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Sample records for francisco volcanic field

  1. Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  2. The San FranciscoVolcanic Field,which covers about 1,800 square miles, is part of northern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The San FranciscoVolcanic Field,which covers about 1,800 square miles, is part of northern Arizona at the high- est elevations.The varied forests and geologic features of the San FranciscoVolcanic Field offer young but extinct volcanoes of the San Francisco Volcanic Field.Without the volcanoes, this region would

  3. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources JumpDimas, California: EnergySan Francisco

  4. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  5. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  6. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  7. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  8. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  9. Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore Technologies IncEnergy2002) |Energy InformationEt

  10. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa: EnergyDarkEnergy

  11. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUD Wind FarmSmartSocietyInformationSan

  12. Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, August 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Field Scale Test and Verification of a PureComfort® 240M Combined Heat and Power System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco

  13. Experimental and simulation studies of water-alternating-enriched gas injection for San Francisco Field, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto Tavera, Claudia Patricia

    2003-01-01

    This thesis presents a complete investigation involving experimental and compositional reservoir simulation studies into enriched gas injection as a method to enhance oil recovery from the San Francisco field in Colombia. In enriched gas floods...

  14. Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

  15. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto ElectricMonaster And Coolbaugh,Information 0)2004) | Open

  16. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMt Ranier Area (Frank,

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New PagesInformationEnergy Information| Open EnergyAl., 2004)

  18. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New PagesInformationEnergy Information|Energy|2007)2004) |

  19. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field, New Mexico, USA, as Inferred from the Envelope Inversion of Active-Experiment Seismic Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  20. Transit-Based Smart Parking in the U.S.: Behavioral Analysis of San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2006-01-01

    A. Eaken. Transit-Based Smart Parking in the San FranciscoCommunity College Parking Smart Card Trailblazer. TheTRANSIT-BASED SMART PARKING IN THE U.S. : BEHAVIORAL

  1. San Francisco State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    San Francisco State University Multi-Hazard Emergency Operations Plan August 2014 Preparedness Response Recovery Mitigation #12;BLANK PAGE #12;Preface #12;BLANK PAGE #12;San Francisco State University.........................................................................................................vi Profile of San Francisco State University

  2. Yukon Exploration and GEoloGY 2009 293 Soil reconnaissance of the Fort Selkirk volcanic field, Yukon (115I/13 and 14)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanborn, Paul

    Yukon Exploration and GEoloGY 2009 293 Soil reconnaissance of the Fort Selkirk volcanic field of the Fort Selkirk volcanic field, Yukon (115I/13 and 14). In: Yukon Exploration and Geology 2009, K.E. MacFarlane, L.H. Weston and L.R. Blackburn (eds.), Yukon Geological Survey, p. 293-304. aBStraCt Valley

  3. Smart Parking Linked to Transit: Lessons Learned from the San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    C.J. Rodier, and A.M. Eaken. Smart Parking Management FieldT. Sugimoto, and T. Okuda. Smart Parking in Toyota’s Motown.S.A. Shaheen. Transit-Based Smart Parking: An Evaluation of

  4. Evolution of a mafic volcanic field in the central Great Basin, south central Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Naumann, T. R.; Smith, E. I.; Bradshaw, T. K.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-10

    was followed by trachytic volcanism (4.3 Ma) and by a second episode of lower-volume hawaiite and basanite (episode 2, 3.0–4.7 Ma). Incompatible elements indicate an asthenospheric source. Isotopically, episode 2 basalts cluster around 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7035 and ?...

  5. San Francisco Workshop Highlights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video showing highlights from the twelfth annual DOE Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop in San Francisco

  6. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 548 JANUARY 2008 7770 Pardee Lane, Second floor, Oakland, CA 94621 p: 510-746-7334 (SFEI), f: 510-746-7300, www.sfei.org San Francisco Estuary National Williams San Francisco Estuary Institute In collaboration with San Francisco Estuary partners including

  7. Solar Policy Environment: San Francisco

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City and County of San Francisco’s “Solar San Francisco” Initiative will strive to remove barriers to the deployment of solar technologies in San Francisco as part of its effort to reduce its overall greenhouse gas emissions to 20% below 1990 levels by the year 2012.

