defects; premature aging; brittle hair; scalypredisposition and premature aging. Acknowledgements. Weagainst cancer and aging Jill O. Fuss and Priscilla K.

Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship of solar radiation to cancer mortality ininvolving exposure to solar radiation. Prev Med. 1990;19:and amount of solar radiation in 49 US metropolitan areas

Mohr, Sharif Burgette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Cancer research at Berkeley Lab: the intersection of science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate September Conservation October Geosciences November Chemistry December Health Cancer research at Berkeley Lab: the intersection of science and health Mention the...

184

Translational Research on Esophageal Cancer: From Cell Line to Clinic.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Worldwide esophageal cancer is a signifi cant and an increasing health problem. In 2005, there were 497,700 new cases, and the prevalence is expected to (more)

Boonstra, J.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Early clinical cancer trials: Proof of concept and beyond.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the last few decades clinical cancer research has developed at accelerating speed, resulting in a tremendous increase of knowledge with regard to tumour biology, (more)

Konings, I.R.H.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Stromal Modulation of Radiation Carcinogenesis in Breast Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and age at exposure for all solid cancers as a group and many individual sites as a consequence of the atomic

Nguyen, David Hiendat Hua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Yeast-based vaccine approaches to cancer immunotherapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulates dendritic cells and represents a promising candidate for cancer immunotherapy development. Effective cross-presentation of antigen delivered to dendritic cells is necessary for successful ...

Howland, Shanshan W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Improved Treatment of X-ray Resistant & Inoperable Cancers ...  

If the electron beam can be transported to the internal cancer without exposure to tissue, ... This figure shows a comparison of X-ray radiation ...

189

Medical Imaging for Breast Cancer - Reducing the Need for Biopsy  

Jefferson Lab is a Department of Energy national laboratory for nuclear physics research. ... Medical Imaging for Breast Cancer - Reducing the Need for Biopsy

190

Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

191

From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United States, one in eight women will be affected by breast cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed - as well as the second most fatal - cancer in American women. It is estimated that there will be nearly 200,000 diagnoses of breast cancer this year; more than 40,000 of these will be fatal. Although advances in medical technologies have greatly increased the odds of surviving the disease, the increase in screenings has not resulted in a significant reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate. Moreover, recent studies have even suggested that an increase in these methods might, in itself, cause cancer. A new tool for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, supported by an award from the Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs of Department of Defense, could give women a new advantage in the fight against breast cancer. This LANL-led project will integrate ultrasound tomography (UST) with recent discoveries in the field of cell and tissue biomechanics to improve breast cancer detection and characterization. UST uses ultrasound waves instead of X-rays to identify and characterize breast tumors. This technology reveals small mechanical-property changes within the breast. These changes are often the earliest signs of breast cancer. Additionally, UST is effective for women with dense breast tissue, who have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. Because the technology does not use radiation, UST can also be used as frequently as needed for women with a high risk of developing breast cancer. In contrast, mammography, the only routine breast-cancer screening tool currently available, is not effective for women with dense breast tissue and may come with unwanted side-effects caused by ionizing radiation. UST has great potential to become an alternative breast-cancer screening tool because of UST's advantages and benefits over mammography. Currently, there is fierce debate surrounding the age at which breast cancer screening should begin, and once begun, how often it should occur. The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms starting at age 40. On the other hand, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine so early. Rather, the Task Force recommends biennial mammography screening for women aged 50 to 74 years. The ten-year discrepancy in the onset of screening results from recent data suggesting that the frequent use of X-ray radiation during screenings could potentially increase the likelihood of developing cancer. This danger is increased by the low sensitivity and accuracy of mammograms, which sometimes require multiple screenings to yield results. Furthermore, mammograms are often not only inaccurate, but average appalling misdiagnoses rates: about 80% false positives and 15% false negatives. These misdiagnoses lead to unwarranted biopsies at an estimated health care cost of $2 billion per year, while at the same time, resulting in excessive cases of undetected cancer. As such, the National Cancer Institute recommends more studies on the advantages of types and frequency of screenings, as well as alternative screening options. The UST technology developed at LANL could be an alternative option to greatly improve the specificity and sensitivity of breast cancer screening without using ionizing radiation. LANL is developing high-resolution ultrasound tomography algorithms and a clinical ultrasound tomography scanner to conduct patient studies at the UNM Hospital. During UST scanning, the patient lies face-down while her breast, immersed in a tank of warm water, is scanned by phased-transducer arrays. UST uses recorded ultrasound signals to reconstruct a high-resolution three-dimensional image of the breast, showing the spatial distribution of mechanical properties within the breast. Breast cancers are detected by higher values of mechanical properties compared to surrounding tissues. Thus, high-resolution breast images obtained using LANL's novel UST algorithms ha

Martineau, Rebecca M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Framework for Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating a Cancer Survivorship Curriculum for Medical Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of a dedicated curriculum. J Cancer Educ. 2007; 224,illness: Competencies for a curriculum for medical students.first year medical school curriculum. J Cancer Educ. 2004;

Uijtdehaage, Sebastian; Hauer, Karen E.; Stuber, Margaret; Rajagopalan, Shobita; Go, Vay L.; Wilkerson, LuAnn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cancer Screening in California: Findings from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Cancer Society, California Division, and PublicDiabetes in California: CancerScreening in California: Findings from the 2001 California

Ponce, Ninez A.; Babey, Susan H.; Etzioni, David; Spencer, Benjamin A.; Brown, E. Richard R; Chawla, Neetu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Questions and Answers About Female Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the radiation from a mammogram? Should I worry about this? Data from the atomic bomb survivors and other groups. The single most effective way a woman can detect early breast cancer is through routine mammography medical history · Physical exam which includes palpation of the breast and nearby lymph nodes · Imaging

195

Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention  

SciTech Connect

Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

Kwak, Mi-Kyoung, E-mail: mkwak@ynu.ac.k [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, 214-1 Dae-dong, Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kensler, Thomas W. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Narrow focus ultra-wideband antenna for breast cancer detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A narrow focus ultra-wideband dielectric-filled antenna has been designed for the purpose of near-field breast cancer detection without the use of coupling media. Instead of immersing the antenna in a lossy liquid coupling medium, direct matching of ... Keywords: antenna feeds, antennas, breast cancer detection, directional, radar-based imaging, ultra-wide band

Daniel M. Hailu; Safieddin Safavi-Naeini

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrative Genomic Approaches Identify IKBKE as a Breast Cancer Oncogene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. IKK3 acti- vates the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) path- way in both cell lines and breast cancers. These observations suggest a mechanism for NF-kB activation in breast cancer, implicate the NF-kB pathway

198

Lab Breakthrough: Nanomaterials Discoveries Lead to Possible Cancer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Breakthrough: Nanomaterials Discoveries Lead to Possible Cancer Lab Breakthrough: Nanomaterials Discoveries Lead to Possible Cancer Treatment Lab Breakthrough: Nanomaterials Discoveries Lead to Possible Cancer Treatment June 4, 2012 - 3:05pm Addthis Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What is a nano-bio catalyst? A nanoparticle that triggers specific reactions in cells. The particle attaches to unwanted (tumor) cells, and when researchers shine light on them, they kill the cells through oxidation.

199

Commentary Breast cancer and childhood anthropometry: emerging hypotheses?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this issue of Breast Cancer Research, Baer and colleagues report a strong protective effect of childhood and adolescent body fatness on premenopausal breast cancer risk based on a large prospective study. Methodological issues are discussed, as are tentative biological interpretations regarding the findings. In this issue of Breast Cancer Research, Baer and colleagues [1] report a strong protective effect of childhood and adolescent body fatness on premenopausal breast cancer risk. The report is based on the Nurses Health Study II, a prospective cohort study including 116,671 US female nurses, aged 2542 years at recruitment in 1989, in which 1318 breast cancer cases occurred during 12 years of follow up. There were slightly stronger associations between average childhood and adolescent body fatness and

Cecilia Mk Magnusson; Andrew W Roddam

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system for prostate cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prostate cancer affects 1 in 6 men in the USA. Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this "blind" biopsy approach can miss at least 20% of prostate cancers. ... Keywords: 3D ultrasound imaging, PET/CT, image segmentation, imageguided biopsy, molecular imaging, nonrigid image registration, prostate cancer, wavelet transform

Baowei Fei; Viraj Master; Peter Nieh; Hamed Akbari; Xiaofeng Yang; Aaron Fenster; David Schuster

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The improvement of breast cancer prognosis accuracy from integrated gene expression and clinical data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting the accurate prognosis of breast cancer from high throughput microarray data is often a challenging task. Although many statistical methods and machine learning techniques were applied to diagnose the prognosis outcome of breast cancer, they ... Keywords: Breast cancer prognosis, Cancer classification, Clinical data, Gene expression, Gene selection, Genetic algorithm, Support vector machine

Austin H. Chen; Chenyin Yang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

PROCEEDINGS Open Access The possible prevention of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prevention of the infectious diseases was accomplished long before there was any understanding of the molecular biology of bacteria and viruses. As for cancer, the sharp drop in frequency of the once-commonest lethal cancer, stomach cancer, was achieved without any contribution from biological research, and the current drop in lung cancer is the end-result of the observation by epidemiologists that most lung cancer is caused by smoking. So the basis for both these triumphs was essentially empirical and owed nothing to biological research. This paper discusses how molecular biology can now offer the possibility of large-scale protection against cancer. Article Research into cancer has in the past been largely managedbydoctorsandtheemphasishastendedtobeon finding new treatments rather than on prevention. But it is quite clear that life expectancy in the industrialised world had almost doubled by the time the first antibiotics were discovered [1], and this must therefore have been achieved by prevention of the major infectious diseases rather than by devising better forms of treatment.

John Cairns

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Review Genomic approaches to research in lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The medical research community is experiencing a marked increase in the amount of information available on genomic sequences and genes expressed by humans and other organisms. This information offers great opportunities for improving our understanding of complex diseases such as lung cancer. In particular, we should expect to witness a rapid increase in the rate of discovery of genes involved in lung cancer pathogenesis and we should be able to develop reliable molecular criteria for classifying lung cancers and predicting biological properties of individual tumors. Achieving these goals will require collaboration by scientists with specialized expertise in medicine, molecular biology, and decision-based statistical analysis.

Edward Gabrielson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

COMMITTEES 2012-2013 Academic Standing (CAS): Marlene Sandstrom, Chair, Dick DeVeaux, Nick Howe, Scarlett Jang, Ken Kuttner, Ngoni Munemo, Dave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

President for Facilities­TBA*, Fred Puddester*, Chris Winters*, Peter Skipper '13, Krista Pickett '13

Aalberts, Daniel P.

205

November 3, 2004 Dear Friends,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keough (Coca Cola), Karen Mills (Solera Capital), Fred Poses (American Standard), Sharon Patrick (Martha

Snider, Barry B.

206

The relationship of cognitive, emotional, and interpersonal factors to screening and health-promoting behaviors among sisters of breast cancer patients.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??While sisters of breast cancer patients are at increased risk for developing breast cancer due to their family cancer history and age, little research with (more)

Hartman, Sheri Jacobs

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Self-reported chemicals exposure, beliefs about disease causation, and risk of breast cancer in the Cape Cod Breast Cancer and Environment Study: a case-control study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2&1&0&1&6&0]. 34. Cape Cod Breast Cancer and the EnvironmentSpring Institute: Cape Cod Breast Cancer and Environmentbetween residence on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and breast

Zota, Ami R; Aschengrau, Ann; Rudel, Ruthann A; Brody, Julia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm Addthis Powerful X-Rays Enable Development of Successful Treatment for Melanoma and Other Life-Threatening Diseases WASHINGTON, DC - Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories is revealing new insights into diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to the swine flu, and, most recently, enabled the discovery of a groundbreaking new drug treatment for malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The drug, Zelboraf (vemurafenib), received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval on Wednesday. In showing the structures of diseased and

209

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging; trichothiodystrophy (TTD), characterized by brittle hair and scaly skin, is another form of greatly accelerated aging. At the ALS, researchers from Berkeley Lab and The Scripps Research Institute recently solved the structure of XPD. The structure gives novel insight into the processes of aging and cancer by revealing how discrete flaws-as seemingly insignificant as a change in either of two adjacent amino acid residues-can lead to diseases with completely different physical manifestations.

210

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging; trichothiodystrophy (TTD), characterized by brittle hair and scaly skin, is another form of greatly accelerated aging. At the ALS, researchers from Berkeley Lab and The Scripps Research Institute recently solved the structure of XPD. The structure gives novel insight into the processes of aging and cancer by revealing how discrete flaws-as seemingly insignificant as a change in either of two adjacent amino acid residues-can lead to diseases with completely different physical manifestations.

211

DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm Addthis Powerful X-Rays Enable Development of Successful Treatment for Melanoma and Other Life-Threatening Diseases WASHINGTON, DC - Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories is revealing new insights into diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to the swine flu, and, most recently, enabled the discovery of a groundbreaking new drug treatment for malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The drug, Zelboraf (vemurafenib), received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval on Wednesday. In showing the structures of diseased and

212

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging; trichothiodystrophy (TTD), characterized by brittle hair and scaly skin, is another form of greatly accelerated aging. At the ALS, researchers from Berkeley Lab and The Scripps Research Institute recently solved the structure of XPD. The structure gives novel insight into the processes of aging and cancer by revealing how discrete flaws-as seemingly insignificant as a change in either of two adjacent amino acid residues-can lead to diseases with completely different physical manifestations.

213

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging; trichothiodystrophy (TTD), characterized by brittle hair and scaly skin, is another form of greatly accelerated aging. At the ALS, researchers from Berkeley Lab and The Scripps Research Institute recently solved the structure of XPD. The structure gives novel insight into the processes of aging and cancer by revealing how discrete flaws-as seemingly insignificant as a change in either of two adjacent amino acid residues-can lead to diseases with completely different physical manifestations.

214

A Targeted Cancer Treatment using Nanomaterials | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When Roots Follow the Path of Least Resistance When Roots Follow the Path of Least Resistance Perfecting Catalytic Arrays A Stable Open Framework with Wide Open Spaces Pumping Through the Middle Crust Looking for Ways to Improve Vaccines Against the Deadly Rotavirus Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Targeted Cancer Treatment using Nanomaterials AUGUST 27, 2009 Bookmark and Share Optical fluorescent imaging of the TiO2-mAb binding to the single brain cancer cells. The bare titianium dioxide nanoparticle bonds with an antibody and attaches itself to brain cancer cells. When exposed to concentrated white light, the titanium dioxide creates free radicals of oxygen that cause the cancer cells to die. Image courtesy of Argonne

215

Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Print Thursday, 12 December 2013 11:55 ras protein The new class of inhibitors interacts with a specific mutation (Glycine to Cysteine) associated with a number of types of lung cancer. Mutations in the protein K-RAS are a very common cause for certain types of human cancers and are generally associated with a poor response to standard therapies. RAS, an abbreviation of Rat Sarcoma, is a nucleotide binding protein that responds to chemical signals (nucleotides). When in the "on" state, RAS activates other proteins, resulting in a cascade of biochemical processes; in the "off" state, RAS remains inactive. Mutations in the RAS

216

Evaluation of nanoparticles-based thermotherapy for cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under alternating magnetic field, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to generate heat for the treatment of cancer. With suitable coating, these nanoparticles are biocompatible, stable in solution, and ...

Wiryaatmadja, Edwina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 13, 2011 4:00 pm Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticle Medicines Mark E. Davis Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology CNMS D D I I...

218

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners  

SciTech Connect

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism...

220

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioscience Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of alterations in the human cancer genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aneuploidy, an abnormal complement of chromosomes, is present in approximately 90% of human malignancies. Despite over 100 years of research, many questions remain regarding the contribution of aneuploidy to the cancer ...

Carter, Scott L. (Scott Lambert)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Research Sheds Light on Workings of Anti-cancer Drug  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Sheds Light on Workings of Anti-cancer Drug The copper sequestering drug tetrathiomolybdate (TM) has been shown in studies to be effective in the treatment of Wilson...

223

Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

Belinsky, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmisano, William A. (Edgewood, NM)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Investigating immune surveillance, tolerance, and therapy in cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximizing the potential of cancer immunotherapy requires model systems that closely recapitulate human disease to study T cell responses to tumor antigens and to test immune therapeutic strategies. Current model systems ...

Cheung, Ann F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Arsenic Cancer Risk Assessment: Recent Advances & Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been an on-going debate on the appropriate regulatory approach for evaluating the carcinogenicity of inorganic arsenic compounds, specifically in the best methods and data sources for establishing a cancer potency, or cancer slope factor (CSF). The CSF is applied to the development of environmental standards, regulation and risk assessments under a variety of federal and state programs. Currently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to rely on chemical non-...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tanikawa C et al. Mol Cancer Res 8: 855-863, 2010. Tanikawa C et al. Cancer Res 69: 8761-9, 2009.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

p53 p53 30000 p53 Tanikawa C et al. Mol Cancer Res 8: 855-863, 2010. Tanikawa C et al. Cancer Res 69: 8761-9, 2009. Tanikawa C et al.Oncogene 28: 3081-92, 2009. Morioka K et al. Cancer Science 100: 1227-1233, 2009. Kidokoro T et al. Oncogene 27: 1562-1571, 2008

Katsumoto, Shingo

227

What is the probability that radiation caused a particular cancer  

SciTech Connect

Courts, lawyers, health physicists, physicians, and others are searching for a credible answer to the question posed in the title of this paper. The cases in which the question arises frequently stem from an individual that has cancer and they, or their next-of-kin, are convinced that a past radiation exposure - usually small - is responsible for causing it. An arithmetic expression of this problem is simple: the probability of causation by the radiation dose in question is equal to the risk of cancer from the radiation dose divided by the risk of cancer from all causes. The application of risk factors to this equation is not so simple. It must involve careful evaluation of the reliability of and variations in risk coefficients for development of cancer due to radiation exposure, other carcinogenic agents, and natural causes for the particular individual. Examination of our knowledge of these various factors indicates that a large range in the answers can result due to the variability and imprecision of the data. Nevertheless, the attempts to calculate and the probability that radiation caused the cancer is extremely useful to provide a gross perspective on the probability of causation. It will likely rule in or out a significant number of cases despite the limitations in our understandings of the etiology of cancer and the risks from various factors. For the remaining cases, a thoughtful and educated judgment based on selected data and circumstances of the case will also be needed before the expert can develop and support his opinion.

