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1

Franklin Timeline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Timeline Timeline Franklin Timeline This page records a brief timeline of significant events and user environment changes on Franklin. Franklin compute nodes have been upgraded from dual core to quad core from July to October 2008. Apr 30, 2012 Franklin is retired. Apr 5, 19, 27, 2012 Reminder announcements on Franklin retirement schedule. -- Thurs Apr 26, 23:59: Batch system is drained, batch queues are stopped (no jobs will be running at this point) -- Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems -- Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled Mar 6, 2012 Announcement on Franklin retirement date set: 04/30/2012. Feb 22, 2012 HW and SW maintenance. Set to default versions: pgi/11.10.0 and xt-mpt/5.3.5. Feb 21, 2012 Update on Franklin earliest retirement date: 4/30/2012.

2

Franklin Configuration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Configuration Configuration Franklin Configuration Franklin is a Cray XT4 with a peak performance of 352 TFlops, 38,288 processor cores, 78 TB of memory, and 436 TB of scratch disk space. Franklin was ranked as the world's eighth most powerful supercomputer in November 2008, and was No. 26 on the November 2010 Top 500 List. Quad CoreAMDOpteronprocessor Compute Nodes Franklin has 9,572 compute nodes, each with a quad-core AMD 'Budapest' 2.3 GHz processor. Read More » Login Nodes Franklin has 10 internal login nodes and 1 external login node. Read More » Files systems The Franklin system has 4 different file systems mounted which provide different levels of disk storage, I/O performance and file permanence. There are two Lustre file systems each with a peak performance of 17

3

Franklin Timeline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.1.0, gcc4.4.4, cce7.2.4, petsc3.1.00, petsc-complex3.1.00, pathscale3.2.99, java6.020. Jul 27-31, 2010 Franklin down due to NERSC Center Power upgrade and system...

4

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Logging in to Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logging in Logging in to Franklin Interactive Access You can log in to Franklin using SSH (Secure Shell) with the following command from any UNIX, Linux, FreeBSD, etc. command...

6

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Logging in to Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logging in Logging in Logging in to Franklin Interactive Access You can log in to Franklin using SSH (Secure Shell) with the following command from any UNIX, Linux, FreeBSD, etc. command shell or terminal: % ssh -l username franklin.nersc.gov There are a number of SSH-capable clients available for Windows, Mac, and UNIX/Linux machines. NERSC does not support or recommend any particular client. Franklin has 10 login nodes; you will be randomly connected to one of those 10 when you ssh to franklin.nersc.gov. In all cases it will appear to you as if you are on "franklin.nersc.gov." The login nodes are where you compile codes, submit jobs, and view data. The login nodes on Franklin are directly connected to the internal high-speed "Seastar" network. Because of this you cannot login and work

8

Combined-cycle power tower  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates a new power tower concept that offers significant benefits for commercialization of power tower technology. The concept uses a molten nitrate salt centralreceiver plant to supply heat, in the form of combustion air preheat, to a conventional combined-cycle power plant. The evaluation focused on first commercial plants, examined three plant capacities (31, 100, and 300 MWe), and compared these plants with a solar-only 100-MWe plant and with gas-only combined-cycle plants in the same three capacities. Results of the analysis point to several benefits relative to the solar-only plant including low energy cost for first plants, low capital cost for first plants, reduced risk with respect to business uncertainties, and the potential for new markets. In addition, the concept appears to have minimal technology development requirements. Significantly, the results show that it is possible to build a first plant with this concept that can compete with existing gas-only combined-cycle plants.

Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.; Price, H.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

TRC Bibliographies: Benjamin Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Ages 912) Jango-Cohen, Judith and Kevin Lepp (Illustrator), Ben Franklin's Big Shock, Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press, 2005. ISBN: 1575058731 (Ages 48) Krensky, Stephen...

10

Combined Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline (EPRI report 1023971) was developed in 2012 to provide plant owners and operators with a comprehensive guideline for identifying and quantifying combined-cycle performance losses and appropriate recovery activities for a generic F-Class combined-cycle power plant (CCPP). This report, Combined-Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline, has been developed as an adjunct ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duke Energy's Edwardsport Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Station presently under construction in Knox County, Indiana. (Photos courtesy of Duke Energy.) Gasification...

13

Benjamin Franklin -- 1706 - 1790  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benjamin Franklin -- 1706 - 1790 Benjamin Franklin -- 1706 - 1790 Nature Bulletin No. 513-A January 19, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BENJAMIN FRANKLIN -- 1706 - 1790 Thursday of this week, January 17th, is Benjamin Franklin's birthday. During his long life, Doctor Franklin, more than any other American, used his unique talents to build a new country and win recognition for it as a center of culture in the New World. Poor Richard's Almanac, from which he made his fortune, was first published in 1732, the year that George Washington was born. At that time the English colonies in America were jealous of each other, squabbling among themselves, and had widely different outlooks -- from the craftsmen, merchants and ship owners of New England to the aristocratic slave-holding plantation owners of Virginia and the Carolinas. Before he died, and in large part through his own efforts and influence, he lived to see them united into a new nation.

14

Axisymmetric Inlet Design for Combined Cycle Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Performance considerations for a turbine-based combined-cycle engine inlet are presented using the inlet of the Lockheed SR-71 as a baseline. A numerical model is developed (more)

Colville, Jesse

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Franklin: User Experiences  

SciTech Connect

The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun (Helen); Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved combined cycle power plant performance continue to grow as the cost of fuel rises and international concerns over global warming increase.This guideline provides a framework for performance monitoring, assessment, recovery and optimization of combined cycle power plants. The guideline distills existing experience and documents on heat rate recovery and capacity improvement into a comprehensive manual for plant implementation and training applications. The purpose ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas turbine combined cycle system that obtains its heat input from a high temperature, high pressure ceramic air heater burning wood waste products as a fuel. This paper presents the results of the design study including the cycle evaluation and a description of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step forward in wood-fueled power plants.

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Franklin Job Launch Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Launch Overview Job Launch Overview Job Launch Overview Overview and Basic Description Franklin has three basic types of nodes. Compute Nodes The 9,572 compute nodes each have a quad-core 2.3 GHz Opteron processor and 8 GB of memory shared by the 4 cores. The compute nodes run a restricted low-overhead operating system optimized for high performance computing. This OS supports only a limited number of system calls and UNIX commands, and does not officially support user-created dynamic-load libraries. A single given compute node is always allocated to run a single user job; multiple jobs never share a compute node. Service Nodes (Login Nodes) Franklin's service nodes run a full Linux operating system and provide support services for the system. Some of these service nodes serve

19

Rita Franklin | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rita Franklin Rita Franklin About Us Rita Franklin - Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer Photo of Rita Franklin Rita R. Franklin is the Department of Energy's Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer. She is responsible for the management and execution of the Department's human capital management programs, including workforce planning, workforce development strategies, improving the hiring process, and improving performance management. She has worked diligently throughout the organization to align human capital policies and programs with organizational mission, strategic goals, and outcomes. She is involved with variety of government-wide initiatives and serves on the Deputy Chief Human Officer's Council. Ms. Franklin has served the Federal government for 32 years in three agencies - the U.S. Information Agency, the Department of

20

Changes related to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Changes related to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation" A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Manhattan Project: President Franklin D. Roosevelt  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President Franklin D. Roosevelt Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 > Einstein's Letter, 1939 People > Administrators > Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United...

23

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

24

Combined Cycle Cogeneration at NALCO Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nalco Chemical Company, while expanding their corporate headquarters, elected to investigate the potential for cogeneration. The headquarters complex has a central physical plant for heating and chilling. The authors describe the analysis approach for determining the most economical system design. Generation capacity ranging from 2.7 MW up to 7.0 MW in both simple cycle cogeneration and combined cycle cogeneration was analyzed. Both single pressure and dual pressure waste heat boilers were included in the evaluation. In addition, absorption chilling and electrical centrifugal chilling capacity expansion were integrated into the model. The gas turbine selection procedure is outlined. Bid evaluation procedure involved a life cycle cost comparison wherein the bid specification responses for each model turbine were incorporated into the life cycle facility program. The recommendation for the facility is a 4.0MW combined cycle cogeneration system. This system is scheduled for startup in October of 1985. Most major equipment has been purchased and the building to house the system is nearing completion. A discussion of the purchase and scheduling integration will be included.

Thunem, C. B.; Jacobs, K. W.; Hanzel, W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Solid oxide fuel cell combined cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The integration of the solid oxide fuel cell and combustion turbine technologies can result in combined-cycle power plants, fueled with natural gas, that have high efficiencies and clean gaseous emissions. Results of a study are presented in which conceptual designs were developed for 3 power plants based upon such an integration, and ranging in rating from 3 to 10 MW net ac. The plant cycles are described and characteristics of key components summarized. Also, plant design-point efficiency estimates are presented as well as values of other plant performance parameters.

Bevc, F.P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States). Power Generation Business Unit; Lundberg, W.L.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Westinghouse fuel cell combined cycle systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficiency (voltage) of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) should increase with operating pressure, and a pressurized SOFC could function as the heat addition process in a Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) engine. An overall cycle efficiency of 70% should be possible. In cogeneration, half of the waste heat from a PSOFC/GT should be able to be captured in process steam and hot water, leading to a fuel effectiveness of about 85%. In order to make the PSOFC/GT a commercial reality, satisfactory operation of the SOFC at elevated pressure must be verified, a pressurized SOFC generator module must be designed, built, and tested, and the combined cycle and parameters must be optimized. A prototype must also be demonstrated. This paper describes progress toward making the PSOFC/GT a reality.

Veyo, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optimum cycle parameters of coal fired closed cycle gas turbine in regenerative and combined cycle configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology developed for the estimation of thermodynamic performance and reports the optimum cycle parameters of coal fired CCGT in regenerative and combined cycle configurations using air, helium and carbon dioxide as working gases. A rigorous approach has been followed for the determination of the cycle efficiency by assuming the specific heat of working gases as a continuous function of temperature for accurate estimation of cycle parameters. 14 refs.

Rao, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation  

SciTech Connect

The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

Brown, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NERSC Franklin Hours Used Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used Franklin Hours Used 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2011 Franklin Usage in Hours 2010 2010 Franklin Usage in Hours 2009 2009 Franklin Usage in Hours 2007-2008 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours 2008 Franklin Usage in Hours Date Hours Used (in thousands) Percentage of Maximum Possible (24 hours/day) 04/28/2012 0.00 0.00 04/27/2012 272.62 29.40 04/26/2012 692.81 74.71 04/25/2012 841.60 90.75 04/24/2012 53.86 5.81 04/23/2012 432.01 46.59 04/22/2012 823.23 88.77 04/21/2012 473.95 51.11 04/20/2012 173.75 18.74 04/19/2012 449.22 48.44 04/18/2012 816.23 88.02 04/17/2012 754.35 81.34 04/16/2012 648.89 69.97 04/15/2012 812.25 87.59 04/14/2012 843.46 90.95 04/13/2012 737.46 79.52 04/12/2012 711.97 76.77 04/11/2012 734.65 79.22 04/10/2012 815.65 87.95 04/09/2012 897.25 96.75

30

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Running Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs jobs Running jobs Job Launch Overview Parallel applications can not run on the login nodes. They must be launched onto the compute nodes via the aprun command. Read More » Interactive Jobs Interactive jobs may be run on Franklin by requesting resources from the batch system. "qsub -I -V -q interactive -lmppwidth=[num_cores]" is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More » Submitting Batch Jobs Basic batch scripts, torque keywords. Sample scripts for advanced work flows: running multiple jobs, MPMD jobs, job dependencies. Read More » Queues and Policies Queue configuration and limits, policies and tips for getting your job through the queue faster. Read More » Monitoring Jobs Once a job is submitted it can be monitored, held, deleted and in some

32

Coal combined cycle system study. Volume I. Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential advantages for proceeding with demonstration of coal-fueled combined cycle power plants through retrofit of a few existing utility steam plants have been evaluated. Two combined cycle concepts were considered: Pressurized Fluidized Bed (PFB) combined cycle and gasification combined cycle. These concepts were compared with AFB steam plants, conventional steam plants with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), and refueling such as with coal-oil mixtures. The ultimate targets are both new plants and conversion of existing plants. Combined cycle plants were found to be most competitive with conventional coal plants and offered lower air emissions and less adverse environmental impact. A demonstration is a necessary step toward commercialization.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Franklin to be Retired April 30, 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Franklin to be Retired April 30, 2012 Franklin to be Retired April 30, 2012 Franklin to be Retired April 30, 2012 March 6, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) Franklin and its external login node Freedom will be retired on April 30, 2012. Batch processing will end on April 26. The schedule of events is: Effective immediately: Software frozen except for critical updates Mon April 2: No new accounts will be createdon Franklin Thurs April 26, 23:59: Batch system is drained, batch queues are stopped (no jobs will be running at this point) Mon April 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon April 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled Please note that NERSC will not archive any Franklin scratch files. All files on $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 will be deleted when Franklin is retired.

34

Franklin to be Retired April 30, 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon April 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled Please note that NERSC will not archive any Franklin scratch files. All files on...

35

User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Lebens. Post- Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT4 Upgrade toCray User Group Meeting NERSC Franklin Home Page: http://planning from both Cray and NERSC, service interruptions

He, Yun Helen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

37

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

38

Advanced Control Demonstration on a Combined Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company, Electricit de France (EDF), and EPRI have undertaken a project to demonstrate the applicability of advanced control techniques on a combined-cycle heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This report describes progress on the project during 2005 including model identification, the advanced controller design, controller program development, and controller testing in a simulation environment. A combined-cycle plant was selected as the host plant because many combined-cycle plants have chang...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Off-design Simulations of Offshore Combined Cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents an off-design simulation of offshore combined cycles. Offshore installations have a substantial power demand to facilitate the oil and gas production. (more)

Flateb, ystein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Running Interactive Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Serial Code or Commands Franklin is a massively parallel high-performance computing platform and is intended and designed to run large parallel codes. While it is possible to run serial jobs on Franklin, it is discouraged. Any code or command that is not preceeded by the aprun command will execute serially on a service (usually login) node. The login nodes are for executing general UNIX shell commands, building code, and submitting jobs intended to run on the compute nodes. The service nodes are shared by many users, so. please do not run your compute- or memory-intensive jobs on these nodes. NERSC may kill running processes that severely degrade service node performance. If your job will run for more than 5 minutes, or use more than 1 GB of memory it should not

43

APSUO Announces Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APSUO Announces Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award APSUO Announces Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award In conjunction with the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the APS Users Organization (APSUO) has established the APSUO Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award. The nomination deadline for this award is March 15, 2004. The award will be presented at the 2004 Users Meeting for the Advanced Photon Source, held at Argonne on May 3-6, 2004. Rosalind Franklin Born in 1920, Rosalind Franklin graduated from Cambridge University in 1941 in time to focus on a wartime problem: the composition of coal and charcoal and how to use them most efficiently. She published five papers on the subject before she was 26 years old, work that is still quoted today, and helped launch the field of high-strength carbon fibers. When Franklin had

44

Franklin County Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Franklin County Wind LLC Franklin County Wind LLC Facility Franklin County Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Franklin County Wind LLC Developer Franklin County Wind LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant (MISO) Location Franklin County IA Coordinates 42.61481487°, -93.36564124° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.61481487,"lon":-93.36564124,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cycle chemistry in combined cycle plants influences about 70 of the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failure mechanisms. These guidelines have been assembled to assist operators and chemists in developing an effective overall cycle chemistry program which will prevent HRSG tube failures (HTF).

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Compressive Seal Development: Combined Ageing and Thermal Cycling Compressive  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to evaluate the combined aging and cycling effect on hybrid Phlogopite mica seals with respect to materials and interfacial degradations in a simulated SOFC environment.

Chou, M.Y-S.; Stevenson, J.W.; Singh, P.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

49

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

2009 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Engineering Economic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture (1015690) contains engineering and economic evaluations of state-of-the-art integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant designs available for near-term deployment. The study assessed the expected performance and costs of coal-fed IGCC power plants before and after retrofit for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The study evaluated paired ca...

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS Accelerometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper vibration combined high temperature cycle tests for packaged capacitive SOI-MEMS accelerometers are presented. The aim of these tests is to provide useful Design for Reliability information for MEMS designers. A high temperature test chamber and a chopper-stabilized read-out circuitry were designed and realized at BME - DED. Twenty thermal cycles of combined Temperature Cycle Test and Fatigue Vibration Test has been carried out on 5 samples. Statistical evaluation of the test results showed that degradation has started in 3 out of the 5 samples.

Szucs, Z; Hodossy, S; Rencz, M; Poppe, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS Accelerometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper vibration combined high temperature cycle tests for packaged capacitive SOI-MEMS accelerometers are presented. The aim of these tests is to provide useful Design for Reliability information for MEMS designers. A high temperature test chamber and a chopper-stabilized read-out circuitry were designed and realized at BME - DED. Twenty thermal cycles of combined Temperature Cycle Test and Fatigue Vibration Test has been carried out on 5 samples. Statistical evaluation of the test results showed that degradation has started in 3 out of the 5 samples.

Z. Szucs; G. Nagy; S. Hodossy; M. Rencz; A. Poppe

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Comprehensive Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plant component availability and reliability. These guidelines for combined cycle/HRSG plants provide information on the application of all-volatile treatment (AVT), oxygenated treatment (OT), phosphate treatment (PT), caustic treatment (CT), and amine treatment. The guidelines will help operators reduce corrosion and deposition and thereby achieve significant operation and maintenance cost ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

AVESTAR® - Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator A simulator that can provide future engineers with realistic, hands-on experience for operating advanced natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants will soon be available at an innovative U.S. Department of Energy training center. Under a new cooperative research and development agreement signed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Invensys Operations Management, the partners will develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) for a generic NGCC power plant equipped for use with post-combustion carbon capture. NETL will operate the new dynamic simulator/OTS at the AVESTAR (Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research) Center in Morgantown, W.Va.

55

Configuration and performance of fuel cell-combined cycle options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The natural gas, indirect-fired, carbonate fuel-cell-bottomed, combined cycle (NG-IFCFC) and the topping natural-gas/solid-oxide fuel-cell combined cycle (NG-SOFCCC) are introduced as novel power-plant systems for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20-200 mega-watt (MW) size range. The novel NG-IFCFC power-plant system configures the ambient pressure molten-carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger: The topping solid-oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) combined cycle is not new. The purpose of combining a gas turbine with a fuel cell was to inject pressurized air into a high-pressure fuel cell and to reduce the size, and thereby, to reduce the cost of the fuel cell. Today, the SOFC remains pressurized, but excess chemical energy is combusted and the thermal energy is utilized by the Carnot cycle heat engine to complete the system. ASPEN performance results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC or NG-SOFCCC are better than conventional fuel cell or gas turbine steam-bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components. Fuel cell and gas turbine systems should not be viewed as competitors, but as an opportunity to expand to markets where neither gas turbines nor fuel cells alone would be commercially viable. Non-attainment areas are the most likely markets.

Rath, L.K.; Le, P.H.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Combined Otto and Stirling Cycle Prime-Mover-Based Power Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? An exploratory study of the combined Otto and Stirling cycle prime mover is presented. The Stirling cycle acts as the bottoming cycle on the (more)

Cullen, Barry, (Thesis)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

"Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" ,"Revolutionary","Evolutionary","Mature" "Pulverized Coal",,,"X" "Pulverized Coal with CCS" " - Non-CCS portion of Pulverized Coal Plant",,,"X" " - CCS","X" "Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle" " - Advanced Combustion Turbine",,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Gasifier",,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X" "Conventional Natural Gas Combined Cycle" " - Conventional Combustion Turbine",,,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X"

58

Your First Program on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your First Program Your First Program Your First Program From Logging in to Submitting a Job In order to follow this page, you will need an account, a username and a password. If you do not have all of these things please visit the Accounts Page. Logging in % ssh -l username franklin.nersc.gov When you successfully log in you will land in your $HOME directory. First Program Code: Parallel Hello World Open a new file called helloWorld.f90 with a text editor such as emacs or vi. Paste the contents of the below code into the file. program helloWorld implicit none include "mpif.h" integer :: myPE, numProcs, ierr call MPI_INIT(ierr) call MPI_COMM_RANK(MPI_COMM_WORLD, myPE, ierr) call MPI_COMM_SIZE(MPI_COMM_WORLD, numProcs, ierr) print *, "Hello World from ", myPE call MPI_FINALIZE(ierr)

59

INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Utility-scale combined-cycle power systems with Kalina bottoming cycles  

SciTech Connect

A new power-generation technology, often referred to as the Kalina cycle, is being developed as a direct replacement for the Rankine steam cycle. It can be applied to any thermal heat source, low or high temperature. Among several Kalina cycle variations, there is one that is particularly well suited as a bottoming cycle for utility combined-cycle applications. It is the subject of this paper. Using an ammonia/water mixture as the working fluid and a condensing system based on absorption-refrigeration principles, the Kalina bottoming cycle outperforms a triple-pressure steam cycle by 16%. Additionally, this version of the Kalina cycle is characterized by an intercooling feature between turbine stages, diametrically opposite to normal reheating practice in steam plants. Energy and mass balances are presented for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina bottoming cycle. Kalina cycle performance is compared to a triple-pressure steam plant. Energy and mass balances are presented as well for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina direct-fired cycle designed for utility purposes.

Kalina, A.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pages that link to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Pages that link to "A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation" A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation...

62

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in India: international implications Title Cost and carbon emissions of coal and combined cycle power plants in...

63

Franklin E. Coffman | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Franklin E. Coffman Franklin E. Coffman About Us Franklin E. Coffman - EMAB Board Member Franklin E. Coffman is a Senior Vice President for AECOM Government Services. He has 20 years of DOE program management experience focused on environmental programs for nuclear facilities- including service as DOE's Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management for a $550 million/year nuclear and hazardous waste program. He also managed the planning, execution, and integration of environmental remediation projects and hazardous facility decontamination and decommissioning at DOE and private industry sites, including the integration of multiple contractors and subcontractors at some 150 major sites and 6,000 contaminated facilities. Dr. Coffman is responsible for AECOM's DOE programs as well as emergency

64

VisIt Now Available On Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VisIt Supported on VisIt Supported on Cray Systems VisIt Supported on Cray Systems May 26, 2009 franklin-16b.jpg NERSC's Cray XT4 System, Franklin Scientists computing on NERSC's Cray XT4 system, called Franklin, can have it all. Now that VisIt, one of the most popular frameworks for scientific visualization, is available on Franklin, users can run their simulations on the machine and visualize the output there too. "VisIt is a very useful tool for interpreting scientific data; researchers can use this to explore data from a variety of perspectives," says Gunther Weber of the CRD Visualization Group and the NERSC Analytics Team. He notes that the tool can be used to visualize scalar and vector fields defined on two- and three-dimensional structured and unstructured meshes.

65

Combined-cycle plants can challenge feedwater control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable feedwater control is critical to the reliable operation of any power plant steam generator system. This is particularly true for combustion turbine/heat recovery steam generator/steam turbine combined-cycle power plants where steam production may have to be sustained under varying modes of operation. Feedwater control system implementation in this type of installation often requires specialized designs to accommodate equipment limitations and the system's process dynamics. In particular, combined-cycle power plants that include integral deaerator and multiple pressure heat recovery steam generators may pose special control challenges in several areas. These include integral deaerator pressure, boiler feed pump recirculation control, boiler feed pump protective interlocks, and drum level control. This article describes a number of basic feedwater control logic features, derived from conventional fired boiler designs adapted for specific cycle configuration, applied in recent medium and large combustion turbine-heat recovery steam generator projects.

Bossio, R.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

California Energy Commission Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission 1 Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle Plants for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in a Gas-Dominated Electricity Market California Energy Commission Request for Proposals RFP # 500-10-502 Pre-Bid Conference Date: Wednesday, November 3, 2010 #12;California Energy

67

Integrated gasification combined cycle - a view to the future  

SciTech Connect

DOE is involved in research, development, and demonstration of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle because of a strong belief that it will result in widespread commercialization that will be of great benefit to this nation. METC`s long-range vision comprises (1) product goals that require improvements to known technical advantages, and (2) market goals that are based on expectations of market pull.

Schmidt, D.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for High Availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyses public domain availability data from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and other significant coal gasification facilities, backed up with additional data gained from interviews and discussions with plant operators. Predictions for the availability of future IGCCs are made based on the experience of the existing fleet and anticipated improvements from the implementation of lessons learned.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

Economics of Phased Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plants: Utility Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phased gasification-combined-cycle power plants can help utilities match load growth and respond to changes in demand and fuel prices. After evaluating the economic merits of phased additions, seven utilities considered the technology a viable option for electricity generation in the 1990s.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Secondary steam models of a combined cycle power plant simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the general description of a full scope simulator for a combined cycle power plant is presented; the antecedents of this work are explained; the basis of the models of the auxiliary and turbine gland steam systems are exposed and some ...