  8. The City Feeds the Poor: The Struggle for Sustainable Food Systems in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Paula Kay

    2012-01-01

    Center, San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, CA.Center, San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, CA.Center, San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, CA.

  9. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 663 OCTOBER 2012 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA on the Margins of San Francisco Bay Final Report An RMP Technical Report by Craig Jones Sea Engineering, Inc. Donald Yee Jay A. Davis Lester J. McKee Ben K. Greenfield Aroon R. Melwani Michelle A. Lent San Francisco

  10. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 707 JANUARY 2014 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA in the Food Webs of San Francisco Bay and Its Local Watersheds by J. A. Davis R. E. Looker D.Yee M. Marvin Accumulation in the Food Webs of San Francisco Bay and Its Local Watersheds. Contribution No. 707. San

  11. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 663 APRIL 2012 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA on the Margins of San Francisco Bay Draft Report by Craig Jones Sea Engineering, Inc. Donald Yee Jay A. Davis Lester J. McKee Ben K. Greenfield Aroon R. Melwani Michelle A. Lent San Francisco Estuary Institute #12

  12. San Francisco's Streamlined Solar Permitting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    San Francisco’s solar permitting process—which allows permits for systems 4 kW and under to be applied for, approved, paid for, and issued online or in person over-the-counter—is one of the most efficient in the nation. This paper describes the process by which the City and County of San Francisco developed and implemented its streamlined solar permitting process, provides an update on San Francisco’s current e-permitting system, and outlines relevant lessons for other jurisdictions undertaking such work. This paper is structured as a resource for other jurisdictions to access best practices in streamlined permitting and learn from San Francisco’s experience.

  13. San Francisco’s Urban Transformations since the 1980s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Richard

    2009-01-01

    23. Construction 61. Education services San Francisco Bayand 21. Mining 61. Education services transportation, 55.remediation services 61. Education services 62. Health care

  14. Registrar's Office San Francisco State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    Registrar's Office San Francisco State University 1600 Holloway Avenue San Francisco, CA 94132 are issued after receipt of payment. Each copy is $8.00. Make checks payable to: SAN FRANCISCO STATE

  15. Java Destilado Francisco Morero PeyronaFrancisco Morero Peyrona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Java Destilado Francisco Morero PeyronaFrancisco Morero Peyrona Sun AmbassadorSun Ambassador Sun Awarded EngineerSun Awarded Engineer III Jornadas de Tecnología JavaIII Jornadas de Tecnología Java www.jtech.ua.es/jornadaswww.jtech.ua.es/jornadas #12;Qué es JavaQué es Java Java Destilado #12;ComunidadComunidad Lenguaje

  16. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION NO. 681 AUGUST 2012 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA, PCBs, PAHs, PBDEs, Dioxins, and Organochlorine Pesticides from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to San Francisco Bay by Nicole David David C. Gluchowski Jon E. Leatherbarrow Donald Yee Lester J. Mc

  17. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - San Francisco...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - San Francisco Workshop 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - San Francisco Workshop On June 11, 2008, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in San Francisco,...

  18. San Francisco Bay Nutrient Management Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUMBER 733 DEC 2014 San Francisco Bay Nutrient Management Strategy: Detailed Modeling Workplan-746-7334 (SFEI) · f: 510-746-7300 · www.sfei.org #12;THIS REPORT SHOULD BE CITED AS: SFEI (2014). San Francisco Bay Nutrient Management Strategy: Detailed Modeling Workplan for FY15-FY21. San Francisco Estuary

  19. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Bay: A Summary of Occurrence Data and Identification of Data Gaps FINAL REPORT by Susan 94804 p: 510-746-7334 (SFEI), f: 510-746-7300, www.sfei.org Contaminants of Emerging Concern in San Klosterhaus Don Yee Meg Sedlak Adam Wong Rebecca Sutton #12;This report should be cited as: Klosterhaus, S

  20. John Shalf Gives Talk at San Francisco High Performance Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at San Francisco High Performance Computing Meetup John Shalf Gives Talk at San Francisco High Performance Computing Meetup September 17, 2014 XBD200503 00083 John Shalf In his...