Voelz, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Carbon Ion Radiotherapy At Gunma University: Currently Indicated Cancer And Estimation Of Need  

SciTech Connect

Carbon ion radiotherapy for the first patient at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was initiated in March of 2010. The major specifications of the facility were determined based on the experience of clinical treatments at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The currently indicated sites of cancer treatment at GHMC are lung, prostate, head and neck, liver, rectum, bone and soft tissue. In order to evaluate the potential need for treatment in the region including Gunma prefecture and the adjacent 4 prefectures, an estimation model was constructed based on the Japanese cancer registration system, regular structure surveys by the Cancer Societies, and published articles on each cancer type. Carbon ion RT was potentially indicated for 8,085 patients and realistically for 1,527 patients, corresponding to 10% and 2% of the newly diagnosed cancer patients in the region. Prostate cancer (541 patients) followed by lung cancer (436 patients), and liver cancer (313 patients) were the most commonly diagnosed cancers.

Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, 3-39-22 Showa, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer  

SciTech Connect

A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

Vivekanandan, Nagarajan, E-mail: viveknaren@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India); Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessing interactions between the associations of common genetic susceptibility variants, reproductive history and body mass index with breast cancer risk in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium: a combined case-control study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7HT, UK. Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre, TheInstitute of Cancer Research, 237 Fulman Road, London,control study. Breast Cancer Research 2010 12:R110. Submit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Modulation of the HGF/c-Met/Akt and p38 cell signaling pathways by 3,3'-diindolylmethane in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24 and perillyl alcohol. Cancer research 68: 7439-in breast cancer cells. Cancer research 66: 4952-4960. 49.through the Akt pathway. Cancer research 60: 6841-6845. 66.

Nicastro, Holly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The prognostic significance of tumor cell detection in the peripheral blood versus the bone marrow in 733 early-stage breast cancer patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2008cancer patients. Breast Cancer Research 2011 13:R61. SubmitMolloy et al. Breast Cancer Research 2011, 13:R61 http://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

BAC-FISH assays delineate complex chromosomal rearrangements in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer *D. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature 1992;359:21-22. [LN. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature [4] Gembicki M,

Kwan, Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

An optimized five-gene multi-platform predictor of hormone receptor negative and triple negative breast cancer metastatic risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Unit, Guy s Hospital,metastatic risk. Breast Cancer Research 2013 15:R103. SubmitYau et al. Breast Cancer Research 2013, 15:R103 http://

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Cyclophosphamide- metabolizing enzyme polymorphisms and survival outcomes after adjuvant chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cohort study Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R26How- Gor et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R26 http://OS. Gor et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R26 http://

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

East-West Symposium on nasopharyngeal cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: To achieve greater understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, molecular oncology, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC), an international meeting was held in June 2005, Toronto, Canada. Results: Further insights were obtained into the role of EBV in NPC development, with its diverse effects ranging from proliferative signals via NF-kB, to immunesuppression, to angiogenic gene regulation. Subsequently, multiple pathways are dysregulated in NPC as revealed by expression array analyses, including apoptosis, integrin, and B-catenin cascades. Advances have been made in the diagnosis and monitoring of NPC, using transoral brushings and plasma levels of EBV transcripts, which may not directly correlate with the number of circulating tumor cells, but is nevertheless informative in predicting and tracking disease response. Many novel therapies have promising results, particularly in the areas of immunotherapies, and the exploration of molecularly targeted approaches such as cetuximab or histone deacetylase inhibitors. Conclusions: The results from large randomized trials and meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated the benefit of concurrent chemotherapy with curative radiation therapy, but at a cost of greater acute and late-tissue toxicities. Further advances are required to achieve an improved understanding on the inter-relationship between environmental and genetic determinants in NPC development, to reduce the global burden of this disease. At the same time, novel therapeutic approaches are necessary to increase curability of NPC, but with reduced long-term toxicities.

Liu, F.-F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada) and Division of Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Ontario (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)]. E-mail: Fei-Fei.Liu@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Frappier, Lori [Department of Microbiology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Kim, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); O'Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Hui, Angela [Division of Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Bastianutto, Carlo [Division of Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ozone, skin cancer, and the SST  

SciTech Connect

In 1971, the U.S. Congress cut off funding for development of supersonic transport aircraft prototypes when it was argued that the pollution created by SSTs could reduce the stratospheric ozone content and increase the incidence of skin cancer. At present, the theory of ozone depletion is in a rather uncertain state. Two examples of this are cited. First, ozone depletion may depend more on the availability of surfaces of aerosols and particles than on the content of chlorine. Second, it has been discovered that NO(x) can tie up active chlorine and thus reduce depletion from that source. We are therefore left with the paradoxical result that under certain circumstances SSTs flying in the lower stratospheric can actually counteract, at least partially, any ozone-depleting effects of CFCs. A recent study by scientists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory showed that melanoma rates would not be affected by changes in the ozone layer. If these results are confirmed, then much of the fear associated with ozone depletion disappears. It is difficult to tell how all this will affect a future supersonic transport program, since it is not clear whether a fleet of SSTs will increase or offset ozone depletion.

Singer, S.F.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort  

SciTech Connect

High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cancer and work in Canada with particular reference to occupational risk factors in breast cancer patients in one community and related selected research methods used to investigate those factors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cancer represents a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. There is no scientific consensus regarding cancer causality or prevention. Occupational exposure potentially remains a (more)

Brophy, James Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Worksheet  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Trading","NF",270,,,15700,15700 9130,"Hutchinson Utilities Comm",6,6,"Manitoba Hydro Power","NF",299,,,4535,4535 9130,"Hutchinson Utilities Comm",6,7,"MidAmerica...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Approaches to the Spatial Modelling of Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Metropolitan Perth, Western Australia, 1990 -2005.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cancer is one of potentially preventable and treatable diseases. Cancer analysis from different perspectives is necessary to provide the information for health research and the (more)

Shao, Changying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

How much is a health insurer willing to pay for colorectal cancer screening tests?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colorectal Cancer (CRC) screening tests have proven to be cost-effective in preventing cancer incidence. Yet, as recent studies have shown, CRC screening tests are noticeably underutilized. Among the factors influencing CRC screening test utilization, ...

Reza Yaesoubi; Stephen D. Roberts

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

APPLYING DATA MINING TECHNIQUES FOR CANCER CLASSIFICATION ON GENE EXPRESSION DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer classification through gene expression data analysis has recently emerged as an active area of research. This paper applies Genetic Algorithms (GA) for selecting a group of relevant genes from cancer microarray data. Then, the popular classifiers, ...

Jinn-Yi Yeh

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparative Oncogenomic Analysis of Copy Number Alterations in Human and Zebrafish Tumors Enables Cancer Driver Discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The identification of cancer drivers is a major goal of current cancer research. Finding driver genes within large chromosomal events is especially challenging because such alterations encompass many genes. Previously, we ...

Zhang, GuangJun

245

Editorial Breast cancer stem cell markers- the rocky road to clinical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lately, understanding the role of cancer stem cells in tumor initiation and progression became a major focus in stem cell biology and in cancer research. Considerable efforts, such as the recent studies by Honeth and colleagues, published in the June issue of Breast Cancer Research, are directed towards developing clinical applications of the cancer stem cell concepts. This work shows that the previously described CD44+CD24- stem cell phenotype is associated with basal-type breast cancers in human patients, in particular BRCA1 inherited cancers, but does not correlate with clinical outcome. These very interesting findings caution that the success of our efforts in translating cancer stem cell research into clinical practice depends on how thorough and rigorous we are at characterizing these cells. The cancer stem cell model, a concept initially proposed

Gabriela Dontu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparative meta-analysis between human and mouse cancer microarray data reveals critical pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of deregulated biomolecular pathways in cancer may be more important than identification of individual genes through differential expression. We have analysed data from 87 microarray datasets, spanning 25 different types of cancer, and ...

Pankaj Chopra; Jaewoo Kang; Seung-Mo Hong

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A general method for studying autocrine signaling and its impact on cancer cell growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autocrine signaling plays essential roles in providing self-sustaining growth signals to cancer cells. Since the introduction of the autocrine hypothesis in 1980s, the contribution of autocrine signaling in cancer medicine ...

Sampattavanich, Somponnat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

High-order chromatin architecture determines the landscape of chromosomal alterations in cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accumulation of data on structural variation in cancer genomes provides an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms of genomic alterations and the forces of selection that act upon these alterations in cancer. ...

Fudenberg, Geoff

249

Mechanistic studies of Gemcitabine-loaded nanoplatforms in resistant pancreatic cancer cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Pancreatic cancer remains the deadliest of all cancers, with a mortality rate of 91%. Gemcitabine is considered the gold chemotherapeutic standard, but only marginally improves life-span due to its chemical ...

Papa, Anne-Laure

250

Standard Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Inn, KGW, Liggett, WS, and Hutchinson, JMR (1984), "The National Bureau of Standards Rocky Flats Soil Standard Reference Material," Nuclear ...

251

Conference Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dennis Kelsh Meredith Newman Isabel Fisenne Dirk Gombert Thomas Hinton JM Robin Hutchinson Kenneth Inn John Leyba William Landing ...

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Adapting a Program to Inform African American and Hispanic American Women About Cancer Clinical Trials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to participate in medical research studies. Ann Epidemiolto participate in medical research studies. Cancer 91(1

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Highlights of the society for immunotherapy of cancer (SITC) 27th annual meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GA, USA. 14 Sidra Medical and Research, Centre, Doha, Qatar.Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. 12 Cancer Immunology Research

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional Information Planned radiation treatment Peregrine calculation from Mission Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). 'PEREGRINE, a hardware and software system that addresses the problem of radiation therapy dosage using fundamental physics principles, is a revolutionary new tool for analyzing and planning radiation treatment for cancer patients. About 90 percent of radiation treatment patients receive photon therapy, which is PEREGRINE's principal application. PEREGRINE may also be applied to the less frequently used electron-beam therapy and to brachytherapy, which is radiation therapy from an internally planted radiation source. It is effective for radiography, which predicts the pattern of radiation that is transmitted through a patient or other object.'1

255

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during cell division. Preventing topo II from disentangling a cell's DNA is fatal to the cell, which is why drugs that target topo II serve as agents against bacterial infections and some forms of cancer. This first ever structural image of topo II should help in the development of future antibacterial and anticancer drugs that are even more effective and carry fewer potential side effects.

256

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioscience Bioscience Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging; trichothiodystrophy (TTD), characterized by brittle hair and scaly skin, is another form of greatly accelerated aging. At the ALS, researchers from Berkeley Lab and The Scripps Research Institute recently solved the structure of XPD. The structure gives novel insight into the processes of aging and cancer by revealing how discrete flaws-as seemingly insignificant as a change in either of two adjacent amino acid residues-can lead to diseases with completely different physical manifestations.

257

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print Topo II: An Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs Print The veil has finally been lifted on an enzyme that is critical to the process of DNA transcription and replication and is a prime target of antibacterial and anticancer drugs. Researchers at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley, have produced the first three-dimensional structural images of a DNA-bound type II topoisomerase (topo II) that is responsible for untangling coiled strands of the chromosome during cell division. Preventing topo II from disentangling a cell's DNA is fatal to the cell, which is why drugs that target topo II serve as agents against bacterial infections and some forms of cancer. This first ever structural image of topo II should help in the development of future antibacterial and anticancer drugs that are even more effective and carry fewer potential side effects.

258

A novel cognitive interpretation of breast cancer thermography with complementary learning fuzzy neural memory structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early detection of breast cancer is the key to improve survival rate. Thermogram is a promising front-line screening tool as it is able to warn women of breast cancer up to 10 years in advance. However, analysis and interpretation of thermogram are heavily ... Keywords: Breast cancer diagnosis, Complementary learning, FALCON-AART, Fuzzy adaptive learning control network fuzzy neural network, Thermogram

T. Z. Tan; C. Quek; G. S. Ng; E. Y. K. Ng

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Contribution of the PALB2 c.2323C>T [p. Q775X] Founder mutation in well-defined breast and/or ovarian cancer families and unselected ovarian cancer cases of French Canadian descent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] mutation carrier fam carrier in family F1469. Abbreviations: bilateral breast cancer (Bi Br), cerebra melanoma (Mel), stomach cancer (Sto), and uterine cancer (Ut). Age at asce diagnosis of cancer. Tischkowitz et al. BMC Medical Genetics 2013, 14:5 Page 4...

Tischkowitz, Marc; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Hamel, Nancy; Pouchet, Carly; Foulkes, William D; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M; Tonin, Patricia N

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

EPA 402-R-93-076 ESTIMATING RADIOGENIC CANCER RISKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks 401 M Street S.W. Washington, DC 20460 #12;ii The scientific basis for this report has been reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging; trichothiodystrophy (TTD), characterized by brittle hair and scaly skin, is another form of greatly accelerated aging. At the ALS, researchers from Berkeley Lab and The Scripps Research Institute recently solved the structure of XPD. The structure gives novel insight into the processes of aging and cancer by revealing how discrete flaws-as seemingly insignificant as a change in either of two adjacent amino acid residues-can lead to diseases with completely different physical manifestations.

262

Design Ensemble Machine Learning Model for Breast Cancer Diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we classify the breast cancer of medical diagnostic data. Information gain has been adapted for feature selections. Neural fuzzy (NF), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), quadratic classifier (QC), each single model scheme as well as their associated, ... Keywords: Ensemble learning, Information gain, KNN, Neural fuzzy, Quadratic classifier

Sheau-Ling Hsieh; Sung-Huai Hsieh; Po-Hsun Cheng; Chi-Huang Chen; Kai-Ping Hsu; I-Shun Lee; Zhenyu Wang; Feipei Lai

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Prostate cancer grading: Gland segmentation and structural features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a novel approach to grade prostate malignancy using digitized histopathological specimens of the prostate tissue. Most of the approaches proposed in the literature to address this problem utilize various textural features ... Keywords: Benign, Carcinoma, Gland segmentation, Gleason grading system, Nuclei, Prostate cancer

Kien Nguyen; Bikash Sabata; Anil K. Jain

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Construction of SAGA HIMAT for carbon ion cancer therapy  

SciTech Connect

SAGA HIMAT is now under construction in Tosu city, Saga prefecture, Kyushu island, Japan. It will open in 2013 and become the fourth carbon ion beam cancer therapy center in Japan. It is a collaborative project among the local governments, industries and universities in northern Kyushu area.

Kudo, Sho; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Totoki, Tadahide [Ion Beam Therapy Center , SAGA HIMAT Foundation, 1-802-3 Hondori-machi, Tosu, Saga 841-0033 (Japan)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Investigation of a bladder cancer cluster in northwestern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Cancer maps from 1950 through 1979 revealed areas of high mortality from bladder cancer for both males and females in several northwestern Illinois counties. In order to further explore this excess, a bladder cancer incidence study was conducted in the eight counties comprising this region. Eligible cases were those first diagnosed with bladder cancer between 1978 and 1985. Age adjusted standardized incidence ratios were calculated for each county and for 97 zip codes within these counties. County results revealed no excesses. Zip code results indicated elevated risks in a few areas, but only two zip codes had significantly elevated results. One of these zip codes had a significant excess in males (standardized incidence ratio = 1.5) and females (standardized incidence ratio = 1.9). This excess was primarily confined to one town in this zip code, in which standardized incidence ratios were significantly elevated in males (1.7) and females (2.6). Further investigation revealed that one of four public drinking water wells in this town had been closed due to contamination; two wells were within a half mile (0.8 km) of a landfill site that had ceased operating in 1972. Tests of these two wells revealed traces of trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other solvents. Further investigation of this cluster is discussed.

Mallin, K. (Illinois Cancer Council, Chicago (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Reflections in Mutation Research Electric light causes cancer?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. And on a population level, there is a strong international correlation between estimates of per capita fat consumption) wasted energy, (3) harm to animal and plant life, (4) and perhaps increases in some severe human maladies dismayed by the recent reports that dietary fat consumption was unrelated to risk of breast cancer in women

Oliver, Douglas L.

267

Arsenic in drinking water and lung cancer: A systematic review  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to inorganic arsenic via drinking water is a growing public health concern. We conducted a systematic review of the literature examining the association between arsenic in drinking water and the risk of lung cancer in humans. Towards this aim, we searched electronic databases for articles published through April 2006. Nine ecological studies, two case-control studies, and six cohort studies were identified. The majority of the studies were conducted in areas of high arsenic exposure (100 {mu}g/L) such as southwestern Taiwan, the Niigata Prefecture, Japan, and Northern Chile. Most of the studies reported markedly higher risks of lung cancer mortality or incidence in high arsenic areas compared to the general population or a low arsenic exposed reference group. The quality assessment showed that, among the studies identified, only four assessed arsenic exposure at the individual level. Further, only one of the ecological studies presented results adjusted for potential confounders other than age; of the cohort and case-control studies, only one-half adjusted for cigarette smoking status in the analysis. Despite these methodologic limitations, the consistent observation of strong, statistically significant associations from different study designs carried out in different regions provide support for a causal association between ingesting drinking water with high concentrations of arsenic and lung cancer. The lung cancer risk at lower exposure concentrations remains uncertain.

Celik, Ismail [Department of Medical Oncology, Hacettepe University Institute of Oncology, Ankara (Turkey); Gallicchio, Lisa [Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Boyd, Kristina; Lam, Tram K.; Matanoski, Genevieve [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Tao Xuguang [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Shiels, Meredith; Hammond, Edward [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Chen Liwei [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Robinson, Karen A. [Department of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Caulfield, Laura E. [Department of International Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Herman, James G. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (United States); Guallar, Eliseo [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Alberg, Anthony J. [Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Hollings Cancer Center, and Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina (United States)], E-mail: alberg@musc.edu

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Genetic heterogeneity in breast cancer: the road to personalized medicine?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-F, Kingsbury Z, Wong ASC, Marass F, Humphray S, Hadfield J, Bentley D, Chin TM, Brenton JD, Caldas C, Rosenfeld N: Non-invasive analysis of acquired resistance to cancer therapy by sequencing of plasma DNA. Nature 2013, 497:108112. 27. Farquhar C, Marjoribanks...

Baird, Richard D; Caldas, Carlos

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

CANCER CELL : SEPTEMBER 2005 175 Clinicians often diagnose tumors based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-based positive feedback control loop exists that can impact cell proliferation. In this issue of Cancer Cell that changes of ECM structure or mechanics, such as whether the matrix is stiff enough to resist cell traction forces, might actively contribute to tumor formation (Ingber et al., 1981). Alterations of mechani- cal

Ingber, Donald E.