Edgardo J. Roldan-Villasana; Ma. de Jesus Cardoso-Goroztieta; Adriana Verduzco-Bravo; Jorge J. Zorrilla-Arena

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plants with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plants with CO2 Capture and Storage Mike Gravely.5 Million Annual Budget FY 10/11 · $62.5 million electric · $24 million natural gas · Program Research Areas:45 Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc's Role and Reference Documents Rich Myhre ­ Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc 3:05 Pacific Gas

72

Novel Power Cycle for Combined-Cycle Systems and Utility Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The description of a new power cycle, based on the use of a multicomponent working fluid, was published earlier. A thermodynamic analysis of this cycle has demonstrated its superiority over the currently used Rankine Cycle, and a distribution of losses in the subsystems of this cycle has been established. A new, improved variant of the cycle, which provides 10% efficiency improvement over the initial variant, has been developed. The new variant employs a cooling of the working fluid between turbine stages and a recuperation of the released heat for supplementation of the boiler heat supply. Analysis shows that with this new, improved cycle efficiencies of up to 52% for a combined-cycle system employing standard turbines, and of up to 55% when modern high-temperature gas turbines are employed, can be achieved. The same cycle can be utilized to retrofit existing direct-fired power plants, providing an efficiency of up to 42%. The possible implications off such a cycle implementation are briefly discussed. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is now conducting a study of this cycle.

Kalina, A. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Westinghouse to launch coal gasifier with combined cycle unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse has designed a prototype coal gasifier which can be intergrated with a combined cycle unit and enable power plants to use coal in an efficient and environmentally acceptable way. Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (CGCC) technology burns gas made from coal in a gas turbine to generate power and then collects the hot exhaust gases to produce steam for further power generation. The commercialization of this process would meet the public's need for an economical and clean way to use coal, the utitities' need to meet electric power demands, and the nation's need to reduce dependence on imported oil. The Westinghouse process is described along with the company's plans for a demonstration plant and the option of a phased introduction to allow utilities to continue the use of existing equipment and generate revenue while adding to capacity. (DCK)

Stavsky, R.M.; Margaritis, P.J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Integrated gasification combined cycle -- A review of IGCC technology  

SciTech Connect

Over the past three decades, significant efforts have been made toward the development of cleaner and more efficient technology for power generation. Coal gasification technology received a big thrust with the concept of combined cycle power generation. The integration of coal gasification with combined cycle for power generation (IGCC) had the inherent characteristic of gas cleanup and waste minimization, which made this system environmentally preferable. Commercial-scale demonstration of a cool water plant and other studies have shown that the greenhouse gas and particulates emission from an IGCC plant is drastically lower than the recommended federal New Source Performance Standard levels. IGCC also offers a phased construction and repowering option, which allows multiple-fuel flexibility and the necessary economic viability. IGCC technology advances continue to improve efficiency and further reduce the emissions, making it the technology of the 21st century.

Joshi, M.M.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop and evaluate novel sorbents for the Siemens Westinghouse Power Company's (SWPC's) ''Ultra-Clean Gas Cleaning Process'' for reducing to near-zero levels the sulfur- and chlorine-containing gas emissions and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) caused by fuel bound constituents found in carbonaceous materials, which are processed in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technologies.

Javad Abbasian

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected six integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.; Reuther, R.B.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Coal Fleet Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC Permitting) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to owners of planned Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants in order to assist them in permitting these advanced coal power generation facilities. The CoalFleet IGCC Permitting Guidelines summarize U.S. federal requirements for obtaining air, water, and solid waste permits for a generic IGCC facility, as described in the CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification (UDBS). The report presents characteristics of IGCC emissions that must be considered in the p...

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

2012 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Research and Development Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThe second generation of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is now being built or planned following nearly two decades of commercial demonstration at multiple units. State-of-the-art IGCC plants have efficiencies equivalent to that of pulverized coal power plants while exhibiting equal or superior environmental performance and lower water usage. Precombustion CO2 capture technology is commercially available and has been ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Economic comparison of cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives for industry  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines various cogeneration alternatives available today and provides an economic comparison for a range of conditions that will enable the most significant factors to be considered in the selection of cogeneration alternatives, and to determine which alternatives are most suitable for the particular application. The cogeneration methods considered are: a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by an unfired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired heat recovery steam generator, a combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a supplementary fired high-pressure heat recovery boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, a combined-cycle combustion turbine electric generating unit followed by a fully fired boiler delivering steam to a noncondensing steam turbine-generator, and a conventional coal-fired boiler and a noncondensing steam turbine-generator. It is concluded that over a wide range of financial and operating conditions, almost all of the cogeneration/combined-cycle alternatives are more economical than continued operation of an existing conventional boiler generating steam only.

Cahill, G.J.; Germinaro, B.D.; Martin, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combined-cycle systems have been performed. Dersch et al, 2004 [2] studied how parabolic troughs could the other part. That approach is relevant for trough systems, but not appropriate in the case of point been used with solar ponds in Israel [5] and low-temperature parabolic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Measuring the Monitoring User Interactive Experiences on Franklin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Seconds Needed to Compile and Link % of Trials Less Than X Value Franklin Home Franklin Scratch Bassi Home Figure 4. The percentage of measurements...

82

Franklin retirement date is set: 04/30/2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled Please note that NERSC will NOT archive any Franklin scratch files. All files on...

83

Franklin County Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Franklin County Wind Project Franklin County Wind Project Facility Franklin County Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Coordinates 37.014702°, -79.895096° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.014702,"lon":-79.895096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

84

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Shutdown, Layup, and Startup of Combined Cycle Units with Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete optimization of cycle chemistry in a combined-cycle unit requires more than proper selection and optimization of operating chemistry. Protection of the steam-water cycle also is essential during shutdown, layup, and startup phases. These guidelines consider protection of steam- and water-touched components at these times, consistent with the operating cycle chemistries in use.

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

Combined Cycles and Cogeneration - An Alternative for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power sequentially with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. The state-of-the-art combined cycle system consisting of combustion turbines, heat recovery steam generators, and steam turbine-generator units, offers a high efficiency method for the production of electrical and heat energy at relatively low installed and operating costs. This paper describes the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology.

Harkins, H. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) Ben Franklin Partners Challenge Grant Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Schools Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Grant Program Provider Department of Community and Economic Development The Ben Franklin Technology Partner's Challenge Grant and Alternative Energy Development Program (AEDP) provides funds to businesses through the four Ben Franklin Technology Partners for access to capital, business expertise, technology commercialization services to advance the development of new technologies and for the generation, conservation, and

87

Direct coal-fired gas turbines for combined cycle plants  

SciTech Connect

The combustion/emissions control island of the CFTCC plant produces cleaned coal combustion gases for expansion in the gas turbine. The gases are cleaned to protect the turbine from flow-path degeneration due to coal contaminants and to reduce environmental emissions to comparable or lower levels than alternate clean coal power plant tedmologies. An advantage of the CFTCC system over other clean coal technologies using gas turbines results from the CFTCC system having been designed as an adaptation to coal of a natural gas-fired combined cycle plant. Gas turbines are built for compactness and simplicity. The RQL combustor is designed using gas turbine combustion technology rather than process plant reactor technology used in other pressurized coal systems. The result is simpler and more compact combustion equipment than for alternate technologies. The natural effect is lower cost and improved reliability. In addition to new power generation plants, CFTCC technology will provide relatively compact and gas turbine compatible coal combustion/emissions control islands that can adapt existing natural gas-fired combined cycle plants to coal when gas prices rise to the point where conversion is economically attractive. Because of the simplicity, compactness, and compatibility of the RQL combustion/emission control island compared to other coal technologies, it could be a primary candidate for such conversions.

Rothrock, J.; Wenglarz, R.; Hart, P.; Mongia, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to develop engineering evaluations of technologies for the capture, use, and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestering of unused CO{sub 2}. Commercially available CO{sub 2}-capture technology is providing a performance and economic baseline against which to compare innovative technologies. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The value used for the {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget is 1 kg of CO{sub 2} per kilowatt-hour (electric). The base case is a 458-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 454 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.835 kg/kWhe. Two additional life-cycle energy balances for emerging technologies were considered: (1) high-temperature CO{sub 2} separation with calcium- or magnesium-based sorbents, and (2) ambient-temperature facilitated-transport polymer membranes for acid-gas removal.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigation of gasification chemical looping combustion combined cycle performance  

SciTech Connect

A novel combined cycle based on coal gasification and chemical looping combustion (CLC) offers a possibility of both high net power efficiency and separation of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. The technique involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier, which transfers oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel, and the avoidance of direct contact between fuel and combustion air. The fuel gas is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, an oxygen-containing compound, in the fuel reactor. The oxygen carrier in this study is NiO. The reduced oxygen carrier, Ni, in the fuel reactor is regenerated by the air in the air reactor. In this way, fuel and air are never mixed, and the fuel oxidation products CO{sub 2} and water vapor leave the system undiluted by air. All that is needed to get an almost pure CO{sub 2} product is to condense the water vapor and to remove the liquid water. When the technique is combined with gas turbine and heat recovery steam generation technology, a new type of combined cycle is formed which gives a possibility of obtaining high net power efficiency and CO{sub 2} separation. The performance of the combined cycle is simulated using the ASPEN software tool in this paper. The influence of the water/coal ratio on the gasification and the influence of the CLC process parameters such as the air reactor temperature, the turbine inlet supplementary firing, and the pressure ratio of the compressor on the system performance are discussed. Results show that, assuming an air reactor temperature of 1200{sup o}C, a gasification temperature of 1100 {sup o}C, and a turbine inlet temperature after supplementary firing of 1350{sup o}C, the system has the potential to achieve a thermal efficiency of 44.4% (low heating value), and the CO{sub 2} emission is 70.1 g/(kW h), 90.1% of the CO{sub 2} captured. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of the Ministry of Education

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Celebrating Black History Month with DOE's Rita Franklin | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rita Franklin Rita Franklin Celebrating Black History Month with DOE's Rita Franklin February 25, 2011 - 10:47am Addthis Rita Franklin, Chief Human Capital Officer, US Department of Energy. | Energy Department Photo Rita Franklin, Chief Human Capital Officer, US Department of Energy. | Energy Department Photo Ebony Meeks Former Assistant Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs Throughout the month of February, we're introducing some remarkable African Americans who are working to advance the President's clean energy agenda and help the Department of Energy achieve its mission. This week we're profiling Rita Franklin who is the Department of Energy's Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer. Question: What is your key responsibility? Rita Franklin: I'm responsible for the management and execution of the

92

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Procurement Guideline for Simple- and Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) procurement guideline for simple- and combined-cycle combustion turbines.

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/ CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE VOLUME I - CONCEPTUAL COMMERCIAL EVALUATION OPTIONAL PROGRAM FINAL REPORT September 1, 2001 - December 31, 2005 By Dennis A. Horazak (Siemens), Program Manager Richard A. Newby (Siemens) Eugene E. Smeltzer (Siemens) Rachid B. Slimane (GTI) P. Vann Bush (GTI) James L. Aderhold, Jr. (GTI) Bruce G. Bryan (GTI) December 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-AC26-99FT40674 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Siemens Power Generation, Inc. 4400 Alafaya Trail Orlando, FL 32826 & Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

94

Integrated gasifier combined cycle polygeneration system to produce liquid hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

An integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) system which simultaneously produces electricity, process steam, and liquid hydrogen was evaluated and compared to IGCC systems which cogenerate electricity and process steam. A number of IGCC plants, all employing a 15 MW gas turbine and producing from 0 to 20 tons per day of liquid hydrogen and from 0 to 20 MW of process steam were considered. The annual revenue required to own and operate such plants was estimated to be significantly lower than the potential market value of the products. The results indicate a significant potential economic benefit to configuring IGCC systems to produce a clean fuel in addition to electricity and process steam in relatively small industrial applications.

Burns, R.K.; Staiger, P.J.; Donovan, R.M.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. This process can reduce C0[sub 2] production because of its higher efficiency, and it is amenable to C0[sub 2] capture, because C0[sub 2] can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, C0[sub 2] transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of C0[sub 2] in geological reservoirs.The intent of this study is to provide the C0[sub 2] budget, or an equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the full study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget will be 1 kg C0[sub 2]/kWh[sub e].

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Johnson, R.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. This process can reduce C0[sub 2] production because of its higher efficiency, and it is amenable to C0[sub 2] capture, because C0[sub 2] can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, C0[sub 2] transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of C0[sub 2] in geological reservoirs.The intent of this study is to provide the C0[sub 2] budget, or an equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the full study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget will be 1 kg C0[sub 2]/kWh[sub e].

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Johnson, R.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Operational strategies for dispatchable combined cycle plants, Part I  

SciTech Connect

The Brush Cogeneration Facility is a dual-unit, combined cycle, cogeneration plant operating in a daily cycling, automatically-dispatchable mode. According to the PSCO tariff for cogenerators, the Independent Power Production Facility Policy, the highest payment schedule is reserved for those facilities capable of automatic generation control (AGC), the so-called `Category 4A Facilities.` AGC entails the ability to receive microwave signals from PSCO`s Load Control Center at Lookout Mountain, Colorado, and automatically adjust output at a rate of 2% of contract maximum load per minute, over at least the top 40% of contract load range. Perhaps the most critical equipment modification enabling AGC was the re-enabling of automatic variable inlet guide vane (IGV) control. During control system modifications for automatic IGVs, the operators realized that the Woodward NetCon control system`s capabilities of control, monitoring and information display were better than anticipated. The relative ease with which IGV changes were made encouraged the operating team to continue to maximize efficiency and optimize plant operations. In fact, the ease of use and modification led to the purchase of an additional NetCon system for plant-wide performance monitoring. The retrofit of the gas turbine control system with the NetCon system was a success. 1 tab.

Nolan, J.P.; Landis, F.P. [Brush Cogeneration Facility, Brush, CO (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method and apparatus for operating a combined cycle power plant having a defective deaerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: a deaerator having primary and secondary functions, the primary function to degasify feedwater for use in the combined cycle power plant; means for normally coupling the deaerator to the combined cycle power plant as a normally functioning part thereof; means for isolating the deaerator from the combined cycle power plant during operations thereof; and alternate means for performing the primary and secondary functions when the deaerator is isolated from the combined cycle power plant, during operations thereof, by the isolating means.

Pavel, J.; Richardson, B.L.; Myers, G.A.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Integrated gasification combined cycle overview of FETC--S program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing market conditions, brought about by utility deregulation and increased environmental regulations, have encouraged the Department of Energy/Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE/FETC) to restructure its Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) program. The program emphasis, which had focused on baseload electricity production from coal, is now expanded to more broadly address the production of a suite of energy and chemical products. The near-term market barrier for baseload power applications for conventional IGCC systems combines with increasing opportunities to process a range of low- and negative-value opportunity feedstocks. The new program is developing a broader range of technology options that will increase the versatility and the technology base for commercialization of gasification-based technologies. This new strategy supports gasification in niche markets where, due to its ability to coproduce a wide variety of commodity and premium products to meet market requirements, it is an attractive alternative. By obtaining operating experience in industrial coproduction applications today, gasification system modules can be refined and improved leading to commercial guarantees and acceptance of gasification technology as a cost-effective technology for baseload power generation and coproduction as these markets begin to open.

Stiegel, G.J.; Maxwell, R.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Proceedings: Ninth International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil and Combined Cycle Plants with Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper selection, application, and optimization of cycle chemistry have long been recognized as integral to ensuring the highest possible levels of component availability and reliability in fossil-fired generating plant units. These proceedings of the Ninth EPRI International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address state-of-the-art practices in conventional and combined-cycle plants. The content provides a worldwide perspective on cycle chemistry practices and insight on industry issues an...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 2008 3-Way Meeting The 2008 3-Way Meeting In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award APRIL 24, 2008 Bookmark and Share Oleg Shpyrko The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Users Organization has named Oleg G. Shpyrko of the University of California, San Diego, as the recipient of the 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award. The award recognizes an important technical or scientific accomplishment by a young investigator that depended on, or is beneficial to, the APS. Shpyrko will receive the

102

Franklin Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Franklin Electric Coop Franklin Electric Coop Place Alabama Utility Id 6717 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Heat Rate Residential Intersection Lights- Unmetered Lighting Mulit-Phase Demand- Over 112.5 kVa Commercial Multi- Phase Over 112.5 Time of Use- Demand Commercial Multi-Phase Service Rate- Non Demand Commercial Security Light- Unmetered Lighting Single Phase Rate Commercial Storage Space Heating Residential Storage Water Heating Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1110/kWh

103

User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades  

SciTech Connect

The NERSC flagship computer Cray XT4 system"Franklin" has gone through three major upgrades: quad core upgrade, CLE 2.1 upgrade, and IO upgrade, during the past year. In this paper, we will discuss the various aspects of the user impacts such as user access, user environment, and user issues etc from these upgrades. The performance impacts on the kernel benchmarks and selected application benchmarks will also be presented.

He, Yun (Helen)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Duct Burner Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides component-level information regarding the maintenance of major components associated with the compressor section of a combustion turbine typically installed at a combined-cycle facility. It combines recommendations offered by major equipment manufacturers with lessons learned from owner/operators of combined-cycle facilities. BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

They`re he-e-re (almost): The 60% efficient combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the technology that promises 60% efficiency from combined-cycle power plants. The topics of the article include advancing design, off-peak thermal energy storage, improving heat recovery steam generator performance, Kalina thermal cycle, performance of Kalina combined-cycle plants, and heat recovery in vapor generators.

DeMoss, T.B.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Deaerator heat exchanger for combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combined cycle power plant. It comprises a steam turbine including an inlet portion for receiving motive steam and an exhaust portion for exhausting the motive steam that is spent by the steam turbine; a condenser connected to the exhaust portion of the steam turbine for receiving the spent motive steam and for condensing the spent motive steam to a supply of condensate; a gas turbine including an exhaust portion for exhausting waste heat that is produced by the gas turbine in the form of exhaust gases; a heat recovery steam generator connected between the exhaust portion of the gas turbine and the steam turbine, for receiving the waste heat exhausted by the gas turbine, for generating the motive steam from a supply of feedwater heated by the waste heat, and for supplying the motive steam to the steam turbine; a deaerator connected to the condenser for receiving the supply of condensate and for deaerating the condensate to provide the supply of feedwater to the heat recovery steam generator; and a heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Richardson, B.L.

1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Franklin County PUD - Solar Energy System Loan (Washington) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Franklin County PUD - Solar Energy System Loan (Washington) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

109

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a t echnoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Liquid Life: Money and the Circulation of Success after Franklin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? What happens when the money form becomes a model for selfhood and social success? Benjamin Franklins autobiography posits a reciprocal relationship between the circulation (more)

Garrett, Matthew

112

Tampa Electric Company Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect

The proposed project will utilize commercially available gasification technology as provided by Texaco in their licensed oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier. In this arrangement, coal is ground to specification and slurried in water to the desired concentration (60--70% solids) in rod mills. This coal slurry and an oxidant (95 % pure oxygen) are then mixed in the gasifier burner where the coal partially combusts, in an oxygen deficient environment, to produce syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/SCF (LHV) at a temperature in excess of 2500{degrees}F. The oxygen will be produced from an Air Separation Unit (ASU). The gasifier is expected to achieve greater than 95% carbon conversion in a single pass. It is currently planned for the gasifier to be a single vessel feeding into one radiant syngas cooler where the temperature will be reduced from about 2500{degrees}F to about 1300{degrees}F. After the radiant cooler, the gas will then be split into two (2) parallel convective coolers, where the temperature will be cooled further to about 900{degrees}F. One stream will go to the 50% HGCU system and the other stream to the traditional CGCU system with 100% capacity. This flow arrangement was selected to provide assurance to Tampa Electric that the IGCC capability would not be restricted due to the demonstration of the HGCU system. A traditional amine scrubber type system with conventional sulfur recovery will be used. Sulfur from the HGCU and CGCU systems will be recovered in the form of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and elemental sulfur respectively.The key components of the combined cycle are the advanced combustion.turbine (CT), heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and steam turbine (ST), and generators. The advanced CT will be a GE 7F operating with a firing temperature of about 2300{degrees}F.

Pless, D.E.; Black, C.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Tampa Electric Company Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect

The proposed project will utilize commercially available gasification technology as provided by Texaco in their licensed oxygen-blown entrained-flow gasifier. In this arrangement, coal is ground to specification and slurried in water to the desired concentration (60--70% solids) in rod mills. This coal slurry and an oxidant (95 % pure oxygen) are then mixed in the gasifier burner where the coal partially combusts, in an oxygen deficient environment, to produce syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/SCF (LHV) at a temperature in excess of 2500[degrees]F. The oxygen will be produced from an Air Separation Unit (ASU). The gasifier is expected to achieve greater than 95% carbon conversion in a single pass. It is currently planned for the gasifier to be a single vessel feeding into one radiant syngas cooler where the temperature will be reduced from about 2500[degrees]F to about 1300[degrees]F. After the radiant cooler, the gas will then be split into two (2) parallel convective coolers, where the temperature will be cooled further to about 900[degrees]F. One stream will go to the 50% HGCU system and the other stream to the traditional CGCU system with 100% capacity. This flow arrangement was selected to provide assurance to Tampa Electric that the IGCC capability would not be restricted due to the demonstration of the HGCU system. A traditional amine scrubber type system with conventional sulfur recovery will be used. Sulfur from the HGCU and CGCU systems will be recovered in the form of H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and elemental sulfur respectively.The key components of the combined cycle are the advanced combustion.turbine (CT), heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and steam turbine (ST), and generators. The advanced CT will be a GE 7F operating with a firing temperature of about 2300[degrees]F.

Pless, D.E.; Black, C.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Costs of Texaco Gasifier-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are an advanced power generation concept with the flexibility to use coal, heavy oils, petroleum coke, biomass, and waste (more)

Akunuri, Naveen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the heat recovery steam generator at a combustion gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance.BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Lessons Learned in Startup and Commissioning of Simple-Cycle and Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbine Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last ten years, hundreds of combustion turbines (CT) have been installed to meet the needs of the power generation market. A variety of CT models have been installed throughout this period, in both simple-cycle and combined-cycle configurations. Some of the initial plants had issues related to meeting performance requirements and acceptable operation, and each new plant design could be improved based on the experience gained on the earlier installations and startups. This report provides a summa...

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

118

Franklin Rural Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name Franklin Rural Electric Cooperative Place Iowa Utility Id 6722 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Space Heating Residential Intersection Lights Lighting Multi-Phase (100 kVa & Under) Commercial Multi-Phase (Over 100 kVa) Commercial Multi-Phase (Primary Metered Over 100 kVa) Commercial Security Lights Lighting Single Phase Commercial Storage Space Heating Residential Storage Water Heating Residential Average Rates

119

Control system for single shaft combined cycle gas and steam turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for starting and controlling a combined cycle turbine of the type having a gas turbine with a fuel flow control valve and a steam turbine with at least one steam control valve both disposed on a single shaft and having a heat recovery steam generator heated by the gas turbine and connected to supply steam to the steam control valve, the combined cycle turbine having a unified control system and driving a load, and also having an auxiliary steam source connected to the steam control valve. It comprises controlling of steam from the auxiliary steam source with the steam control valve to crank the combined cycle turbine for starting, initiating and controlling fuel flow to the gas turbine with the fuel flow control valve and initiating combustion, controlling initial acceleration of the combined cycle turbine with the steam control valve on auxiliary steam, coordinating control of the combined cycle turbine by the steam control valve and the fuel control valve with the unified control system, transferring acceleration control during a smooth acceleration phase of the combined cycle turbine by the steam control valve and the fuel control valve with the unified control system, transferring acceleration control during a smooth acceleration phase of the combined cycle turbine to the fuel flow control valve and gradually reducing the opening of the steam control valve to a minimum value when the turbine reaches rated speed.

Moore, J.H.; Kure-Jensen, J.; Rowen, W.I.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

A review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its application Copersucar, CP 162, Piracicaba, SP ­ Brazil ­ 13400-970 Biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined-from-sugarcane program. 1. Introduction The biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cy- cle (BIG

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC's Franklin NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability July 20, 2009 OCEAN EDDIES: This image comes from a computer simulation modeling eddies in the ocean. An interesting feature is the abundance of eddies away from the equator, which is shown in the center of the image at y=0. This research collaboration led by Paola Cessi of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography performed over 15,000 years worth of deep ocean circulation simulations with 1.6 million processor core hours on the upgraded Franklin system. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center has officially accepted a series of upgrades to its Cray XT4 supercomputer, providing the facility's 3,000 users with twice

122

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Integration of Ion Transport Membrane Technology with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (AP), has reviewed the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process, whereby coal (or some other hydrocarbon such as petroleum coke or heavy oil) is broken down into its constituent volatile and nonvolatile components through the process of oxidative-pyrolysis. Combustible synthetic gas created in the process can be used in a traditional combined cycle. IGCC is particularly appealing for its potentially higher efficiencies compared ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Fuel Gas System for Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Plant Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the fuel gas system at a gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance.BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and operators of CTCC facilities may find ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Steam Turbine and Generator Designs for Combined-Cycle Applications: Durability, Reliability, and Procurement Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined-cycle power plants are currently preferred for new power generation capacity in much of the world, particularly in the United States. Steam turbines and electrical generators are vital components affecting plant performance and reliability. Over 90 percent of the world's combined-cycle steam turbines are provided by six major manufacturers: Alstom, General Electric, Siemens-Westinghouse, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, and Hitachi. This report provides information on their model offerings and consideration...