  1. Urban Form, Wind, Comfort, and Sustainability: The San Francisco Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyungkoo

    2014-01-01

    small subset of San Francisco’s diverse urban form and windsmall. The boundary layer changes in the vertical wind profile over urban,

  2. AUGUST 2012 SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUGUST 2012 SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE AQUATIC SCIENCE CENTER Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta OF FISH AND GAME AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROGRAM AUGUST 2012 Prepared by: San Francisco Estuary Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Historical Ecology Investigation: exploring pat tern and process Suggested

  3. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The California San Francisco Green Building Standards Code is Part 11 of twelve parts Chapter 13C of the official1 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Green Building Standards Code (Omitting amendments to 2010 California Building Code and 2010 California Residential Code which do

  4. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  5. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering COSE ADVISORY BOARD SCHOLARSHIP the effect of the scholarship upon my financial aid. By signing this form, I grant the San Francisco State: San Francisco State University, College of Science & Engineering, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco

  6. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering KENNETH FONG BIOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP the effect of the scholarship upon my financial aid. By signing this form, I grant the San Francisco State: San Francisco State University, College of Science & Engineering, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco

  7. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering PAMELA FONG MATHEMATICS SCHOLARSHIP the effect of the scholarship upon my financial aid. By signing this form, I grant the San Francisco State: San Francisco State University, College of Science & Engineering, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco

  8. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering C.Y. CHOW MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP the effect of the scholarship upon my financial aid. By signing this form, I grant the San Francisco State: San Francisco State University, College of Science & Engineering, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco

  9. Jeong-Im Yi 2004 San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA. Master of Fine Arts, Painting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong-Im Yi Education 2004 San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA. Master of Fine Arts Korean Cultural Center Annual Juried Exhibition, LA, CA 2002-2003 San Francisco Art Institute Graduate Fellowship, San Francisco, CA 2001 Diplome D'honneur, Biennale Des Artistes Haute-Marnais 2001, Chaumont

  10. In the Public Interest: Space, Ethnicity, and Authority in San Francisco's Mission District, 1906-1973

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Ocean

    2009-01-01

    Collection, San Francisco Public Library, Photo ID Number:Collection, San Francisco Public Library, Photo ID Number:Collection, San Francisco Public Library, Photo ID Number:

  11. City of San Francisco- Residential Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Single family homeowners in San Francisco's PG&E territory can receive Green Home Assessments, providing detailed reports showing energy loss, heat tests, and a list of improvements that will...

  12. 2006 Augmented Cognition International, San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison, Robert

    2 EGI Project Team · Neural Avionics Team ­ Operator Performance Laboratory (OPL) · Neurology;2006 Augmented Cognition International, San Francisco 4 EGI Neural Avionics · Complex avionics may reach EGI Neural Avionics Model · State data ­ Aircraft ­ Mission ­ Automation ­ Human · Classification

  13. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  14. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent...

  15. The San Francisco Consortium CT Host, CE Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    The San Francisco Consortium CT Host, CE Home me l r Student: Complete Sections 1 through 5. Print Campus Campus California College of Podiatric Medicine City College of San Francisco Cogswell College Golden Gate University Tuition Required Hastings College of the Law San Francisco State University

  16. Dioxins in San Francisco Conceptual Model/Impairment Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL Dioxins in San Francisco Bay Conceptual Model/Impairment Assessment Prepared by Mike Connor Partnership November 12, 2004 SFEI Contribution #309 #12;Dioxins in San Francisco Bay: Impairment Assessment. This CM/IA report examines dioxins in San Francisco Bay. Dioxins comprise a group of several hundred

  17. Asymptotic distribution theory for contamination Francisco Vera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jim

    Asymptotic distribution theory for contamination models Francisco Vera , David Dickey and James and the second to the other sources (the contamination component). Here the goal is two-fold: (i) detect the overall presence of Contamination and (ii) identify observations that may be contaminated. A locally most

  18. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Francisco, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  19. Hit from both sides: tracking industrial and volcanic plumes in Mexico City with surface measurements and OMI SO2 retrievals during the MILAGRO field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Foy, B.

    Large sulfur dioxide plumes were measured in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO field campaign. This paper seeks to identify the sources of these plumes and the meteorological processes that affect ...