270

ORIGINAL ARTICLE FER kinase promotes breast cancer metastasis by regulating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with normal prostate epithelium and regulates prostate cancer cell proliferation by activating signal-integrin-dependent cell adhesion and anoikis resistance IA Ivanova1 , JF Vermeulen1 , C Ercan1 , JM of new intervention strategies. Here, we show that FER kinase (FER) controls migration and metastasis

Cai, Long

271

The Narrative Construction of Breast Cancer: A Comparative Case Study of the Susan G. Komen Foundation and National Breast Cancer Coalisions' Campaign Strategies, Messages, and Effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this research is to reveal the connections, contradictions, tensions, and paradoxes inherent in the narratives of breast cancer created by the Susan (more)

Olson, Amanda M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Quantitative Resolution to some "Absolute Discrepancies" in Cancer Theories: a View from Phage lambda Genetic Switch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is it possible to understand cancer? Or more specifically, is it possible to understand cancer from genetic side? There already many answers in literature. The most optimistic one has claimed that it is mission-possible. Duesberg and his colleagues reviewed the impressive amount of research results on cancer accumulated over 100 years. It confirms the a general opinion that considering all available experimental results and clinical observations there is no cancer theory without major difficulties, including the prevailing gene-based cancer theories. They have then listed 9 "absolute discrepancies" for such cancer theory. In this letter the quantitative evidence against one of their major reasons for dismissing mutation cancer theory, by both in vivo experiment and a first principle computation, is explicitly pointed out.

P. Ao

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact that the research project did not continue beyond its first year.

David G. Hoel, PhD

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

New synthetic derivatives of triterpenoids in the treatment of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18?-olean-1,12-dien-30-oate (?-CDODA-Me) and methyl 2-cyano-3,11-dioxo-18?-olean-1,12-dien-30-oate (?-CDODA-Me ) isomers are synthetic analogs of the naturally occurring triterpenoid glycyrrhetinic acid. The activity of these compounds as selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) agonists and as cytotoxic anticancer agents has been investigated in colon, prostate and pancreatic cancer cells. In colon cancer cells ?-CDODA-Me arrested the growth at G2/M and this was accompanied by decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 protein and mRNA and several Sp-dependent genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1 or Flt-1). ?-CDODA-Me also inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenografts. ?- CDODA-Me decreased expression of microRNA-27a (miR-27a), and this was accompanied by increased expression of two miR-27a-regulated mRNAs, namely ZBTB10 (an Sp repressor) and Myt-1 which catalyzes phosphorylation of cdc2 to inhibit progression of cells through G2/M. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells induction of two proapoptotic proteins namely nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug- activated gene-1 (NAG-1) and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) was PPAR? independent and required activation of kinases. ?-CDODA-Me also decreased the levels of androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) mRNA and protein levels. Thus the cytotoxicity of ?- CDODA-Me involved multiple pathways that selectively activate growth inhibitory and proapoptotic responses. Betulinic acid (BA), an inhibitor of melanoma is a pentacyclic triterpenoid natural product that induces apoptosis and antiangiogenic responses in tumors derived from multiple tissues. However, the underlying mechanism of action of BA is unknown. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells, BA acts as a novel anticancer agent by inducing proteasome-dependent repression of Sp proteins and Sp- dependent genes. The anticancer activity of the 2-cyano substituted analogs of BA, CN-BA and its methyl ester, CN-BA-Me was also investigated in colon and pancreatic cancer cells. Both CNBA and CN-BA-Me were highly cytotoxic and activated PPAR? and induced several receptor-mediated responses. The results clearly demonstrated that both the PPAR? agonist activities of CN-BA and CN-BA-Me were structure-, response-/gene- and cell context-dependent suggesting that these compounds are a novel class of selective PPAR? modulators with potential for clinical treatment of prostate, colon and pancreatic cancer.

Papineni, Sabitha

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

CANCER OF THE UPPER ALIMENTARY TRACT AND LARYNX IN POLAND AND IN POLISH-BORN AMERICANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Mortality for cancers of the buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus and larynx in Poland in 1959-72 was analysed and compared with cancer incidence regis-tered in the selected regions of Poland, with cancer mortality and incidence in other countries, and with mortality among Polish-born migrants to the U.S.A. The patterns of occurrence of these cancers in Poland appear to be similar to those of other European and American countries, except perhaps for the rather high and still increasing incidence of laryngeal cancer. Among male Polish migrants, however, mortality for these cancers was distinctly higher than either in Poland or among native Americans. This contrast, largest for oesophageal and laryngeal cancer, decreased between 1950 and 1959-61, but only for those aged below 65. Similarity of these shifts with those observed for lung cancer is stressed and explanations are looked for. Factors associated with the studied cancers and outlines for the further studies are discussed briefly. CANCERS of the upper alimentary tract and the larynx have been discussed

J. Staszew-ski

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PROCEEDINGS Open Access Occupational cancer in developed countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of occupational exposures have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. About one third of the factors identified as definite or probable human carcinogens were first investigated in the workplace and these exposures exact a considerable toll on working populations. There are many additional workplace exposures that are suspect carcinogens that require further evaluation to ensure a safe work environment. Information from occupational investigations is also relevant to the general population because many occupational exposures can be found outside the workplace. Much of our understanding about occupational cancer has been obtained from studies largely composed of white men in developed countries. The movement of industry from developed to developing countries underscores the need for future investigations to include more diverse populations. What do we know? Studies of exposures in the workplace have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs on the Evaluation of

Aaron Blair; Loraine Marrett; Laura Beane Freeman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

HPV & head and neck cancer: a descriptive update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

similar to tobacco smoke but actually has a greater concentration of the aromatic poly-carbon carcinogens found in cigarette smoke. Fur- thermore, cannabis is usually smoked unfiltered, allowing a greater concentration of toxin unfettered access... implicated in the aetiology of HNSCC, especially a low consumption of fibre and vita- mins in the form of fresh fruit and vegetables [11]. Oral hygiene and the state of dentition have also been linked to an increased risk of developing oro-pharyngeal cancer...

Goon, Peter K C; Stanley, Margaret A; Ebmeyer, Jorg; Steinstraesser, Lars; Upile, Tahwinder; Jerjes, Waseem; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Gorner, Martin; Sudhoff, Holger H

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Statistical analysis of end-points in cancer clinical trials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cancer and Clinical Oncology"), "International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics", "Journal of 20 Clinical Oncology", and "Radiotherapy and Oncology". Papers were identified from the contents pages and were studied provided they fulfilled... are used. Brief communications in letters and abstracts from meetings were excluded. A decision on the size of the survey was made after the first 20 papers had been studied as a pilot study. Two criteria were used. Firstly a minimum of 50 papers...

Campbell, Ian

280

External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

Dunn, Emily F., E-mail: dunn@humonc.wisc.ed [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Moody, John S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Moses Cone Regional Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice K Taylor, N Phan, ME Cybulski, L Laframboise, DR Boreham Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high dose rates using a linear no threshold model. Based on this approach, it has been postulated that human exposure to medical imaging involving low doses of x-rays and gamma rays increase an individual's risk of developing cancer throughout their lifetime. Conversely, there is evidence that low doses of gamma radiation increase the latency period of cancer depending upon genotype, cancer type, and the magnitude of

282

Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Extrahepatic Biliary Tract Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) for patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer treated with curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 168 patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer undergoing curative resection between August 2001 and April 2009. Of the 168 patients, 115 received adjuvant CRT (CRT group) and 53 did not (no-CRT group). Gender, age, tumor size, histologic differentiation, pre- and postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level, resection margin, vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, N stage, overall stage, and the use of adjuvant CRT were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors associated with LRC, DFS, and OS. Results: For all patients, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rate was 54.8%, 30.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the 5-year LRC, DFS, and OS rates in the CRT group were significantly better than those in the no-CRT group (58.5% vs. 44.4%, p = .007; 32.1% vs. 26.1%, p = .041; 36.5% vs. 28.2%, p = .049, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that adjuvant CRT was a significant independent prognostic factor for LRC, DFS, and OS (p < .05). Conclusion: Our results have suggested that adjuvant CRT helps achieve LRC and, consequently, improves DFS and OS in patients with extrahepatic biliary tract cancer.

Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae, E-mail: k2onco@ncc.re.kr; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Seong Hoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Supporting clinical processes with semantic web technologies: a case in breast cancer treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breast cancer surgery is carried out almost entirely manually and there is an obvious risk of human error due to temporary or occasional lack of staff experience (substitutions, sick leaves and other reasons). Another aspect is that the successful ... Keywords: OWL, SOA, automated decision making, breast cancer, cancer treatment, e-healthcare, electronic healthcare, electronic healthcare records, electronic medical records, monitoring, ontologies, ontology web language, patient safety, prognostic factors, semantic web, service-oriented architecture

Ainhoa Serna Nocedal; Jon Kepa Gerrikagoitia; Iker Huerga

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Breast cancer risk and environmental exposures. Environ Health Perspect 105:891896  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although environmental contaminants have potential to affect breast cancer risk, explicit environmental links to this disease are limited. The most well-defined environmental risk factors are radiation exposure and alcohol ingestion. Diet is clearly related to the increased incidence of breast cancer in developed countries, but its precise role is not yet established. Recent studies have implicated exposure to organochlorines including DDT as a risk factor for breast cancer in

Mary S. Wolff; Ainsley Weston

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

Henderson, Tara O., E-mail: thenderson@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Olive, Aliza [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Mertens, Ann [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Meadows, Anna [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hammond, Sue [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)] [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Whitton, John [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Inskip, Peter D. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Robison, Leslie L. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Diller, Lisa [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The association of polymorphisms in hormone metabolism pathway genes, menopausal hormone therapy, and breast cancer risk: a nested case-control study in the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study cohort. Breast Cancer Research 2011 13:R37. SubmitLee et al. Breast Cancer Research 2011, 13:R37 http://Lee et al. Breast Cancer Research 2011, 13:R37 http://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Pregnancy-related factors and the risk of breast carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teachers Study cohort Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R35SG, Ma et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R35 http://car- Ma et al. Breast Cancer Research 2010, 12:R35 http://

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

IL-27 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenic factor production in a STAT1-dominant pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013, 32:97 http://Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013 32:97. SubmitExperimental & Clinical Cancer Research 2013, 32:97 http://

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Analysis of 15 years of skin cancer in central Iran (Yazd)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation in center of Iran. Pejoohesh in medical scienceskin cancer in central Iran (Yazd) Mohammad Taghi NoorbalaScience University of Yazd, Iran. mtnoorbala@gmail.com

Noorbala, Mohammad Taghi; Kafaie, P

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Computational methods for analyzing and detecting genomic structural variation : applications to cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate whole human genome sequencing using reversibleson, S. , 2008: Rapid genome sequencing with short universalalterations in cancer. In Genome Sequencing Technology and

Bashir, Ali

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

Kulich, M., E-mail: kulich@karlin.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Sokolovska 83, CZ-186 75 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rericha, V. [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic); Rericha, R. [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic); Shore, D.L. [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)] [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, D.P. [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

BSA 09-12 & 13-11: Radiolabeled Vorozole for Breast Cancer ...  

BSA 09-12 & 13-11: Radiolabeled Vorozole for Breast Cancer Monitoring. ... Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, ...

294

The improvement of cancer management by the application of the currently available knowledge.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I have been intensively involved in the research on the application of currently available knowledge for the improvement of cancer care. This research covers the (more)

Barton, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 18 Lycopene and Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 18 Lycopene and Prostate Cancer Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf...

296

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Abstract The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high...

297

Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

Terenziani, Monica [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Casalini, Patrizia [Molecular Biology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Molecular Biology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Gandola, Lorenza; Trecate, Giovanna [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Catania, Serena; Cefalo, Graziella [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Conti, Alberto [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Massimino, Maura; Meazza, Cristina; Podda, Marta; Spreafico, Filippo [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Suman, Laura [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Gennaro, Massimiliano, E-mail: gennaromassimiliano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)] [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

Yordy, John S., E-mail: john.yordy@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Almond, Peter R. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

The role and regulation of Flice-Like Inhibitory Protein (FLIP) in cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cells in vitro .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Human ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Although cisplatin (CDDP) and paclitaxel are the first-line chemotherapeutic agents for ovarian cancer, chemoresistance is a (more)

Abedini, Mohammad Reza

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Development of in vivo Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of breast cancer and intra-operative margin assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. It is the most common cause of death in women ages 45-55. Optical techniques can potentially play a diagnostic role in several aspects ...

Haka, Abigail S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature 1992; 359: 21-22.LN. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature 5. Nikiforov YE.of children after the Chernobyl reactor accident. Int J

Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Lost Chapter in Korean History, Evolving Democracy, and an Opportunity for Peace and Security in the North Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the North Pacific By Fred Martin Korea a long sufferingLincoln. -O-O-O-O- Fred J. Martin, Jr. retired in 1993 asat Bank of America, Martin also served as Vice President-

Martin, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott ARPA-E Announces 2012 Energy Innovation Summit Featuring Bill Gates, Fred Smith and Lee Scott...

304

Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

Alizadeh, Moein [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre [Research Center, Department of Statistics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Generic Planning Target Margin for Rectal Cancer Treatment Setup Variation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To calculate the generic planning target margin (GPTM) for patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer placed in a prone position with a customized cradle for small-bowel exclusion. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 consecutive rectal cancer patients were treated for 25 or 28 fractions in a prone position using a cradle to maximize small bowel exclusion. Treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans were used to create orthogonally digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for portal image registration, which were compared with daily portal images from an electronic portal-imaging device (EPID). Translation values needed to align the DRRs and EPIDs were recorded for the superior to inferior (SI), right to left (RL), and anterior to posterior (AP) directions, and used to calculate the GPTM using the four-parameter model. Age, weight, and body mass index were tested compared with the setup variation using a Pearson correlation and a t test for significance. Gender versus setup variation was compared with a t test. Results: A total of 1,723 EPID images were reviewed. The GPTM was 10 mm superior, 8 mm inferior, 7 mm RL and 10 mm AP. Age and gender were unrelated to setup variation. Weight was significantly associated with systematic AP variation (p < 0.05). BMI was significantly associated with systematic SI (p < 0.05) and AP (p < 0.01) variation and random RL variation (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The GPTM for rectal cancer is asymmetric with a maximum of 10 mm in the superior, anterior and posterior dimensions. Body mass index may effect setup variation. Research using advanced treatment planning should include these margins in the planning target volume definition.

Robertson, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: jrobertson@beaumont.edu; Campbell, Jonathon P.; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Does Treatment Duration Affect Outcome After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The protraction of external beam radiotherapy (RT) time is detrimental in several disease sites. In prostate cancer, the overall treatment time can be considerable, as can the potential for treatment breaks. We evaluated the effect of elapsed treatment time on outcome after RT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and November 2004, 1,796 men with prostate cancer were treated with RT alone. The nontreatment day ratio (NTDR) was defined as the number of nontreatment days divided by the total elapsed days of RT. This ratio was used to account for the relationship between treatment duration and total RT dose. Men were stratified into low risk (n = 789), intermediate risk (n = 798), and high risk (n = 209) using a single-factor model. Results: The 10-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rate was 68% for a NTDR <33% vs. 58% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.02; BF was defined as a prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL). In the low-risk group, the 10-year FFBF rate was 82% for NTDR <33% vs. 57% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.0019). The NTDR was independently predictive for FFBF (p = 0.03), in addition to T stage (p = 0.005) and initial prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) on multivariate analysis, including Gleason score and radiation dose. The NTDR was not a significant predictor of FFBF when examined in the intermediate-risk group, high-risk group, or all risk groups combined. Conclusions: A proportionally longer treatment duration was identified as an adverse factor in low-risk patients. Treatment breaks resulting in a NTDR of {>=}33% (e.g., four or more breaks during a 40-fraction treatment, 5 d/wk) should be avoided.

D'Ambrosio, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, David Y.T. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

ORIGINAL PAPER A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- induced second malignancies, on Japanese atomic bomb survivors, and on background US cancer incidence and carcin- ogenic agent. As such, it is effective as a treatment for cancer, but can also induce secondary (&) Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th St., New York, NY

Brenner, David Jonathan

309

Network-based classification of recurrent endometrial cancers using high-throughput DNA methylation data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DNA methylation, a well-studied mechanism of epigenetic regulation, plays important roles in cancer. Increased levels of global DNA methylation is observed in primary solid tumors including endometrial carcinomas and is generally associated with silencing ... Keywords: DNA methylation, Steiner tree, cancer recurrence, classification, protein-protein interaction network, random walk

Jianhua Ruan; Md. Jamiul Jahid; Fei Gu; Chengwei Lei; Yi-Wen Huang; Ya-Ting Hsu; David G. Mutch; Chun-Liang Chen; Nameer B. Kirma; Tim H. Huang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An integrated algorithm for gene selection and classification applied to microarray data of ovarian cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: The type of data in microarray provides unprecedented amount of data. A typical microarray data of ovarian cancer consists of the expressions of tens of thousands of genes on a genomic scale, and there is no systematic procedure to analyze ... Keywords: Gene selection, Genetic algorithm, Microarray data, Ovarian cancer, Particle swarm optimization, Support vector machine

Zne-Jung Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Evaluation of cancer mortality in a cohort of workers exposed to low-level radiation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this dissertation was to re-analyze existing data to explore methodologic approaches that may determine whether excess cancer mortality in the ORNL cohort can be explained by time-related factors not previously considered; grouping of cancer outcomes; selection bias due to choice of method selected to incorporate an empirical induction period; or the type of statistical model chosen.

Lea, C.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Markers Combined Inhibin and CA125 Assays in the Detection of Ovarian Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: The reproductive hormone inhibin has been used as a diagnostic marker of ovarian mucinous and granulosa cell cancers. The aims of this study were to develop a new inhibin immunofluorometric assay (?C IFMA) to replace an inhibin RIA as a diagnostic marker of these ovarian cancers and to assess whether the ?C IFMA in combination with CA125, which detects serous cancers, leads to an improved biochemical diagnosis of all ovarian cancers. Methods: Serum inhibin concentrations were determined in healthy postmenopausal women (n ? 165) and women with ovarian cancers (n ? 154), using an inhibin RIA and an ?C IFMA, which detects inhibin forms containing the ?C subunit as well as the free ?C subunit. Results: The ?C IFMA gave a similar or better discrimination of mucinous (90 % vs 71%) and granulosa cell (100 % vs 100%) cancers compared with the inhibin RIA. Combination of CA125 and ?C IFMA values by canonical variate analysis or by multiROC analysis showed that the percentage of all ovarian cancers detected was significantly increased compared with either CA125 or ?C IFMA alone. Conclusions: The ?C IFMA shows a similar or better specificity compared with the RIA, but with increased sensitivity. In combination with CA125, the ?C IFMA provides an effective dual test for the detection of the majority (90%) of ovarian cancers.