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

129

Exxon Chemical's Coal-Fired Combined Cycle Power Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Chemical's Central Engineering Division has recently developed and patented CAT-PAC for Industrial Cogeneration and Utility Power Plants. It involves the marriage of a conventional direct pulverized coal-fired boiler radiant section with a convection section adapted from our furnace experience. In particular, it is an open-cycle, hot air turbine arrangement with indirect heating of the air in the boiler convection section. The turbine exhaust is then used as pre-heated combustion air for the boiler. The air coil heats the 150 psig air from the standard gas turbine axial compressor to approximately, 1750F. Today, CAT-PAC would require about 10% less fuel (or 1000 Btu/kwh) than the best coal-fired Utility Plant for the same net power output, at a comparable investment. With improved air heater metallurgy, and/or trim firing of a premium fuel (up to 2000 F permissible gas turbine temperature), CAT-PAC savings would double to 20%. Today, in an industrial coal-fired cogeneration plant, CAT-PAC can produce up to 75% more power for a given steam load, while maintaining the highest cogeneration efficiencies. With improved metallurgy, and/or trim firing, the additional power would approach 100%.

Guide, J. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thermodynamic Analysis of Combined Cycle District Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the University of Massachusetts' Combined Heat and Power (CHP) District Heating System. Energy and exergy analyses are performed based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics for power generation systems that include a 10 MW Solar combustion gas turbine, a 4-MW steam turbine, a 100,000 pph heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), three 125,000 pph package boilers, and auxiliary equipment. In the analysis, actual system data is used to assess the district heating system performance, energy and exergy efficiencies, exergetic improvement potential and exergy losses. Energy and exergy calculations are conducted for the whole year on an hourly basis. System efficiencies are calculated for a wide range of component operating loads. The results show how thermodynamic analysis can be used to identify the magnitudes and location of energy losses in order to improve the existing system, processes or components.

Suresh, S.; Gopalakrishnan, H.; Kosanovic, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Application of RBF-type ARX Modeling and Control to Gas Turbine Combined Cycle SCR Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of RBF-type ARX Modeling and Control to Gas Turbine Combined Cycle SCR Systems Y, nonlinear model-based predictive control, energy saving. 1. INTRODUCTION In Japan, GTCC(Gas Turbine Combined gas-firing GTCC power plant is most effective in terms of thermal efficiency and lower CO2 energy

Ozaki, Tohru

132

Impact of Cycling on the Operation and Maintenance Cost of Conventional and Combined-Cycle Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing privatization of electricity generation across the world, competition and shareholder demand for higher profits, stricter regulations on environmental impacts, changes in fuel prices, and the increasing penetration of nondispatchable energy have resulted in an increasing need for larger energy generators to operate as non-baseload units. As a result, both conventional power plants and combined-cycle power plants are increasingly being subjected to load-following and cyclic operation. ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Split stream boilers for high-temperature/high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles  

SciTech Connect

Research and development work on high-temperature and high-pressure (up to 1,500 F TIT and 4,500 psia) topping steam turbines and associated steam generators for steam power plants as well as combined cycle plants is being carried forward by DOE, EPRI, and independent companies. Aeroderivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines both will require exhaust gas supplementary firing to achieve high throttle temperatures. This paper presents an analysis and examples of a split stream boiler arrangement for high-temperature and high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles. A portion of the gas turbine exhaust flow is run in parallel with a conventional heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This side stream is supplementary fired opposed to the current practice of full exhaust flow firing. Chemical fuel gas recuperation can be incorporated in the side stream as an option. A significant combined cycle efficiency gain of 2 to 4 percentage points can be realized using this split stream approach. Calculations and graphs show how the DOE goal of 60 percent combined cycle efficiency burning natural gas fuel can be exceeded. The boiler concept is equally applicable to the integrated coal gas fuel combined cycle (IGCC).

Rice, I.G. [Rice (I.G.), Spring, TX (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Apparatus and methods for supplying auxiliary steam in a combined cycle system  

SciTech Connect

To provide auxiliary steam, a low pressure valve is opened in a combined cycle system to divert low pressure steam from the heat recovery steam generator to a header for supplying steam to a second combined cycle's steam turbine seals, sparging devices and cooling steam for the steam turbine if the steam turbine and gas turbine lie on a common shaft with the generator. Cooling steam is supplied the gas turbine in the combined cycle system from the high pressure steam turbine. Spent gas turbine cooling steam may augment the low pressure steam supplied to the header by opening a high pressure valve whereby high and low pressure steam flows are combined. An attemperator is used to reduce the temperature of the combined steam in response to auxiliary steam flows above a predetermined flow and a steam header temperature above a predetermined temperature. The auxiliary steam may be used to start additional combined cycle units or to provide a host unit with steam turbine cooling and sealing steam during full-speed no-load operation after a load rejection.

Gorman, William G. (Ballston Spa, NY); Carberg, William George (Ballston Spa, NY); Jones, Charles Michael (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Descriptions of Past Research in Program 79: Combustion Turbine and Combined-Cycle Operations and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The asset value of natural-gas-fired combustion turbines, especially in combined cycle plants, is on the rise, driven by their inherent efficiency, emissions, operational characteristics, broader market fit with a forecast affordable fuel supply, and complementary role covering load swings such as those from intermittent renewables. Cycling and high-temperature operations adversely affect combustion turbine life, as well as plant reliability and availability. The risks associated with hot section durabil...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Combined Ageing and Thermal Cycling of Compressive Mica Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Phlogopite mica seals were evaluated in a combined ageing and thermal cycling test. Two interlayers were investigated: a glass and a metallic foil. Samples were first aged at 800 degrees C for {approx}500 or {approx}1000 hrs in a simulated SOFC environment, followed by short-term thermal cycling. The results of hybrid mica with glass interlayer showed extensive reaction and poor thermal cycle stability after ageing for 1036 hrs and 21 thermal cycles. Use of the brazing alloy as the interlayer showed no interaction with mica over 504 hrs, and reasonable leak rates were maintained through eight cycles. The leakage development was found to be consistent with fracture surface and microstructure analyses.

Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Franklin County PUD - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Franklin County PUD - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Franklin County PUD - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Franklin County PUD - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Freezer: $15 Refrigerator: $15 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30 Gas Clothes Washer: $20 Electric Clothes Washer: $30 Water Heater: $25 Windows/Patio Doors: $6 per sq/ft Weatherization/Insulation: $0.05 - $0.85 sq/ft PTCS Air Source Heat Pumps: $500 - $1,100 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,500

138

New Features of the Hopper XE6 - Differences from Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Features of the Hopper XE6 New Features of the Hopper XE6 New Features of the Hopper XE6 - Differences from Franklin While the Franklin and Hopper systems are both have similar programming environments and user software, there are some key architectural differences between the two systems. This page describes those differences and how they may improve your productivity. More Cores per Node and Multiple Sockets per Node Hopper has a total of 24 cores on each node. With more cores per node, you may want to explore adding OpenMP to applications. Hopper also has two sockets on each compute node whereas Franklin only has one. Please see the Hopper mutli-core FAQ page for a discussion of effectively using all 24 cores per node and the Hopper configuration page for more system specification details.

139

PERIODICITY OF ESTROUS CYCLE IN ALBINO RATS; RESPONSE TO SOME CRUDE DRUG COMBINATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The extracts of bark, leaves and stem of A. indica, fruits of P. longum, berries of E. officinalis and seeds of G. indicum were prepared using different solvents. Three different combinations of these extracts were tried on the female albino rats for their effect on the estrous cycle. The combination consisting of alcoholic extracts of leaves and stem of A. indica, fruits of P. longum, berries of E. officinalis and seeds of G. indicum has exhibited considerable effect on estrous cycle by prolongation of diestrous phase.

C. K. Kokate; M. Krishna; Reddy; N. Chari

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0318) Location: Clark County, Kentucky Contacts: For further information on this environmental For further information on the DOE National impact statement (EIS), call: Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, call: 1-800-432-8330 ext. 5460 1-800-472-2756 or contact: or contact: Mr. Roy Spears Ms. Carol Borgstrom

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Rosalind Franklin's work on coal,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Rosalind Franklin's work on coal, carbon research involved studies of coal, carbon, and graphite. She made a number of enduring contributions Franklin's published work on coal, carbon,Rosalind Franklin's role in unravelling the structure

Harris, Peter J F

144

Thermal Design of an Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor Combined Cycle Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Current work modeling high temperature compact heat exchangers may demonstrate the design feasibility of a Vapor Core Reactor (VCR) driven combined cycle power plant. For solid nuclear fuel designs, the cycle efficiency is typically limited by a metallurgical temperature limit which is dictated by fuel and structural melting points. In a vapor core, the gas/vapor phase nuclear fuel is uniformly mixed with the topping cycle working fluid. Heat is generated homogeneously throughout the working fluid thus extending the metallurgical temperature limit. Because of the high temperature, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation is employed for topping cycle power extraction. MHD rejected heat is transported via compact heat exchanger to a conventional Brayton gas turbine bottoming cycle. High bottoming cycle mass flow rates are required to remove the waste heat because of low heat capacities for the bottoming cycle gas. High mass flow is also necessary to balance the high Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) mass flow rate in the topping cycle. Heat exchanger design is critical due to the high temperatures and corrosive influence of fluoride compounds and fission products existing in VCR/MHD exhaust. Working fluid compositions for the topping cycle include variations of Uranium Tetrafluoride, Helium and various electrical conductivity seeds for the MHD. Bottoming cycle working fluid compositions include variations of Helium and Xenon. Some thought has been given to include liquid metal vapor in the bottoming cycle for a Cheng or evaporative cooled design enhancement. The NASA Glenn Lewis Research Center code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) is utilized for evaluating chemical species existing in the gas stream. Work being conducted demonstrates the compact heat exchanger design, utilization of the CEA code, and assessment of different topping and bottoming working fluid compositions. (authors)

Bays, Samuel E.; Anghaie, Samim; Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Proceedings: Eighth International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil and Combined Cycle Plants with Heat Recovery Steam Generators, June 20-22, 2006, Calgary, Alberta Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper selection, application, and optimization of the cycle chemistry have long been recognized as integral to ensuring the highest possible levels of component availability and reliability in fossil-fired generating plant units. These proceedings of the Eighth EPRI International Conference on Cycle Chemistry in Fossil Plants address state-of-the-art practices in conventional and combined cycle plants. The content provides a worldwide perspective on cycle chemistry practices, and insight as to industry ...

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

CO2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) Energy Resources International, Inc. 1015 18 th Street, N.W., Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 CO 2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle 1 Abstract This study compares the economic value of two CO 2 mitigation actions: terrestrial reforestation to sequester CO 2 emitted from coal-fired power generation versus natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power generation to avoid (minimize) CO 2 release. The same quantity of carbon offset was assumed for both actions. Tree stock growth, carbon absorption/release cycles, and replanting were considered to maintain the quantity of carbon offset via reforestation. The study identified important parameters with both CO 2 mitigation options that should be considered when examining alternative strategies.

147

Combined cycle solar central receiver hybrid power system study. Volume III. Appendices. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design study for a 100 MW gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle solar/fossil-fuel hybrid power plant is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (a) preconceptual design data; (b) market potential analysis methodology; (c) parametric analysis methodology; (d) EPGS systems description; (e) commercial-scale solar hybrid power system assessment; and (f) conceptual design data lists. (WHK)

None

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Heat Recovery Steam Generators for Combined Cycle Applications: HRSG Procurement, Design, Construction, and Operation Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design alternatives and procurement approaches for heat recovery steam generators, supplemental firing duct burners, and ancillary steam systems are addressed in this report. Power engineers and project developers will find an up-to-date, comprehensive resource for planning, specification and preliminary design in support of combined cycle plant development.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Phased Construction of Natural Gas Combined-Cycle Plants with Coal Gasification and CO2 Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a brief review of technologies and key issues involved in a phased construction approach for a low-emission integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) plant where carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for use or sequestration can be added at a later date.

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evaluation of a Dow-Based Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plant Using Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study developed performance and cost data for two different Dow-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants, designed to fire either Texas lignite or Wyoming subbituminous coals at a Gulf Coast location. It demonstrated the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of these plants for generating power from low-rank coals.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cost and performance analysis of biomass-based integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To make a significant contribution to the power mix in the United States biomass power systems must be competitive on a cost and efficiency basis. We describe the cost and performance of three biomass-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The economic viability and efficiency performance of the IGCC generation technology appear to be quite attractive.

Craig, K. R.; Mann, M. K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Start-up Optimization of a Combined Cycle Power Plant A. Linda, E. Sllberga,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bModelon AB, Lund, Sweden cSiemens AG, Energy Sector, Erlangen, Germany Abstract In the electricity market of today, with increasing de- mand for electricity production on short notice, the combined cycle to opti- mize are explored. Results are encouraging and show that energy production during start-up can

153

DADICC: Intelligent system for anomaly detection in a combined cycle gas turbine plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DADICC is the abbreviated name for an intelligent system able to detect on-line and diagnose anomalies as soon as possible in the dynamic evolution of the behaviour of a power plant based on a combined cycle gas turbine. In order to reach this objective, ... Keywords: Anomaly detection, Diagnosis, Expert system, Multi-agent system, Neural network, Normal behaviour

Antonio Arranz; Alberto Cruz; Miguel A. Sanz-Bobi; Pablo Ruz; Josu Coutio

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Combined Heat and Power: Coal-Fired Air Turbine (CAT)-Cycle Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By combining an integrated system with a gas turbine, coal-fired air turbine cycle technology can produce energy at an efficiency rate of over 40%, with capital and operating costs below those of competing conventional systems. Read this fact sheet to discover the additional benefits of this exciting new technology.

Recca, L.

1999-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbine Steam Bypass Model Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various systems and components that are unique to this type of power generation plants and are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil power plant. As such, current CTCC facility owners use of the Electric Power ...

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Franklin College Faculty Senate Committee on Planning and Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Geography Ranked #29 among geography programs in U.S. (NRC 2010 ranking) History History ranked 19.g., a Women's History Month calendar; a new logo for Theatre and Film Studies; and e-blast newsletters to the oil spill media attention to the work of Dr. Samantha Joye in Marine Sciences. Franklin College

Arnold, Jonathan

157

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Combustion Turbine/Combined-Cycle Operations and Maintenance Cost Analyzer, Version 8.61  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CTCC O&M Cost Analyzer is a spreadsheet software product that estimates operations and maintenance (O&M) costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle plants for specific gas turbine models over the operating life of the assetThe CTCC O&M Cost Analyzer software contains powerful capabilities to assist users in evaluating non-fuel O&M costs and in supporting a life-cycle cost evaluation perspective. The software uses a "bottoms-up" approach for ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

159

Gas Turbine/Combined Cycle Post-Combustion Emission Control Best Maintenance Practices Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most simple cycle and combined cycle gas turbines installed in the last ten years have been equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) controls for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and are required to maintain outlet NOx emissions as low as 2.5 ppm (at 15 oxygen content). In addition, many of these units are equipped with catalyst to oxidize carbon monoxide (CO) by as much as 90 or more, lowering CO emissions to less than 5 ppm (also at 15 oxygen content). With many of these units having acquired more than 5...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

160

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Environmental Assessment for the Warren Station externally fired combined cycle demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Penelec project is one of 5 projects for potential funding under the fifth solicitation under the Clean Coal Technology program. In Penelec, two existing boilers would be replaced at Warren Station, PA; the new unit would produce 73 MW(e) in a combined cycle mode (using both gas-fired and steam turbines). The project would fill the need for a full utility-size demonstration of externally fire combined cycle (EFCC) technology as the next step toward commercialization. This environmental assessment was prepared for compliance with NEPA; its purpose is to provide sufficient basis for determining whether to prepare an environmental impact statement or to issue a finding of no significant impact. It is divided into the sections: purpose and need for proposed action; alternatives; brief description of affected environment; environmental consequences, including discussion of commercial operation beyond the demonstration period.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tubular SOFC and SOFC/gas turbine combined cycle status and prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presently under fabrication at Westinghouse for a consortium of Dutch and Danish utilities is the world`s first 100 kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power generation system. This natural gas fueled experimental field unit will be installed near Arnhem, Netherlands, at an auxiliary district heating plant. Electrical generation efficiency of this simple cycle atmospheric pressure system will approach 50% [net ac/LHV]. For larger capacity systems, the horizon for the efficiency (atmospheric pressure) is about 55%. Pressurization would increase the efficiency. Objectives of the analyses reported were: (1) to document the improved performance potential of the two shaft turbine cycle given access to a better recuperator and lower lead losses, (2) to assess the performance of PSOFC/GT combined cycles in the 3 MW plant application that are based on use of a simple single shaft gas turbine having a design-point turbine inlet temperature that closely matches the temperature of the SOFC exhaust gas (about 850 C), (3) to estimate the performance potential of smaller combined cycle power plants employing a single SOFC submodule, and (4) to evaluate the cogeneration potential of such systems.

Veyo, S.E.; Lundberg, W.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Technical and economic evaluation of a Brayton-Rankine combined-cycle solar-thermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to conduct an assessment of gas-liquid direct-contact heat exchange and of a new storage-coupled system (the open-cycle Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycle). Both technical and economic issues are evaluated. Specifically, the storage-coupled combined cycle is compared with a molten salt system. The open Brayton cycle system is used as a topping cycle, and the reject heat powers the molten salt/Rankine system. In this study the molten salt system is left unmodified, the Brayton cycle is integrated on top of a Martin Marietta description of an existing molten salt plant. This compares a nonoptimized combined cycle with an optimized molten salt system.

Wright, J. D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Design Considerations for CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research were to assess the performance and costs of coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with Greenfield and retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The study is part of the CoalFleet Program, a collaborative research and development program that promotes deployment of advanced coal technologies, including IGCC, ultrasupercritical pulverized, oxy-fuel combustion, and supercritical circulating fluidized bed technologies. Two types of coalPittsburg...

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluation of Thermal Zero Liquid Discharge Treatment Technologies for Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to identify and update key details of zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management systems currently operating at U.S. gas-fired combined cycle generating stations (CC). The study focused on not only the technologies applied, but also on the advantages and shortcomings of the various processes and summarized the lessons learned from the operating systems. Most ZLD's were found to employ one of four different types of water pretreatment process assemblies consisting of the following:...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE)`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports the commercialization of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems. This overview briefly describes the supporting RD&D activities and the IGCC projects selected for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program.

Ness, H.M.; Brdar, R.D.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integrated gasification combined-cycle research development and demonstration activities in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) advanced power systems for demonstration in the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, is managing a research development and demonstration (RD&D)program that supports the CCT program, and addresses long-term improvements in support of IGCC technology. This overview briefly describes the CCT projects and the supporting RD&D activities.

Ness, H.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Attemperator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants. Therefore, use of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Preventive Maintenance Basis Database (1018758) by owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants and that have been previously added to the database. Because of the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, the EPRI Generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

CoalFleet Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Research and Development Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of EPRI technical report 1013219, CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants that was published in January 2007. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the state of IGCC technology, gauge technology development progress made since 2007, and discuss updated estimates on the potential for advanced technologies to improve power plant performance and economics. The report consists of the following four parts: establishme...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Standardization of HRSG production components for large, combined-cycle power plants  

SciTech Connect

Stein Industrie's experience in the development of heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) for combined cycle applications is briefly reviewed. Standardization of several components, the extended use of N.C. machine tools and automatic welding procedures have made it possible to improve quality as well as production costs. This process has been concentrated on three types of HRSG for 35, 100 and 200 MW class gas turbines. 4 figs.

Chellini, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

2012 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Research and Development Roadmap - PUBLIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second generation of integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants is now being built or planned following nearly two decades of commercial demonstration at multiple units. State-of-the-art IGCC plants have efficiencies equivalent to that of pulverized coal power plants while exhibiting equal or superior environmental performance and lower water usage. Pre-combustion CO2 capture technology is commercially available and has been demonstrated in several gasification plants, ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Steam Valves Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various components that are unique to these types of power generation plants. Therefore, use of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Preventive Maintenance Basis Database (1018758) by owners of CTCC facilities is somewhat limited to only those components that are common to both CTCC facilities and nuclear or fossil power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, the ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Continuous Emissions Monitoring Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant. As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants and already in the database. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Combustion Turbine Diagnostic Health Monitoring: Combined Cycle Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CCPFDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry-wide transition to condition-based maintenance strategies has prompted development of sophisticated, automated condition assessment tools. The Combined Cycle Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CCPFDM) presented in this report is the third of a suite of intelligent software tools being developed by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of the Combustion Turbine Health Management (CTHM) System. The CTHM System will offer a significant ...

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Tampa Electric Company Polk Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant Carbon Capture Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Industry Technology Demonstration Program on Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), an engineering study was conducted to evaluate the cost and performance impacts of various CCS schemes at the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station. The portion of the work presented here was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) IGCC with CCS demonstration program collaborative and focuses on novel CO2 capture and purification systems integrated...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

CoalFleet RD&D Augmentation Plan for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, clean coal technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offer societies around the world the promise of efficient, affordable power generation at markedly reduced levels of emissions8212including "greenhouse gases" linked to global climate change8212relative to today's current fleet of coal-fired power plants. To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of IGCC and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiati...

2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

Conceptual design and techno-economic assessment of integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology  

SciTech Connect

Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic trough collectors causes an increase to competitiveness of solar thermal power plants (STPP) by substitution of oil with direct steam generation that results in lower investment and operating costs. In this study the integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology is introduced and techno-economic assessment of this plant is reported compared with two conventional cases. Three considered cases are: an integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology (ISCCS-DSG), a solar electric generating system (SEGS), and an integrated solar combined cycle system with HTF (heat transfer fluid) technology (ISCCS-HTF). This study shows that levelized energy cost (LEC) for the ISCCS-DSG is lower than the two other cases due to reducing O and M costs and also due to increasing the heat to electricity net efficiency of the power plant. Among the three STPPs, SEGS has the lowest CO{sub 2} emissions, but it will operate during daytime only. (author)

Nezammahalleh, H.; Farhadi, F.; Tanhaemami, M. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, No 593 Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Externally-fired combined cycle: An effective coal fueled technology for repowering and new generation  

SciTech Connect

The Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) is an attractive emerging technology for powering high efficiency combined gas and steam turbine cycles with coal or other ash bearing fuels. In the EFCC, the heat input to a gas turbine is supplied indirectly through a ceramic air heater. The air heater, along with an atmospheric coal combustor and ancillary equipment, replaces the conventional gas turbine combustor. A steam generator located downstream from the ceramic air heater and steam turbine cycle, along with an exhaust cleanup system, completes the combined cycle. A key element of the EFCC Development Program, the 25 MMBtu/h heat-input Kennebunk Test Facility (KTF), has recently begun operation. The KTF has been operating with natural gas and will begin operating with coal in early 1995. The US Department of Energy selected an EFCC repowering of the Pennsylvania Electric Company`s Warren Station for funding under the Clean Coal Technology Program Round V. The project focuses on repowering an existing 48 MW (gross) steam turbine with an EFCC power island incorporating a 30 MW gas turbine, for a gross power output of 78 MW and a net output of 72 MW. The net plant heat rate will be decreased by approximately 30% to below 9,700 Btu/kWh. Use of a dry scrubber and fabric filter will reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and particulate emissions to levels under those required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions are controlled by the use of staged combustion. The demonstration project is currently in the engineering phase, with startup scheduled for 1997. This paper discusses the background of the EFCC, the KTF, the Warren Station EFCC Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, the commercial plant concept, and the market potential for the EFCC.

Stoddard, L.E.; Bary, M.R. [Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Gray, K.M. [Pennsylvania Electric Co., Johnstown, PA (United States); LaHaye, P.G. [Hague International, South Portland, ME (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

System study on partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery - article no. 051801  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

S partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery is proposed in this paper. Partial gasification adopts cascade conversion of the composition of coal. Active composition of coal is simply gasified, while inactive composition, that is char, is burnt in a boiler. Oxy-fuel combustion of syngas produces only CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, so the CO{sub 2} can be separated through cooling the working fluid. This decreases the amount of energy consumption to separate CO{sub 2} compared with conventional methods. The novel system integrates the above two key technologies by injecting steam from a steam turbine into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine to combine the Rankine cycle with the Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiency of this system will be higher based on the cascade utilization of energy level. Compared with the conventional integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), the compressor of the gas turbine, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) and gasifier are substituted for a pump, reheater, and partial gasifier, so the system is simplified. Furthermore, the novel system is investigated by means of energy-utilization diagram methodology and provides a simple analysis of their economic and environmental performance. As a result, the thermal efficiency of this system may be expected to be 45%, with CO{sub 2} recovery of 41.2%, which is 1.5-3.5% higher than that of an IGCC system. At the same time, the total investment cost of the new system is about 16% lower than that of an IGCC. The comparison between the partial gasification technology and the IGCC technology is based on the two representative cases to identify the specific feature of the proposed system.