  20. San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances SFEI Contribution 115

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances SFEI Contribution 115 August 2004 San Francisco Estuary Institute A Simple Mass Balance Model for PAH Fate in the San Francisco Estuary Ben K. Greenfield Jay A. Davis #12;PAH fate in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary

  1. Assessing the Feasibility of Creek Daylighting in San Francisco, Part II: A Preliminary Analysis of Yosemite Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brooke Ray

    2007-01-01

    Planning, Wastewater Enterprise, San Francisco Public UtilitiesPlanning Efforts Initial outreach efforts by the San Francisco Public Utilities

  2. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  3. Urban Form, Wind, Comfort, and Sustainability: The San Francisco Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyungkoo

    2014-01-01

    59 Figure 46. Measurement of windDesigning for an Acceptable Wind Environment. Transportation1989). Developing the San Francisco wind ordinance and its

  4. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  5. San Francisco Estuary Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan: Version 1 Framework and Protocols Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Steering Committee Compiled and Edited by Joshua N. Collins, PhD San ................. 91 #12;#12;Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan 2002 Executive Summary i San Francisco Estuary

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO CSANTA BARBARA · SANTA CRUZ Geometry, Topology, and Physics Seminar

  7. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO +SANTA BARBARA · SANTA CRUZ Geometry, Topology, and Physics Seminar

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO CSANTA BARBARA · SANTA CRUZ Geometry, Topology, and Physics Seminar N

  9. San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Conceptual Framework and Rationale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Conceptual Framework Anderson SFEI Contribution 317 November 2004 San Francisco Estuary Institute #12;Page 1 San Francisco Anderson San Francisco Estuary Institute, Oakland, CA SFEI Contribution #317 November, 2004 #12;Page 2

  10. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO CSANTA BARBARA · SANTA CRUZ Geometry, Topology, and Physics Seminar 3D

  11. SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY CRIME & FIRE STATISTICS FOR 2011-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY 2014 CRIME & FIRE STATISTICS FOR 2011-2013 SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPARTMENT 1600 HOLLOWAY AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94132 (415) 338-7200 / 24HRS FOR EMERGENCY DIAL 9-1-1 STUDENT AFFAIRS & ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT Last updated October 1, 2014 #12;San Francisco

  12. San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Identification and Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Identification and Evaluation of Unidentified Organic Contaminants in the San Francisco Estuary Daniel R. Oros Nicole David SFEI Contribution 45 August 2002 San Francisco Estuary Institute #12;San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring

  13. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO CSANTA BARBARA · SANTA CRUZ Differential Geometry Seminar and Geometry

  14. Earth Planets Space, 61, 7181, 2009 Gilbert-Gauss geomagnetic reversal recorded in Pliocene volcanic sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    volcanic sequences from Georgia (Lesser Caucasus): revisited Avto Goguitchaichvili1 , Miguel Angel correlation with the original (Thoki) sequence, previous preliminary measurements of natural remanent magne- tization (Sologashvili, 1986), and field observations allowed us to establish a new magnetic stratigraphy

  15. San Francisco State University -IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS MEDICAL WAIVER REQUEST FORM All students must provide proof of immunization before they may register for classes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    San Francisco State University - IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS MEDICAL WAIVER REQUEST FORM All students? Registrar's Office, SSB 101 San Francisco State University 1600 Holloway Avenue San Francisco, CA 94132

  16. The volcanic ash problem Bernd Zimanowski a;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The volcanic ash problem Bernd Zimanowski a;Ã , Kenneth Wohletz b , Pierfrancesco Dellino c , Ralf are the result of intensive magma and rock fragmentation, and they produce volcanic ash, which consists of fragments 6 2 mm in average diameter. The problem with volcanic ash is that its formation is poorly

  17. San Francisco Mayor Joseph Alioto and the Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullaney, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    motel room across the parking lot, San Francisco Polices picture window. In the parking lot, the three men stoppedbe right there. In the parking lot, two young lawyers drive

  18. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Chemistry & Biochemistry, Computer Science, Earth & Climate Sciences (aka Geosciences), EngineeringSan Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering DAVID & CARY CASSA MEMORIAL University (SFSU) College of Science & Engineering (COSE) permission to check SFSU's records to verify