David M. Robertson; Nicholas Cahir; Henry G. Burger; Pamela Mamers; Philip I. Mccloud; Kim Pettersson; Michael Mcguckin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Utilizing 2-NBDG Fluorescence to Study Hypoxia-Induced Changes in Breast Cancer Glycolysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· 2-NBDG is preferentially taken up in cancer over normal · 2-NBDG can be used to track changes-NBDG to track changes in glycolysis resulting from hypoxia Time after hypoxia OBJECTIVES APPROACH hypoxia study to a panel of human breast cancer cell lines of various receptor status (ER+, ER-, HER2

Ramanujam, Nimmi

314

Journal of Theoretical Biology 249 (2007) 518531 Second cancers after fractionated radiotherapy: Stochastic population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-studied carcinogen, followed by long-term monitoring. In addition to putative radiation initiation that produces pre Abstract When ionizing radiation is used in cancer therapy it can induce second cancers in nearby organs into human carcinogenesis, since the therapy involves administering well-characterized doses of a well

Brenner, David Jonathan

315

An optimal tumor marker group-coupled artificial neural network for diagnosis of lung cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Epidemiological statistics has shown that there are approximately 1.2 million new cases of lung cancer diagnosed every year and the death rate of these patients is 17.8%. Earlier diagnosis is key to promote the five-year survival rate of ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Diagnosis, Lung cancer, Tumor marker

Yongjun Wu; Yiming Wu; Jing Wang; Zhen Yan; Lingbo Qu; Bingren Xiang; Yiguo Zhang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Design and development of stacked patch antenna for breast cancer detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breast cancer affects many women, and early detection aids in fast and effective treatment. Mammography, which is currently the most popular method of breast screening, has some limitations, and microwave imaging offers an attractive alternative. The ... Keywords: breast cancer detection, stacked patch antenna, wide slot antenna

N. Mahalakshmi; N. R. Indira; P. Vasikaran

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system for breast cancer risk assessment and insurance premium assignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an agent-based system for distributed risk assessment of breast cancer development employing fuzzy and probabilistic computing. The proposed fuzzy multi agent system consists of multiple fuzzy agents that benefit from fuzzy ... Keywords: Breast cancer, Fuzzy probability, Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system, Insurance premium, Uncertainty

Farzaneh Tatari; Mohammad-R. Akbarzadeh-T; Ahmad Sabahi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microwave tomography for breast cancer detection on Cell broadband engine processors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave tomography (MT) is a safe screening modality that can be used for breast cancer detection. The technique uses the dielectric property contrasts between different breast tissues at microwave frequencies to determine the existence of abnormalities. ... Keywords: Breast cancer detection, Cell BE processor, Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD), Microwave tomography (MT)

Meilian Xu; Parimala Thulasiraman; Sima Noghanian

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the panel of breast cancer cell lines. Subnetwork enrichment of these genes has identifed 35 common regulators with 6 or more predicted markers. In addition to identifying epigenetically regulated genes, we show evidence of differentially expressed methylation patterns between the basal and luminal subtypes. Our results indicate that the proposed computational protocol is a viable platform for identifying epigenetically regulated genes. Our protocol has generated a list of predictors including COL1A2, TOP2A, TFF1, and VAV3, genes whose key roles in epigenetic regulation is documented in the literature. Subnetwork enrichment of these predicted markers further suggests that epigenetic regulation of individual genes occurs in a coordinated fashion and through common regulators.

Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Pro-neural transcription factors as cancer markers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.biomedcentral.com/1755-8794/1/17 We next sought to test the validity of Ascl1, neurotensin receptor (NTR2) and NTS as cancer markers in clinical prostate material from a distinct cohort of patients by immunohistochemistry (Figure 7A). NTS and Ascl1 were negative... bars above the heatmap. These sam- ples were tested for enrichment of malignant tissue types (Table 3). Malignant tissue samples enriching proneural signature sample groups are highlighted as coloured bars at the top of the heatmap. DDC NTS POU4F1 ASCL...

Vias, Maria; Massie, Charles E; East, Philip; Scott, Helen; Warren, Anne; Zhou, Zongxiang; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Neal, David E; Mills, Ian G

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis by binding to messenger RNAs (mRNA) and inhibiting translation. To initiate an investigation into the identification of miRNAs in the domestic dog, an emerging model for human disease, a comparison of the human and canine genetic databases was conducted. The bioinformatics work revealed significant conservation of miRNA genes between the two species. Proof of principle experiments, including serial dilutions and sequencing, were performed to verify that primers made to amplify human mature miRNAs can be used to amplify canine miRNAs, providing that the mature sequences are conserved. TaqMan Real-time RT-PCR, a sensitive and specific method, was used to isolate the first miRNA mature products from canine tissues. The expression levels of miR-17-3p, miR-17-5p, miR-18, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20, and miR-92 were evaluated in five canine tissues (heart, lung, brain, kidney, and liver). Because miRNAs have been found to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancer were compared between malignant canine mammary tumors (n=6) and normal canine mammary tissue (n=10). Resulting data revealed miR-29b and miR-21 to have a statistically significant (p<0.05) up-regulation in cancerous samples. Overall expression patterns showed nine of the ten miRNAs follow the same pattern of expression in the domestic dog as the human, while the miR-145 expression does not show a difference between the normal and cancerous samples.

Boggs, Rene' Michelle

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical outcomes are encouraging. Prospective comparison with more traditional approach is warranted.

Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guo Xiaomao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The State Cancer Profiles web site and extensions of linked micromap plots and conditioned choropleth map plots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Cancer Institute's State Cancer Profiles web site that was launched in mid-April put the power of new graphical tools into the hands of cancer control planners and the public. This paper emphasizes advances in two graphics templates, one ...

Daniel B. Carr; Sue Bell; Linda Pickle; Yuguang Zhang; Yaru Li

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Addressing colorectal cancer disparities: the identification of geographic targets for screening interventions in Miami-Dade County, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an analysis of spatial clustering of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The objective was to identify geographically based targets for colorectal cancer screening interventions for Blacks and Hispanic Whites, ... Keywords: SaTScan, colorectal cancer clusters, public health significance, screening disparities, stage at diagnosis

Recinda Sherman; Kevin Henry; David Lee

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

326

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to Routine Mammographic Screening Featured Project Description David J. Brenner, Steve Marino, and Charles Geard, Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York Summary: To obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Abstract: The aim of this work is to obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Given the increasing emphasis on clinical mammographic screening for breast cancer, it is of societal importance to provide realistic risk estimates with realistic confidence bounds for breast cancer

327

Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: mxy131@ncc.re.k [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Set To Save *and* AB 811Set To Save and AB 811 Energy Independence Program (EIP)gy p g ( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Office of Energy ManagementPatrick Conlon, Director, Office of Energy Management 73-710 Fred Waring Drive

Kammen, Daniel M.

329

AB 811 enables you to tailor a program that makes sense for your community and constituents. You determine the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information please contact: City of Palm Desert Office of Energy Management 73-710 Fred Waring Drive, Suite

Kammen, Daniel M.

330

1998 DARPA BN Transcription & Understanding Workshop ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Transcription, Francis Kubala, Jason Davenport, Hubert Jin, Daben Liu, Tim Leek, Spyros Matsoukas, David Miller, Long Nguyen, Fred Richardson ...

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

331

Image Windows - description of data types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... image, or RGB color image. cstack Stack of color (RGB) images. FRED (text) window; Dialog; (various) graphics windows.

332

Cancer-Associated IDH1 Mutations Produce 2-hydroxyglutarate  

SciTech Connect

Mutations in the enzyme cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are a common feature of a major subset of primary human brain cancers. These mutations occur at a single amino acid residue of the IDH1 active site, resulting in loss of the enzyme's ability to catalyse conversion of isocitrate to {alpha}-ketoglutarate. However, only a single copy of the gene is mutated in tumours, raising the possibility that the mutations do not result in a simple loss of function. Here we show that cancer-associated IDH1 mutations result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of {alpha}-ketoglutarate to R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Structural studies demonstrate that when arginine 132 is mutated to histidine, residues in the active site are shifted to produce structural changes consistent with reduced oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and acquisition of the ability to convert {alpha}-ketoglutarate to 2HG. Excess accumulation of 2HG has been shown to lead to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumours in patients with inborn errors of 2HG metabolism. Similarly, in human malignant gliomas harbouring IDH1 mutations, we find markedly elevated levels of 2HG. These data demonstrate that the IDH1 mutations result in production of the onco-metabolite 2HG, and indicate that the excess 2HG which accumulates in vivo contributes to the formation and malignant progression of gliomas.

Dang, L.; White, D; Gross, S; Bennett, B; Bittinger, M; Driggers, E; Fantin, V; Jang, H; Jin, S; et al.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

334

Studies of the mortality of atomic bomb survivors. Report 12, Part I. Cancer: 1950-1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This continues the series of periodic general reports on cancer mortality in the cohort of A-bomb survivors followed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The follow-up is extended by the 5 years 1986-1990, and analysis includes an additional 10,500 survivors with recently estimated radiation doses. Together these extensions add about 550,000 person-years of follow-up. The cohort analyzed consists of 86,572 subjects, of which about 60% have dose estimates of at least 0.005 Sv. During 1950-1990 there have been 3086 and 4741 cancer deaths for the less than and greater than 0.005 Sv groups, respectively. It is estimated that among these there have been approximately 420 excess cancer deaths during 19509-1990, of which about 85 were due to leukemia, For cancers other than leukemia (solid cancers), about 25% of the excess deaths in 1950-1990 occurred during the last 5 years; for those exposed as children this figure is nearly 50%. For leukemia only about 3% of the excess deaths in 1950-1990 occurred in th last 5 years. Whereas most of the excess for leukemia occurred in the first 15 years after exposure, for solid cancers the pattern of excess risk in apparently more like alife-long elevation of the natural age-specific cancer risk. 29 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

Pierce, D.A.; Shimizu, Y.; Preston, D.L. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Editorial Introducing Viewpoints Breast Cancer Researchs new style literature appraisal service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Literature awareness is an essential requirement for successful research. Breast Cancer Research has launched a new Viewpoints section, which replaces the Paper Reports section as a means of highlighting important research articles relevant to the biology of breast cancer and bringing them to the attention of the breast cancer community. 160 As publications on breast cancer (ranging from basic science through to results of clinical trials) continue apace, it is essential that those involved in the field are made aware of key developments. To facilitate this, Breast Cancer Research launched a Paper Report service in May 1999. The original format highlighted recent publications specifically relevant to breast cancer in the form of a short report. Each report, which was published on our web site, included a brief description of the research and comments from the reporter. The reports were based on articles selected by the reporter from a broad range of journals covering all areas of science relevant to research in breast cancer. Since the service began, we have published 188 Paper Reports on our web site

Valerie Speirs

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Role and expression of FRS2 and FRS3 in prostate cancer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by quantitative real time PCR in a panel of archival clinical prostate cancers using methods previously developed in our group [25]. Benign (n = 5), Grade 3 (n = 4), Grade 4 (n = 6) and Grade 5 (n = 9) tumors each derived from separate individual patients were... accelerates tumorigenicity of prostate epithelial cells. Cancer Research 1997, 57:5369-5378. 8. Freeman KW, Gangula RD, Welm BE, Ozen M, Foster BA, Rosen JM, Ittmann M, Greenberg NM, Spencer DM: Conditional activation of Valencia et al. BMC Cancer 2011, 11...

Valencia, Tania; Joseph, Ajay; Kachroo, Naveen; Darby, Steve; Meakin, Susan; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

DOE/EA-0965 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65 65 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE PREPARED BY U.S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY, CHICAGO FIELD OFFICE PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT D I V I S I O N AUGUST 1994 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product. process, or service by trade name, trademark,

339

Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Genetically engineered multivalent single chain antibody constructs for cancer therapy  

SciTech Connect

Current therapeutic approaches against the advanced stages of human solid tumors are palliative rather than curative. Many modalities, including, surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, either alone or in combination have met with only modest success for advanced metastatic cancers. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) combines the specificity of monoclonal antibodies with cytotxic effects of radioisotopes. It is the ?smart? way of delivering radiation to the known and occult metastatic cancer cells and is independent of drug toxicity and/or hormone resistance. The tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) containing the unique disaccharide sialyl-Tn, is highly expressed in majority of adenocarcinomas, including carcinomas of the prostate, breast, ovaries, pancreas and colon (80-90%) compared to undetectable expression in normal tissues. Monoclonal antibody CC49, reactive with TAG-72, after conjugation to potent gamma- and beta-emitting radionuclides, has been useful in selective systemic radiolocalization of disease and therapy of primary and metastatic tumor sites. However, limited therapeutic responses were observed in patients. Limited success of antibody based delivery of radioisotopes can be attributed to several factors including undesirable pharmacokinetics, poor tumor uptake and high immunogenicity of intact antibodies (IgGs). The primary factors contributing towards the failure of RIT include: 1) longer serum half-lives of the intact IgG molecules resulting in the radiotoxicity, 2) generation of human antibodies against murine antibodies (HAMA) that limits the frequency of dose administration, 3) poor diffusion rates of intact IgG due to the large size and 4) high interstitial fluid pressures (IFP) encountered in solid tumors. The major goal of our multidisciplinary project was to develop specific novel radiopharmaceuticals, with desired pharmacokinetics, for the diagnosis and therapy of solid tumors. To overcome the low uptake of radioactivity by tumors and to increase its tumor: normal tissue ratio for improved therapeutic index, we engineered a variety antibody constructs. These constructs were evaluated using novel approaches like special radionuclides, pretargeting and optimization. Due to the smaller size, the engineered antibody molecules should penetrate better throughout a tumor mass, with less dose heterogeneity, than is the case with intact IgG. Multivalent scFvs with an appropriate radionuclide, therefore, hold promising prospects for cancer therapy and clinical imaging in MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals. In addition, the human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) responses in patients against antibody-based therapy are usually directed against the immunoglobulin constant regions; however, anti-idiotypic responses can also be detected. The HAMA responses reduce the efficacy of treatment by removing the circulating antibody molecules, fragments, and possibly scFvs by altering the pharmacokinetic properties of the antibody. HAMA responses against divalent IgG, divalent Ig fragments, and possibly multimeric scFvs could cause immune complex formation with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions that could be harmful to patients. The use of small molecules, such as scFvs (monomeric as well as multimeric), with their shorter biological half-lives and the lack of the constant regions and humanized variable (binding regions) performed in our studies should reduce the development of HAMA. The generation of humanized and fully human scFvs should further reduce the development of HAMA. Specific accomplishments on the project are the production of large amounts of recombinant antibodies as they are required in large amounts for cancer diagnosis and therapy. A variety of single-chain Fv (scFv) constructs were engineered for the desired pharmacokinetic properties. Tetrameric and dimeric scFvs showed a two-fold advantage: (1) there was a considerable gain in avidity as compared to smaller fragments, and (2) the biological half-life was more compatible with RIT and RIS requirements. For RIT, delivery for sc(Fv)2 and [sc(Fv)2]2 in a fr

Surinder Batra, Ph.D.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MORPHOMETRIC SUBTYPING FOR A PANEL OF BREAST CANCER CELL LINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A panel of cell lines of diverse molecular background offers an improved model system for high-content screening, comparative analysis, and cell systems biology. A computational pipeline has been developed to collect images from cell-based assays, segment individual cells and colonies, represent segmented objects in a multidimensional space, and cluster them for identifying distinct subpopulations. While each segmentation strategy can vary for different imaging assays, representation and subpopulation analysis share a common thread. Application of this pipeline to a library of 41 breast cancer cell lines is demonstrated. These cell lines are grown in 2D and imaged through immunofluorescence microscopy. Subpopulations in this panel are identified and shown to correlate with previous subtyping literature that was derived from transcript data.

Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joe W.; Parvin, Bahram

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia  

SciTech Connect

Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States); Tekkel, M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

Zeng Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Yuan Zhu [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Zhu Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Li Lei; Shi Huashan [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Xiao Jianghong [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Li Zhiping, E-mail: lizhiping620312@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Effects of Radiation on Development of Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Hyperplasia in Canine Model Gayle Woloschak Northwestern University Abstract Purpose/Objective(s): There have been few studies analyzing radiation-induced prostate cancer in humans or animals. Our research attempts to fill this void by determining the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation on the incidence of prostate cancer and prostatic hyperplasia in a large cohort of beagle dogs. Material/Methods: The subjects for the experiment were beagle dogs, which were chosen due to physiologic and anatomic similarities to humans (Thompson, 1989). We retrospectively analyzed data from historic irradiation experiments conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on 347 beagles. The cobalt-60 cohort consisted of 268 dogs, which received whole

345

Cost-Effectiveness of a Mailed Educational Reminder to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

controlled trial of faecal-occult-blood screening forcancer with faecal-occult-blood test. Lancet 1996, 348:1467-by screening for fecal occult blood. Minnesota Colon Cancer

Lee, Jeffrey K; Groessl, Erik J; Ganiats, Theodore G; Ho, Samuel B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners. Progress report, March 1, 1991--November 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 2 Trans Fats and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 2 Trans Fats and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2

348

Targeted delivery of a cisplatin prodrug for safer and more effective prostate cancer therapy in vivo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Targeted delivery and controlled release of inactive platinum (Pt) prodrugs may offer a new approach to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the Pt family of drugs, which are used to treat 50% of all cancers today. ...

Dhar, Shanta

349

EA-0965: Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine, Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and equip the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC), which would be located on the Indianapolis campus of the Indiana...

350

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 9 Flaxseed, Lignans, and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 Flaxseed, Lignans, and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

351

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 11 a-Linolenic Acid and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 11 a-Linolenic Acid and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

352

A microfluidic platform for combinatorial synthesis and optimization of targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of nanotechnology to engineer drug delivery vehicles comprised of controlled release polymers with targeting molecules has the potential to revolutionize cancer therapy, among other diseases. Although a myriad of ...

Valencia, Pedro M. (Pedro Miguel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

Dunbar, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

Dunbar, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

Gourley, Paul L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

356

Resolving Cancer Heterogeneity by Single Cell Sequencing (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Xun Xu on "Resolving Cancer Heterogeneity by Single Cell Sequencing" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Xu, Xun [BGI

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Multimodal spectroscopy : real-time diagnosis of breast cancer during core needle biopsy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early detection of breast cancer is critical for improved survival. Currently, breast abnormalities are diagnosed based on a histopathological evaluation of tissue removed during core needle biopsy. Microcalcifications are ...