Xu, Y.J.; Jin, H.G.; Lin, R.M.; Han, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

City of Franklin, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky (Utility Company) Kentucky (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Franklin Place Kentucky Utility Id 6718 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0869/kWh Commercial: $0.0938/kWh Industrial: $0.0724/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Franklin,_Kentucky_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409617"

182

City of Franklin, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Franklin Franklin Place Nebraska Utility Id 6723 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- All Electric Commercial General Service- Demand Commercial General Service- Single Phase Commercial General Service- Three Phase Commercial Irrigation Wells Commercial Municipal Residential Facilities Residential Residential and Churches Residential Residential- All Electric Residential Street Lights Lighting

183

New Franklin, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Franklin, Ohio: Energy Resources Franklin, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.9417229°, -81.5415079° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9417229,"lon":-81.5415079,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

184

Microsoft Word - CX_Memo_FranklinSubstation.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amy Freel Amy Freel Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Franklin Substation Upgrades Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.11 Electrical power substations and interconnection facilities Location: Pasco, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: The BPA proposes to make improvements to the BPA fee-owned Franklin Substation located in southeastern Washington in order to bring the substation into compliance with BPA's minimum voltage guidelines. A shunt capacitor bank would be installed to provide voltage support. Project activities would include moving a temporary mobile capacitor bank, removing transformers, extending a 115-kilovolt (kV) bus, installing a new 115-kV

185

Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

Czarnecki, J.B.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Life-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions for air-blown gasification combined-cycle using selexol  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. With its higher efficiency, this process can reduce CO{sub 2} production. It is also amenable to CO{sub 2} capture, because CO{sub 2} Can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, CO{sub 2} transport -by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of CO{sub 2} in geological reservoirs. The intent of this study is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the fill study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget will be 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh{sub e}. The base case is a 470-MW (at the busbar) IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, US Illinois {number_sign}6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 461 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.830 kg/kWh{sub e}. In the CO{sub 2} recovery case, the gasifier output is taken through water-gas shift and then to Selexol, a glycol-based absorber-stripper process that recovers CO{sub 2} before it enters the combustion turbine. This process results in 350 MW at the busbar.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Combined cycle and waste heat recovery power systems based on a novel thermodynamic energy cycle utilizing low-temperature heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A new thermodynamic energy cycle has been developed, using a multicomponent working agent. Condensation is supplemented with absorption, following expansion in the turbine. Several combined power systems based on this cycle have been designed and cost-estimated. Efficiencies of these new systems are 1.35 to 1.5 times higher than the best Rankine Cycle system, at the same border conditions. Investment cost per unit of power output is about two-thirds of the cost of a comparable Rankine Cycle system. Results make cogeneration economically attractive at current energy prices. The first experimental installation is planned by Fayette Manufacturing Company and Detroit Diesel Allison Division of General Motors.

Kalina, A.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Single-shaft combined cycle packs power in at low cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide demand for combined cycle (CC) powerplants has grown exponentially over the past decade, and most forecasts call for the boom to continue. Reasons, by now, are clear: the CC powerplant--in its basic form, a gas turbine exhausting into a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) that supplies a steam turbine--is the most efficient electric generating system commercially available today. It also exhibits capital costs significantly lower than competing nuclear, fossil-fired steam, and renewable-energy stations. In addition, its low air emissions, water consumption, space requirements, and physical profile are no trifling advantages in an era marked by tough permitting and siting processes. A relatively recent advance that may further cement the CC`s front-running position is combining the gas turbine, steam turbine, and electric generator on a single shaft. Locking together the turbines and generator to form one single-train operating system promises to simplify plant design and operation, and may lower first costs. Trade-offs of the single-shaft approach, however, include the need for higher starting power and less operating flexibility, particularly if no synchronous clutch is used between the gas and steam turbine. Also worth noting: the arrangement takes away the phased construction option where a simple-cycle gas turbine is installed first and the steam cycle is added later. But depending on project specifics, the rewards of the single-shaft CC can outweigh its drawbacks, as a look at several recent installations reveals in this article.

Swanekamp, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Gas turbine effects on integrated-gasification-combined-cycle power plant operations  

SciTech Connect

This study used detailed thermodynamic modeling procedures to assess the influence of different gas turbine characteristics and steam cycle conditions on the design and off-design performance of integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. IGCC plant simulation models for a base case plant with Texaco gasifiers and both radiant and convective syngas coolers were developed, and three different types of gas turbines were evaluated as well as non-reheat and reheat steam systems. Results indicated that improving the gas turbine heat rate significantly improves the heat rate of the IGCC power plant. In addition results indicated that using a reheat steam system with current gas turbines improves IGCC performance, though as gas turbine efficiency increases, the impact of using a reheat steam system decreases. Increasing gas turbine temperatures from 1985{degree}F to 2500{degree}F was also found to have the potential to reduce overall IGCC system heat rates by approximately 700 BTU/kWh. The methodologies and models developed for this work are extremely useful tools for investigating the impact of specific gas turbine and steam cycle conditions on the overall performance of IGCC power plants. Moreover, they can assist utilities during the preliminary engineering phase of an IGCC project in evaluating the cost effectiveness of using specific gas turbines and steam cycles in the overall plant design. 45 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Eustis, F.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). High Temperature Gasdynamics Lab.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60% are discussed. The goal of 60% efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

KRW oxygen-blown gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestration of unused CO{sub 2}. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an equivalent CO{sub 2} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The base case is a 458-MW (gross generation) IGCC system that uses an oxygen-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and low-pressure glycol sulfur removal followed by Claus/SCOT treatment to produce a saleable product. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production for the entire energy cycle of 411 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.801 kg/k Whe. For comparison, in two cases, the gasifier output was taken through water-gas shift and then to low-pressure glycol H{sub 2}S recovery, followed by either low-pressure glycol or membrane CO{sub 2} recovery and then by a combustion turbine being fed a high-hydrogen-content fuel. Two additional cases employed chilled methanol for H{sub 2}S recovery and a fuel cell as the topping cycle with no shift stages. From the IGCC plant, a 500-km pipeline took the CO{sub 2} to geological sequestering. In a comparison of air-blown and oxygen-blown CO{sub 2}-release base cases, the cost of electricity for the air-blown IGCC was 56.86 mills/kWh, and the cost of oxygen-blown IGCC was 58.29 mills/kWh.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy impacts of controlling carbon dioxide emissions from an integrated gasification/combined-cycle system  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results from a study of the impacts associated with CO{sub 2} recovery in integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) systems which is being conducted for the Morgantown Energy Technology Center by Argonne National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to compare, on a consistent systems-oriented basis, the energy and economic impacts of adding CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration to an IGCC system. The research reported here has emphasized commercial technologies for capturing CO{sub 2}, but ongoing work is also addressing advanced technologies under development and alternate power-system configurations that may enhance system efficiency.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Retrofit of CO2 Capture of Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant target for control of CO2 emission would be stationary power plants as they are large sources and relatively easy to control. Most of the focus of studies has been on new plants Only a few have looked at retrofits of the existing plants and those have mainly concentrated on coal-fired systems. However, there are a large number of existing gas-fired combined cycle plant in existence and understanding whether retrofit of these plants is realistic is important. This study considers retrofit of...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

195

South Bangkok combined cycle plant technical feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report, written by Black and Veatch International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand. It establishes the conceptual design for the installation of a 300 MW combined cycle unit at the South Bangkok Plant. It is divided into the following sections: Gas/Oil Resource Assessment; Water Resources Assessment; Bases of Design; Site Arrangement; Generation Plant Arrangement; Conceptual Design; Transmission System Integration; Capital and Operating Cost Estimate; and Project Implementation.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Deaerator pressure control system for a combined cycle steam generator power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a combined cycle steam generation power plant, until steam extraction can be used to reheat the deaerator, the economizer and/or the pegging recirculation are controlled so as to track the pressure upwards of the autocirculation reheater from the low pressure evaporator with a certain lag in pressure, and to establish pressure in the deaerator on the decreasing trend of the autocirculation reheater at a slower rate and without lowering below a minimum pressure so as to prevent the occurrence of bubbling and cavitation effect.

Martens, A.; Myers, G. A.

1985-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

197

Feasibility Study for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Facility at a Texas Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC) has grown sharply since the passage of the Energy Policy Act in 2005. Many new projects are being planned since the AEP and Duke 600-MW IGCC plants were announced nearly two years ago. This report compares the cost and performance of IGCC with a supercritical pulverized coal plant (SCPC) based on lower-rank Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. IGCC options included 100% PRB and 50/50 PRB/petcoke cases. The addition of CO2 capture equipment al...

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

An inlet air washer/chiller system for combined cycle planet repowering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conditioning method to achieve increased output at any relative humidity condition is an air washer and absorption chiller arrangement. At elevated temperatures and low humidity, the air washer operates as an evaporative cooler without the chiller in operation. In this mode, the air washer will give similar results as a media type evaporative cooler at a fraction of the pressure loss. In the air washer plus chiller operating mode the chiller maintains cooling effectiveness of the air washer during periods of high relative humidity. This makes such a system very appropriate anywhere relative humidity is high. Many combined cycle plants utilize supplemental firing of the heat recovery steam generators to offset the loss of gas turbine power at high ambient temperatures. This paper shows that in contrast to supplementary firing, the combination air washer/chiller system can generate power more efficiently and at lower cost.

Sengupta, U.; Soroka, G. (Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Modeling and optimization of a combined cycle Stirling-ORC system and design of an integrated microchannel Stirling heat rejector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of a combined Stirling-ORC power cycle is evaluated, and an integrated microchannel heat exchanger is designed as an annular cold-side heat rejector for (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Conversion to Dual Fuel Capability in Combustion Turbine Plants: Addition of Distillate Oil Firing for Combined Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During development of combined cycle projects, key assumptions and estimates regarding markets and technology on which the project is based may change. With fuel costs of combined cycle plants representing over 90 percent of annual operating cost, sudden changes in fuel pricing demand attention and re-evaluation. Conversion from natural gas fuel only to dual fuel capability with the addition of distillate oil firing systems is a technical response to market conditions that may have long-term as well as s...

2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Oxygen-blown gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

This project emphasizes CO2-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems, CO2 transportation, and options for the long-term sequestration Of CO2. The intent is to quantify the CO2 budget, or an ``equivalent CO2`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The base case is a 458-MW (gross generation) IGCC system that uses an oxygen-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, bituminous coal feed, and low-pressure glycol sulfur removal, followed by Claus/SCOT treatment, to produce a saleable product. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production for the entire energy cycle of 411 MW, with a CO2 release rate of 0.801 kg/kV-Whe. For comparison, in two cases, the gasifier output was taken through water-gas shift and then to low-pressure glycol H2S recovery, followed by either low-pressure glycol or membrane CO2 recovery and then by a combustion turbine being fed a high-hydrogen-content fuel. Two additional cases employed chilled methanol for H2S recovery and a fuel cell as the topping cycle, with no shift stages. From the IGCC plant, a 500-km pipeline takes the CO2 to geological sequestering. For the optimal CO2 recovery case, the net electric power production was reduced by 37.6 MW from the base case, with a CO2 release rate of 0.277 kg/kWhe (when makeup power was considered). In a comparison of air-blown and oxygen-blown CO2-release base cases, the cost of electricity for the air-blown IGCC was 56.86 mills/kWh, while the cost for oxygen-blown IGCC was 58.29 mills/kWh. For the optimal cases employing glycol CO2 recovery, there was no clear advantage; the cost for air-blown IGCC was 95.48 mills/kWh, and the cost for the oxygen-blown IGCC was slightly lower, at 94.55 mills/kWh.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

TBH-0023 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TBH-0023 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker TBH-0023 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker TBH-0023 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker TBH-0023 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Franklin C. Tucker (the Complainant) against his previous employer, BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. BWXT is the manager of Y-12, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nuclear Weapons Complex. The Complainant filed the complaint of retaliation against BWXT with the Oak Ridge Operations Diversity Programs and Employee Concerns Office on October 20, 2003.1/ In the complaint, the Complainant contends that he made protected disclosures to officials of BWXT and the DOE, and

203

Combined cycle electric power plant with coordinated steam load distribution control  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube through which a fluid, e.g., water, is directed to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner further heats the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube. The temperature of the gas turbine exhaust gases is sensed for varying the fuel flow to the afterburner by a fuel valve, whereby the temperatures of the gas turbine exhaust gases and therefore of the superheated steam, are controlled. Loading and unloading of the steam turbine is accomplished automatically in coordinated plant control as a function of steam throttle pressure.

Uram, R.

1979-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S-1 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The National Environmental Policy Act Process NEPA is a federal law that serves as the basic national charter for protection of the environment. For major federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of the environment, NEPA requires federal agencies to prepare a detailed statement that includes the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and reasonable alternatives. A fundamental objective of NEPA is to foster better decisionmaking by ensuring that high quality environmental information is available to public officials and members of the

206

Shell-based gasification-combined-cycle power plant evaluations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a detailed engineering and economic evaluation of shell-based integrated gasification - combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. Two complete nominal 1000 MW capacity Shell-based grass roots IGCC plant designs and cost estimates were prepared. The following conclusions were made: Shell-based IGCC plants firing Illinois coal and employing current technology gas turbines (2000/sup 0/F firing temperature) have the potential to be cost competitive with conventional coal-fired steam plants with FGD. Shell-based IGCC plants firing Texas lignite have the potential to generate power at costs that are competitive with those based on firing high rank coal. Shell-based IGCC plants firing Illinois No. 6 coal have equivalent performance and costs similar to Texaco-based IGCC systems.

Hartman, J.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Integrated gasification-combined-cycle power plants - Performance and cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

Several studies of Integrated Gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have indicated that these plants have the potential for providing performance and cost improvements over conventional coal-fired steam power plants with flue gas desulfurization. Generally, IGCC power plants have a higher energy-conversion efficiency, require less water, conform with existing environmental standards at lower cost, and are expected to convert coal to electricity at lower costs than coal-fired steam plants. This study compares estimated costs and performance of various IGCC plant design configurations. A second-law analysis identifies the real energy waste in each design configuration. In addition, a thermoeconomic analysis reveals the potential for reducing the cost of electricity generated by an IGCC power plant.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Tawfik, T.; Lin, L. (Tennessee State Univ., Nashville (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Analysis of potential benefits of integrated-gasifier combined cycles for a utility system  

SciTech Connect

Potential benefits of integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) units were evaluated for a reference utility system by comparing long range expansion plans using IGCC units and gas turbine peakers with a plan using only state of the art steam turbine units and gas turbine peakers. Also evaluated was the importance of the benefits of individual IGCC unit characteristics, particularly unit efficiency, unit equivalent forced outage rate, and unit size. A range of IGCC units was analyzed, including cases achievable with state of the art gas turbines and cases assuming advanced gas turbine technology. All utility system expansion plans that used IGCC units showed substantial savings compared with the base expansion plan using the steam turbine units.

Choo, Y.K.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Gas turbine procurement and combined-cycle repowering: 1986 workshop: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two workshops related to gas turbine utilization in the electric utility industry were held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on September 23-26, 1986. A total of 83 persons participated in the workshops, with 26 electric utilities represented by 44 of the participants. The balance of the participants included gas turbine manufacturers, architectural/engineering firms, EPRI representatives, and professional staff of Energy Systems Associates, the contractor for organizing and operating the workshops. The first workshop, ''Gas Turbine Procurement,'' included presentations on industrial gas turbines from four manufacturers, as well as presentations on specification, engineering, procurement, construction, instrumentation and control, and reliability, availability, and maintainability, as experienced by industry, engineering firms, and electric utilities. The second workshop, ''Combined Cycle Repowering,'' included presentations of repowering engineering feasibility studies by four electric utilities of selected generating stations, including one nuclear station under construction. Separate abstracts were prepared for 10 papers in this workshop.

Sanders, C.F.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Extractors manual for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Data Base System: Major Plants Data Base  

SciTech Connect

National concern over the depletion of conventional energy sources has prompted industry to evaluate coal gasification as an alternative source of energy. One approach being evaluated is gasifying coal in a gasifier and feeding the fuel gas to a combined-cycle power plant. This system is called an Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plant. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is also encouraging the development of new technologies by sponsoring research and development (R and D) projects in IGCC. In order to make data generated from these projects available to government and private sector personnel, the IGCC Data System has been established. A technology-specific data system consists of data that are stored for that technology in each of the specialized data bases that make up the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) data system. The IGCC Data System consists of data stored in the Major Plants Data Base (MPDB) and the Test Data Data Base (TDDB). To capture the results of government-sponsored IGCC research programs, documents have been written for the MPDB and TDDB to specify the data that contractors need to report and the procedures for reporting them. The IGCC documents identify and define the data that need to be reported for IGCC projects so that the data entered into the TDDB and MPDB will meet the needs of the users of the IGCC Data System. This document addresses what information is needed and how it must be formatted so that it can be entered into the MPDB for IGCC. The data that are most relevant to potential IGCC Data System users have been divided into four categories: project tracking needs; economic/commercialization needs; critical performance needs; and modeling and R and D needs. 4 figs., 28 tabs.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Extractors manual for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Data Base System: Test Data Data Base  

SciTech Connect

National concern over the depletion of conventional energy sources has prompted industry to evaluate coal gasification as an alternative source of energy. One approach being evaluated is gasifying coal in a gasifier and feeding the fuel gas to a combined-cycle power plant. This system is called an Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plant. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is also encouraging the development of new technologies by sponsoring research and development (R and D) projects in IGCC. In order to make data generated from these projects available to government and private sector personnel, the IGCC Data System has been established. A technology-specific data system consists of data that are stored for that technology in each of the specialized data bases that make up the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) data system. The IGCC Data System consists of data stored in the Major Plants Data Base (MPDB) and the Test Data Data Base (TDDB). To capture the results of government-sponsored IGCC research programs, documents have been written for the TDDB and MPDB to specify the data that contractors need to report and the procedures for reporting them. The IGCC documents identify and define the data that need to be reported for IGCC projects so that the data entered into the TDDB and MPDB will meet the needs of the users of the IGCC Data System. This document addresses what information is needed and how it must be formatted so that it can be entered into the TDDB for IGCC. The data that are most relevant to potential IGCC Data System users have been divided into four categories: project tracking needs; economic/commercialization needs; critical performance needs; and modeling and R and D needs.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Overspeed protection for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improved combined cycle power plant and overspeed protection system of the type having a reheat steam turbine including a high pressure steam turbine section with at least one control valve, and a lower pressure steam turbine section. The improvement comprises: a valveless steam conduit connected between the outlet of the steam reheater section and the inlet of the lower pressure steam turbine section, a plurality of solid couplings serving to solidly couple the rotating members together as a single rotor, the rotor having a single thrust bearing, and control means for sensing a potential overspeed condition operatively connected to the control valves to prevent overspeed, whereby the steam in the steam reheater and in the valveless steam conduit may freely expand through the lower pressure steam turbine and potential overspeed of the rotor is resisted by the combined inertia of the coupled rotating members and by the braking torque of the air compressor, wherein the heat recovery steam generator includes a low pressure steam generating section connected to supply low pressure steam to the steam reheater section along with the steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine section.

Moore, J.H.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Final Report Environmental Footprints and Costs of Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, over 50 percent of electricity in the U.S. is generated from coal. Given that coal reserves in the U.S. are estimated to meet our energy needs over the next 250 years, coal is expected to continue to play a major role in the generation of electricity in this country. With dwindling supplies and high prices of natural gas and oil, a large proportion of the new power generation facilities built in the U.S. can be expected to use coal as the main fuel. The environmental impact of these facilities can only be minimized by innovations in technology that allow for efficient burning of coal, along with an increased capture of the air pollutants that are an inherent part of coal combustion. EPA considers integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) as one of the most promising technologies in reducing environmental consequences of generating electricity from coal. EPA has undertaken several initiatives to facilitate and incentivize development and deployment of this technology. This report is the result of one of these initiatives and it represents the combined efforts of a joint EPA/DOE team formed to advance the IGCC technology. The various offices within DOE that participated in the development/review of this report were the Office of Fossil Energy, including the Clean Coal Office and the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

Pulverized Coal; Technologies Foreword

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Applying combined pinch and exergy analysis to closed-cycle gas turbine system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pinch technology has developed into a powerful tool for thermodynamic analysis of chemical processes and associated utilities, resulting in significant energy savings. Conventional pinch analysis identifies the most economical energy consumption in terms of heat loads and provides practical design guidelines to achieve this. However, in analyzing systems involving heat and power, for example, steam and gas turbines, etc., pure heat load analysis is insufficient. Exergy analysis, on the other hand, provides a tool for heat and power analysis, although at times it does not provide clear practical design guideline. An appropriate combination of pinch and exergy analysis can provide practical methodology for the analysis of heat and power systems. The methodology has been successfully applied to refrigeration systems. This paper introduces the application of a combined pinch and exergy approach to commercial power plants with a demonstration example of a closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) system. Efficiency improvement of about 0.82 percent (50.2 to 51.02 percent) can be obtained by application of the new approach. More importantly, the approach can be used as an analysis and screening tool for the various design improvements and is generally applicable to any commercial power generation facility.

Dhole, V.R.; Zheng, J.P. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

SciTech Connect

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The potential for control of carbon dioxide emissions from integrated gasification/combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production through efficient fuel used is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy-efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such systems and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an to equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget is 1 kg/kWh CO{sub 2}. The base case for the comparison is a 457-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, preparation, and transportation of the coal and limestone result in a net system electric power production of 454 MW with a 0.835 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output is taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2} and then processed in a glycol-based absorber unit to recover CO{sub 2} Prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then transports the CO{sub 2} for geological sequestering. The net electric power production for the system with CO{sub 2} recovery is 381 MW with a 0.156 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project DEIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed DOE action to provide cost-shared financial support for construction and operation of an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky. Under the Proposed Action, DOE would provide financial assistance, through a Cooperative Agreement with Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, for design, construction, and operation of a 540 megawatt demonstration power station comprised of two synthesis gas-fired combined cycle units in Clark County, Kentucky. The station would also be comprised of a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasifier to produce synthesis gas from a co-feed of coal and refuse-derived fuel pellets and a high temperature molten carbonate fuel cell. The facility would be powered by the synthesis gas feed. The proposed project would consist of the following major components: (1) refuse-derived fuel pellets and coal receipt and storage facilities; (2) a gasification plant; (3) sulfur removal and recovery facilities; (4) an air separation plant; (5) a high-temperature molten carbonate fuel cell; and (6) two combined cycle generation units. The IGCC facility would be built to provide needed power capacity to central and eastern Kentucky. At a minimum, 50 percent of the high sulfur coal used would be from the Kentucky region. Two No Action Alternatives are analyzed in the DEIS. Under the No Action Alternative 1, DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of the proposed facility and no new facility would be built. Under the No Action Alternative 2, DOE would not provide any funding and, instead of the proposed demonstration project, Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Global Energy, Inc., would construct and operate, a 540 megawatt natural gas-fired power station. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socioeconomics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, and environmental justice were included in the assessment.

N /A

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

City of Franklin, Virginia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia (Utility Company) Virginia (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Franklin Place Virginia Utility Id 6715 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Church and synagogue service-Three phase Commercial Church and synagogue service-single phase Commercial General Service- Large Industrial General service-medium-single phase Industrial General service-medium-single phase-MGS-D Industrial General service-medium-three phase Industrial

223

PUD No 1 of Franklin County | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County County Jump to: navigation, search Name PUD No 1 of Franklin County Place Washington Utility Id 6716 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png INDUSTRIAL SERVICE RATE SCHEDULE NO. 2.3 Industrial INDUSTRIAL SERVICE RATE SCHEDULE NO. 2.3 (PRIMARY) Industrial LARGE AGRICULTURE IRRIGATION SERVICE RATE SCHEDULE NO. 4 Commercial

224

Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a gasification with CO{sub 2} capture process simulator with a combined cycle power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTARs IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Overspeed protection method for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for achieving overspeed protection in a combined cycle gas and steam turbine power plant. It comprises solidly coupling together to rotate at all times as a single rotor unit, including during sudden loss of load occurrences, the rotating members of a gas turbine with its associated combustor and air compressor, a high pressure steam turbine at least one lower pressure stream turbine and an electrical generator; transferring heat from the gas turbine exhaust to steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine in a steam reheater before it is input to the at least one lower pressure steam turbine; connecting an output of the steam reheater with an input of the lower pressure steam turbine via a valveless steam conduit; and using a single overspeed control to detect a sudden loss of load occurrence and, in response, simultaneously reducing steam input to the high pressure steam turbine and reducing fuel input to the gas turbine combustor while permitting residual reheater output to continue to expand freely through the at least one lower pressure steam turbine.