  19. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Chemistry & Biochemistry, Computer Science, Earth & Climate Sciences (aka Geosciences), EngineeringSan Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering BRUCE A. ROSENBLATT COMMUNITY University (SFSU) College of Science & Engineering (COSE) permission to check SFSU's records to verify

  20. San Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Chemistry & Biochemistry, Computer Science, Earth & Climate Sciences (aka Geosciences), EngineeringSan Francisco State University College of Science & Engineering JAMES C. KELLEY SCHOLARSHIP University (SFSU) College of Science & Engineering (COSE) permission to check SFSU's records to verify

  1. Dealing with Disaster: The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strupp, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Risk: Constructing the Earthquake Threat, New York: A. deSullivan et al. , Living in Earthquake Country: A Survey ofThe San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 Christoph Strupp German

  2. San Francisco Mayor Joseph Alioto and the Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullaney, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Alioto’s encounters with F.B.I. agents, the services heforged. They met San Francisco FBI Special Agent-in-ChargeFratianno’s orders for being an FBI informant, and Fratianno

  3. CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIOS FOR THE SAN FRANCISCO REGION A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012042 Prepared for: California for useful discussion and downscaling information. For global climate model simulations, the authors

  4. Prepared: January 24, 2013 University of California, San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Gail

    Department of Pharmaceutical Services 2007 - 2012 University of California, San Francisco Associate Director Department of Pharmaceutical Services OTHER POSITIONS HELD CONCURRENTLY 2006 - 2012 Medication Outcomes Management Program. PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS Memberships - American Society of Health Systems Pharmacists

  5. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  6. Post glacial volcanism and magmatism on the Askja volcanic system, North Iceland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Margaret Elizabeth

    2012-06-25

    Postglacial activity on the Askja volcanic system, north Iceland, has been dominated by basaltic volcanism. Over 80% of Askja's postglacial basalts fall within a relatively narrow compositional range containing between 4 and 8 wt.% MgO. The 'main...

  7. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  8. Disaster debris management and recovery of housing stock in San Francisco, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiyed, Zahraa Nazim

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential effects of a 7.2 magnitude earthquake in San Francisco City, particularly the implications on San Francisco's residential housing stock and impacts on the construction and demolition ...

  9. Simulation vs Real Execution in DCOP Solving Francisco Cruz, Patricia Gutierrez, Pedro Meseguer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeoh, William

    Simulation vs Real Execution in DCOP Solving Francisco Cruz, Patricia Gutierrez, Pedro Meseguer environment they try to recreate. #12;2 Francisco Cruz, Patricia Gutierrez, Pedro Meseguer Typically, DCR

  10. 25th SOFE, San Francisco, CA, June 11-14, 2013 2013, ITER Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    25th SOFE, San Francisco, CA, June 11-14, 2013 © 2013, ITER Organization Slide 1 ITER Blanket Engineering, San Francisco, CA, June 11-14, 2013 The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization #12;25th SOFE, San Francisco, CA, June 11-14, 2013 © 2013, ITER

  11. San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances A Review of Urban Runoff Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances A Review of Urban RunoffKee Jon Leatherbarrow Sarah Pearce Jay Davis SFEI Contribution 66 September 2003 San Francisco Estuary Institute #12;A Review of Urban Runoff Processes in the San Francisco Bay Area: Existing knowledge

  12. STUDIES IN GEOPHYSICS 4'~xplosiveVolcanism:-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in diameter, (4) steam production at temperatures of 10(PC to high levels of superheating(300 . - to WC!. and pressures. The explosions featured ejection of steam and fragmented melt. The modeled volcanic phenomena of water superheating. INTRODUCTION The understanding of explosive volcanism has been limited

  13. A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central...

  14. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;...

  15. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism,...