Volynskaya, Zoya I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Integrated analysis of breast cancer cell lines reveals unique signaling pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer is a heterogeneous disease resulting from the accumulation of genetic defects that negatively impact control of cell division, motility, adhesion and apoptosis. Deregulation in signaling along the EGFR-MAPK pathway is common in breast cancer, though the manner in which deregulation occurs varies between both individuals and cancer subtypes. We were interested in identifying subnetworks within the EGFR-MAPK pathway that are similarly deregulated across subsets of breast cancers. To that end, we mapped genomic, transcriptional and proteomic profiles for 30 breast cancer cell lines onto a curated Pathway Logic symbolic systems model of EGFR-MEK signaling. This model was comprised of 539 molecular states and 396 rules governing signaling between active states. We analyzed these models and identified several subtype specific subnetworks, including one that suggested PAK1 is particularly important in regulating the MAPK cascade when it is over-expressed. We hypothesized that PAK1 overexpressing cell lines would have increased sensitivity to MEK inhibitors. We tested this experimentally by measuring quantitative responses of 20 breast cancer cell lines to three MEK inhibitors. We found that PAK1 over-expressing luminal breast cancer cell lines are significantly more sensitive to MEK inhibition as compared to those that express PAK1 at low levels. This indicates that PAK1 over-expression may be a useful clinical marker to identify patient populations that may be sensitive to MEK inhibitors. All together, our results support the utility of symbolic system biology models for identification of therapeutic approaches that will be effective against breast cancer subsets.

Heiser, Laura M.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Talcott, Carolyn L.; Laderoute, Keith R.; Knapp, Merrill; Guan, Yinghui; Hu, Zhi; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Weber, Barbara L.; Laquerre, Sylvie; Jackson, Jeffrey R.; Wooster, Richard F.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Development of chemotherapies for hormone-dependent breast and prostate cancers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer is a leading cause of human mortality worldwide, and is expected to soon become the overall leading cause of death in the United States. Some cancers are hormone-related, including the sex-specific cancers of the breast (predominantly in women) and prostate (in men). In both cases, early stage tumors are responsive to inhibitory endocrine-based therapies. However, both cancers progress to hormone-nonresponsive states and this is in part due to altered properties of the primary nuclear hormone receptor signaling pathway (estrogen receptor [ER] in breast; androgen receptor [AR] in prostate). Other nuclear receptors are thus being investigated as therapeutic targets due to their crosstalk with hormone receptor pathways and these include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ?(PPAR?, retinoic acid receptor and retinoid X receptor (RAR/RXR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR). Previous studies have demonstrated that the AhR mediates chemoprotective, antiestrogenic, and tumoristatic effects in experimental models, and relatively non-toxic selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulators (SAhRMs) have been developed. Studies in this dissertation have investigated the therapeutic properties of a new class of compounds related to the SAhRM 3,3-diindolylmethane (DIM) in models of breast cancer. Additionally, the potential therapeutic role of the AhR in human prostate cancer cells has been investigated. Several ring- and methylene-substituted DIMs exhibited antiestrogenic and tumoristatic activities in breast cancer cells and in carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumors. At least some of the methylene-substituted DIMs act through PPAR?. The AhR is expressed in LNCaP and iv 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells and AhR agonists inhibit cell growth and AR-induced transactivation through pathways independent of androgen receptor downregulation.

Morrow, Michael Derek

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Radiation-induced cancer and its modifying factor among A-bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have conducted a long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 120,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and non-exposed controls since 1950. The most recent findings regarding cancer mortality and incidence in this cohort can be briefly summarized as follows: 1) An increase in leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors peaked 5-6 years after the bombing and has decreased with time thereafter. In addition to leukemia, the incidence of cancer of the lung, breast, esophagus, stomach, colon, thyroid, ovary, urinary tract, and multiple myeloma increases with dose. At present, there is no indication of an increase in cancer of the rectum or uterus among A-bomb survivors. In general, radiation-induced solid cancers begin to appear after the age at which they are normally prone to develop, and have continued to increase with time in proportion to the natural increase in mortality of the control group. 2) There are factors which modify the effects of radiation, such as age at the time of bombing (ATB) and sex. Sensitivity to radiation, in terms of cancer induction, is higher for persons who were young ATB in general, than for those who were older ATB. 3) There was no increase in childhood cancer among those exposed while in utero, but there is a recent indication of an increase in cancer incidence among these persons as they age. 4) There seems to be no interaction in a multiplicative way between radiation and smoking and lung cancer induction.

Kato, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Radioimmunoguided surgery using iodine 125 B72. 3 in patients with colorectal cancer  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary data using B72.3 murine monoclonal antibody labeled with iodine 125 suggested that both clinically apparent as well as occult sites of colorectal cancer could be identified intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma detecting probe. We report the preliminary data of a multicenter trial of this approach in patients with primary or recurrent colorectal cancer. One hundred four patients with primary, suspected, or known recurrent colorectal cancer received an intravenous infusion of 1 mg of B72.3 monoclonal antibody radiolabeled with 7.4 x 10 Bq of iodine 125. Twenty-six patients with primary colorectal cancer and 72 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer were examined. Using the gamma detecting probe, 78% of the patients had localization of the antibody in their tumor; this included 75% of primary tumor sites and 63% of all recurrent tumor sites; 9.2% of all tumor sites identified represented occult sites detected only with the gamma detecting probe. The overall sensitivity was 77% and a predictive value of a positive detection was 78%. A total of 30 occult sites in 26 patients were identified. In patients with recurrent cancer, the antibody study provided unique data that precluded resection in 10 patients, and in another eight patients it extended the potentially curative procedure.

Cohen, A.M.; Martin, E.W. Jr.; Lavery, I.; Daly, J.; Sardi, A.; Aitken, D.; Bland, K.; Mojzisik, C.; Hinkle, G. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior-inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT-contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Estimation of radiation-induced cancer from three-dimensional dose distributions: Concept of organ equivalent dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Estimates of secondary cancer risk after radiotherapy are becoming more important for comparative treatment planning. Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate three-dimensional dose distributions for each individual patient. These data open up new possibilities for more precise estimates of secondary cancer incidence rates in the irradiated organs. We report a new method to estimate organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates. The concept of an organ equivalent dose (OED) for radiation-induced cancer assumes that any two dose distributions in an organ are equivalent if they cause the same radiation-induced cancer incidence. Methods and Materials: The two operational parameters of the OED concept are the organ-specific cancer incidence rate at low doses, which is taken from the data of the atomic bomb survivors, and cell sterilization at higher doses. The effect of cell sterilization in various organs was estimated by analyzing the secondary cancer incidence data of patients with Hodgkin's disease who were treated with radiotherapy in between 1962 and 1993. The radiotherapy plans used at the time the patients had been treated were reconstructed on a fully segmented whole body CT scan. The dose distributions were calculated in individual organs for which cancer incidence data were available. The model parameter that described cell sterilization was obtained by analyzing the dose and cancer incidence rates for the individual organs. Results: We found organ-specific cell radiosensitivities that varied from 0.017 for the mouth and pharynx up to 1.592 for the bladder. Using the two model parameters (organ-specific cancer incidence rate and the parameter characterizing cell sterilization), the OED concept can be applied to any three-dimensional dose distribution to analyze cancer incidence. Conclusion: We believe that the concept of OED presented in this investigation represents a first step in assessing the potential risk of secondary cancer induction after the clinical application of radiotherapy.

Schneider, Uwe [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: uwe.schneider@psi.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Ross, Dieter [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, City Hospital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, Barbara [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radio-Oncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

EPRI Comments on a UK Case-Control Study of Magnetic Fields from High Voltage Power Lines and Childhood Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A paper, entitled "Childhood cancer and magnetic fields from high voltage power lines in England and Wales: a case-control study," was published in the British Journal of Cancer on September 28, 2010. The authors assessed the association between exposure to EMF from power lines at the address of birth and childhood cancer. The current paper provides additional results to a study published earlier from the same data set in 2005. These EPRI comments provide an overview of study findings, conclusions, stren...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

366

Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of BRCA1/2. Breast Cancer Research 2011 13:R110. Submit yourStayner. The Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsdenis supported by Cancer Research UK Grants C1287/A10118 and

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Effects of BRCA2 cis-regulation in normal breast and cancer risk amongst BRCA2 mutation carriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

random hexamers and oligo-dT pri- mers, according to the manufacturers instructions. Breast cell lines culture Breast cancer (PMC42, MCF-7 and SUM-159) and nor- mal breast (MCF-10A) cell lines were cultured as pre- viously described [29... in the Chromatin Immunoprecipitation section. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) ChIP experiments were performed using chromatin extracted from SUM-159 (cancer), PMC42 (cancer), MCF-7 (cancer) and MCF10-A (normal) breast cell lines with antibodies against RNA...

Maia, Ana-Teresa; Antoniou, Antonis C; O'Reilly, Martin; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Dunning, Mark; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina N; McGuffog, Lesley; Domchek, Susan M; Embrace, Embrace; Easton, Douglas F; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana; Gemo, Gemo; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Faivre, Laurence; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Couch, Fergus J; Godwin, Andrew K; Caligo, Maria-Adelaide; Swe-brca, Swe-brca; Barkardottir, Rosa B; kConFab, kConFab; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Caldas, Carlos; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Ponder, Bruce AJ

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indiv. indiv. Gilbertetal. (Hanford & Combined) Gilbertetal.on both radiation and the Hanford facility. The data used toG. Radiation exposures of Hanford workers dying from cancer

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 11 Retinoids and Carotenoids as Cancer Chemopreventive Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 11 Retinoids and Carotenoids as Cancer Chemopreventive Agents Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

370

Cervicopectoral flap in head and neck cancer surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Copcu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Flapsreconstructionhead neckcancercarcinomatumorcosmesis Background: Reconstruction of the head and neck after adequate resection of primary tumor and neck dissection is a challenge. It should be performed at one sitting in advanced tumors. Defects caused by the resection should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Cervicopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the cheek defects. Methods: This study included twelve patients presenting with cancer of the head and neck to Izmir Ataturk Training Hospital and Adnan Menderes University Hospital. Tumor resection and neck dissection was performed in one session by the same surgeon. A single incision was made and a medially based cervicopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure in neck dissection and for closure of defects after tumor resection. Results: There was no major complication. Two flaps had partial superficial epidermolysis at the

Technical Innovations; Eray Copcu; Kubilay Metin; Alper Aktas; Nazan S Sivrioglu; Ycel ztan; Nazan S Sivrioglu; Ycel ztan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

3.0 CANCER RISKS FROM ON-SITE EXPOSURE This chapter examines the potential scenarios, exposure pathways, and risks of cancer to humans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pathways, and risks of cancer to humans that may be posed by exposure to TENORM from abandoned uranium mine of uranium mine TENORM wastes,1 there are several possible exposure scenarios for humans to the various, the primary exposure scenarios to TENORM wastes at uranium mines would involve recreational use of the site

372

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs.

Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Izumi, Shizue; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ron, E.; Tokunaga, Masayoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sachio (Hiroshima City Medical Association (Japan)); Sugimoto, Sumio (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Percentage of Cancer Volume in Biopsy Cores Is Prognostic for Prostate Cancer Death and Overall Survival in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the percentage of cancer volume (PCV) in needle biopsy specimens for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for 599 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy to a minimal planning target volume dose of 75 Gy (range, 75-79.2). We assessed the effect of PCV and the pretreatment and treatment-related factors on the freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: The median number of biopsy cores was 7 (interquartile range, 6-12), median PCV was 10% (interquartile range, 2.5-25%), and median follow-up was 62 months. The PCV correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group and individual risk features, including T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores. On log-rank analysis, the PCV stratified by quartile was prognostic for all endpoints, including overall survival. In addition, the PCV was a stronger prognostic factor than the percentage of positive biopsy cores when the two metrics were analyzed together. On multivariate analysis, the PCV predicted a worse outcome for all endpoints, including freedom from biochemical failure, (hazard ratio, 1.9; p = .0035), freedom from metastasis (hazard ratio, 1.7, p = .09), cause-specific survival (hazard ratio, 3.9, p = .014), and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.8, p = .02). Conclusions: For patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy, the volume of cancer in the biopsy specimen adds prognostic value for clinically relevant endpoints, particularly in intermediate- and high-risk patients. Although the PCV determination is more arduous than the percentage of positive biopsy cores, it provides superior risk stratification.

Vance, Sean M.; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schulyer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mechanisms of Action of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in Colon Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and their NO derivatives (NO-NSAIDs), and synthetic analogs are highly effective as anticancer agents that exhibit relatively low toxicity compared to most clinically used drugs. However, the mechanisms of action for NSAIDs and NO-NSAIDs are not well defined and this has restricted their clinical applications and applications for combined therapies. Earlier studies from our laboratory reported that specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors (Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4) are overexpressed in several types of human cancers including colon cancer and many Sp-regulated genes are pro-oncogenic and individual targets for cancer chemotherapy. Based on published results showing that NSAIDs downregulate several putative Sp-regulated genes, we hypothesized that the anticancer properties of NSAIDs may be due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. NSAIDs including aspirin and tolfenamic acid (TA) and nitro derivatives of NSAIDs such as GT-094 have been investigated in colon cancer cells and in vivo xenograft models. Aspirin and TA induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and tumor growth in vivo and downregulated genes associated with cell growth, survival, and angiogenesis. Previous RNA interference studies in this laboratory have shown that many of these genes are regulated, in part, by Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 that are overexpressed in colon and other cancer cell lines. Not surprisingly, these NSAIDs also decreased Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and Sp-regulated gene products in colon cancer cells and this was due to caspase-dependent proteolysis of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins. Aspirin-induced activation of caspases and degradation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to sequestration of zinc and could be reversed by addition of zinc sulphate, whereas TA mediated induction of caspases was independent of zinc ions and is currently being investigated. GT-094 is a novel NO chimera-containing NSAID, which also inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis; these effects were accompanied by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and were reversed after cotreatment with the antioxidant glutathione. GT-094 also downregulated Sp and Sp-dependent gene products and was due to decreased expression of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) and induction of ZBTB10, an Sp transcriptional repressor that is regulated by miR-27a in colon cancer cells. Moreover, the effects of GT-094 on Sp1, Sp3, Sp4, miR-27a and ZBTB10 were also inhibited by glutathione suggesting that the anticancer activity of GT-094 in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to ROS-dependent disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10. The importance of ROS induction in targeting Sp transcription factors was also confirmed using pro-oxidants such as ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide and t-butyl hydroperoxide and similar results have been observed in collaborative studies with other ROS inducers in colon cancer cells. Many cancer cell lines and tumors exhibit addiction to non-oncogenes such as Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 for maintaining the oncogenic phenotype and future research will focus on the mechanisms of ROS-mediated targeting of Sp transcription factors which represents a novel approach for cancer chemotherapy.

Pathi, Satya

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk Title Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goth-Goldstein, Regine, Marion L. Russell, Donghui Li, Ana P. Müller, Maira Caleffi, Joao Eschiletti, Marcia Graudenz, and Michael D. Sohn Date Published 04/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This study investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) increases breast cancer risk. PAHs are products of incomplete burning of organic matter and are present in cigarette smoke, ambient air, drinking water, and diet. PAHs require metabolic transformation to bind to DNA, causing DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and are thought to be an important pre-cancer marker. In breast tissue, PAHs appear to be metabolized to their cancer-causing form primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Because the genotoxic impact of PAH depends on their metabolism, we hypothesized that high CYP1B1 enzyme levels result in increased formation of PAH-DNA adducts in breast tissue, leading to increased development of breast cancer. We have investigated molecular mechanisms of the relationship between PAH exposure, CYP1B1 expression and breast cancer risk in a clinic-based case-control study. We collected histologically normal breast tissue from 56 women (43 cases and 13 controls) undergoing breast surgery and analyzed these specimens for CYP1B1 genotype, PAH-DNA adducts and CYP1B1 gene expression. We did not detect any difference in aromatic DNA adduct levels of cases and controls, only between smokers and non-smokers. CYP1B1 transcript levels were slightly lower in controls than cases, but the difference was not statistically significant. We found no correlation between the levels of CYP1B1 expression and DNA adducts. If CYP1B1 has any role in breast cancer etiology it might be through its metabolism of estrogen rather than its metabolism of PAHs. However, due to the lack of statistical power these results should be interpreted with caution

376

The Rise Of Public Sector Unionism In Detroit, 1947-1967.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 1947, the Michigan Legislature passed into law the Hutchinson Act banning strikes of state and local workers. The law provided for the termination of (more)

Jones, Louis Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Publications Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Seismic Performance of Masonry Walls With Bed Joint Reinforcement Published: 7/1/1998 Authors: AE Schultz, RS Hutchinson, Geraldine S Cheok ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

378

Lightweight Alloys for Aerospace Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

C.R. Hutchinson, X. Fan, S.J. Pennycook and G.J. Shiflet. Improving Recrystallization Resistance in Wrought Aluminum Alloys with. Scandium Addition .

379

Case-control study of cancer among Du Pont employees with potential for exposure to dimethylformamide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case-control study was undertaken to determine whether the risk of developing cancers of the buccal cavity and pharynx (N = 39), liver (N = 6), prostate (N = 43), testis (N = 11), or malignant melanoma of the skin (N = 39) is related to exposure to dimethylformamide (DMF). Case and control subjects were obtained from four Du Pont plants. DMF is produced at one plant and used at the other three. Cancer cases identified from the company Cancer Registry comprise those reported among active male employees at the study plants during 1956 to 1985. For each case, two control subjects were selected, matched on sex, payroll class (wage or salary), birth year, and plant. To determine whether an employee could have been exposed to DMF during his career at the plant, all jobs with potential for exposure to DMF were identified. Each job was assigned an exposure ranking based on DMF industrial hygiene air monitoring, DMF metabolite (measured as N-methylformamide in urine) monitoring, and knowledge of the evolution of manufacturing processes and workplace exposure controls. Each employee's DMF exposure pattern was then characterized as (a) ever v never having been exposed to DMF and (b) highest DMF exposure experienced. Summary analyses for all plants combined showed no statistically significant association between ever having been exposed to DMF and subsequent development of cancers of the buccal cavity and pharynx, liver, malignant melanoma, prostate, and testis. Examined by plant site, prostate cancer at one plant was significantly elevated, based on three case subjects exposed out of four.

Walrath, J.; Fayerweather, W.E.; Gilby, P.G.; Pell, S.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recursive Partitioning Analysis for New Classification of Patients With Esophageal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Background: The 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system does not include lymph node size in the guidelines for staging patients with esophageal cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine the prognostic impact of the maximum metastatic lymph node diameter (ND) on survival and to develop and validate a new staging system for patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: Information on 402 patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT at two institutions was reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses of data from one institution were used to assess the impact of clinical factors on survival, and recursive partitioning analysis was performed to develop the new staging classification. To assess its clinical utility, the new classification was validated using data from the second institution. Results: By multivariate analysis, gender, T, N, and ND stages were independently and significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05). The resulting new staging classification was based on the T and ND. The four new stages led to good separation of survival curves in both the developmental and validation datasets (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed that lymph node size is a strong independent prognostic factor and that the new staging system, which incorporated lymph node size, provided good prognostic power, and discriminated effectively for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT.