Moore, J.H.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

Overspeed protection for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an improved combined cycle power plant and overspeed protection system of the type having a reheat steam turbine. It comprises: a high pressure steam turbine section with at least one control valve, and a lower pressure steam turbine section; a gas turbine including a turbine section, a combustor, a fuel valve supplying the combustor, and an air compressor with a discharge end leading to the combustor; a load riven by the reheat steam turbine and the gas turbine; the reheat steam turbine, the gas turbine and the load all having rotating members; a heat recovery steam generator heated by the gas turbine, including a high pressure steam generating section supplying steam to the high pressure steam turbine section through the control valve, and a steam reheater section receiving steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine section. The improvement comprises: a valveless steam conduit connected between the outlet of the steam reheater section and the inlet of the lower pressure steam turbine section, and solid couplings serving to solidify couple the rotating members together as a single rotor, the rotor having a single thrust bearing.

Moore, J.H.

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cooldown control system for a combined cycle electrical power generation plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combined cycle electrical power plant including a steam turbine, a heat recovery steam generator for supplying steam to the steam turbine, a gas turbine for supplying heat to the heat recovery steam generator. The steam generator and gas turbine both produce electrical power under load, and the gas turbine has a control circuit determining the operation therof. A cooldown control system is described for the power generation plant. The system comprises: first means for detecting one of a steaming condition and a non-steaming condition in the heat recovery steam generator; second means responsive to the steaming condition and to a gas turbine STOP signal for reducing the load of the gas turbine toward a minimum load level; third means responsive to the non-steaming condition and to the minimum load level being reached for generating a STOP command and applying the STOP command to the control circuit of the gas turbine, thereby to indicate a sequence of steps to stop the gas turbine.

Martens, A.; Snow, B.E.

1987-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The abundance of coal in the United States makes it one of our Nation's most important strategic resources in building a secure energy future. With today's prices and technology, recoverable reserves located in the United States could supply the Nation's coal consumption for approximately 250 years at current usage rates. However, if coal is to reach its full potential as an environmentally acceptable source of energy, an expanded menu of advanced clean coal technologies must be developed to provide substantially improved options both for the consumer and private industry. Before any technology can be seriously considered for commercialization, it must be demonstrated at a sufficiently large-scale to develop industry confidence in its technical and economic feasibility. The implementation of a federal technology demonstration program is the established means of accelerating the development of technology to meet national energy strategy and environmental policy goals, to reduce the risk to human health and the environment to an acceptable level, to accelerate commercialization, and to provide the incentives required for continued activity in research and development directed at providing solutions to long-range energy problems. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

N /A

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

229

Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Performance and operational economics estimates for a coal gasification combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant  

SciTech Connect

A performance and operational economics analysis is presented for an integrated-gasifier, combined-cycle (IGCC) system to meet the steam and baseload electrical requirements. The effect of time variations in steam and electrial requirements is included. The amount and timing of electricity purchases from sales to the electric utility are determined. The resulting expenses for purchased electricity and revenues from electricity sales are estimated by using an assumed utility rate structure model. Cogeneration results for a range of potential IGCC cogeneration system sizes are compared with the fuel consumption and costs of natural gas and electricity to meet requirements without cogeneration. The results indicate that an IGCC cogeneration system could save about 10 percent of the total fuel energy presently required to supply steam and electrical requirements without cogeneration. Also for the assumed future fuel and electricity prices, an annual operating cost savings of 21 percent to 26 percent could be achieved with such a cogeneration system. An analysis of the effects of electricity price, fuel price, and system availability indicates that the IGCC cogeneration system has a good potential for economical operation over a wide range in these assumptions.

Nainiger, J.J.; Burns, R.K.; Easley, A.J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal's sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E's technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal`s sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E`s technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL&P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Copyright 1999 by ASMEGas Turbines for Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Combined Cycles (APFBC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes gas turbines from several manufacturers that, with modification, have potential for repowering existing steam plants with high efficiency advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) technology. The paper discusses the issues that must be addressed by these manufacturers if they are to have units suited for entry into the APFBC market. APFBC repowering retains the continued use of existing coal-fired capacity with acceptable economy. APFBC repowering significantly improves the energy efficiency of an existing plant, the plants environmental performance, and reduces operating costs. Coal-fired APFBC is now under test in large scale demonstrations, and will be ready for commercial repowering installations around year 2005, so it is prudent to begin evaluating the types of APFBC-modified units that might be offered from different manufacturers. APFBC repowering has some important advantages for the power generating company owner. For example, repowering the 106 MWe output Carolina Power & Light Companys (CP&L) L.V. Sutton steam station Unit 2 with APFBC would boost output and improve the energy efficiency.

John M. Rockey; Richard E. Weinstein

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Wabash River Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed project would result in a combined-cycle power plant with lower emissions and higher efficiency than most existing coal-fired power plants of comparable size. The net plant heat rate (energy content of the fuel input per useable electrical generation output; i.e., Btu/kilowatt hour) for the new repowered unit would be a 21% improvement over the existing unit, while reducing SO{sub 2} emissions by greater than 90% and limiting NO{sub x} emissions by greater than 85% over that produced by conventional coal-fired boilers. The technology, which relies on gasified coal, is capable of producing as much as 25% more electricity from a given amount of coal than today`s conventional coal-burning methods. Besides having the positive environmental benefit of producing less pollutants per unit of power generated, the higher overall efficiency of the proposed CGCC project encourages greater utilization to meet base load requirements in order to realize the associated economic benefits. This greater utilization (i.e., increased capacity factor) of a cleaner operating plant has global environmental benefits in that it is likely that such power would replace power currently being produced by less efficient plants emitting a greater volume of pollutants per unit of power generated.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

TBA-0023 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker 23 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker TBA-0023 - In the Matter of Franklin C. Tucker This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on April 9, 2007, involving a Complaint of Retaliation filed by Franklin C. Tucker (also referred to as the employee or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his Complaint, Tucker claims that his former employer, DOE contractor BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT or the contractor), retaliated against him for engaging in activity that is protected by Part 708. In the IAD, an Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer determined that the employee engaged in activity that is protected under Part 708, but that BWXT showed that it would have taken the same adverse

237

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP the next 5 to 20 years. As a replacement for Tomlinson-based cogeneration, black liquor- gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration promises higher elecuical efficiency, with prospective environmental, safety

238

Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY LANDFILL - LANDFILL GAS (LFG) TO LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS (LNG) - PROJECT January/February 2005 Prepared for: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Table of Contents Page BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................1 SUMMARY OF EFFORT PERFORMED ......................................................................................2 Task 2B.1 - Literature Search and Contacts Made...................................................................2 Task 2B.2 - LFG Resource/Resource Collection System - Project Phase One.......................3 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................5

239

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation, development of a plant-wide dynamic model of an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture will be discussed. The IGCC reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power using Illinois No.6 coal as the feed. The plant includes an entrained, downflow, General Electric Energy (GEE) gasifier with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC), a two-stage water gas shift (WGS) conversion process, and two advanced 'F' class combustion turbines partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit (ASU). A subcritical steam cycle is considered for heat recovery steam generation. Syngas is selectively cleaned by a SELEXOL acid gas removal (AGR) process. Sulfur is recovered using a two-train Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. A multistage intercooled compressor is used for compressing CO2 to the pressure required for sequestration. Using Illinois No.6 coal, the reference plant generates 640 MWe of net power. The plant-wide steady-state and dynamic IGCC simulations have been generated using the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign} process simulators, respectively. The model is generated based on the Case 2 IGCC configuration detailed in the study available in the NETL website1. The GEE gasifier is represented with a restricted equilibrium reactor model where the temperature approach to equilibrium for individual reactions can be modified based on the experimental data. In this radiant-only configuration, the syngas from the Radiant Syngas Cooler (RSC) is quenched in a scrubber. The blackwater from the scrubber bottom is further cleaned in the blackwater treatment plant. The cleaned water is returned back to the scrubber and also used for slurry preparation. The acid gas from the sour water stripper (SWS) is sent to the Claus plant. The syngas from the scrubber passes through a sour shift process. The WGS reactors are modeled as adiabatic plug flow reactors with rigorous kinetics based on the mid-life activity of the shift-catalyst. The SELEXOL unit consists of the H2S and CO2 absorbers that are designed to meet the stringent environmental limits and requirements of other associated units. The model also considers the stripper for recovering H2S that is sent as a feed to a split-flow Claus unit. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The cleaned syngas is sent to the GE 7FB gas turbine. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady-state simulation is solved in sequential-modular mode in Aspen Plus{reg_sign} and consists of more than 300 unit operations, 33 design specs, and 16 calculator blocks. The equation-oriented dynamic simulation consists of more than 100,000 equations solved using a multi-step Gear's integrator in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The challenges faced in solving the dynamic model and key transient results from this dynamic model will also be discussed.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Transient studies of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Next-generation coal-fired power plants need to consider the option for CO2 capture as stringent governmental mandates are expected to be issued in near future. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are more efficient than the conventional coal combustion processes when the option for CO2 capture is considered. However, no IGCC plant with CO2 capture currently exists in the world. Therefore, it is important to consider the operability and controllability issues of such a plant before it is commercially built. To facilitate this objective, a detailed plant-wide dynamic simulation of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture has been developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics{reg_sign}. The plant considers a General Electric Energy (GEE)-type downflow radiant-only gasifier followed by a quench section. A two-stage water gas shift (WGS) reaction is considered for conversion of CO to CO2. A two-stage acid gas removal (AGR) process based on a physical solvent is simulated for selective capture of H2S and CO2. Compression of the captured CO2 for sequestration, an oxy-Claus process for removal of H2S and NH3, black water treatment, and the sour water treatment are also modeled. The tail gas from the Claus unit is recycled to the SELEXOL unit. The clean syngas from the AGR process is sent to a gas turbine followed by a heat recovery steam generator. This turbine is modeled as per published data in the literature. Diluent N2 is used from the elevated-pressure ASU for reducing the NOx formation. The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is modeled by considering generation of high-pressure, intermediate-pressure, and low-pressure steam. All of the vessels, reactors, heat exchangers, and the columns have been sized. The basic IGCC process control structure has been synthesized by standard guidelines and existing practices. The steady state results are validated with data from a commercial gasifier. In the future grid-connected system, the plant should satisfy the environmental targets and quality of the feed to other sections, wherever applicable, without violating the operating constraints, and without sacrificing the efficiency. However, it was found that the emission of acid gases may far exceed the environmental targets and the overshoot of some of the key variables may be unacceptable under transient operation while following the load. A number of operational strategies and control configurations is explored for achieving these stringent requirements. The transient response of the plant is also studied by perturbing a number of key inputs.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Combining thorium with burnable poison for reactivity control of a very long cycle BWR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of utilizing thorium together with gadolinium, erbium, or boron burnable absorber in BWR fuel assemblies for very long cycle is investigated. Nuclear characteristics such as reactivity and power distributions ...

Inoue, Yuichiro, 1969-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Effects of the Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previous assessment of the effects of a Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site made in 1967 was updated so that the potential adverse effects may be better understood in light of existing operations, current environmental and safety standards, and proposed facilities and operations. The major effects would probably arise from flooding of portions of the site by the reservoir associated with the dam and by the raising of the ground water table under the site. A preliminary analysis of the effects of the dam is presented, and a number of studies are recommended in order to fully evaluate and understand these potential impacts. The following seven tasks are identified and discussed: groundwater - hydrology analysis; soil liquefaction analysis; hydrostatic uplift and soil effects on structures; assessment of the potential for landsliding and sloughing; facility decommissioning; hydrothermal analysis; and, meteorological effects. Four other aspects commented upon in this report are: aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, socioeconomic effects, and public interaction. Possible effects on ongoing DOE-sponsored R and D are also noted. To the extent possible, cost estimates are developed for corrective actions which must be taken on the Hanford Site to accommodate the dam. Where this was not possible, appropriate courses of action leading to cost estimates are presented.

Harty, H.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Reports: 2004 Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Markets Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine plant owners, operators, and project developers. EPRI's comprehensive Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle (CT/CC) program provides a range of tools, methodologies, and approaches to help owner/operators and project developers face these challenges and prosper in this evolving marketplace. Access to this resource base in a timely, concise manner is key to delivering benefits in the new e...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

247

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

248

CoalFleet User Design Basis Specification for Coal-Based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Duke Edwardsport integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant started up in 2012, and Mississippi Powers Kemper County IGCC plant is in construction. The capital cost of these initial commercial scale IGCC plants is high. The industry needs specifications that encourage greater standardization in IGCC design in order to bring down the investment cost for the next generation of plants. Standardization also supports repeatable, reliable performance and reduces the time and cost ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Turbine Section of the Combu stion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant. As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report: 2003: Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Markets Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deregulation of power generation markets worldwide presents both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine plant owners, operators, and project developers. EPRI's comprehensive Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle (CT/CC) program provides a range of tools, methodologies, and approaches to help owner/operators and project developers face these challenges and prosper in this evolving marketplace. Access to this resource base in a timely, concise manner is key to delivering benefits in t...

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Stop and Control Valve Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various components that are unique to these types of power generation plants. Therefore, use of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Preventive Maintenance Basis Database (1018758) by owners of CTCC facilities is somewhat limited to only those components that are common to both CTCC facilities and nuclear or fossil power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, ...

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

Condensers for Combined-Cycle Plants: Air-Cooled and Water-Cooled Condensers Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined-Cycle (NGCC) power plants are expected to play an increasing role in the mix of new power generation. Additional guidance is needed for utilities, contracted engineering firms, and suppliers to better specify, design, supply, and operate these next-generation plants. This document focuses on the steam condensers, both wet and air-cooled, which are anticipated to serve these plants. It provides guidance, best practices, and lessons learned in regard to these condensers and offers insi...

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Compressor Section of the C ombustion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant. As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

General Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Combustor Section of the Combus tion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant. As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Program on Technology Innovation: Tampa Electric Company Polk Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plant Carbon Capture Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Industry Technology Demonstration Program on Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), an engineering study was conducted to evaluate the cost and performance impacts of various CCS schemes at the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station. The portion of the work presented here was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation Program and focuses on a comparison of chemical and physical solvent-based CO2 capture systems i...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Uncertainty analysis of integrated gasification combined cycle systems based on Frame 7H versus 7F gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is a promising alternative for clean generation of power and coproduction of chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. Advanced concepts for IGCC systems that incorporate state-of-the-art gas turbine systems, however, are not commercially demonstrated. Therefore, there is uncertainty regarding the future commercial-scale performance, emissions, and cost of such technologies. The Frame 7F gas turbine represents current state-of-practice, whereas the Frame 7H is the most recently introduced advanced commercial gas turbine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risks and potential payoffs of IGCC technology based on different gas turbine combined cycle designs. Models of entrained-flow gasifier-based IGCC systems with Frame 7F (IGCC-7F) and 7H gas turbine combined cycles (IGCC-7H) were developed in ASPEN Plus. An uncertainty analysis was conducted. Gasifier carbon conversion and project cost uncertainty are identified as the most important uncertain inputs with respect to system performance and cost. The uncertainties in the difference of the efficiencies and costs for the two systems are characterized. Despite uncertainty, the IGCC-7H system is robustly preferred to the IGCC-7F system. Advances in gas turbine design will improve the performance, emissions, and cost of IGCC systems. The implications of this study for decision-making regarding technology selection, research planning, and plant operation are discussed. 38 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

Yunhua Zhu; H. Christopher Frey [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Capture Retrofit Options: Duke Edwardsport Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project supported by Duke Energy using tailored collaboration funds to study the potential impact to plant performance of retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture on the Duke Edwardsport integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) plant. The Duke Edwardsport IGCC plant is under construction and scheduled to begin operation in September 2012. Details on the project have been published in a 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report, Duke Edwardsport Gener...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nuon Magnum Integrated-Gasification -Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project Preliminary Design Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second pre-design specification (PDS) in a projected series for integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) plants, sponsored by EPRIs CoalFleet for Tomorrow program and involving more than 50 power industry companies. A PDS represents the level of nonproprietary information available at the feasibility study stage in the development of an IGCC project. This PDS is based on the design of the 1200-MWe Magnum IGCC plant, which Nuon Power Generation B.V. has proposed to build on the northern co...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Combined Climate and Carbon-Cycle Effects of Large-Scale Deforestation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The prevention of deforestation and promotion of afforestation have often been cited as strategies to slow global warming. Deforestation releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, which exerts a warming influence on Earth's climate. However, biophysical effects of deforestation, which include changes in land surface albedo, evapotranspiration, and cloud cover also affect climate. Here we present results from several large-scale deforestation experiments performed with a three-dimensional coupled global carbon-cycle and climate model. These are the first such simulations performed using a fully three-dimensional model representing physical and biogeochemical interactions among land, atmosphere, and ocean. We find that global-scale deforestation has a net cooling influence on Earth's climate, since the warming carbon-cycle effects of deforestation are overwhelmed by the net cooling associated with changes in albedo and evapotranspiration. Latitude-specific deforestation experiments indicate that afforestation projects in the tropics would be clearly beneficial in mitigating global-scale warming, but would be counterproductive if implemented at high latitudes and would offer only marginal benefits in temperate regions. While these results question the efficacy of mid- and high-latitude afforestation projects for climate mitigation, forests remain environmentally valuable resources for many reasons unrelated to climate.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Wickett, M; Phillips, T J; Lobell, D B; Delire, C; Mirin, A

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The University of Texas at Arlington 2011-2012 Scholarship Application Franklin L. Hodge Memorial Scholarship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Arlington 2011-2012 Scholarship Application Franklin L. Hodge Memorial. Applicant must be a graduate of a Navarro County, Texas high school. 2. Applicant must have a minimum high The University of Texas at Arlington (UT Arlington) collects concerning you. You may review and have UT Arlington

Corley, Bill

262

The University of Texas at Arlington 2012-2013 Scholarship Application Franklin L. Hodge Memorial Scholarship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Arlington 2012-2013 Scholarship Application Franklin L. Hodge Memorial of a Navarro County, Texas high school. 2. Applicant must have a minimum high school or college grade point The University of Texas at Arlington (UT Arlington) collects concerning you. You may review and have UT

Huang, Haiying

263

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer',  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer', BlIIlehr to: pmbommer on the fate and behavior of spilled oil. Of course, since this spill originates a mile deep, some. ~ Lehr book chapter .pdf #12;Review of modeling procedures for oil spill weathering behavior William J

Fleskes, Joe

264

Franklin College Faculty Senate Minutes of meeting on Tuesday, 26 April 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Geography Ranked #29 among geography programs in U.S. (NRC 2010 ranking) History History ranked 19.g., a Women's History Month calendar; a new logo for Theatre and Film Studies; and e-blast newsletters to the oil spill media attention to the work of Dr. Samantha Joye in Marine Sciences. Franklin College

Arnold, Jonathan

265

Comparison of the leading candidate combinations of blanket materials, thermodynamic cycles, and tritium systems for full scale fusion power plants  

SciTech Connect

The many possible combinations of blanket materials, tritium generation and recovery systems, and power conversion systems were surveyed and a comprehensive set of designs were generated by using a common set of ground rules that include all of the boundary conditions that could be envisioned for a full- scale commercial fusion power plant. Particular attention was given to the effects of blanket temperature on power plant cycle efficiency and economics, the interdependence of the thermodynamic cycle and the tritium recovery system, and to thermal and pressure stresses in the blanket structure. The results indicate that, of the wide variety of systems that have been considered, the most promising employs lithium recirculated in a closed loop within a niobium blanket structure and cooled with boiling potassium or cesium. This approach gives the simplest and lowest cost tritium recovery system, the lowest pressure and thermal stresses, the simplest structure with the lowest probability of a leak, the greatest resistance to damage from a plasma energy dump, and the lowest rate of plasma contamination by either outgassing or sputtering. The only other blanket materials combination that appears fairly likely to give a satisfactory tritium generation and recovery system is a lithium-beryllium fluoride-Incoloy blanket, and even this system involves major uncertainties in the effectiveness, size, and cost of the tritium recovery system. Further, the Li$sub 2$BeF$sub 4$ blanket system has the disadvantage that the world reserves of beryllium are too limited to support a full-blown fusion reactor economy, its poor thermal conductivity leads to cooling difficulties and a requirement for a complex structure with intricate cooling passages, and this inherently leads to an expansive blanket with a relatively high probability of leaks. The other blanket materials combinations yield even less attractive systems. (auth)

Fraas, A.P.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Combined cycle electric power plant with a steam turbine having a sliding pressure main bypass and control valve system  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant includes two gas turbines, a steam turbine, and a digital control system with an operator analog or manual backup. Each of the gas turbines has an exhaust heat recovery steam generator connected to a common header from which the steam is supplied by one or both of the steam generators for operating the steam turbine. The control system is of the sliding pressure type and maintains a predetermined steam pressure as a function of steam flow according to a predetermined characterization depending on the number of steam generators in service to limit the maximum steam velocity through the steam generators, and reduce the probability of water carryover into the steam turbine. Such control is always maintained by the bypass valve. The turbine control valve responds to the speed/load demand only, except when the bypass valve is closed and the rate of steam generation is insufficient to maintain a predetermined pressure flow relationship.

Uram, R.

1980-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

The role of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle in the USDOE`s Clean Coal Research, Development and Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

For many years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been funding research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to develop advanced power generation technologies. The goal of this activity is to catalyze the private sector to commercialize technologies that will provide reasonably priced electricity and still meet stringent environmental standards. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are emerging as one of the more attractive candidate technologies to meet this goal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has been assigned the responsibility for implementing IGCC projects in DOE`s Clean Coal RD&D program. The IGCC technology offers the potential for significant Improvements in environmental performance, compared to today`s coal-fired power plants. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from IGCC systems will be less than one-tenth of existing environmental standards. Thus, the IGCC technology will make coal-based plants as clean as plants that bum natural gas.

Bajura, R.A.; Schmidt, D.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

GM and Amtrak opt for combined-cycle cogeneration: GM figures 2-year payback; electricity sell-back is gravy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Motors anticipates a $2 million reduction in annual energy costs with a 10 MW gas-fired combined-cycle cogeneration system that will have a two-year payback. The system will provide about two-thirds of the plant's total power and one-third of its steam requirements. The revenues from selling power generated during weekends and off-shifts to Detroit Edison are not part of the calculations. This system includes two model 501-KB5 gas turbines and a 10 MW, air-cooled generator, with exhaust gases captured and sent to a waste heat recovery boiler that can produce up to 40,000 pph of high-pressure steam, which is fed to a steam turbine to boost capacity to 12 MW when steam loads are low. Low pressure steam contributes to the space heating system. The system will serve as a model for other GM facilities.

Barber, J.

1985-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

SEI uraguay project: Technical specifications. Turn-key' contract for greenfield combined cycle plant. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The study, conducted by Southern Electric International (SEI), was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of U.T.E., the Government of Uruguay's electric power company. It is an assessment of three potential projects under consideration by U.T.E. The changes resulting from these projects would add 120 to 360 megawatts capacity to the current system. The first option would involve repowering Jose Batlle y Ordonez Units 3 and 4. As an alternate to this plan, U.T.E. is considering new combined cycle plant at a Greenfield site. The third project would increase capacity at La Tablada. Each of the plants under consideration will have dual-fuel capability to operate on natural gas and No. 2 distillate. A conceptual design was performed and budgetary capital costs were developed for each alternative. SEI ultimately makes recommendations for each of the three projects. This is volume 2 of 3.