  16. December 18, 2008December 18, 2008 AGU San Francisco `Failed' magmatic eruptionsAGU San Francisco `Failed' magmatic eruptions 11 The review of the 1975-1977The review of the 1975-1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauducel, François

    December 18, 2008December 18, 2008 AGU San Francisco `Failed' magmatic eruptionsAGU San Francisco Physique du Globe de Paris Volcanological Observatories Dpt. #12;December 18, 2008December 18, 2008 AGU San Francisco `Failed' magmatic eruptionsAGU San Francisco `Failed' magmatic eruptions 22 PlanPlan I

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZBERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    ANGELES · MERCED · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO Dear California Undergraduate Student, You may

  18. Generalized complementing maps Francisco R. RUIZ DEL PORTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz, Jesús M.

    Generalized complementing maps Francisco R. RUIZ DEL PORTAL Departamento de Geometr´ia y Topolog´ia Facultad de Ciencias Matem´aticas Universidad Complutense de Madrid 28040 Madrid, Spain R Portal-00825. 357 #12;F.R. Ruiz del Portal Generalized complementing maps differential version of this degree based

  19. THE MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (MPA) SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (MPA) DEGREE AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY #12;Overview Overview Small to Mid-Size Program Full-time faculty of 5 ­ full focus on public administration Each has of Public Policy, Affairs, & Administration) #12;Curriculum overview 39 ­ 42 Units: Solid core

  20. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  1. In the Public Interest: Space, Ethnicity, and Authority in San Francisco's Mission District, 1906-1973

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Ocean

    2009-01-01

    BART – Bay Area Rapid Transit BTC – Building Trades CouncilBuilding Trades Council (BTC), which was the driving forceneighborhood's largest unions—the BTC and the San Francisco

  2. OMAE2014 June 8-13, 2014, San Francisco, California, USA OMAE2014...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore and Arctic Engineering OMAE2014 June 8-13, 2014, San Francisco, California, USA OMAE2014-24175 Hydrodynamic Module Coupling in the Offshore Wind Energy Simulation...

  3. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  4. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  5. Revenue and Ridership Potential for a High-Speed Rail Service in the San Francisco/Sacramento-Los Angeles Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavitt, Daniel; Vaca, Erin; Hall, Peter

    1994-01-01

    in the San Francisco/Sacramento-Los Angeles Corridor DarnelService in the Francisco/Sacramento-Los Angeles Corridorto 2010 2 k0 Bay Area/Sacramento-Los Angeles RegionCorridor

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZBERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANGELES · MERCED · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO FINANCIAL AID OFFICE RIVERSIDE, CAIFORNIA 92521

  7. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01

    experimental ponds. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 62(1–2):Pollution [SFBRWQCB] California San Francisco Bay Regional Water

  8. Part II, Conclusion: Ecology and Regional Context of Tidal Wetlands in the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferner, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    natural resources is critically important in the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) where recent human activities have had devastating effects

  9. TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Eugene Smith 1 The determination of volcanic risk to the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain requires, then volcanism in the future may not be a significant threat to Yucca Mountain. On the other hand, if melting

  10. San Francisco State University -IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS All students must provide proof of immunization before they may register for classes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    San Francisco State University - IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS All students must provide proof Mail or Bring this form in person to: Questions? Registrar's Office, SSB 101 San Francisco State University 1600 Holloway Avenue San Francisco, CA 94132 Registrar, One Stop Student Service Center, SSB 101

  11. San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Estimates of Suspended-sediment Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances Estimates of Suspended-sediment Flux Entering San Francisco Bay from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta Lester McKee Neil Ganju David Schoellhamer Jay Davis Don Yee Jon Leatherbarrow Rainer Hoenicke SFEI Contribution 65 December 2002 San

  12. A simulation-based approach to forecasting the next great San Francisco earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLeod, Dennis

    A simulation-based approach to forecasting the next great San Francisco earthquake J. B. Rundle In 1906 the great San Francisco earthquake and fire destroyed much of the city. As we approach the 100-year anniversary of that event, a critical concern is the hazard posed by another such earthquake

  13. J. Paul Leonard Library, Room 460K, 1630 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco CA 94132 Tel: 415-405-5565 SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Paul Leonard Library, Room 460K, 1630 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco CA 94132 Tel: 415 and digital restoration are required for editing, this is outsourced as standard through Image Trends, Inc

  14. San Francisco, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -RobSSL INDepartment of Energy San Francisco Mayor'sCities,