Nomura, Motoo, E-mail: excell@hkg.odn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan) [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan); Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Shitara, Kohei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kondoh, Chihiro; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Minoru [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan); Muro, Kei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Sawada, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

doi:10.1155/2010/953537 Review Article Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, ?-, ?-, and ?-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients. 1.

Internal Radiotherapy; Gann Ting; Chih-hsien Chang; Hsin-ell Wang; Te-wei Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Phosphoglycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) in the Human Placenta .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Multidrug resistance phosphoglycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) were first isolated in chemoresistant cancer cells and have since been found in a variety (more)

Rainey, Jenna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Estimating Cardiac Exposure From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the value of maximum heart distance (MHD) in predicting the dose and biologically effective dose (BED) to the heart and the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery for left-tangential breast or chest wall irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 consecutive breast cancer patients given adjuvant left-tangential irradiation at a large U.K. radiotherapy center during 2006 were selected. For each patient, the following were derived using three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) planning: (1) mean dose and BED to the heart, (2) mean dose and BED to the LAD coronary artery, (3) MHD, (4) position of the CT slice showing the maximum area of the irradiated heart relative to the mid-plane slice, and (5) sternal and contralateral breast thickness (measures of body fat). Results: A strong linear correlation was found between the MHD and the mean heart dose. For every 1-cm increase in MHD, the mean heart dose increased by 2.9% on average (95% confidence interval 2.5-3.3). A strong linear-quadratic relationship was seen between the MHD and the mean heart BED. The mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED were also correlated with the MHD but the associations were weaker. These relationships were not affected by body fat. The mid-plane CT slice did not give a reliable assessment of cardiac irradiation. Conclusion: The MHD is a reliable predictor of the mean heart dose and BED and gives an approximate estimate of the mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED. Doses predicted by the MHD could help assess the risk of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity where individual CT-based cardiac dosimetry is not possible.

Taylor, C.W. [Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: carolyn.taylor@ctsu.ox.ac.uk; McGale, P. [Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford (United Kingdom); Povall, J.M.; Thomas, E.; Kumar, S.; Dodwell, D. [Yorkshire Centre for Clinical Oncology, St. James's Institute of Oncology, St. James's Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Darby, S.C. [Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford (United Kingdom)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield  

SciTech Connect

The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device.

Hood, Rodney C., E-mail: Rodney.Hood@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Wu, Q. Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Anti-inflammatory and Cytotoxic Activities of Mango (Mangifera indica L. var Keitt) Polyphenols in Cancer and Non-cancer Breast Fibroblasts in Vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide and polyphenols are under investigation as an alternative to conventional treatment approaches of breast cancer. The anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of polyphenols have been demonstrated in many studies, yet cellular targets and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The overall goal of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic properties of polyphenol compounds extracted from the mango variety Keitt in MCF-12A breast non-cancer and MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells by assessing the modulation of signaling pathways involved in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Mango polyphenols were identified by HPLC-MS analysis. The generation of reactive oxygen species was performed using fluorescence intensity in the DCFH-DA assay. Gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, and protein expression was conducted by Western Blotting and Multiplex Bead assay analysis. Bioactive compounds identified in the mango pulp by HPLC-MS included a great variety of polyphenols such as gallic acid, galloyl glucosides with different degree of polymerization and other polyphenols. The anti-inflammatory activities of mango polyphenols were evaluated in MCF-12A non cancer breast fibroblasts. An inflammatory microenvironment for MCF-12A breast cells was induced with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?). The generation of reactive oxygen species was suppressed significantly compared to cells induced with TNF-?, where there was no significant difference between the concentrations of mango polyphenol extract. Results showed a significant down-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory genes involved in the PI3K/AKT pathway and related downstream targets such as NF-?B and mTOR involved in biological processes including cell growth, proliferation and survival. Moreover, mango polyphenols had a significant impact on the miRNA-126-PI3K/AKT axis which plays an important role in inflammation and carcinogenesis, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory underlying mechanism. The cytotoxic effects of mango polyphenols were investigated in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Mango polyphenols decreased the production of reactive oxygen species; however no significant differences were found between the tested concentrations of mango polyphenols. The gene expression of proapoptotic factors involved in the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway such as cytochrome C and caspase-3 were significantly regulated after mango polyphenol treatment. In addition, the suppression of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and downstream effectors such as HIF-1? and VEGF as well as the disruption of the miRNA-21-PTEN/AKT axis were identified as potential underlying mechanism of the cytotoxic properties of mango polyphenols. Overall, findings from this study show that mango polyphenols counteract inflammatory and cancerous cell signaling processes; therefore the potential of mango polyphenols in the prevention of breast-cancer focusing on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR-axis should be further investigated.

Arbizu Berrocal, Shirley Heidi

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? An X-ray Vortex on the Horizon? How Two Drops Become One Scientists Discover How Nanocluster Contaminants Increase Risk of Spreading Mobile RNA is Poised and Ready Glass Does a Double-Take Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Protein that Repairs Damage to Cancer Cells MAY 5, 2008 Bookmark and Share The ABH2-DNA complex. A team of University of Chicago scientists has shown how two proteins locate and repair damaged genetic material inside cells. Because one of the proteins detects and repairs DNA damage that may result from a certain type of cancer therapy, the researchers raised the possibility of designing a molecule that could interfere with the repair process, making cancer

387

Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases 4.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases April 1, 2011 - 5:52pm Addthis Two structures of the Mre11-Rad50 complex were solved independently and overlaid, further revealing a flexible hinge in Rad50 near the Mre11 binding site | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Two structures of the Mre11-Rad50 complex were solved independently and overlaid, further revealing a flexible hinge in Rad50 near the Mre11 binding site | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Researchers discovered that a cell's speedy ability to repair damaged DNA relies on the remarkable flexibility of a molecular motor.

388

Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones  

SciTech Connect

The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The ACGT Master Ontology and its applications - Towards an ontology-driven cancer research and management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: This paper introduces the objectives, methods and results of ontology development in the EU co-funded project Advancing Clinico-genomic Trials on Cancer - Open Grid Services for Improving Medical Knowledge Discovery (ACGT). While the available ... Keywords: Cancer research, Clinical trial administration, Ontological engineering, Ontology, Translational medicine

Mathias Brochhausen; Andrew D. Spear; Cristian Cocos; Gabriele Weiler; Luis Martn; Alberto Anguita; Holger Stenzhorn; Evangelia Daskalaki; Fatima Schera; Ulf Schwarz; Stelios Sfakianakis; Stephan Kiefer; Martin Drr; Norbert Graf; Manolis Tsiknakis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Using support vector regression to model the correlation between the clinical metastases time and gene expression profile for breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Recently, the microarray analysis has been an important tool used for studying the cancer type, biological mechanism, and diagnostic biomarkers. There are several machine-learning methods being used to construct the prognostic model based ... Keywords: Breast cancer, Feature selection, Metastases time, Microarray, Support vector regression

Shih-Hau Chiu; Chien-Chi Chen; Thy-Hou Lin

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Meta-analysis of Genomic and Proteomic Features to Predict Synthetic Lethality of Yeast and Human Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal in cancer medicine is to find selective drugs with reduced side-effect. A pair of genes is called synthetic lethality (SL) if mutations of both genes will kill a cell while mutation of either gene alone will not. Hence, a gene in SL interactions ... Keywords: Cancer, Classification, Comparative genomics, Meta-analysis, Synthetic lethality, TCGA

Min Wu, Xuejuan Li, Fan Zhang, Xiaoli Li, Chee-Keong Kwoh, Jie Zheng

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform  

SciTech Connect

Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

Merckel, Laura G., E-mail: L.G.Merckel-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Bartels, Lambertus W., E-mail: W.Bartels@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Koehler, Max O., E-mail: max.kohler@philips.com [Philips Healthcare (Finland); Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den, E-mail: D.vandenBongard@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiotherapy (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel, E-mail: R.Deckers-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands)] [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Mali, Willem P. Th. M., E-mail: W.Mali@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: Christoph.Binkert@ksw.ch [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Moonen, Chrit T., E-mail: C.Moonen@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A., E-mail: K.G.A.Gilhuijs@umcutrecht.nl; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den, E-mail: mbosch@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

doi:10.1155/2012/373879 Review Article On the RET Rearrangements in Chernobyl-Related Thyroid Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. There is a consensus that Chernobyl accident has induced thyroid cancer increase in children and adolescents. The UNSCEAR report concluded that no somatic disorders other than thyroid cancer were caused by radiation exposure due to the accident except for acute radiation sickness occurred to the people within the Power Plant at the time of the accident. A hypothesis is discussed in this paper that the increase of thyroid cancer was caused predominantly by the screening, overdiagnosis, and registration of nonirradiated persons as Chernobyl victims. A mechanism of thyroid cancer overdiagnosis is described that can be active even today, causing hypertherapy. Older neglected tumors found by the screening shortly after the Chernobyl accident or brought from noncontaminated areas were misclassified as aggressive radiation-induced cancers. Therefore, supposed markers of the radiationinduced thyroid cancer, such as the RET rearrangements, are probably associated with disease duration and tumor progression. The screening effect is obviously dependent on the basis level of medical surveillance: the higher the level, the smaller the screening effect. Absence of any significant increase of thyroid cancer after the Fukushima accident in spite of the vigorous screening would certify the high level of health care in Japan especially for children. In some publications [1, 2], cause-effect relationships between radiation, certain genetic abnormalities, and incidence increase of the post-Chernobyl thyroid cancer (TC)

Sergei V. Jargin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of Xq27-28 Linkage in the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG) Families  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancer Linkage Consortium (Cancer Research UKGenetic Epidemiology Laboratory, St James University Hospital, Leeds, UK) BC/CA/HI Group: Raymond N. Balise1, Richard Gallagher2, Jerry Halpern1, Chih-lin Hsieh3, Laurence Kolonel4, Ingrid Oakley5, Dee West1...

Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Childs, Erica J; Cropp, Cheryl D; Schaid, Daniel J; Xu, Jianfeng; Camp, Nicola J; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Farnham, James M; George, Asha; Powell, Isaac; Carpten, John D; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Severi, Gianluca; English, Dallas R; Foulkes, William D; Mhle, Lovise; Mller, Pl; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas; Guy, Michelle; Edwards, Steve; Badzioch, Michael D; Whittemore, Alice S; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Stanford, Janet L; Karyadi, Danielle M; Deutsch, Kerry; McIntosh, Laura; Ostrander, Elaine A; Wiley, Kathleen E; Isaacs, Sarah D; Walsh, Patrick C; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Hebbring, Scott; Lange, Ethan M; Cooney, Kathleen A; Tammela, Teuvo LJ; Schleutker, Johanna; Maier, Christiane; Bochum, Sylvia; Hoegel, Josef; Grnberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Emanuelsson, Monica; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Valeri, Antoine; Cussenot, Olivier; Isaacs, William B; International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Role of Peroxiredoxin I in Rectal Cancer and Related to p53 Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is widely accepted for the treatment of localized rectal cancer. Although peroxiredoxin I (PrxI) and p53 have been implicated in carcinogenesis and cancer treatment, the role of PrxI and its interaction with p53 in the prognosis and treatment response of rectal cancer remain relatively unstudied. Methods and Materials: In the present study, we examined the levels of PrxI and p53 in rectal cancer patients using membrane arrays and compared them with normal population samples. To demonstrate the biologic changes after manipulation of PrxI expression, we established stable transfectants of HCT-116 (wild-type p53) and HT-29 (mutant p53) cells with a PrxI silencing vector. The predictive capacities of PrxI and p53 were also assessed by relating the immunohistochemical staining of a retrospective series of rectal cancer cases to the clinical outcome. Results: The membrane array and immunochemical staining data showed that PrxI, but not p53, was significantly associated with the tumor burden. Our immunochemistry findings further indicated that PrxI positivity was linked to a poor response to neoadjuvant therapy and worse survival. In cellular and animal experiments, the inhibition of PrxI significantly decreased tumor growth and sensitized the tumor to irradiation, as indicated by a lower capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species and more extensive DNA damage. The p53 status might have contributed to the difference between HCT-116 and HT-29 after knockdown of PrxI. Conclusion: According to our data, the level of PrxI combined with the p53 status is relevant to the prognosis and the treatment response. We suggested that PrxI might be a new biomarker for rectal cancer.

Chen, Miao-Fen [Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuan-Der [Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China); Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chung-Hung [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng [Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Huang, Wen-Shih; Chin, Chih-Chien [Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China); Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, Paul- Yang [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jeng-Yi, E-mail: wangcgmh@gmail.co [Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China); Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Changes in Initial Treatment for Prostate Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999-2007  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the absence of evidence from large clinical trials, optimal therapy for localized prostate cancer remains unclear; however, treatment patterns continue to change. We examined changes in the management of patients with prostate cancer in the Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective claims-based analysis of the use of radiation therapy, surgery, and androgen deprivation therapy in the 12 months after diagnosis of prostate cancer in a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare claims. Patients were Medicare beneficiaries 67 years or older with incident prostate cancer diagnosed between 1999 and 2007. Results: There were 20,918 incident cases of prostate cancer between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy decreased from 55% to 36%, and the proportion of patients receiving no active therapy increased from 16% to 23%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the most common method of radiation therapy, accounting for 77% of external beam radiotherapy by 2007. Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy began to replace open surgical approaches, being used in 49% of radical prostatectomies by 2007. Conclusions: Between 2002 and 2007, the use of androgen deprivation therapy decreased, open surgical approaches were largely replaced by minimally invasive radical prostatectomy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the predominant method of radiation therapy in the Medicare population. The aging of the population and the increasing use of newer, higher-cost technologies in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer may have important implications for nationwide health care costs.

Dinan, Michaela A.; Robinson, Timothy J. [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Zagar, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Scales, Charles D. [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Curtis, Lesley H.; Reed, Shelby D. [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Schulman, Kevin A., E-mail: kevin.schulman@duke.edu [Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient, impairment in sexual function may persist after the completion of therapy and merits further investigation.

Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Narang, Amol K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Hematology Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Reese, Jennifer B. [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gearhart, Susan L. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States) [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Azad, Nolifer S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chan, June; Olsen, Leah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Efron, Jonathan E. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p =}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)], E-mail: mwahab@med.miami.edu; Reis, Isildinha M. [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Hamilton, Kara [Division of Biostatistics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

Hu, Zhi (El Cerrito, CA); Kuo, Wen-Lin (San Ramon, CA); Neve, Richard M. (San Mateo, CA); Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

400

KISS1 and Its G Protein-Coupled Receptor (GPR54) in Cancer Progression and Metastasis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activation of G-protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) signaling generated by kisspeptins (endogenous GPR54 ligands encoded by KISS1 gene) has been known to regulate puberty and to suppress cancer metastasis. However, an endogenous GPR54 signaling in cancer progression is still unclear. This study demonstrates that an autocrine GPR54 signaling regulates breast cancer progression and metastasis. When MMTV-PyMT mice were crossed with Gpr54 heterozygous mice, Gpr54 heterozygosity attenuated PyMT-inudced breast cancer progression, including tumorigenesis and metastasis. Likewise, Gpr54 heterozygosity retarded in vitro primary tumor cell proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent growth, and in vivo tumor growth in SCID mice. Furthermore, the anchorage-independent growth was linked to dosage-depdent Gpr54 regulation of RhoA. Human KISS1 and GPR54 were abundantly expressed in benign breast tissue. In MCF10A normal human breast epthelial cells, knockdown of GPR54 or inactivation of RhoA reduced Ras-induced anchorage-independent growth, while consistutively active RhoA recovered Ras-induced tumorigeneity in GPR54-silenced cells. Therefore, this study suggests that autocrine GPR54 signaling via RhoA is sufficient for breast tumorigenesis. The major population of human breast cancer is estrogen receptor-positive (ER?). This study further demonstrates that a loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling in non-metastatic ER? breast cancer cells induces estrogen-independent tumor growth and metastasis with a morphological change. In MCF7 non-metastatic ER? human breast cancer cells, loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling by knockdown of KISS1 or GPR54 caused a morphological change with an alteration of epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) gene expression. Accordingly, silencing of GPR54 signaling by knockdown with KISS1 shRNA or GPR54 shRNA reduced cell proliferation, but enhanced cell motility and anchorage-independent growth. In addition, loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling caused E?-insensitivity. In xenograft tumor growth assays, the lack of autocrine GPR54 signaling caused E?-indpendent tumor growth. In the experimental metastasis mouse model, loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling promoted pulmonary metastasis. Thus, those data indicate that loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling causes estrogen-independent tumor growth and metastasis by promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Altogether, this study demonstrates that the autocrine KISS1-GPR54 signaling is sufficient for breast tumorigenesis and for suppressing ER? breast cancer metastasis.

Cho, Sunggook Gook

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

High-throughput analysis of chromosome translocations and other genome rearrangements in epithelial cancers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 448:561-566. 5. Stephens PJ, McBride DJ, Lin ML, Varela I, Pleasance ED, Simpson JT, Stebbings LA, Leroy C, Edkins S, Mudie LJ, Greenman CD, Jia M, Latimer C, Teague JW, Lau KW, Burton J, Quail MA, Swerdlow H, Churcher C, Natrajan R, Sieuwerts AM... . Howarth KD, Blood KA, Ng BL, Beavis JC, Chua Y, Cooke SL, Raby S, Ichimura K, Collins VP, Carter NP, Edwards PA: Array painting reveals a high frequency of balanced translocations in breast cancer cell lines that break in cancer- relevant genes. Oncogene...

Newman, Scott; Edwards, Paul A W

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electronmultiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposis sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual-wavelength fluorescence images were acquired using a targeted 111In- DTPA-K(IRDye800)-c(KRGDf) to selectively detect tumor angiogenesis and an untargeted Cy5.5 to image lymphatics. After acquiring the experimental data, fluorescence image-guided surgery was performed. Dynamic, multi-wavelength fluorescence imaging was accomplished using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF). Excitation light was used for reflectance images with a LCTF transmitting a shorter wavelength than the peak in the excitation light spectrum. Therefore, images can be dynamically acquired alternating frame by frame between emission and excitation light, which should enable image-guided surgery.