Not Available

1994-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants; Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation March 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1396 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

272

A Partnership Approach for Electronic Data Capture in Small-Scale Clinical Joshua D. Franklin, MLIS1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Franklin, MLIS1 , Paul Oldenkamp2 , Alicia Guidry1 , James F. Brinkley, MD, PhD1 1 University of Washington capture (EDC) systems. AMIA Annu Symp Proc 2008 Nov 6; 960. 2. Oldenkamp P. Guide to low cost electronic

Washington at Seattle, University of

273

Microsoft Word - CX-Franklin-BadgerCanyonGrandview-RedMtnsDisconnectSwitch_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2012 8, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Franklin-Badger Canyon and Grandview-Red Mountain switch replacements PP&A Project No.: 2,349 / 2,350 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace disconnect switches and related equipment on the Franklin-Badger Canyon No.2 and Grandview-Red Mountain No.1 115- kilovolt transmission lines. The switch stands will be replaced in the same locations as the existing structures, and related load break equipment will be upgraded in-kind to existing. Both

274

Recovery, transport, and disposal of CO{sub 2} from an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit CO{sub 2} emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production and is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such a system, and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an equivalent CO{sub 2} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the equivalent CO{sub 2} budget is 1 kg CO{sub 2}/kWh. The base case for the comparison is a 458-MW IGCC system using an air-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No.6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, transportation, and preparation of the coal and limestone result in a net electric power production of 448 MW with a 0.872 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output was taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2}, and processed in a Selexol unit to recover CO{sub 2} prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then took the CO{sub 2} to geological sequestering. The net electric power production was 383 MW with a 0.218 kg/kWh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

Pulverized Coal

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Combined cycle electric power plant having a control system which enables dry steam generator operation during gas turbine operation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for a combined cycle electric power plant is described. It contains: at least one gas turbine including an exit through which heated exhaust gases pass; means for generating steam coupled to said gas turbine exit for transferring heat from the exhaust gases to a fluid passing through the steam generator; a steam turbine coupled to the steam generator and driven by the steam supplied thereby; means for generating electric power by the driving power of the turbines; condenser means for receiving and converting the spent steam from the steam turbine into condensate; and steam generating means comprising a low pressure storage tank, a first heat exchange tube, a boiler feedwater pump for directing fluid from a low pressure storage tank through the first heat exchange tube, a main storage drum, a second heat exchange tube, and a high pressure recirculation pump for directing fluid from the main storage pump through the second heat exchange tube. The control system monitors the temperature of the exhaust gas turbine gases as directed to the steam generator and deactuates the steam turbine when a predetermined temperature is exceeded.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1974-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Combined cycle electric power plant and a heat recovery steam generator having improved boiler feed pump flow control  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes an economizer tube and a high pressure evaporator tube and a boiler feed pump for directing the heat exchange fluid serially through the aforementioned tubes. A condenser is associated with the steam turbine for converting the spent steam into condensate water to be supplied to a deaerator for removing undesired air and for preliminarily heating the water condensate before being pumped to the economizer tube. Condensate flow through the economizer tube is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the boiler feed pump at a predetermined, substantially constant rate. A bypass conduit is provided to feed back a portion of the flow heated in the economizer tube to the deaerator; the portion being equal to the difference between the constant flow through the economizer tube and the flow to be directed through the high pressure evaporator tube as required by the steam turbine for its present load.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

The U.S. Department of Energy`s integrated gasification combined cycle research, development and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

Historically, coal has played a major role as a fuel source for power generation both domestically and abroad. Despite increasingly stringent environmental constraints and affordable natural gas, coal will remain one of the primary fuels for producing electricity. This is due to its abundance throughout the world, low price, ease of transport an export, decreasing capital cost for coal-based systems, and the need to maintain fuel diversity. Recognizing the role coal will continue to play, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is working in partnership with industry to develop ways to use this abundant fuel resource in a manner that is more economical, more efficient and environmentally superior to conventional means to burn coal. The most promising of these technologies is integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. Although IGCC systems offer many advantages, there are still several hurdles that must be overcome before the technology achieves widespread commercial acceptance. The major hurdles to commercialization include reducing capital and operating costs, reducing technical risk, demonstrating environmental and technical performance at commercial scale, and demonstrating system reliability and operability. Overcoming these hurdles, as well as continued progress in improving system efficiency, are the goals of the DOE IGCC research, development and demonstrate (RD and D) program. This paper provides an overview of this integrated RD and D program and describes fundamental areas of technology development, key research projects and their related demonstration scale activities.

Brdar, R.D.; Cicero, D.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling responses to increasing precipitation variability depends on precipitation amount and soil texture, and that accurate prediction of future N cycling and gas effluxes requires models with relatively sophisticated representation of the relevant processes.

Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reduction of NO/sub x/ through staged combustion in combined cycle supplemental boilers. Volume I. Systems optimization analyses. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An investigation directed to control of emissions from supplemental-fired combined cycles with the use of staged combustion in the steam generating portion of the system is discussed. A combined cycle, as considered in this report, is the assembly of any number of gas turbines, steam generators, and steam turbines for electric power generation in which the exhaust of the gas turbines is passed through the steam generators. A supplementary-fired combined cycle employs combustion of fuel in the gas turbine exhaust to increase temperatures in the steam system. Staged combustion is achieved by the separation of the exhaust from the gas turbines into two streams prior to entering the steam generator with provisions for primary combustion of fuel in one stream with a deficiency of air. Combustion is completed in a secondary stage by mixing the unfired stream into the products of the fired stream. The use of staged combustion provides conditions favorable for the occurrence of chemical reactions that result in a reduction of mass flow of nitric oxide (NO) present in the gas turbine exhaust. Volume I is concerned with the engineering analysis of combined cycle performance and NO/sub x/ reduction potential. (GRA)

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Model of the Feed Water System Including a Generic Model of the Deaerator for a Full Scope Combined Cycle Power Plant Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the modelling of the Feed water System and an original generic model for closed vessels containing a fluid in two phases at equilibrium conditions with an incondensable gas. The model was used for the deaerator of a Combined Cycle ... Keywords: deaerator, pressurised vessels model, feedwater simulation

Edgardo J. Roldan-Villasana; Ana K. Vazquez

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

An Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Natural Gas-Fired Combined-Cycle Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) assessment on the technical feasibility, performance, and associated costs of applying post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology to a natural gasfired combined-cycle (NGCC) power station.

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

Steady-state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are a promising technology option for power generation with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in view of their efficiency and environmental advantages over conventional coal utilization technologies. This paper presents a three-phase, top-down, optimization-based approach for designing an IGCC plant with precombustion CO2 capture in a process simulator environment. In the first design phase, important global design decisions are made on the basis of plant-wide optimization studies with the aim of increasing IGCC thermal efficiency and thereby making better use of coal resources and reducing CO2 emissions. For the design of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture, the optimal combination of the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion in the water-gas shift (WGS) reactors and the extent of CO2 capture in the SELEXOL process, using dimethylether of polyethylene glycol as the solvent, is determined in the first phase. In the second design phase, the impact of local design decisions is explored considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first phase as additional constraints. Two decisions are made focusing on the SELEXOL and Claus unit. In the third design phase, the operating conditions are optimized considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first and second phases as additional constraints. The operational flexibility of the plant must be taken into account before taking final design decisions. Two studies on the operational flexibility of the WGS reactors and one study focusing on the operational flexibility of the sour water stripper (SWS) are presented. At the end of the first iteration, after executing all the phases once, the net plant efficiency (HHV basis) increases to 34.1% compared to 32.5% in a previously published study (DOE/NETL-2007/1281; National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2007). The study shows that the three-phase, top-down design approach presented is very useful and effective in a process simulator environment for improving efficiency and flexibility of IGCC power plants with CO2 capture. In addition, the study identifies a number of key design variables that has strong impact on the efficiency of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture.

Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Technical Support for the Development of the U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Training Sim ulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) is one technology option from the next generation of coal-fired power plants with high efficiency and near-zero emissions that has been evaluated by major utilities and developers for baseload capacity additions. The increased attention to IGCC power generation has created a growing demand for experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale IGCC plants. To meet this need, DOEs National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has led a pr...

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Demonstration Development Project - Combustion Turbine Low Power Turndown Technologies: A Review of Current and Emerging Technologies for Combined Cycle Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a Demonstration Development Program that supports projects that evaluate developing technologies which will potentially decrease cost and increase performance of power generating assets. This report provides a review of recent developments in combined cycle technologies that provide improved performance in the areas of response time (start-up and ramp time), power turndown while maintaining low emissions, and fuel flexibility.A review of technologies either ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

Induced-Draft Cooling Towers and Parallel Wet/Dry Cooling for Combined-Cycle Plants: Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifica tions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information and examples of best practices for the design and specification of wet and parallel (hybrid) cooling towers for combined-cycle applications. Two reference (template) specifications are includedone for totally wet cooling systems and one for parallel cooling systems with a wet cooling tower and air-cooled condensers (ACC) in parallel. These template specifications are intended to be the starting point from which the utility or developer can "customize" as needed to fit its...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Alkali removal at about 1400{sup o}C for the pressurized pulverized coal combustion combined cycle. 1. Thermodynamics and concept  

SciTech Connect

The limitation of fossil fuel resources and the necessity of reducing CO{sub 2} emission require an increase of the efficiency of power plants by using combined cycle power systems. The pressurized pulverized coal combustion (PPCC) combined cycle is a coal fired combined cycle concept which is able to achieve efficiencies in excess of 53%. The direct use of the hot flue gas for driving a gas turbine requires a hot gas cleanup to achieve corrosion prevention of the turbine blading. One of the main problems is the release of alkalis during the coal combustion process. Therefore, the thermodynamic basics for the control of alkali vapor pressures in the hot flue gas of PPCC have been investigated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric measurements on alkali oxide activities in and alkali partial pressures over coal ash slags with and without additives and alkali laden model sorbents. The obtained results reveal that the requirements of the gas turbine manufacturers regarding alkali concentration in the hot flue gas should be satisfiable by certain aluminosilicate sorbents. On the basis of these results, a concept for alkali vapor removal is proposed. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Winfried Willenborg; Michael Mueller; Klaus Hilpert [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Engineering and Economic Evaluations of Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant Designs with Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research were to assess the performance and costs of coal-fired integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. The base cases are Greenfield designs without carbon dioxide (CO2) capture; two additional cases were studied with retrofitted full CO2 capture. The study represents Phase 3 of a multiyear study executed on behalf of the CoalFleet for Tomorrow program, a collaborative research and development program that promotes the deployment of advanced coal technologies, i...

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

290

A cost-effective and fuel-conserving nonelectric air conditioner that combines engine-driven compression and absorption cycles  

SciTech Connect

A natural-gas-fueled electricity-producing condensing furnace with the potential of being mass produced at a cost of less than $1000 and providing a cost-effective and highly fuel-conserving alternative to virtually every residential gas furnace in the world has been developed. While this is a new system, it completely consists of existing mass-produced components including single-cylinder air-cooled engines, induction motors/generators, and control devices. Thus, timely commercialization can be expected and an important new energy technology and industry can result. However, all the benefits of this electricity-producing furnace occur during the winter. This has stimulated the search for a new system that can provide comparable benefits in terms of fuel conservation, the environment, and electric utility peak reduction during the summer, along with the prospects of a new and efficient new use for the natural gas surpluses that occur during the summer. The resulting system, which can use existing component equipment, is a commercial-size nonelectric air conditioner that consists of an automobile-type engine converted to natural gas, or possibly a diesel or combustion turbine, driving a Freon compression cycle, with virtually all of the engine reject heat from the exhaust and from the engine cooling system driving a conventional absorption air conditioning cycle.

Wicks, F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Application of the Concept of Exergy in the Selection of a Gas-Turbine Engine for Combined-Cycle Power Plant Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown that the second-law efficiency of a gas-turbine engine may be calculated in a rational and simple manner by making use of an algebraic equation giving the exergy content of turbine exhaust as a function of exhaust temperature only. Since a high second-law efficiency of a gas-turbine engine is necessary to have high overall system efficiency, the decision maker may thus make use of the procedure presented in this work to quickly identify those gas-turbine engines that could be good candidates for combined-cycle operation.

Huang, F. F.; Naumowicz, T.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Flue Gas Cleanup at Temperatures about 1400 C for a Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant: State and Perspectives in the Pressurized Pulverized Coal Combustion (PPCC) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PPCC technology, a combined cycle, requires comprehensive cleaning of the flue gases because coal contains a large variety of minerals and other substances. This would lead to fast destruction of the gas turbine blades due to erosion and corrosion. The present specifications of the turbine manufacturers for the required flue gas quality are at a maximum particulate content of 5 mg/m3 s.t.p., diameter of Kraftwerke GmbH, SaarEnergie GmbH, Siemens AG, and Steag AG.

Foerster, M.E.C.; Oeking, K.; Hannes, K.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

293

Analysis of community solar systems for combined space and domestic hot water heating using annual cycle thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified design procedure is examined for estimating the storage capacity and collector area for annual-cycle-storage, community solar heating systems in which 100% of the annual space heating energy demand is provided from the solar source for the typical meteorological year. Hourly computer simulations of the performance of these systems were carried out for 10 cities in the United States for 3 different building types and 4 community sizes. These permitted the use of design values for evaluation of a more simplified system sizing method. Results of this study show a strong correlation between annual collector efficiency and two major, location-specific, annual weather parameters: the mean air temperature during daylignt hours and the total global insolation on the collector surface. Storage capacity correlates well with the net winter load, which is a measure of the seasonal variation in the total load, a correlation which appears to be independent of collector type.

Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.; Cook, J.D.; Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Novel Cell Design for Combined In Situ Acoustic Emission and X-ray Diffraction of Cycling Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been devised and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk which acts as both an X-ray window and a current collector. In this manner the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazard is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles which were previously studied by the AE technique were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin J [ORNL; Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam- and water-cooled gas turbine: steam turbine combined cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical study was made of the performance of air-, steam-, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam-turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal-barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205/sup 0/C to 1370/sup 0/C, resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4% when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425/sup 0/C to 1675/sup 0/C and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683/sup 0/C and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6% by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425/sup 0/C to 1730/sup 0/C and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air-cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205/sup 0/C. The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

Nainiger, J.J.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

87 Final Report: IGCC-LCA VII Prepared by: Laura Draucker Raj Bhander Barbara Bennet Tom Davis Robert Eckard William Ellis John Kauffman James Littlefield Amanda Malone Ron Munson...

298

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"ASTM Standard Inch-Pound Reinforcing Bars". http:www.crsi.orgrebarmetric.html. Davis, Leroy,(2007). Reference & Information: American Wire Gauge Cable Descriptions....

299

Expeditious Data Center Sustainability, Flow, and Temperature Modeling: Life-Cycle Exergy Consumption Combined with a Potential Flow Based, Rankine Vortex Superposed, Predictive Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategy bypasses the vapor- compression cycle of the CRACis based on the same vapor-compression refrigeration cycle4.1, which shows the vapor-compression refrig- eration cycle

Lettieri, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Alabama - State Energy Profile Data - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Barry (Alabama Power Co) ; James H Miller Jr (Alabama Power Co) ; H Allen Franklin Combined Cycle (Southern Power Co) ; E B Harris Electric Generating Plant ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. [Public health hazards of fossil-fuel, combined cycle, combustion turbine, and geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Public health and safety hazards have been identified for five types of power plants: coal-fired, oil-fired steam turbine, combined cycle, combustion (gas) turbine, and geothermal. The results of the analysis show that air pollutants are the major hazard that affects the health and safety of the general public. A total of ninety plant hazards were identified for the five plant types. Each of these hazards were rated in six categories as to their affect on the general public. The criteria used in the analysis were: area/population exposed; duration; mitigation; quantity to toxicity ratio; nature of health effects; and public attitude. Even though ninety hazards were identified for the five plants analyzed, the large majority of hazards were similar for each plant. Highest ratings were given to the products of the combustion cycle or to hydrogen sulfide emissions from geothermal plants. Water pollution, cooling tower effects and noise received relatively low ratings. The highest rated of the infrequent or hypothetical hazards were those associated with potential fires, explosions, and chlorine releases at the plant. Hazards associated with major cooling water releases, water pollution and missiles received the lowest ratings. Since the results of the study clearly show that air pollutants are currently considered the most severe hazard, additional effort must be made to further understand the complex interactions of pollutants with man and his environment. Of particular importance is the determination of dose-response relationships for long term, low level exposure to air pollutants. (EDB)

Roman, W.S.; Israel, W.J.; Sacramo, R.F.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Combined cycle total energy system  

SciTech Connect

A system is described for the co-generation of steam and electricity comprising: a source of gaseous fuel, a source of air, means for mixing the fuel and air to form a relatively lean fuel/air mixture, a gas turbine, a first fuel/air mixture compressor directly driven by the turbine, a second fuel/air mixture compressor driven by the turbine for further compressing the fuel/air mixture, a catalytic burner between the second compressor and gas turbine, a motor/generator, a steam turbine, means coupling the gas turbine, motor/generator, first and second compressors and steam turbine to one another, a source of water, a steam boiler connected to the source of water and to the exhaust system of the gas turbine, a steam economizer connected to the boiler, a steam superheater in heat exchange relationship with the exhaust system of the gas turbine disposed between the economizer and the steam turbine, and controllable means for bypassing superheated steam from the superheater around the steam turbine to maximize steam or electric power output of the system selectively.

Joy, J.R.

1986-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

AVESTAR - Training - Combined Cycle Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exercise Startup Circulating Water System Startup Fuel Systems Draw vacuum in Condenser Start Gas Turbine (GT) and bring to rated speed on natural gas ITS operations to...

304

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced F-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics simulation and integrated with MATLAB for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Combined cycle electric power plant and heat recovery steam generator having improved multi-loop temperature control of the steam generated  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube and a steam drum from which heated steam is directed through the superheater to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner serves to further heat the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube and a bypass conduit is disposed about the superheater tube whereby a variable steam flow determined by a bypass valve disposed in the bypass conduit may be directed about the superheater tube to be mixed with the superheated steam therefrom, whereby the temperature of the superheated steam supplied to the steam turbine may be accurately controlled. Steam temperature control means includes a first control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for regulating the position of the bypass valve with respect to a first setpoint, and a second control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for controlling the fuel supply to the afterburner with respect to a second setpoint varying in accordance with the bypass valve position. In particular, as the bypass valve position increases, the second setpoint, originally higher, is lowered toward a value substantially equal to that of the first setpoint.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)  

SciTech Connect

A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An evaluaton of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 2, Sensitivity studies and appendixes: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute contracted with Bechtel Group, Inc., to provide an evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD). A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The study confirms that the Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. In addition, coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol; NGCC = natural gas combined-cycle; BIGCC =gasification combined-cycle. P ART III U NCERTAINTY Aaverage, (ii) natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC), (iii) coal

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant.Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

State estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) plant as part of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate estimation of process state variables not only can increase the effectiveness and reliability of process measurement technology, but can also enhance plant efficiency, improve control system performance, and increase plant availability. Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO2 capture will have to satisfy stricter operational and environmental constraints. To operate the IGCC plant without violating stringent environmental emission standards requires accurate estimation of the relevant process state variables, outputs, and disturbances. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured at all, while some of them can be measured, but with low precision, low reliability, or low signal-to-noise ratio. As a result, accurate estimation of the process variables is of great importance to avoid the inherent difficulties associated with the inaccuracy of the data. Motivated by this, the current paper focuses on the state estimation of an acid gas removal (AGR) process as part of an IGCC plant with CO2 capture. This process has extensive heat and mass integration and therefore is very suitable for testing the efficiency of the designed estimators in the presence of complex interactions between process variables. The traditional Kalman filter (KF) (Kalman, 1960) algorithm has been used as a state estimator which resembles that of a predictor-corrector algorithm for solving numerical problems. In traditional KF implementation, good guesses for the process noise covariance matrix (Q) and the measurement noise covariance matrix (R) are required to obtain satisfactory filter performance. However, in the real world, these matrices are unknown and it is difficult to generate good guesses for them. In this paper, use of an adaptive KF will be presented that adapts Q and R at every time step of the algorithm. Results show that very accurate estimations of the desired process states, outputs or disturbances can be achieved by using the adaptive KF.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Southern Company Services' study of a Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW)-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plant  

SciTech Connect

A site-specific evaluation of an integrated-gasification-combined- cycle (IGCC) unit was conducted by Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) to determine the effect of such a plant would have on electricity cost, load response, and fuel flexibility on the Southern electric system (SES). The design of the Plant Wansley IGCC plant in this study was configured to utilize three oxygen-blown Kellogg Rust Westinghouse (KRW) gasifiers integrated with two General Electric (GE) MS7001F combustion turbines. The nominal 400-MW IGCC plant was based on a nonphased construction schedule, with an operational start date in the year 2007. Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was the base coal used in the study. Alabama lignite was also investigated as a potential low-cost feedstock for the IGCC plant, but was found to be higher in cost that the Illinois No. 6 coal when shipped to the Wansley site. The performance and cost results for the nominal 400-MW plant were used in an economic assessment that compared the replacement of a 777-MW pulverized-coal-fired unit with 777-MW of IGCC capacity based on the Southern electric system's expansion plans of installing 777-MW of baseload capacity in the year 2007. The economic analysis indicated that the IGCC plant was competitive compared to a baseload pulverized-coal-fired unit. Capital costs of the IGCC unit were approximately the same as a comparably sized pulverized-coal-fired plant, but the IGCC plant had a lower production cost due to its lower heat rate. 10 refs., 34 figs., 18 tabs.

Gallaspy, D.T.; Johnson, T.W.; Sears, R.E. (Southern Co. Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Impact of Mobility on Structure-Based Drug Design for the MMPs Franklin J. Moy, Pranab K. Chanda, James Chen, Scott Cosmi, Wade Edris, Jeremy I. Levin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Mobility on Structure-Based Drug Design for the MMPs Franklin J. Moy, Pranab K. Chanda and Chemical Sciences, Wyeth Research, 401 North Middletown Road, Pearl RiVer, New York 10965 Received June 20 design of new drug candidates (for reviews, see refs 1-4). The beneficial impact of structure- based

Powers, Robert

315

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS) and the Parallel Computing toolbox from Mathworks. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ECOR VAP Flux Corrections, Gap-filling, and Results David R. Cook, Meredith Franklin, Donna J. Holdridge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECOR VAP Flux Corrections, Gap-filling, and Results ECOR VAP Flux Corrections, Gap-filling, and Results David R. Cook, Meredith Franklin, Donna J. Holdridge Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Climate Change Research Division, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357, as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Argonne National Laboratory is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT An eddy correlation (ECOR) value-added product (VAP) has been developed that uses ECOR temperature, humidity, and wetness state (or default values of the same) to determine corrections to and gap-filling of the flux measurements. An outlier routine is used to remove obvious incorrect data before gap-filling is performed.

318

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant withAnalysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling, Optimization, and Operability Studies of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Rigorous Kinetic Modeling and Optimization Study of a Modified Claus Unit for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant with CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and the ability to recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Because of these criteria, modifications to the conventional process are often required, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant, such as rapid change in the feed flow rates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but they are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified, and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions, which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both the H{sub 2}S/SO{sub 2} ratio and the adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. Impact of CO{sub 2} capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, Dustin; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Turton, Richard; Zitney, Stephen E.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Modeling and optimization of a modified claus process as part of an integrted gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The modified Claus process is one of the most common technologies for sulfur recovery from acid gas streams. Important design criteria for the Claus unit, when part of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, are the ability to destroy ammonia completely and recover sulfur thoroughly from a relatively low purity acid gas stream without sacrificing flame stability. Due to these criteria, modifications are often required to the conventional process, resulting in a modified Claus process. For the studies discussed here, these modifications include the use of a 95% pure oxygen stream as the oxidant, a split flow configuration, and the preheating of the feeds with the intermediate pressure steam generated in the waste heat boiler (WHB). In the future, for IGCC plants with CO2 capture, the Claus unit must satisfy emission standards without sacrificing the plant efficiency in the face of typical disturbances of an IGCC plant such as rapid change in the feed flowrates due to load-following and wide changes in the feed composition because of changes in the coal feed to the gasifier. The Claus unit should be adequately designed and efficiently operated to satisfy these objectives. Even though the Claus process has been commercialized for decades, most papers concerned with the modeling of the Claus process treat the key reactions as equilibrium reactions. Such models are validated by manipulating the temperature approach to equilibrium for a set of steady-state operating data, but are of limited use for dynamic studies. One of the objectives of this study is to develop a model that can be used for dynamic studies. In a Claus process, especially in the furnace and the WHB, many reactions may take place. In this work, a set of linearly independent reactions has been identified and kinetic models of the furnace flame and anoxic zones, WHB, and catalytic reactors have been developed. To facilitate the modeling of the Claus furnace, a four-stage method was devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H2S/SO2 ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both H2S/SO2 ratio and adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO2 capture. Impact of CO2 capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Style and age of tectonism of Sadlerochit Mountains of Franklin Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pre-Tertiary rocks north of the Franklin Mountains and south of the coastal plain in ANWR can be subdivided into two major structural units: (1) basement - Neruokpuk Formation, Nanook Limestone, and Katakturuk Dolomite - and (2) Lower Mississippian to Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. Basement rocks underwent intense deformation prior to deposition of Lower Mississippian rocks; locally the contact is structural. Crustal shortening at the structural level exposed was accommodated primarily by concentric folding. Axial planes of major folds generally strike N70/sup 0/-90/sup 0/E and dip 50/sup 0/-80/sup 0/S, indicating north vergence, and can be subdivided into two groups: east-northeast trending and east trending. Major folds plunge subhorizontally and continue laterally for up to 10 mi (15 km). Exposed reverse faults show relatively small amounts of throw (ANWR, constrain the principal post-Mississippian deformation, a phase of north-south compression to have occurred between the mid-Eocene and the present. East-trending folds suggest two deformational events. Relative timing of these events, based on field data, is equivocal.

Leiggi, P.A.; Russell, B.J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: Combined stability in isothermal ageing and thermal cycling with YSZ coated ferritic stainless steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkali-containing silicate glass (SCN-1) is currently being evaluated as a candidate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass contains about 17 mole% alkalis (K+Na) and has low glass transition and softening temperatures. It remains vitreous and compliant around 750-800oC after sealing without substantial crystallization, as contrary to conventional glass-ceramic sealants, which experience rapid crystallization after the sealing process. The glassy nature and low characteristic temperatures can reduce residual stresses and result in the potential for crack healing. In a previous study, the glass was found to have good thermal cycle stability and was chemically compatible with YSZ coating during short term testing. In the current study, the compliant glass was further evaluated in a more realistic way in that the sealed glass couples were first isothermally aged for 1000h followed by thermal cycling. High temperature leakage was measured. The chemical compatibility was also investigated with powder mixtures at 700 and 800oC to enhance potential interfacial reaction. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and evaluated with regard to the leakage and chemical compatibility results.

Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Willamina Project Report : Indirect-Fired, Biomass-Fueled, Combined-Cycle, Gas Turbine Power Plant Using a Ceramic Heat Exchanger. Volume 1. Conceptual Plant Design and Analysis. Final report. [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

A new technology for a wood-fueled electrical generation plant was evaluated. The proposed plant utilizes an indirectly fired gas turbine (IFGT) using a ceramic heat exchanger for high efficiency, due to its high temperature capability. The proposed plant utilizes a wood-fueled furnace with a ceramic heat exchanger to heat compressed air for a gas turbine. The configuration proposed is a combined cycle power plant that can produce 6 to 12 MW, depending upon the amount of wood used to supplementally fire a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), which in turn powers a steam turbine. Drawings, specifications, and cost estimates based on a combined cycle analysis and wood-fired HRSG were developed. The total plant capital cost was estimated to be $13.1 million ($1640/kW). The heat rate for a 8-MW plant was calculated to be 10,965 Btu/kW when using wood residues with a 42% moisture content. Levelized electric energy costs were estimated to be 6.9 cents/kWh.

F.W. Braun Engineers.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Single pressure steam bottoming cycle for gas turbines combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for recapturing waste heat from the exhaust of a gas turbine to drive a high pressure-high temperature steam turbine and a low pressure steam turbine. It comprises: delivering the exhaust of the gas turbine to the hot side of an economizer-reheater apparatus; delivering a heated stream of feedwater and recycled condensate through the cold side of the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus to elevate the temperature below the pinch point of the boiler; delivering the discharge from the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine through the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus; driving the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine with the discharge stream of feedwater and recycled condensate which is heated to a temperature below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus; and driving the low pressure steam turbine with the discharged stream of the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine reheated below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus.

Zervos, N.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluidized-Bed Steam-Electric Steam-Electric Combined-CycleCombined-Cycle Current (1974) Future Future a Source:steam plants. The combined-cycle versions of advanced

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The High Cycle Fatigue, Damage Initiation and Growth and Final ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Based Fatigue Life Prediction Models and Methods for Combined Low Cycle and High Cycle Fatigue Fatigue Behavior of AM60B Subjected to Variable ...

329

Franklin Job Launch Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and 8 GB of memory shared by the 4 cores. The compute nodes run a restricted low-overhead operating system optimized for high performance computing. This OS supports only...

330

Franklin: User Experiences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration and Progress at NERSC. Cray Technical Workshopstaff are involved along with NERSC on the two team efforts.and on site) and also our NERSC colleagues for their hard

He, Yun Helen; National Energy Research Supercomputing Center

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Franklin: User Experiences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Borrill. High Performance Computing For Cosmic Microwaves (DOE) keystone high performance computing facility thatfinalists for high performance computing competition [8].

He, Yun Helen; National Energy Research Supercomputing Center

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Franklin Allen Anna Gelpern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. But conflict re- mains about whether to allow drilling in the federal portion of ANWR. While ANWR is thought in North America. Thus, the ANWR question is typically cast in symbolic terms -- "big oil" looking to cash a simple thought ex- periment to help cut through the symbol- ism. Imagine that ANWR -- both the region

Zywina, David

333

Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method  

SciTech Connect

A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

Labinov, Solomon D. (Knoxville, TN); Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Optimal Instrumentation for Combined Cycle Plant Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants today rely on distributed control systems (DCS) to operate their equipment. These control systems subsequently rely on process information provided by various instruments in the field. The accuracy and reliability of field instrumentation has a direct correlation to the ability of the control system to operate correctly, including the ability to control the plant in a safe and reliable manner.Beyond instrumentation relied on for control of the power plant, additional ...

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Natural Gas Combined Cycle 3 Study Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

Workshop On Gasification; Power Plants; Subcritical Pulverized Coal; Supercritical Pulverized Coal; F Cop

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Assessment of the Cheng Simplified Combined Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will help resource planners assess the cost-effectiveness of retrofitting increased steam injection to a cogeneration plant or power station with gas turbines.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (BIGCC).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Conversion of biomass to energy does not contribute to the net increase of carbon dioxide in the environment, therefore the use of biomass waste as (more)

Yap, Mun Roy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SEPT02AL 1. Browns Ferry Nuclear Tennessee Valley Authority 2. James H Miller Jr Coal Alabama Power Co 3. Barry 4. E C Gaston 5. H Allen Franklin Combined Cycle

339

A preliminary evaluation of the thermal effects of the Ben Franklin Dam project on Columbia River temperatures below the Hanford Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planned construction of the Ben Franklin project below the Hanford production reactors poses the question of determining to what extent this project will affect the Columbia River temperatures. Using the plant operations record for the year 1966, and the weather record for the same period, a series of simulation runs was made to determine the effects of the clam on the temperature regime, and the extent to which density currents could be expected to develop. This information is to be used as background for the later evaluation of the modification of the existing radionuclide discharge. The digital simulation model COL HEAT, was used. This model has been previously developed under Atomic Energy Commission sponsorship for use in the regional evaluation of the effects of the Hanford plant.

Jaske, R.T.

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Natural Gas Combined-Cycle Power Generation System.combined with separate accounting for the use of energy in fuel production, is referred to as full- fuel- cycle (

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

High Cycle Fatigue in a Single Crystal Superalloy: Time ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Single crystal superalloys, High cycle fatigue, Environmental coatings, Rupture ... modes were modeled separately and then combined into a damage.

342

A Modification of the Atmospheric Energy Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modification is made of the conventional energy cycle by combining the eddy flux convergence and the mean meridional circulation terms in the mean momentum and heat equations. The combined terms are interpreted as the effective flux ...

Yoshikazu Hayashi

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hybrid Cycles with Hydrogen as Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas turbine and steam turbine combined cycle fueled with hydrogen have an overall high efficiency. The virtues of the supercritical steam turbine, the high temperature gas turbine and the low pressure steam turbine are fully expressed in this system. ... Keywords: gas turbine, new energy, combined cycle, hydrogen energy, thermal efficiency, energy conversion

Jing Rulin; Xu Hong; Hu Sangao; Gao Dan; Guo Xiaodan; Ni Weidou

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Print E-mail U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, in consultation with the Carbon Cycle...

345

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

346

Ultrasonic Fatigue Testing System Combined with Nondestructive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Ultrasonic Fatigue Testing System Combined with ... High and Very High Cycle Fatigue in Al and Cu Thin Films on Si Substrate.

347

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to an integrated fuel cell power plant, and more specifically to a combination of cycles wherein a first fuel cell cycle tops an indirect-fired gas turbine cycle and a second fuel cell cycle bottoms the gas turbine cycle so that the cycles are thermally integrated in a tandem operating arrangement. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to the employer-employee relationship between the United States Department of Energy and the inventors.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The High Cycle Fatigue and Final Fracture Behavior of Alloy Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Based Fatigue Life Prediction Models and Methods for Combined Low Cycle and High Cycle Fatigue Fatigue Behavior of AM60B Subjected to Variable ...

349

Forecast Combinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast combinations have frequently been found in empirical studies to produce better forecasts on average than methods based on the ex-ante best individual forecasting model. Moreover, simple combinations that ignore correlations between forecast errors often dominate more refined combination schemes aimed at estimating the theoretically optimal combination weights. In this chapter we analyze theoretically the factors that determine the advantages from combining forecasts (for example, the degree of correlation between forecast errors and the relative size of the individual models forecast error variances). Although the reasons for the success of simple combination schemes are poorly understood, we discuss several possibilities related to model misspecification, instability (non-stationarities) and estimation error in situations where thenumbersofmodelsislargerelativetothe available sample size. We discuss the role of combinations under asymmetric loss and consider combinations of point, interval and probability forecasts. Key words: Forecast combinations; pooling and trimming; shrinkage methods; model misspecification, diversification gains

Allan Timmermann; Jel Codes C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Gas turbine bottoming cycles: Triple-pressure steam versus Kalina  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a triple-pressure steam cycle has been compared with a single-stage Kalina cycle and an optimized three-stage Kalina cycle as the bottoming sections of a gas turbine combined cycle power plant. A Monte Carlo direct search was used to find the optimum separator temperature and ammonia mass fraction for the three-stage Kalina cycle for a specific plant configuration. Both Kalina cycles were more efficient than the triple pressure steam cycle. Optimization of the three-stage Kalina cycle resulted in almost a two percentage point improvement.

Marston, C.H. [Villanova Univ., PA (United States); Hyre, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Combined power plants -- Past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early history of combined power plants is described, together with the birth of the CCGT plant (the combined cycle gas turbine). Sustained CCGT development in the 1970s and 1980s, based on sound thermodynamic considerations, is outlined. Finally more recent developments and future prospects for the combined gas turbine/steam turbine combined plant are discussed.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

GasTurbine/Heat Recovery Steam Generator Cycle Alignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are to outline a procedure for identifying common opportunities for combined cycle plant performance improvement; to define a framework to analyze these performance opportunities; and to describe the application of this methodology to achieve improved base load performance and part load operability. This overall integrated approach to combined cycle plant performance analysis is referred to as cycle alignment.Three cases are described for potential combined ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Short-cycle higher education: Purposes and issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article deals with a worldwide movement called short-cycle higher education .... lowed less than a fair share of the combined budget, college faculties had.

354

Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue: The Role of Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth process continued by a combined process of oxidation and creep. ... of a model developed for crack growth during sustained peak low cycle fatigue.

355

Projections of Full-Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Metrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Combined-Cycle Power Generation System. NREL. http://extensively for electric power generation, and for dieselextensively for electric power generation, and for diesel

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Abdellatif M. Yacout Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division The nuclear fuel cycle is a complex system with multiple components and activities that are combined to provide nuclear energy to a variety of end users. The end uses of nuclear energy are diverse and include electricity, process heat, water desalination, district heating, and possibly future hydrogen production for transportation and energy storage uses. Components of the nuclear fuel cycle include front end components such as uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, and the reactor component. Back end of the fuel cycle include used fuel coming out the reactor, used fuel temporary and permanent storage, and fuel reprocessing. Combined with those components there

357

Direct fired power cycle  

SciTech Connect

A method for implementing a thermodynamic cycle is described comprising the steps of: expanding a gaseous working stream to transform its energy into usable form; removing from the expanded gaseous working stream a withdrawal stream; combining the withdrawal stream with a lean stream, having a higher content of a higher-boiling component than is contained in the withdrawal stream, to form a composite stream; condensing the composite stream to provide heat; separating the composite stream to form a liquid stream; forming an oncoming liquid working stream that evaporates at a temperature lower than the temperature at which the composite stream condenses; and evaporating the oncoming liquid working stream, using the heat produced by condensing the composite stream, to form the gaseous working stream.

Kalina, A.I.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Debug Jobs Short jobs requesting less than 30 minutes and requiring 512 nodes (2,048 cores) or fewer can run in the debug queue. From 5am-6pm Pacific Time, 256 nodes are reserved for debugging and interactive use. See also, running Interactive Jobs. Sample Batch Scripts The following batch script requests 8 cores on 2 nodes with a 10 minute wall clock limit in the debug queue. Torque directive lines tell the batch system how to run a job and begin with #PBS. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=8 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 #PBS -j eo #PBS -V cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 8 ./a.out Here is another example requesting 8 processors using 4 nodes with only 2 cores per node: #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=8 #PBS -l mppnppn=2 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00

359

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Debug Jobs Short jobs requesting less than 30 minutes and requiring 512 nodes (2,048 cores) or fewer can run in the debug queue. From...

360

Franklin Fellows Program February 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assistance implementation; nonproliferation; human rights and democracy promotion; protecting the environment

Garfunkel, Eric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Franklin F. Snyder Interview with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mean we had normal circumstances and my father had a grain and flour mill. Before that, he'd been in

US Army Corps of Engineers

362

Memory Usage Considerations on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the memory requirement vvia internal checking in their codes or by some tools. Craypat could track heap usage. And IPM also tracks memory usage. Last edited: 2013-06-30 08:33:51...

363

Graph Invariants and Large Cycles - a Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graph invariants are the best and single tools for investigation of abstract structures of graphs. They, combined in convenient relations, carry global and general information about a graph and its various substructures (cycle structures, factors, colorings, coverings, and so on). In this survey paper we have attempted to bring together all direct (pure) relations between basic invariants of a graph and its large cycle structures, perhaps the most important cycle structures, namely Hamilton, longest, dominating and some generalized cycles including Hamilton and dominating cycles as special cases. These very few relations actually form a source (basis) from which nearly all possible hamiltonian results can be developed further based on generalized and extended invariants, extended list of path or cycle structures and additional structural limitations.

Nikoghosyan, Zh G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Life Cycle Engineering Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for green manufacturing and construction applications; conduct life cycle engineering assessments for energy efficiency and environmental ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

Better Sensors and Controls for Cycling and Turndown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the electrical generation mix (increase in renewable energy supply), relative costs of fossil fuels, and evolution of the system demand have resulted in greater reliance on cycling and turndown operation in fossil power plants. Coal and combined-cycle generating units are experiencing a combination of broader operating conditions and aging sensing and control equipment, which results in operating limitations during cycling and turndown. This report summarizes sensing and control ...

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modeling Metal Powder Compaction Using Combined Finite and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Modeling Metal Powder Compaction Using Combined Finite ... Optimization of Thermal Cycle for Rails with Respect to the Wear Resistance.

367

The probability of long cycles in interchange processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the number of cycles of length k in a permutation, as a function on the symmetric group. We write it explicitly as a combination of characters of irreducible representations. This allows to study formation of long cycles in the interchange process, including a precise formula for the probability that the permutation is one long cycle at a given time t, and estimates for the cases of shorter cycles.

Alon, Gil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

" "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," " " "," " ," " "NAICS Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","Establishments with Any Cogeneration Technology in Use(c)","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

369

Search Combinators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to model search in a constraint solver can be an essential asset for solving combinatorial problems. However, existing infrastructure for defining search heuristics is often inadequate. Either modeling capabilities are extremely limited or users are faced with a general-purpose programming language whose features are not tailored towards writing search heuristics. As a result, major improvements in performance may remain unexplored. This article introduces search combinators, a lightweight and solver-independent method that bridges the gap between a conceptually simple modeling language for search (high-level, functional and naturally compositional) and an efficient implementation (low-level, imperative and highly non-modular). By allowing the user to define application-tailored search strategies from a small set of primitives, search combinators effectively provide a rich domain-specific language (DSL) for modeling search to the user. Remarkably, this DSL comes at a low implementation cost to the...

Schrijvers, Tom; Wuille, Pieter; Samulowitz, Horst; Stuckey, Peter J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Edgeworth cycles revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some gasoline markets exhibit remarkable price cycles, where price spikes are followed by a series of small price declines: a pattern consistent with a model of Edgeworth cycles described by Maskin and Tirole. We extend ...

Doyle, Joseph J.

372

Solar Augmented Steam Cycles: 2010 Industry Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several studies were performed to evaluate a range of solar augmented steam cycle design options. All the designs use steam generated by a solar field in a conventional steam cycle, either offsetting some of the fuel required to generate power or boosting plant power output. The scope of the studies included a conceptual design modeling effort to evaluate a broad range of solar integration design options for biomass and natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC) power plants and two detailed case studies at NGCC ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cycle to Cycle Manufacturing Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most manufacturing processes produce parts that can only be correctly measured after the process cycle has been completed. Even if in-process measurement and control is possible, it is often too expensive or complex to ...

Hardt, David E.

375

Finding good candidate cycles for efficient p-cycle network design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- An important problem in p-cycle network design is to find a set of p-cycles to protect a given working capacity distribution so that the total spare capacity used by the p-cycles is minimized. Existing approaches for solving the problem include ILP and heuristic algorithm. Both require a set of candidate p-cycles to be precomputed. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to compute a small set of candidate p-cycles that can lead to good performance when used by ILP or the heuristic algorithm. The key idea of the algorithm is to generate a combination of high efficiency cycles and short cycles so that both densely distributed and sparsely distributed working capacities can he efficiently protected by the candidate cycles. The algorithm is also flexible in that the number of cycles generated is controlled by an input parameter. Simulation study showed that the cycles generated by our algorithm can lead to near optimal solutions when used by

Chang Liu; Lu Rum

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

ACTION TEAM PROGRESS REPORT Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Subcommittee on Regulatory Innovation and Economic Incentives of the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee: Reliable, online electricity generation from multiple coal types; synthetic gas clean-up; and, capture and deployment of advanced coal technologies. FY'07 Objectives: Continue collaboration with DOE's Fossil Energy

377

Assessment of Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plants with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Did Assembled design, capacity factor, and emissions data from public sources: EPA, eGRID, EIA-923 list in spreadsheet form. EPA eGRID and DOE EIA databases provide unit-by-unit data on rated capacity, fuel consumption, CO2 production, etc. http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/ener gy-resources/egrid

378

Qualifications of Candle Filters for Combined Cycle Combustion Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct firing of coal produces particulate matter that has to be removed for environmental and process reasons. In order to increase the current advanced coal combustion processes, under the U.S. Department of Energy's auspices, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) has developed ceramic candle filters that can operate at high temperatures. The Coal Research Center of Southern Illinois University (SIUC), in collaboration with SWPC, developed a program for long-term filter testing at the SIUC Steam Plant followed by experiments using a single-filter reactor unit. The objectives of this program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy were to identify and demonstrate the stability of porous candle filter elements for use in high temperature atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) process applications. These verifications were accomplished through extended time slipstream testing of a candle filter array under AFBC conditions using SIUC's existing AFBC boiler. Temperature, mass flow rate, and differential pressure across the filter array were monitored for a duration of 45 days. After test exposure at SIUC, the filter elements were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy and BET surface area analyses. In addition, a single-filter reactor was built and utilized to study long term filter operation, the permeability exhibited by a filter element before and after the slipstream test, and the thermal shock resilience of a used filter by observing differential pressure changes upon rapid heating and cooling of the filter. The data acquired during the slipstream test and the post-test evaluations demonstrated the suitability of filter elements in advanced power generation applications.

Tomasz Wiltowski

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

A hybrid SOFC-microturbine combined-cycle system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As centralized electricity generation and transmission issues continue to complicate electricity demand, interest in distributed generation solutions is increasing. Solid oxide fuel cells are high (more)

Wilson, Jonathan David.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development efforts have been underway for decades to replace dry-gas cleaning technology with humid-gas cleaning technology that would maintain the water vapor content in the raw gas by conducting cleaning at sufficiently high temperature to avoid water vapor condensation and would thus significantly simplify the plant and improve its thermal efficiency. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. conducted a program with the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) to develop a Novel Gas Cleaning process that uses a new type of gas-sorbent contactor, the ''filter-reactor''. The Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process described and evaluated here is in its early stages of development and this evaluation is classified as conceptual. The commercial evaluations have been coupled with integrated Process Development Unit testing performed at a GTI coal gasifier test facility to demonstrate, at sub-scale the process performance capabilities. The commercial evaluations and Process Development Unit test results are presented in Volumes 1 and 2 of this report, respectively. Two gas cleaning applications with significantly differing gas cleaning requirements were considered in the evaluation: IGCC power generation, and Methanol Synthesis with electric power co-production. For the IGCC power generation application, two sets of gas cleaning requirements were applied, one representing the most stringent ''current'' gas cleaning requirements, and a second set representing possible, very stringent ''future'' gas cleaning requirements. Current gas cleaning requirements were used for Methanol Synthesis in the evaluation because these cleaning requirements represent the most stringent of cleaning requirements and the most challenging for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning process. The scope of the evaluation for each application was: (1) Select the configuration for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning Process, the arrangement of the individual gas cleaning stages, and the probable operating conditions of the gas cleaning stages to conceptually satisfy the gas cleaning requirements; (2) Estimate process material & energy balances for the major plant sections and for each gas cleaning stage; (3) Conceptually size and specify the major gas cleaning process equipment; (4) Determine the resulting overall performance of the application; and (5) Estimate the investment cost and operating cost for each application. Analogous evaluation steps were applied for each application using conventional gas cleaning technology, and comparison was made to extract the potential benefits, issues, and development needs of the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology. The gas cleaning process and related gas conditioning steps were also required to meet specifications that address plant environmental emissions, the protection of the gas turbine and other Power Island components, and the protection of the methanol synthesis reactor. Detailed material & energy balances for the gas cleaning applications, coupled with preliminary thermodynamic modeling and laboratory testing of candidate sorbents, identified the probable sorbent types that should be used, their needed operating conditions in each stage, and their required levels of performance. The study showed that Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning technology can be configured to address and conceptually meet all of the gas cleaning requirements for IGCC, and that it can potentially overcome several of the conventional IGCC power plant availability issues, resulting in improved power plant thermal efficiency and cost. For IGCC application, Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning yields 6% greater generating capacity and 2.3 percentage-points greater efficiency under the Current Standards case, and more than 9% generating capacity increase and 3.6 percentage-points higher efficiency in the Future Standards case. While the conceptual equipment costs are estimated to be only slightly lower for the Filter-Reactor Novel Gas Cleaning processes than for the conventional processes, the improved power plant capacity results in the potentia

Dennis A. Horazak; Richard A. Newby; Eugene E. Smeltzer; Rachid B. Slimane; P. Vann Bush; James L. Aderhold Jr; Bruce G. Bryan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Average utilization of the nation's natural gas combined-cycle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (purple line) and 2010 (red line) average capacity factors for natural gas plant operations between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. rose from 26% to 32%.

382

Duty Cycle Software  

Duty cycles capture the influence of one variable in relations to the whole system. This allows for analysis in determining the impact of new ...

383

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Cycles in fossil diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transitions in Global Marine Diversity, Science 281, 1157-know if this cycle is a variation in true diversity or onlyin observed diversity, but either case requires explanation

Rohde, Robert A.; Muller, Richard A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c,e Low-Intermediate Gas turbine exhaust, boiler exhaust,cycles for micro-gas turbines," Applied Thermal Engineering,Tiba, "Optimization of gas-turbine combined cycles for solar

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Comparison of Low Cycle (Notch) Fatigue Behaviour at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

as part of a life cycle costing approach during preliminary design ..... combined with the stress state at the notch root (which can be seen in Figure 9 to be...

388

Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facilty Location Evaluation for Franklin-Badger Canyon 230-kV Line and Badger Canyon Substation Study Area 74-6B.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is the construction of a 15-mile, 230-kV double-circuit transmission line from Franklin Substation near Pasco, Washington, to a proposed new Badger Canyon Substation to be constructed 5 miles west of Kennewick, Washington. Depending on the final route location chosen, approximately 15 miles of 230-kV double circuit transmission line requiring 5.6 miles of new and 9.4 miles of existing right-of-way would be needed as well as approximately 2500 feet of new access road. Land use affected includes crossing Sacajawea State Park and passig through irrigated cropland and grassland on existing right-of-way, and depending on the alternative route chosen, could cross land proposed for residential development and a proposed interstate highway. An additional 10 to 11 acres of potential cropland would be required for the proposed substation. Disturbance to wildlife during construction would occur and habitat associated with the above land uses would be eliminated. Some erosion and sedimentation would occur. Visual impacts would affect Sacajawea State Park, a proposed highway, and potential residential development land. Noise and other disturbances to residents will occur, primarily during construction.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1974-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

Efficient circuit partitioning to extend cycle simulation beyond synchronous circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cycle simulation techniques, such as levelized compiled code, can ordinarily be applied only to synchronous designs. They usually cannot be applied to designs containing circuit features like combinational paths, multiple clock domains, generated clocks, ... Keywords: logic simulation, cycle simulation, circuit partitioning, levelized compiled code

Charles J. DeVane

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fuel Cycle Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as well as for coal and natural gas grid-generation technologies, are provided as baseline cases Cycle Power Plants 14.9 33.1 Natural Gas Turbine, Combined Cycle Power Plants 18.3 46.0 Coal comparable to the total energy use associated with the natural gas and coal grid-generation technologies

Argonne National Laboratory

391

Proceedings: Sixth International Conference on Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of boiler water, feedwater, and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil-fired plants. These conference proceedings address the state of the art in fossil plant and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry as well as international practices for control of corrosion and water preparation and purification.

None

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Proceedings: Sixth International Conference on Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of boiler water, feedwater, and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil-fired plants. These conference proceedings address the state of the art in fossil plant and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry as well as international practices for control of corrosion and water preparation and purification.

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Anderson Quin Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

1993-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

394

Life Cycle Assessment of a Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

% of total from natural gas production & distribution % of total from ammonia production & distribution Natural gas (in ground) 169.2 97.6% 0.0% 99.9% 0.1% Coal (in ground) 1.8...

395

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

397

Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This report, which describes formal cycle chemistry improvement programs at nine utilities, will assist utilities in achieving significant operation and maintenance cost reductions.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

Crude Oil Price Cycles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The heating oil and diesel fuel price runups in late January were made even more problematic by coming on top of the high side of the latest crude market cycle. Over the past 10...

399

Crude Oil Price Cycles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The heating oil and diesel price runups in late January were made even more problematic by coming on top of the high side of the latest crude market cycle.