  15. San Francisco, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbon Development |SMCHarborSamchullySanFrancisco,

  16. Agro Industrias do Vale do Sao Francisco | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar EnergyAerodynallIndustrias do Vale do Sao Francisco Jump

  17. Magnetic Anomalies on Io and Their Relationship to the Spatial Distribution of Volcanic Centers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knicely, Joshua

    2015-04-23

    and observation altitude ...................................................... 43 1 1. INTRODUCTION Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system due to tidal heating. The intense heating is produced by a Laplace orbital resonance with Jupiter..., for example, indicates the past presence of a powerful magnetic field and an early stage of plate tectonics as deduced from observed magnetic stripes and apparent transform faults. The magnetic anomaly pattern on Mars contributes to the hypothesis that many...

  18. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas...

  19. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  20. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data...

  1. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static...

  2. Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matoza, Robin S.

    2009-01-01

    into a volcano-seismic source process in low-viscosityDIEGO Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanicTHE DISSERTATION Seismic and infrasonic source processes in

  3. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  4. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, 1989 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of...

  5. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

  6. Numerical simulations of volcanic jets: Importance of vent overpressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, Darcy E.; Wohletz, Kenneth H.; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory studies of volcanic jets, J. Geophys. Res. , 89(Analysis of supersonic air jets, Phys. Rev. , 76(5), 662 –and dynamics of supersonic jets, Astron. Astrophys. , 113(

  7. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  8. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu,...

  9. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  10. Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this study we combine thermal maturation models, based on the...

  12. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico, USA,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpHessen

  13. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources JumpDimas, California:County,BasinSan Juan

  14. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbon DevelopmentValley Clean EnergySan Juan

  15. Carsharing Parking Policy: A Review of North American Practices and San Francisco Bay Area Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Cohen, Adam P.; Martin, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    Salt Lake City. Free Metered Parking for “Green Vehicles. ”www.slcgov.com/Transportation/Parking/green.htm AccessedAccessed June 24, 2009. 27. Parking. San Francisco Bay Area

  16. Getting the Prices Right: An Evaluation of Pricing Parking by Demand in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Gregory; Shoup, Donald

    2013-01-01

    built a new 1,500-space parking structure for $47 million (Boston’s plague of cheap parking. Boston Globe, February 7.the Insiders Guide to Parking in San Francisco. Sausalito:

  17. The people or the place? : revitalization / gentrification in San Francisco's Bayview Hunters Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nafici, Saara

    2006-01-01

    The long-neglected minority neighborhoods of Bayview and Hunters Point, San Francisco, are facing the prospect of an uncertain future. The next few years will bring to the neighborhood intense private and public investment ...

  18. Solving the housing crisis in San Francisco with factory-built housing technology and regulatory reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejias, Luis (Luis Eric)

    2015-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area is in the midst of a housing crisis as population and economic growth outstrip the ability of developers to build enough housing, resulting in a significant supply-demand imbalance that is expected ...

  19. Architecture as connector : insertions, ruins, and additions at Pier 26, San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Eunice M. (Eunice Mae), 1973-

    2000-01-01

    The thesis addresses the issues of adaptive reuse of Pier 26, one of few remaining pieces of San Francisco's grand maritime heritage. With the city's vision of changing its unused industrial waterfront into a recreational ...

  20. San Francisco Real Estate Market: The City, the Peninsula and the East Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Kenneth T.; Jordan, Susan

    1988-01-01

    or $4,000, and monthly real estate tax payments. 70 14 SeeBerkeley CENTER Fon REAL ESTATE AND URBAN ECONOMICS WORKINGNO. 88-152 SAN FRANCISCO REAL ESTATE MARKET: THE CITY, THE

  1. The Sorted City: San Francisco, Hope SF, and the Redevelopment of Public Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rongerude, Jane Marie

    2009-01-01

    in San Francisco's Public Housing, 1965 – 1975. In Journaland the Rise of Liberal Housing Thought, 1910-1942. DoctoralBratt, R. G. (2002). Housing for Very Low-Income Households:

  2. Organ Trade : sea level rise adaptation strategies for the San Francisco Bay Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungureanu, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    It is not only coastal conditions, but inland ones, that can inform an approach to and process of wetland adaptation in the face of sea level rise. A particular watershed clip in Alameda County, located in South San Francisco ...