Kwon, Sun Kuk

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Low-coherence enhanced backscattering of light: characteristics and applications for colon cancer screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cooled atoms,5 liquid crystals,6 photonic crystals,7 amplifying materials,8, 9 and solar system bodies.10 system, we varied the spatial coherence length Lsc of the incident light from 200 µm to 35 µmLow-coherence enhanced backscattering of light: characteristics and applications for colon cancer

Pradhan, Prabhakar

404

Concurrent cisplatin, 5-FU, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Phase I-II data regarding neoadjuvant cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), paclitaxel, and radiation (PFT-R) from our institution demonstrated encouraging pathologic complete response (pCR) rates. This article updates our experience with PFT-R, and compares these results to our experience with cisplatin, 5-FU, and radiation therapy (PF-R) in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: We searched the Massachusetts General Hospital cancer registry for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy between 1994-2002. Records of patients treated with curative, neoadjuvant therapy were examined for chemotherapeutic regimen. Outcomes of patients treated with PF-R or PFT-R were assessed for response to therapy, toxicity, and survival. Results: A total of 177 patients were treated with neoadjuvant therapy with curative intent; 164 (93%) received PF-R (n = 81) or PFT-R (n = 83). Median overall survival was 24 months. After a median follow-up of 54 months for surviving patients, 3-year overall survival was 40% with no significant difference between PF-R (39%) and PFT-R (42%). Conclusions: Our findings failed to demonstrate an improvement in pCR or survival with PFT-R vs. PF-R. These results do not support this regimen of concurrent neoadjuvant PFT-R in esophageal cancer, and suggest that further investigations into alternative regimens and novel agents are warranted.

Roof, Kevin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: kroof@sero.net; Coen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lynch, Thomas J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wright, Cameron [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Fidias, Panos [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors. The RERF Life Span Study. Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

SciTech Connect

This article summarizes the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We focus primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1950 through 1985 based on recently revised dosimetry procedures. We report the risk of cancer other than leukemia among the atomic bomb survivors. We note that the number of excess deaths of radiation-induced malignant tumors other than leukemia increases with age. Survivors who were exposed in the first or second decade of life have just entered the cancer-prone age and have so far exhibited a high relative risk in association with radiation dose. Whether the elevated risk will continue or will fall with time is not yet clear, although some evidence suggests that the risk may be declining. It is important to continue long-term follow-up of this cohort to document the changes with time since exposure and to provide direct rather than projected risks over the lifetime of an exposed individual.

Shimizu, Y.; Schull, W.J.; Kato, H. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985  

SciTech Connect

An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Tokunaga, Masayoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Municipal Hospital (Japan); Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Number 23 1995 Los Alamos Science Radiation, Cell Cycle, and Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dial painters during the early part of this century and the sobering epidemiological studies of the atomic-bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki bear witness to the fact that ionizing radiation can insti- gate a variety of cancer types. The bomb survivors, for example, display a small but statistically significant

Massey, Thomas N.

408

Cancer mortality among a group of fluorspar miners exposed to radon progeny  

SciTech Connect

A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1984) of 1,772 Newfoundland underground fluorspar miners occupationally exposed to high levels of radon daughters (mean dose = 382.8 working levels months) has been conducted. Observed numbers of cancers of the lung, salivary gland, and buccal cavity and pharynx were significantly elevated among these miners. A highly significant relation was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of salivary gland (n = 2) and buccal cavity and pharynx (n = 6) cancers precluded meaningful analysis of dose response. Attributable and relative risk coefficients for lung cancer were estimated as 6.3 deaths per working level month per million person-years and 0.9% per working level month, respectively. Relative risk coefficients were highest for those first exposed before age 20 years. Cigarette smokers had relative and attributable risk coefficients comparable to those of nonsmokers. Relative risks fell sharply with age, whereas attributable risks were lowest in the youngest and oldest age groups. The results suggest that efforts to raise existing occupational exposure standards may be inappropriate.

Morrison, H.I.; Semenciw, R.M.; Mao, Y.; Wigle, D.T.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Dysregulated expression of Fau and MELK is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, UK Corresponding author: Gwyn T Williams, g.t.williams@keele.ac.uk Received: 10 Dec 2008 Revisions requested: 20 Feb 2009 Revisions received: 1 May 2009 Accepted: 11 Aug 2009 Published: 11 Aug 2009 Breast Cancer Research 2009, 11:R60 (doi:10.1186/bcr...

Pickard, Mark R; Green, Andrew R; Ellis, Ian O; Caldas, Carlos; Hedge, Vanessa L; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Williams, Gwyn T

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Evaluation of Breast Cancer Susceptibility Using Improved Genetic Algorithms to Generate Genotype SNP Barcodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic association is a challenging task for the identification and characterization of genes that increase the susceptibility to common complex multifactorial diseases. To fully execute genetic studies of complex diseases, modern geneticists face the ... Keywords: breast cancer,Single nucleotide polymorphism,SNP-SNP interactions,genetic algorithm

Cheng-Hong Yang; Yu-Da Lin; Li-Yeh Chaung; Hsueh-Wei Chang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Computational Modeling and Real-Time Control of Patient-Specific Laser Treatment of Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractAn adaptive feedback control system is presented which employs a computational model of bioheat transfer in living tissue to guide, in real-time, laser treatments of prostate cancer monitored by magnetic resonance thermal imaging. The system is built on what can be referred to as cyberinfrastructurea complex structure of high-speed network, large-scale parallel computing devices, laser optics, imaging, visualizations, inverse-analysis algorithms, mesh generation, and control systems that guide laser therapy to optimally control the ablation of cancerous tissue. The computational system has been successfully tested on in vivo, canine prostate. Over the course of an 18 min laser-induced thermal therapy performed at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) in Houston, Texas, the computational models were calibrated to intra-operative real-time thermal imaging treatment data and the calibrated models controlled the bioheat transfer to within 5 C of the predetermined treatment plan. The computational arena is in Austin, Texas and managed at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES). The system is designed to control the bioheat transfer remotely while simultaneously providing real-time remote visualization of the on-going treatment. Post-operative histology of the canine prostate reveal that the damage region was within the targeted 1.2 cm diameter treatment objective. KeywordsHyperthermia, Real-time computing, Medical imaging, Cancer treatment, Cyberinfrastructure, PDE

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Early Detection of Melanoma and other Cancers in Residents of Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to develop simple and inexpensive tests to screen for the presence of early stage cancer in the residents of Nevada with a particular emphasis on the membership of the Hotel Employee Restaurant Employee International Union (HEREIU) in Las Vegas. Our specific goals were: 1) to develop a clinical database of individuals with cancer and to create a biological specimen Collection and Storage Systems (the NVCI bio-bank); 2) to initiate screening of individuals for proteomic markers indicating susceptibility to or the presence of specific cancers, e.g. breast, ovarian, prostate and bladder. In addition, we proposed the implementation of novel digital imaging technologies to detect melanoma; 3) to genotype blood samples from individuals who consent to participate in IRB approved research studies using a high throughput single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) method based on optical thin-film biosensor chip technology; and 4) to conduct biostatistical analysis of clinical, demographic, genetic, proteomic and digital imaging data to stratify the population cohort into relative risk groups for cancers that are prevalent in Nevada.

David Ward, PhD and Nicholas Vogelzang, MD

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma-Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams, and Cancer Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics.

Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Apport en acides gras insaturs et risque de cancer du sein : revue des tudes pidmiologiques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the contributing food : neutral or beneficial for vegetable oil, rather deleterious for animal products. Contrary questionnaires alimentaires ou des marqueurs (plasma, érythrocytes, tissu adipeux). La relation entre apport en, erythrocytes, adipose tissue). The relationship between MUFA intake and breast cancer risk seems to depend

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

415

Augmented reality image overlay projection for image guided open liver ablation of metastatic liver cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents an evaluation of a novel augmented reality approach for the visualisation of real time guidance of an ablation tool to a tumor in open liver surgery. The approach uses a portable image overlay device, directly integrated into a liver ... Keywords: ablation, augmented reality, image guidance, metastatic liver cancer, projection

Kate Alicia Gavaghan; Sylvain Anderegg; Matthias Peterhans; Thiago Oliveira-Santos; Stefan Weber

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Image Analysis and Machine Learning Applied to Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, prognostic implications of the system were explored because the computer­analyzed features are very similar cancers, or had distant metastases at the time of presentation. One hundred twenty­four patients of the 166 patients developed distant metastases sometime following surgery or were followed a minimum of 2

Street, Nick

417

Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

SATB1 tethers multiple gene loci to reprogram expression profiledriving breast cancer metastasis  

SciTech Connect

Global changes in gene expression occur during tumor progression, as indicated by expression profiling of metastatic tumors. How this occurs is poorly understood. SATB1 functions as a genome organizer by folding chromatin via tethering multiple genomic loci and recruiting chromatin remodeling enzymes to regulate chromatin structure and expression of a large number of genes. Here we show that SATB1 is expressed at high levels in aggressive breast cancer cells, and is undetectable in non-malignant breast epithelial cells. Importantly, RNAi-mediated removal of SATB1 from highly-aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells altered the expression levels of over 1200 genes, restored breast-like acinar polarity in three-dimensional cultures, and prevented the metastastic phenotype in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of SATB1 in the less-aggressive breast cancer cell line Hs578T altered the gene expression profile and increased metastasis dramatically in vivo. Thus, SATB1 is a global regulator of gene expression in breast cancer cells, directly regulating crucial metastasis-associated genes, including ERRB2 (HER2/NEU), TGF-{beta}1, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and metastasin. The identification of SATB1 as a protein that re-programs chromatin organization and transcription profiles to promote breast cancer metastasis suggests a new model for metastasis and may provide means of therapeutic intervention.

Han, Hye-Jung; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI{sub 50}) concentration of 2.35 {mu}M. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

Lin, Y.-J. [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hou, Y.C. [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A. [Department of Life Science, National Tsing Hua University, HsinChu, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Jim J.C. [Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lai, C.-H. [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, B.-H. [Faculty of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wan Lei [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: leiwan@mail.cmuh.org.tw; Tsai, F.-J. [Department of Medical Genetics and Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, No. 2 Yuh-Der Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: d0704@mail.cmuh.org.tw

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

420

A supplement to the european guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006 the fourth edition of the European Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis was published by the European Commission Due to the fast developments in the field of digital mammography and the experience with digital mammography systems ... Keywords: mammography, quality control

Ruben E van Engen; Kenneth C. Young; Hilde Bosmans; Barbara Lazzari; Stephan Schopphoven; Patrice Heid; Martin Thijssen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Medical image diagnosis of liver cancer by feedback GMDH-type neural network using knowledge base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A revised group method of data handling (GMDH)-type neural network algorithm using knowledge base for medical image diagnosis, is proposed and applied to medical image diagnosis of liver cancer. In this algorithm, the knowledge base for medical image ... Keywords: Artificial intelligence, GMDH, Medical image diagnosis, Neural networks

Tadashi Kondo; Junji Ueno; Shoichiro Takao

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Residual Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated With Endocrine Therapy With or Without Radical Radiotherapy: A Side Study of the SPCG-7 Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 randomized trial demonstrated a survival benefit of combined endocrine therapy and external-beam radiotherapy over endocrine therapy alone in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. In a subset of the study population, the incidence and clinical implications of residual prostate cancer in posttreatment prostate biopsy specimens was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Biopsy specimens were obtained from 120 of 875 men in the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 study. Results: Biopsies were performed at median of 45 months follow-up. In 63 patients receiving endocrine treatment only and 57 patients receiving combined treatment, residual cancer was found in 66% (n = 41) and 22% (n = 12), respectively (p =}8). Endocrine therapy alone was predictive of residual prostate cancer: odds ratio 7.49 (3.18-17.7), p cancer-specific death 19% vs. 9.7% (p = 0.025). In multivariable analysis, biochemical recurrence was significantly associated with residual cancer: hazard ratio 2.69 (1.45-4.99), p = 0.002, and endocrine therapy alone hazard ratio 3.45 (1.80-6.62), p cancer was significantly associated with serum prostate-specific antigen recurrence, local tumor progression, clinical recurrence, and cancer-specific death in univariable analysis. Residual cancer was predictive of prostate-specific antigen recurrence in multivariable analysis.

Solberg, Arne, E-mail: arne.solberg@stolav.n [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Haugen, Olav A. [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Pathology and Medical Genetics, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Viset, Trond [Department of Pathology and Medical Genetics, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Bergh, Anders [Department of Medical Biosciences/Pathology, Umea University Hospital, Umea (Sweden); Tasdemir, Ilker [Department of Urology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger (Norway); Ahlgren, Goeran [Department of Urology, Malmoe University Hospital, UMAS (Sweden); Widmark, Anders [Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umea University Hospital, Umea (Sweden); Angelsen, Anders [Department of Urology, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and =}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy. Conclusions: Whole-breast IMRT is associated with very low rates of local recurrence at 5 years, 83%-98% 'good/excellent' cosmetic outcomes, and minimal chronic toxicity, including late fibrosis.

Keller, Lanea M.M., E-mail: Lanea.Keller@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sopka, Dennis M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

Nomura, Motoo, E-mail: excell@hkg.odn.ne.jp [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Shitara, Kohei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Hatooka, Shunzo [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan); Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei [Department of Clinical Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital (Japan)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Evaluation of Microscopic Disease in Oral Tongue Cancer Using Whole-Mount Histopathologic Techniques: Implications for the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To map the distribution of microscopic disease (MD) in head-and-neck cancer by analyzing digital images of whole-mounted serial sections of tongue cancer specimens. Methods and Materials: Ten T1-3 oral tongue cancer specimens were evaluated. The specimens were sliced into 3-mm blocks from which one or more 4-{mu}m slides were taken and digitized to create whole-mounted serial sections. Gross tumor and microscopic disease were digitally contoured on each slide. Lines perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) edge were created at 0.05-mm intervals and the distance between GTV and MD measured. Results: Of 88 slides assessed, 44 (50%) had evidence of MD. Of the 63,809 perpendicular lines drawn along the GTV edges, 2320 (3.6%) encountered microscopic disease along their path. The majority of MD abutted the GTV, and only 26.7% was noncontiguous with the GTV edge. The maximum distance from the border was 7.8 mm. Ninety-nine percent of all MD was within 4.75 mm and 95% was within 3.95 mm of the GTV. Conclusion: In this study we were able to assess the distribution of MD more accurately than has been possible with routine pathologic techniques. The results indicate that when the GTV is correctly identified, there is very little MD to be found outside this volume. This has implications for the volume of tissue resected at surgery and the volume included in the clinical target volume in conformal radiotherapy planning.

Campbell, Sorcha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Poon, Ian, E-mail: Ian.Poon@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Markel, Dan; Vena, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Higgins, Kevin; Enepekides, Dan [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rapheal, Simon; Wong, John; Allo, Ghassan; Morgen, Eric [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Khaoum, Nader; Smith, Ben; Balogh, Judith; MacKenzie, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Davidson, Jean [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Dan; Yaffe, Martin [Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

COMPACT CdZnTe-BASED GAMMA CAMERA FOR PROSTATE CANCER IMAGING  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high false-positive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera have been completed. The results show better than 6-mm resolution at a distance of 1 cm. Details of the test results are discussed in this paper.

CUI, Y.; LALL, T.; TSUI, B.; YU, J.; MAHLER, G.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.; VASKA, P.; DeGERONIMO, G.; O' CONNOR, P.; MEINKEN, G.; JOYAL, J.; BARRETT, J.; CAMARDA, G.; HOSSAIN, A.; KIM, K.H.; YANG, G.; POMPER, M.; CHO, S.; WEISMAN, K.; SEO, Y.; BABICH, J.; LaFRANCE, N.; AND JAMES, R.B.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

427

TRASH TO TREASURE: CONVERTING COLD WAR LEGACY WASTE INTO WEAPONS AGAINST CANCER  

SciTech Connect

As part of its commitment to clean up Cold War legacy sites, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated an exciting and unique project to dispose of its inventory of uranium-233 (233U) stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and extract isotopes that show great promise in the treatment of deadly cancers. In addition to increasing the supply of potentially useful medical isotopes, the project will rid DOE of a nuclear concern and cut surveillance and security costs. For more than 30 years, DOE's ORNL has stored over 1,200 containers of fissile 233U, originally produced for several defense-related projects, including a pilot study that looked at using 233U as a commercial reactor fuel. This uranium, designated as special nuclear material, requires expensive security, safety, and environmental controls. It has been stored at an ORNL facility, Building 3019A, that dates back to the Manhattan Project. Down-blending the material to a safer form, rather than continuing to store it, will eliminate a $15 million a year financial liability for the DOE and increase the supply of medical isotopes by 5,700 percent. During the down-blending process, thorium-229 (229Th) will be extracted. The thorium will then be used to extract actinium-225 (225Ac), which will ultimately supply its progeny, bismuth-213 (213Bi), for on-going cancer research. The research includes Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia at Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center in New York, as well as other serious cancers of the lungs, pancreas, and kidneys using a technique known as alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy. Alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy is based on the emission of alpha particles by radionuclides. 213Bi is attached to a monoclonal antibody that targets specific cells. The bismuth then delivers a high-powered but short-range radiation dose, effectively killing the cancerous cells but sparing the surrounding tissue. Production of the actinium and bismuth would be a private venture at no cost to the government. Isotek Systems, LLC, was commissioned by the DOE to execute the project, known as the 233U Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown Project. Isotek is a partnership between Duratek Federal Services, Burns and Roe Enterprises, and Nuclear Fuel Services. By pooling their pioneering experiences in nuclear engineering and design, nuclear recycling, and waste management, the partnership has developed a novel process to meet this clean-up milestone. The project is not only important for its cancer treatment potential, but also for setting the stage for reducing global threats through the down-blending of materials.

Nicholas, R.G.; Lacy, N.H.; Butz, T.R.; Brandon, N.E.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chronic cisplatin treatment promotes enhanced damage repair and tumor progression in a mouse model of lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemotherapy resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment, yet the mechanisms of response to specific therapies have been largely unexplored in vivo. Employing genetic, genomic, and imaging approaches, we examined ...

Oliver, Trudy Gale

429

Healthy Colon, Healthy Life (Colon Sano, Vida Sana): Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Latinos in Santa Clara, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorectal cancer . Fecal occult blood test . Latinos .to-date (UTD) with fecal occult blood test (FOBT); 66% wereLM (2001) Barriers to fecal occult blood testing and

Walsh, Judith M.; Salazar, Ren; Kaplan, Celia; Nguyen, Lamkieu; Hwang, Jimmy; Pasick, Rena J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Volume 3 Chapter 12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Healthy and Cancerous Human Tissues Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 2526793B0420777596C5A5

431

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 19 Linoleic Acids and Cancer Cell Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 19 Linoleic Acids and Cancer Cell Functions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

432

Somatic rearrangements across cancer reveal classes of samples with distinct patterns of DNA breakage and rearrangement-induced hypermutability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-genome sequencing using massively parallel sequencing technologies enables accurate detection of somatic rearrangements in cancer. Pinpointing large numbers of rearrangement breakpoints to base-pair resolution allows ...