400

The Annual Agricultural Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad agriculture 1.WAV Length of track 00:44:03 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Annual Agricultural Cycle Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Secular Cycles and Millennial Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both secular cycles and millennial up- ward trend dynamics.Cycles and Millennial Trends by Andrey Korotayev, ArtemySecular Cycles and Millennial Trends 1 Initially, we want to

Korotayev, Andrey V; Malkov, Artemy S; Khaltourina, Daria A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Divisions Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division Jeffrey Binder, Division Director Jeffrey Binder, Division Director The Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division (FCID) of the Nuclear Science...

404

Comparative study and evaluation of advanced-cycle systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume presents 3 appendices (A, B, and C) containing data dealing with the advanced power cycles evaluated. They are: Phase 1 Power Cycles Data Tabulation; Phase 2 Power Cycles--Conceptual Designs; and Summary of Power Cycle Data and Development Plans from the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study. The 19 advanced cycles and their fuels evaluated in Phase 1 and two reference cycles (last two) are: advanced steam, atmospheric fluidized-bed furnace, coal; advanced steam, conventional furnace, No. 6 oil; advanced steam, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, nuclear; advanced steam, liquid metal fast breeder reactor, nuclear; advanced open-cycle gas turbine, recuperative, air-cooled, high Btu gas derived from coal; advanced open-cycle gas turbine, recuperative, air-cooled, No. 6 oil; advanced open-cycle gas turbine, combined-cycle, air-cooled, low-Btu gas derived from coal; advanced open-cycle gas turbine, combined-cycle, water-cooled, low-Btu gas derived from coal; advanced open-cycle gas turbine combined-cycle, water-cooled, liquid semiclean fuel derived from coal; closed-cycle gas turbine, supercritical carbon dioxide, atmospheric fluidized-bed, coal; closed-cycle gas turbine, helium atmospheric fluidized-bed, coal; closed-cycle gas turbine, helium, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, nuclear; open-cycle plasma MHD, coal; closed-cycle plasma MHD, conventional furnace, coal; liquid-metal MHD, atmospheric fluidized-bed, coal; metal-vapor turbine, atmospheric fluidized-bed, coal; thermionic, conventional furnace, coal; fuel-cell, low-temperature, hydrogen derived from coal; fuel-cell, low-temperature, No. 6 oil; conventional steam with stack gas scrubbing (reference case for base load and midrange), coal; and simple-cycle gas turbine (reference case for peaking), high-Btu gas derived from coal. (MCW)

Pomeroy, B.D.; Fleck, J.J.; Marsh, W.D.; Brown, D.H.; Shah, R.P.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

International nuclear fuel cycle fact book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

Leigh, I.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Helium process cycle  

SciTech Connect

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

409

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

412

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a cryogenic refrigerator which cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He/[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

413

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K. 12 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a cryogenic refrigerator which cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of {sup 3}He in a single phase {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He solution. The {sup 3}He in superfluid {sup 4}He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid {sup 3}He at an initial concentration in superfluid {sup 4}He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of {sup 4}He while restricting passage of {sup 3}He. The {sup 3}He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Kotsubo, Vincent Y. (La Canada, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Regional business cycles in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is clear evidence for differences in the structure of the Italian regional business cycle in the period 1951-2004: the relationship with the national business cycle is closer in the North than in the South. The interaction between regional cycles ... Keywords: Regional business cycles, Spectral analysis, Stylized facts

Camilla Mastromarco; Ulrich Woitek

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Technology assessments of advanced power generation systems 2: Kalina bottoming cycle: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary assessment of the Kalina cycle as the bottoming system of a small, combined-cycle power plant found that the cost of electricity for this plant was calculated to be somewhat less than that of competing steam-bottoming systems. This new system requires further analysis, however, particularly of the trade-off between heat exchanger cost and cycle performance.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Technology Assessments of Advanced Power Generation Systems II--Kalina Bottoming Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of the Kalina cycle as the bottoming system of a small, combined-cycle power plant found that the cost of electricity for this plant was calculated to be somewhat less than that of competing steam-bottoming systems. This new system requires further analysis, however, particularly of the trade-off between heat exchanger cost and cycle performance.

1986-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Enhanced absorption cycle computer model. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperatures boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorptions systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system`s components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H{sub 2}O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H{sub 2}O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the User`s Manual.

Grossman, G.; Wilk, M. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Strategy for the practical utilization of thorium fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect

There has been increasing interest in the utilization of thorium fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors for the past few years. This is due to a number of factors, the chief being the recent emphasis given to increasing the proliferation resistance of reactor fuel cycles and the thorium cycle characteristic that bred /sup 233/U can be denatured with /sup 238/U (further, a high radioactivity is associated with recycle /sup 233/U, which increases fuel diversion resistance). Another important factor influencing interest in thorium fuel cycles is the increasing cost of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ ores leading to more emphasis being placed on obtaining higher fuel conversion ratios in thermal reactor systems, and the fact that thorium fuel cycles have higher fuel conversion ratios in thermal reactors than do uranium fuel cycles. Finally, there is increasing information which indicates that fast breeder reactors have significantly higher capital costs than do thermal reactors, such that there is an economic advantage in the long term to have combinations of fast breeder reactors and high-conversion thermal reactors operating together. Overall, it appears that the practical, early utilization of thorium fuel cycles in power reactors requires commercialization of HTGRs operating first on stowaway fuel cycles, followed by thorium fuel recycle. In the longer term, thorium utilization involves use of thorium blankets in fast breeder reactors, in combination with recycling the bred /sup 233/U to HTGRs (preferably), or to other thermal reactors.

Kasten, P.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Internal cycle modeling and environmental assessment of multiple cycle consumer products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic flow models are presented for remanufactured, reused or recycled products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early loss and stochastic return are included for fast and slow cycling products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reuse-to-input flow ratio (Internal Cycle Factor, ICF) is determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cycle rate, which is increasing with the ICF, monitors eco-performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early internal cycle losses diminish the ICF, the cycle rate and performance. - Abstract: Dynamic annual flow models incorporating consumer discard and usage loss and featuring deterministic and stochastic end-of-cycle (EOC) return by the consumer are developed for reused or remanufactured products (multiple cycle products, MCPs), including fast and slow cycling, short and long-lived products. It is shown that internal flows (reuse and overall consumption) increase proportionally to the dimensionless internal cycle factor (ICF) which is related to environmental impact reduction factors. The combined reuse/recycle (or cycle) rate is shown capable for shortcut, albeit effective, monitoring of environmental performance in terms of waste production, virgin material extraction and manufacturing impacts of all MCPs, a task, which physical variables (lifetime, cycling frequency, mean or total number of return trips) and conventional rates, via which environmental policy has been officially implemented (e.g. recycling rate) cannot accomplish. The cycle rate is shown to be an increasing (hyperbolic) function of ICF. The impact of the stochastic EOC return characteristics on total reuse and consumption flows, as well as on eco-performance, is assessed: symmetric EOC return has a small, positive effect on performance compared to deterministic, while early shifted EOC return is more beneficial. In order to be efficient, environmental policy should set higher minimum reuse targets for higher trippage MCPs. The results may serve for monitoring, flow accounting and comparative eco-assessment of MCPs. They may be useful in identifying reachable and efficient reuse/recycle targets for consumer products and in planning return via appropriate labelling and digital coding for enhancing environmental performance, while satisfying consumer demand.

Tsiliyannis, C.A., E-mail: anion@otenet.gr [ANION Environmental Ltd., 26 Lykoudi Str., Athens 11141 (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

BNL | Carbon Cycle Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding of the impacts of global change on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and improve knowledge of possible global change mitigation approaches. The group has three main focus areas. FACE Climate Change Experimental Facility Design and Management The CCS&T group is an internationally recognized leader in the development of Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) research facilities. We are interested in the design and management of manipulative experiments that examine the effects of carbon dioxide, ozone, other atmospheric pollutants, temperature and precipitation on natural and managed ecosystems. FACE Plant Physiology and High Throughput Biochemical Phenotyping At FACE facilities we have studied the mechanisms that underlie the

423

Fuel Cycle Subcommittee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report to NEAC Report to NEAC Fuel Cycle Subcommittee Meeting of April 23, 2013 Washington D.C. June 13, 2013 Burton Richter (Chair), Margaret Chu, Darleane Hoffman, Raymond Juzaitis, Sekazi K Mtingwa, Ronald P Omberg, Joy L Rempe, Dominique Warin 2 I Introduction and Summary The Fuel Cycle Subcommittee of NEAC met in Washington on April 23, 2013. The meeting focused on issues relating to the NE advanced reactor program (sections II, III, and IV), and on storage and transportation issues (section V) related to a possible interim storage program that is the first step in moving toward a new permanent repository as recommended by the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) and discussed in the recent response by DOE to Congress on the BRC report 1 . The agenda is given in

424

Stirling cycle engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a Stirling cycle engine having a plurality of working gas charges separated by pistons reciprocating in cylinders, the total gas content is minimized and the mean pressure equalization among the serial cylinders is improved by using two piston rings axially spaced at least as much as the piston stroke and by providing a duct in the cylinder wall opening in the space between the two piston rings and leading to a source of minimum or maximum working gas pressure.

Lundholm, Gunnar (Lund, SE)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Energy Strategy Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective long-range energy planning begins with a reflective analysis that encompasses the complexity of today's energy reality and sets a course for activity to achieve long-range continuing advancement. This strategy approach involves an interrelated 'cycle' that once started and controlled in the proper direction is almost self-building in improvement. Energy conservation is the driving force to create additive progress involving system flexibility, process integration, and less energy dependence.

Korich, R. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

USCEA fuel cycle '93  

SciTech Connect

The US Council for Energy Awareness sponsored the Fuel Cycle '93 conference in Dallas, Texas, on March 21-24, 1993. Over 250 participants attended, numerous papers were presented, and several panel discussions were held. The focus of most industry participants remains the formation of USEC and the pending US-Russian HEU agreement. Following are brief summaries of two key papers and the Fuel Market Issues panel discussion.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Handbook aims to improve understanding and communication regarding nuclear fuel cycle options. It is intended to assist DOE, Campaign Managers, and other presenters prepare presentations and reports. When looking for information, check here. The Handbook generally includes few details of how calculations were performed, which can be found by consulting references provided to the reader. The Handbook emphasizes results in the form of graphics and diagrams, with only enough text to explain the graphic, to ensure that the messages associated with the graphic is clear, and to explain key assumptions and methods that cause the graphed results. Some of the material is new and is not found in previous reports, for example: (1) Section 3 has system-level mass flow diagrams for 0-tier (once-through), 1-tier (UOX to CR=0.50 fast reactor), and 2-tier (UOX to MOX-Pu to CR=0.50 fast reactor) scenarios - at both static and dynamic equilibrium. (2) To help inform fast reactor transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio and uranium supply behavior, section 5 provides the sustainable fast reactor growth rate as a function of TRU conversion ratio. (3) To help clarify the difference in recycling Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, and all-TRU, section 5 provides mass fraction, gamma, and neutron emission for those four cases for MOX, heterogeneous LWR IMF (assemblies mixing IMF and UOX pins), and a CR=0.50 fast reactor. There are data for the first 10 LWR recycle passes and equilibrium. (4) Section 6 provides information on the cycle length, planned and unplanned outages, and TRU enrichment as a function of fast reactor TRU conversion ratio, as well as the dilution of TRU feedstock by uranium in making fast reactor fuel. (The recovered uranium is considered to be more pure than recovered TRU.) The latter parameter impacts the required TRU impurity limits specified by the Fuels Campaign. (5) Section 7 provides flows for an 800-tonne UOX separation plant. (6) To complement 'tornado' economic uncertainty diagrams, which show at a glance combined uncertainty information, section 9.2 has a new set of simpler graphs that show the impact on fuel cycle costs for once through, 1-tier, and 2-tier scenarios as a function of key input parameters.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Edward A. Hoffman; Gretchen E. Matthern; Kent A. Williams

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study how alternative process schemes and power cycles might be used and integrated to achieve higher systems efficiency. To achieve these design results, the total systems approach is taken requiring creative integration of the various process units within the plant. Advanced gas turbine based cycles for Integrated gasification Combined cycle (IGCC) applications are identified by a screening analysis and the more promising cycles recommended for detailed systems analysis. In the case of the IGFC task, the main objective is met by developing a steady-state simulation of the entire plant and then using dynamic simulations of the hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)/Gas Turbine sub-system to investigate the turbo-machinery performance. From these investigations the desired performance characteristics and a basis for design of turbo-machinery for use in a fuel cell gas turbine power block is developed.

A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes the status of activities to upgrade the Dynamic Mercury Cycling Model (D-MCM), an EPRI simulation model that predicts mercury cycling and bioaccumulation in lakes.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

Gas Turbine Technology, Part A: Overview, Cycles, and Thermodynamic Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of cogeneration technology has accelerated in recent years, and it is estimated that fifty percent of the cogeneration market will involve gas turbines. To several energy engineers, gas turbine engines present a new and somewhat perplexing prime mover. This paper (Parts A & B) intends to treat the area of gas turbine technology to provide a broad overview and understanding of this subject. This paper (Part A) covers the basics of gas turbine cycles, thermodynamics and performance considerations that are important in cogeneration. Simple, regenerative and combined cycles will be discussed, along with important performance losses (inlet and exit losses and part load operation). Waste heat recovery, as it relates to gas turbine performance, will also be discussed. This paper will provide the basic equations enabling quick computations to be made. Topics such as typical efficiencies, evaporative cooling costs, emissions, etc. will be discussed. A brief discussion of advanced cycles such as the dual fluid cycle and close cycles is also made.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hemispheric Helicity Trend for Solar Cycle 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using vector magnetograms obtained with the Spectro-polarimeter (SP) on aboard Hinode satellite, we studied two helicity parameters (local twist and current helicity) of 64 active regions occurred in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. Our analysis gives the following results. (1) The 34 active regions of the solar cycle 24 follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule, whereas the 30 active regions of the solar cycle 23 do not. (2) When combining all 64 active regions as one sample, they follow the hemispheric helicity sign rule as in most other observations. (3) Despite with the so-far most accurate measurement of vector magnetic field given by SP/Hinode, the rule is still weak with large scatters. (4) The data show evidence of different helicity signs between strong and weak fields, confirming previous result from a large sample of ground-based observations. (5) With two example sunspots we show that the helicity parameters change sign from the inner umbra to ...

Hao, Juan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cycling Losses During Screw Air Compressor Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air compressors use 10-13 % of a typical industrial facilities' total electricity. Because they often operate at part load, their part load efficiency significantly affects plant energy cost. An intensive study of screw air compressor part load efficiency confirmed that modulation only controls are accurately portrayed by traditional part load models under most conditions. It also confirmed that load-unload type controls are accurately modeled when cycle times are longer than 5 minutes. However, the study revealed compressors with cycling controls require as much as 10-25 % more power than is normally assumed when cycle times decrease below 2 minutes. This short cycle time is common in industrial environments. The study also found that combined modulating and unloading controls operate the compressor as much as 20% more efficiently than previously predicted. Several measures are recommended for improving part load efficiency by up to 25 %: Increase receiver capacity Install load-unload controls Maintain compressor controls Set higher low-unloading setpoints.

Maxwell, J. B.; Wheeler, G.; Bushnell, D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

HEMISPHERIC HELICITY TREND FOR SOLAR CYCLE 24  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using vector magnetograms obtained with the Spectro-polarimeter (SP) on board Hinode satellite, we studied two helicity parameters (local twist and current helicity) of 64 active regions that occurred in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. Our analysis gives the following results. (1) The 34 active regions of the solar cycle 24 follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule, whereas the 30 active regions of the solar cycle 23 do not. (2) When combining all 64 active regions as one sample, they follow the hemispheric helicity sign rule as in most other observations. (3) Despite the so-far most accurate measurement of vector magnetic field given by SP/Hinode, the rule is still weak with large scatters. (4) The data show evidence of different helicity signs between strong and weak fields, confirming previous result from a large sample of ground-based observations. (5) With two example sunspots we show that the helicity parameters change sign from the inner umbra to the outer penumbra, where the sign of penumbra agrees with the sign of the active region as a whole. From these results, we speculate that both the {Sigma}-effect (turbulent convection) and the dynamo have contributed in the generation of helicity, whereas in both cases turbulence in the convection zone has played a significant role.

Hao Juan; Zhang Mei, E-mail: haojuan@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

High efficiency Brayton cycles using LNG  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modified, closed-loop Brayton cycle power conversion system that uses liquefied natural gas as the cold heat sink media. When combined with a helium gas cooled nuclear reactor, achievable efficiency can approach 68 76% (as compared to 35% for conventional steam cycle power cooled by air or water). A superheater heat exchanger can be used to exchange heat from a side-stream of hot helium gas split-off from the primary helium coolant loop to post-heat vaporized natural gas exiting from low and high-pressure coolers. The superheater raises the exit temperature of the natural gas to close to room temperature, which makes the gas more attractive to sell on the open market. An additional benefit is significantly reduced costs of a LNG revaporization plant, since the nuclear reactor provides the heat for vaporization instead of burning a portion of the LNG to provide the heat.

Morrow, Charles W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Closed cycle cogeneration for the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While present energy needs can be met with available supplies of fossil fuels, the need to plan for the eventual elimination of dependence on premium fuels in utility and industrial applications remains urgent. One of the most promising power conversion technologies for these needs is the closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) configured for power and heat production. Closed cycle gas turbines have been in commercial use, principally in Europe, for over four decades. That experience base, combined with emerging awareness of potential CCGT applications, could lead to the operation of coal-fired CCGT cogeneration systems in the U.S. within the next decade. This paper discusses the multi-fuel capability of the CCGT and compares its performance as a flexible cogeneration system with that of a more conventional steam turbine system.

Crim, W.M.; Fraize, W.E.; Kinney, G.; Malone, G.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

High geothermal energy utilization geothermal/fossil hybrid power cycle: a preliminary investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combining geothermal and fossil fuel energy into the so-called hybrid cycle is compared with a state-of-the-art double-flash geothermal power cycle using resources which vary from 429/sup 0/K (312/sup 0/F) to 588/sup 0/K (598/sup 0/F). It is demonstrated that a hybrid plant can compete thermodynamically with the combined output from both a fossil-fired and a geothermal plant operating separately. Economic comparison of the hybrid and double-flash cycles is outlined, and results are presented that indicate the performance of marginal hydrothermal resources may be improved enough to compete with existing power cycles on a cost basis. It is also concluded that on a site-specific basis a hybrid cycle is capable of complementing double-flash cycles at large-capacity resources, and can operate in a cycling load mode at constant geothermal fluid flow rate.

Grijalva, R. L.; Sanemitsu, S. K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

FranklinAvenue SouthDepysterStreet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grille F10 Pita Pit F11 Bu alo Wild Wings F12 College Creamery F13 Euro Gyro F14 College Coneys F15 Taco (one way tra c) foottraconlyfoottraconly SouthWaterStreetNorthWaterStreet Red listings, see map

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

438

Franklin, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

776507°, -76.9224608° 776507°, -76.9224608° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.6776507,"lon":-76.9224608,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Batch Queue Configuration and Policies on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Job Scheduling Jobs must be submitted to a valid Submit Queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate Torque execution class. Users can not directly access the Torque execution classes. Submit Queue Execution Queue (Do not use in batch script) Nodes Available Processors Max Wallclock Relative Priority (1 being the highest) Run Limit Queued Limit (eligible to run limit) Queue Charge Factor xfer xfer 1 4 6 hrs 3 3 2 1 interactive interactive 1-128 1-512 30 mins 1 1 1 1 debug debug 1-512 1-2,048 30 mins 2 1 1 1 premium premium 1-4,096 1-16,384 24 hrs 4 2 2 2 regular reg_short 1-511 1-2,044 6 hrs 7 12 8 1 reg_small 1-255 1-1,020 48 hrs 7 7 3 1

440

Microsoft PowerPoint - Franklin System IO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is a File System? * A special-purpose database for the storage, hierarchical organization, manipulation, navigation, access, and retrieval of data. This is a layer...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "franklin combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MPT2. Far node latency would be about 1.9 usec (35 hopswith 0.053 usec per hop) extra on top of the near node3.3.3 NPB benchmarks usec Dual Core Quad Core NPB2.4 Class

He, Yun Helen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Franklin, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

834313°, -71.396725° 834313°, -71.396725° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0834313,"lon":-71.396725,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Franklin, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

22567°, -83.3060432° 22567°, -83.3060432° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5222567,"lon":-83.3060432,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

David Franklin Merriman (June 6, 2011)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Chicago's Residential Building Stock with Julie Lynn Davis, Center for Urban Research and Learning, Loyola

Illinois at Chicago, University of

445

David Franklin Merriman (May 31, 2011)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Residential Building Stock with Julie Lynn Davis, Center for Urban Research and Learning, Loyola University

Illinois at Chicago, University of

446

The Kalina cycle and similar cycles for geothermal power production  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a brief discussion of the mechanics of the Kalina cycle and ideas to extend the concept to other somewhat different cycles. A modified cycle which has a potential heat rejection advantage but little or no performance improvement is discussed. Then, the results of the application of the Kalina cycle and the modified cycle to a geothermal application (360/degree/F resource) are discussed. The results are compared with published results for the Kalina cycle with high temperature sources and estimates about performance at the geothermal temperatures. Finally, the conclusions of this scoping work are given along with recommendations of the direction of future work in this area. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Novel heat pipe combination  

SciTech Connect

The basic heat pipe principle is employed in a heat pipe combination wherein two heat pipes are combined in opposing relationship to form an integral unit; such that the temperature, heat flow, thermal characteristics, and temperature-related parameters of a monitored environment or object exposed to one end of the heat pipe combination can be measured and controlled by controlling the heat flow of the opposite end of the heat pipe combination.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

Peggs, Stephen G. (Port Jefferson, NY); Brennan, J. Michael (East Northport, NY); Tuozzolo, Joseph E. (Sayville, NY); Zaltsman, Alexander (Commack, NY)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Kinetics of pyroprocesses in ATW fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) combines the technologies of accelerators and reactors to treat the nuclear waste problem. An ATW system uses a high-current accelerator to generate spallation neutrons to initiate the transmutation of actinides and select fission products in a subcritical nuclear assembly surrounding the target volume. For high burnup and efficient operation, an ATW system requires simple, reliable, and efficient fuel preparation and cleanup procedures to periodically remove {open_quotes}neutron poisons.{close_quotes} We have identified several fuel cycles based on pyroprocessing.

Li, Ning; Hu, Y.C.; Park, B.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nutrient Cycling Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The particular goal of this study is to develop measurement techniques for understanding how consortia of organisms from geothermal facilities utilize sulfur and iron for metabolic activity; and in turn, what role that activity plays in initiating or promoting the development of a biofilm on plant substrates. Sulfur cycling is of interest because sulfur is produced in the resource. Iron is found in some of the steel formulations used in plant components and is also added as chemical treatment for reducing sulfide emissions from the plants. This report describes the set-up and operation of a bioreactor for evaluating the response of colonies of geothermal organisms to changes in nutrient and environmental conditions. Data from initial experiments are presented and plans for future testing is discussed.

Peter A. Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

A New Absorption Cycle: The Single-Effect Regenerative Absoprtion Refrigeration Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGENERATIVE ABSORPTION REFRIGERATION CYCLE ABSTRACT A new absorption cycle , using heat as the energy

Dao, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Life Cycle Analysis: Power Studies Compilation Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour LC Life Cycle LCA Life Cycle Analysis LCC Life Cycle Costing LCI Life Cycle Inventory LCOE Levelized Cost of Delivered Electricity LNB Low NO x Burner LNG Liquefied...

454

Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

Dao, Kim (14 Nace Ave., Piedmont, CA 94611)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Closed-cycle Retrofit Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is investigating implications of a potential U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act 316(b) rulemaking that would establish "Best Technology Available" (BTA) based on closed-cycle cooling retrofits for facilities with once-through cooling. This report focuses on estimated costs associated with closed-cycle cooling system retrofits that include: 1) capital costs, 2) energy required to operate the closed-cycle system, 3) heat rate penalty, and 4) extended downtime required to retrof...

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Carbon Cycle 2.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Cycle 2.0 Carbon Cycle 2.0 Pioneering science for sustainable energy solutions Artificial Photosynthesis Energy Storage Combustion Carbon Capture & Storage Developing World Efficiency Photovoltaics Biofuels Energy Analysis Climate Modeling Carbon Cycle 2.0 is... 1. A vision for * a global energy system integrated with the Earth's natural carbon cycles * an interactive Berkeley Lab environment with a shared sense of purpose 2. A program development plan that will allow us to deepen our capabilities and provide more opportunities to have impact 3. An attempt to integrate our basic research with applications using models of technology deployment constraints 4. Set of internal activities aimed at priming the effort

457

Optimization of Air Conditioning Cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Systems based on the vapor compression cycle are the most widely used in a variety of air conditioning applications. Despite the vast growth of modern (more)

Seshadri, Swarooph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458
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