Lander, Eric S.

433

Novel genotoxins that target estrogen receptor- and androgen receptor- positive cancers : identification of DNA adducts, pharmacokinetics, and mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed and synthesized novel molecules capable of selectively killing tumor cells that aberrantly express steroid hormone receptors. Many human breast cancers express high levels of the estrogen receptor (ER), ...

Hillier, Shawn M. (Shawn Matthew)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects  

SciTech Connect

Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

1997-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 8 Dietary Sphingolipids in the Prevention and Treatment of Colon Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 8 Dietary Sphingolipids in the Prevention and Treatment of Colon Cancer Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadabl

436

Investigation of T cell-mediated immune surveillance against tumor-specific antigens in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The association of tumor cells and lymphocytes has led to the hypothesis that our immune system actively inhibits the formation and progression of cancer, a phenomenon called tumor immune surveillance. T cells specific to ...

Du Page, Michel Justin Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Spatiotemporal and spatial threshold models for relating UV exposures and skin cancer in the central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact mechanisms relating exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and elevated risk of skin cancer remain the subject of debate. For example, there is disagreement on whether the main risk factor is duration of the exposure, its intensity, or some ...

Laura A. Hatfield; Richard W. Hoffbeck; Bruce H. Alexander; Bradley P. Carlin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 2 Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids And Cancer Cachexia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 2 Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids And Cancer Cachexia Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

439

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Mechanisms Involved in the Pro-Apoptotic Effect of Melatonin in Cancer Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: It is well established that melatonin exerts antitumoral effects in many cancer types, mostly decreasing cell proliferation at low concentrations. On the other hand, induction of apoptosis by melatonin has been described in the last few years in some particular cancer types. The cytotoxic effect occurs after its administration at high concentrations, and the molecular pathways involved have been only partially determined. Moreover, a synergistic effect has been found in several cancer types when it is administered in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. In the present review, we will summarize published work on the pro-apoptotic effect of melatonin in cancer cells and the reported mechanisms involved in such action. We will also construct a hypothesis on how different cell signaling pathways may relate each other on account for such effect.

Carmen Rodriguez; Vanesa Martn; Federico Herrera; Guillermo Garca-santos; Jezabel Rodriguez-blanco; Sara Casado-zapico; Ana Mara Snchez-snchez; Santos Surez; Noelia Puente-moncada; Mara Jos Antua; Isaac Antoln

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

In vitro and in vivo effects of the PPAR-alpha agonists fenofibrate and retinoic acid in endometrial cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Fenofibrate, an agonist of PPAR-alpha, in doses above 25 ?M, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells. We show that these effects are potentiated by retinoic acid, an agonist of the retinoid...

Saidi, Samir A; Holland, Cathrine M; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Smith, Stephen K

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fred hutchinson cancer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0-2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

Lee, Heon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gong Yong, E-mail: gyjin@chonbuk.ac.kr; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Keun Sang [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Preventive Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lynch, David [National Jewish Health, Interstitial and Autoimmune Lung Disease Program, Department of Radiology (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

High-Dose Radiotherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Cancer Control and Toxicity Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of short-course androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on cancer control outcomes and toxicity in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (high-dose radiotherapy [HDRT]). Methods and Materials: Demographic, disease, and treatment characteristics of prostate cancer patients at 2 institution consortiums were charted. Of 296 men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (defined as {>=}T2b, prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL, or Gleason score [GS] of 7, with none of the following: {>=}T3, prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, GS {>=}8, or positive nodes) treated with HDRT to a dose of 72 Gy or greater, 123 received short-course ADT and 173 did not. Univariate and multivariate analyses on biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) (including subset analysis by disease factors) and on overall survival (OS) were performed, as were comparisons of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates. Results: For the whole group, the median dose was 75.6 Gy; the minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the median follow-up was 47.4 months. For ADT vs. no ADT, the 5-year BFFS rate was 86% vs. 79% (p = 0.138) and the 5-year OS rate was 87% vs. 80% (p = 0.159). On multivariate analysis, percent positive cores (PPC) (p = 0.002) and GS (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with BFFS, with ADT showing a trend (p = 0.055). The impact of ADT was highest in the subsets with PPC greater than 50% (p = 0.019), GS 4+3 (p = 0.078), and number of risk factors greater than 1 (p = 0.022). Only intensity-modulated radiotherapy use (p = 0.012) and GS (p = 0.023) reached significance for OS, and there were no significant differences in GU or GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although the use of ADT with HDRT did not influence BFFS, our study suggests a benefit in patients with PPC greater than 50%, GS 4+3, or multiple risk factors. No OS benefit was shown, and ADT was not associated with additional radiotherapy-related GI or GU toxicity.

Edelman, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rossi, Peter J.; Cooper, Sherrie [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh B., E-mail: abjani@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Minichromosome Maintenance Protein 7 is a potential therapeutic target in human cancer and a novel prognostic marker of non-small cell lung cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sections from 331 NSCLC patients, who had undergone surgical resection. Immunohistochemistry using an MCM7-specific anti- body showed nuclear localization in cancer tissues, but nothing was detected in normal lung tissues (Figure 1B). Importantly, specific... ;#27; #20; C Normal tissues (n = 11) NSCLC (n = 6) SCLC (n = 3) ** NS* R el at iv e m R N A e xp re ss io n le ve ls o f M CM 7 A Normal lungMCM7 positive ?100 ?200 ?200 ?200 B D MCM7 positive (n = 196) MCM7 negative (n = 135) 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 500...

Toyokawa, Gouji; Masuda, Ken; Daigo, Yataro; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Yoshimatsu, Masanori; Takawa, Masashi; Hayami, Shinya; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Chino, Makoto; Field, Helen I; Neal, David E; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Ponder, Bruce A J; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

2011-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Number of Graduates Hired by Employer Employer: City: State: Number of Graduates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ROCHESTER MN 4 RIVER'S EDGE HOSPITAL AND CLINIC ST. PETER MN 4 ROSEMOUNT-APPLE VALLEY-EAGAN PUBLIC SCH SCHOOLS FOREST LAKE MN 3 HUTCHINSON PUBLIC SCHOOLS HUTCHINSON MN 3 KWIK TRIP MANKATO MN 3 LAKE CRYSTAL WELLCOME MEMORIAL PUB SCH LAKE CRYSTAL MN 3 MTU ONSITE ENERGY MANKATO MN 3 OWATONNA PUBLIC SCHOOLS OWATONNA

Bates, Rebecca A.

445

Technical Considerations for NRC/National Academy Proposed Study of Cancer Risks in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), is updating the 1990 U.S. National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (NCI) report, "Cancer in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities." The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a committee of scientists and professionals in the fields of epidemiology, radiation biology, nuclear plant effluents, and environmental risk assessment to provide study design considerations to the NAS commit...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Second Malignant Neoplasms in Digestive Organs After Childhood Cancer: A Cohort-Nested Case-Control Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cancers of the digestive system constitute a major risk for childhood cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy once they reach adulthood. The aim of this study was to determine therapy-related risk factors for the development of a second malignancy in the digestive organs (SMDO) after a childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: Among 4,568 2-year survivors of a childhood solid cancer diagnosed before 17 years of age at eight French and British centers, and among 25,120 patients diagnosed as having a malignant neoplasm before the age of 20 years, whose data were extracted from the Nordic Cancer Registries, we matched 58 case patients (41 men and 17 women) of SMDO and 167 controls, in their respective cohort, for sex, age at first cancer, calendar year of occurrence of the first cancer, and duration of follow-up. The radiation dose received at the site of each second malignancy and at the corresponding site of its matched control was estimated. Results: The risk of developing a SMDO was 9.7-fold higher in relation to the general populations in France and the United Kingdom. In the case-control study, a strong dose-response relationship was estimated, compared with that in survivors who had not received radiotherapy; the odds ratio was 5.2 (95% CI, 1.7-16.0) for local radiation doses between 10 and 29 Gy and 9.6 (95% CI, 2.6-35.2) for doses equal to or greater than 30 Gy. Chemotherapy was also found to increase the risk of developing SMDO. Conclusions: This study confirms that childhood cancer treatments strongly increase the risk of SMDO, which occur only after a very long latency period.

Tukenova, Markhaba; Diallo, Ibrahima [Radiation Epidemiology Group, CESP Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, INSERM, Villejuif (France); University Paris Sud 11, UMRS, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif (France); Anderson, Harald [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Hawkins, Mike [Center for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies, Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Garwicz, Stanislaw [Childhood Cancer Research Center, University Children's Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Sankila, Risto [Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki (Finland); El Fayech, Chiraz [Radiation Epidemiology Group, CESP Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, INSERM, Villejuif (France); University Paris Sud 11, UMRS, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif (France); Winter, Dave [Center for Childhood Cancer Survivor Studies, Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Rubino, Carole [Radiation Epidemiology Group, CESP Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, INSERM, Villejuif (France); University Paris Sud 11, UMRS, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif (France); Adjadj, Elisabeth [Radiation Epidemiology Group, CESP Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, INSERM, Villejuif (France); University Paris Sud 11, UMRS, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif (France); Curie Institute, Paris (France); Haddy, Nadia; Oberlin, Odile [Radiation Epidemiology Group, CESP Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, INSERM, Villejuif (France); University Paris Sud 11, UMRS, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif (France); Moller, Torgil [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Langmark, Froydis [Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki (Finland); and others

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Cancer risk among children of atomic bomb survivors. A review of RERF epidemiologic studies. Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes recent epidemiologic studies of cancer risk among the children of atomic bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. These children include two groups: (1) the in utero-exposed children (ie, those born to mothers who had been pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and (2) the F1 population, which was conceived after the atomic-bombings and born to parents of whom one or both were atomic bomb survivors. Although from 1950 to 1984 only 18 cancer cases were identified among the in utero sample, cancer risk did appear to significantly increase as maternal uterine dose increased. However, since the observed cases are too few in number to allow a site-specific review, the increased cancer risk cannot be definitively attributed to atomic bomb radiation, as yet. For those members of the F1 population who were less than 20 years old between 1946 and 1982, cancer risk did not appear to increase significantly as parental gonadal dose increased. Follow-up of this population will continue to determine if the patterns of adult-onset cancer are altered.

Yoshimoto, Y. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Knockdown of Snail Sensitizes Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents and Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor; only patients with small tumors and complete resection have a chance of a complete cure. Pancreatic cancer responds poorly to conventional therapies, including chemotherapy and irradiation. Snail is a transcription factor that has been associated with anti-apoptotic and chemoresistant properties in pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether knockdown of Snail suppresses growth of and/or sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents and irradiation through induction of apoptosis. An adeno-associated virus vector was used to deliver Snail siRNA and knockdown Snail expression in untreated pancreatic cancer cells and in pancreatic cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents or ?-irradiation. Our data indicate that our adeno-associated virus vector can efficiently deliver Snail siRNA into PANC-1 cells both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in the knockdown of Snail expression at the mRNA and protein levels. We further show that knockdown of Snail expression

Kejun Zhang; Xuelong Jiao; Xiaoyi Liu; Bingyuan Zhang; Jigang Wang; Quan Wang; Yan Tao; Dianliang Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Nakatsugawa, S. (Fukui Medical School (Japan)); Sugahara, T. (Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan))

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/Instrumentation: Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory

451

Low-Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Dose/Dose-Rate Low-LET Radiation Protects Us from Cancer Bobby R. Scott, Ph.D. and Jennifer D. Di Palma Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA Life on earth evolved in a low-level ionizing radiation environment comprised of terrestrial radiation and cosmic rays. Today we all reside in an ionizing radiation environment comprised of both natural background radiation and radiation from human activities (e.g., Chernobyl accident). An evolutionary benefit of the interaction of low-level, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) ionizing radiation with mammalian life forms on earth is adapted protection. Adapted protection involves low-dose/dose-rate, low-LET radiation induced high-fidelity DNA repair in cooperation with normal apoptosis (presumed p53

452

Breast cancer by proxy: Can the microenvironment be both the cause and consequence?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Breast cancer is one of the most clear-cut examples of a solid tumor in which systemic cues play a decisive part in its development. The breast tissue is constantly subjected to changes in hormone levels and modifications in the microenvironment. This scenario is even more striking during tumor development because of the dramatic loss or aberration of basement membrane (BM) and myoepithelial cells and the gain of peritumoral myofibroblasts. We suggest that the microenvironment, defined here as all components of the mammary gland other than luminal and/or tumor epithelial cells, might be instrumental in maintaining organ integrity and in promoting, and at times even initiating, breast cancer development. As such, the tumor microenvironment and its constituents, alone or in combination, might serve as promising targets for therapy.

Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J

2008-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE funded this grant to the Medical University of South Carolina for a cancer and birth defects registry for an initial three year period which was completed as of April 29, 1994. While this Technical Progress Report is prepared principally to document the activities of year 03, it also summarizes the accomplishments of the first two years in order to put into perspective the energy and progress of the program over the entire three year funding cycle.

Dunbar, J.B.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fundamentals of Semantic Web Technologies in Medical Environments: a case in breast cancer risk estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk estimation of developing breast cancer poses as the first prevention method for early diagnosis. Furthermore, data integration from different departments involved in the process plays a key role. In order to guarantee patient safety, the whole process should be orchestrated and monitored automatically. Support for the solution will be a linked data cloud, composed by all the departments that take part in the process, combined with rule engines.

Huerga, Iker; Gerrikagoitia, Jon Kepa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Assessing Cancer Risk of Coal-Fired Power Plant Workers Exposed to PAHs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the relationship between the concentration of urinary 1-OH-Py, 3-OH-BaP and the degree as well as the pathways of human exposure to PAHs, we collected 24-hour air, dietary and urine samples of 60 oven workers in a coal-fired power plant of Central ... Keywords: biomarkers, medium-air and food, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), exposure assessment, cancer risk

Bin Li; Zhaolong Zhang; Haitao Fan; Cheng Zeng

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83-1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83-1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14-1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liao Kaijun [Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Armstrong, Katrina [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Architectural and engineering design work for the Nevada Cancer Institute facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to complete the architectural and engineering design, program planning, and other preliminary work necessary to construct the new Nevada Cancer Institute facility. These goals were accomplished with the construction of a new building of approximately 119,000 gross square feet. The facility houses the diagnostic and radio therapeutic treatment laboratories, radiation oncology treatment facility, physician offices, and clinical research areas.

Heather Murren, President

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Radiosensitivity of skin fibroblasts from atomic bomb survivors with and without breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Fibroblasts were established in vitro from skin biopsies obtained from 55 women and 1 man with or without breast cancer and with or without exposure to radiation from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. The radiosensitivity of these cells was evaluated by clonogenic assays after exposure to X-rays or to fission neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf source. Data were fitted to a multitarget model, S/S0 = A (1 - (1 - ekD)N), for both X-ray and neutron dose-survival curves. A single hit model, S/S0 = AekD, fits the neutron dose-survival responses as well. There were no differences in the means or variances of radiosensitivity between exposed and nonexposed groups or between patients with or without breast cancer. Hence, although the sample is not large, it provides no support for the hypothesis that atomic bomb radiation preferentially induces breast cancer in women whose cells in vitro are sensitive to cell killing by radiation.

Ban, S.; Setlow, R.B.; Bender, M.A.; Ezaki, H.; Hiraoka, T.; Yamane, M.; Nishiki, M.; Dohi, K.; Awa, A.A.; Miller, R.C. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large, fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P . 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A.; Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Analysis of cancer risk related to longitudinal information on smoking habits  

SciTech Connect

Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) has followed the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) cohort consisting of atomic bomb survivors and unexposed subjects for more than 40 years. The information on their lifestyles, including smoking habits, has been collected in the past 25 years through two mail surveys of the entire LSS cohort and three interview surveys of a subcohort for the biennial medical examination program. In the present study an attempt was made to consolidate the information on smoking habits obtained from the five serial surveys, and then a risk analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of updating the smoking information on the smoking-related risk estimates for lung cancer. The estimates of smoking-related risk became larger and estimates of dose response became sharper by updating smoking information using all of the data obtained from the five serial surveys. Analyses were also conducted for cancer sites other than lung. The differences in risk estimates between the two approaches were not as evident for the other cancer sites as for lung. 13 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P = 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima-Nagasaki, Japan); Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

An alternative hypothesis for association between distribution wiring configurations and cancer: Planning phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several epidemiologic studies have reported positive associations between electric distribution wiring configurations and cancer incidence, particularly among children. According to the investigators of these studies, the results suggest a possible link between exposure to 60-Hertz magnetic fields because residential magnetic fields are correlated with wiring configurations. This report analyzes the plausibility of an alternate hypothesis to explain the epidemiologic observations, and recommends research to explore its validity. According to the hypothesis, ground return currents in plumbing service lines are associated with electric wiring configuration, and cause the release of corrosion products in tap water, whose ingestion constitutes a risk factor for cancer. To corroborate this hypothesis three conditions must be satisfied: the magnitude of the ground return currents in water pipes is related to wiring configuration, with higher currents generally found associated with homes classified in the high exposure categories; corrosion on the internal surface of water pipe is related to ac currents flowing on the pipe, with higher currents associated with higher rates of corrosion, and ingestion of water from pipes undergoing AC-induced corrosive processes increases the probability of developing cancer. The study's analysis did not uncover any critical data that would undermine the plausibility of this confounder hypothesis. 102 refs., 11 figs., 22 tabs.

Kavet, R. (Environmental Research Information, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (USA)); Silva, J.M. (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Effects of Bioactive Compounds from Different Potato Genotypes on Prostate Cancer Development in Athymic Nude Mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytochemicals are widely noted for their role in chemoprevention. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the third most important food crop worldwide and is considered a significant source of antioxidants, providing an ideal delivery system for beneficial compounds. The anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties of potato bioactive compounds have been reported in vitro on human prostate cancer cell lines. However, in vivo studies are limited, and more information is needed to determine the chemopreventive properties of potato in the diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of potato bioactives on prostate cancer in vivo using a mouse model. Athymic nude mice received xenografts of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) and were administered extracts of potato bioactives from either the white flesh Solanum bulbocastanum (PI243510) or CO112F2-2P/P (purple-flesh Colorado selection), while control mice received water. Neither potato extract provided a significant reduction in tumor growth nor reduced levels of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF, but the S. bulbocastanum extract reduced expression of metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) in tumors, and both potato extracts reduced MTA1 expression in lungs, suggesting the need for further research on the potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic properties of potato bioactives.

Turner, Sarah

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z