  3. Optimizing resilience : performance based assessment of retrofits for wood-frame housing in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiyed, Zahraa Nazim

    2013-01-01

    Prevalent seismic hazards in the San Francisco Bay Area region require the building stock to be able to withstand frequent ground accelerations while maintaining life-safety standards. Most housing in the City of San ...

  4. 13 OctOber 2013 Mission Bay Conference Center, San Francisco, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    1­3 OctOber 2013 Mission Bay Conference Center, San Francisco, USA www.beyond-the-genome.com Beyond the Genome 2013 #12;2 1­3 OctOber 2013 Mission Bay Conference Center, San Francisco, USA www.beyond-the-genome.com Beyond the Genome 2013 Exhibition and sponsorship Nick Moss BioMed Central T: +44 (0)20 3192 2723 E: nick

  5. Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes characterization2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Geothermal waters from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand: Li,1 B and Sr isotopes 13 In this study, we report chemical and isotope data for 23 geothermal water samples collected geothermal waters collected from deep boreholes16 in different geothermal fields (Ohaaki, Wairakei, Mokai

  6. Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Measurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash Daniel M. Peters and R. G. Grainger of Volcanic Ash". This project will measure vol- canic ash aerosol extinction spectra and the aerosol particle is required in the analysis of IR satellite observations of ash clouds. Dry, water ice and sulphuric acid

  7. Optical properties of volcanic ash Dan M. Peters1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Optical properties of volcanic ash Dan M. Peters1 , Roy G. Grainger1 , Robert McPheat2 , Ben Reed1 volcanic ash clouds remotely. Current meth- ods of detection use wavelengths from the UV to infra-red both of the ash. As ash composition varies from eruption to eruption the refractive index also differs; our aim

  8. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations Cedex 02, France. 2 GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam - Section 2.2, 14473 Potsdam, Germany. 3 Iceland GeoSurvey - ISOR , 108 Reykjavík, Iceland Abstract Structural features of volcanic and hydrothermal systems can

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Late Miocene to Pleistocene potassic volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL PAPER Late Miocene to Pleistocene potassic volcanism in the Republic of Macedonia Yotzo Abstract The potassic (K) to ultrapotassic (UK) volcanic rocks cropping out in the Vardar Zone of Macedonia are located in the large Kozuf Massif (Voras Massif in Greece) at the Macedonia­Greek border. Three distinct

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Volcanic tsunami: a review of source mechanisms, past

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    ORIGINAL PAPER Volcanic tsunami: a review of source mechanisms, past events and hazards Asia has had both volcanic tsunamis and possesses some of the most densely populated, economically tsunami hazard in Southeast Asia. Source mechanisms of tsunami related to eruptive and gravitational

  11. Case Files of the California Poison Control System, San Francisco Division: Blue Thunder Ingestion: Methanol, Nitromethane, and Elevated Creatinine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngo, Adeline Su-Yin; Rowley, Freda; Olson, Kent R.

    2010-01-01

    Files of the California Poison Control System, San FranciscoK. R. Olson California Poison Control System, San Franciscoreported to the Drug and Poison Information Center in Izmir,

  12. Taking LID to the Streets: A Case Study of Stormwater Management on Leland Avenue in San Francisco, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thong, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    County Water Program, Stormwater C3 guidebook requirementshtml/dep/html/stormwater/nyc_green_infrastructure_plan.shtml2009). San Francisco Stormwater Design Guidelines. San

  13. Diet, Prey Selection, and Body Condition of Age-0 Delta Smelt, Hypomesus transpacificus, in the Upper San Francisco Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slater, Steven B.; Baxter, Randall D.

    2014-01-01

    Francisco Estuary. IEP technical report. Sacramento (CA):Bay/Delta Estuary. IEP Technical report no. 78. Sacramento (Bay/Delta Estuary. IEP technical report no. 9. Sacramento (

  14. Is Dilution The Solution To Pollution? Municipal Sewerage Systems In Late Nineteenth Century San Francisco And London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brooke Ray

    2007-01-01

    Robin W. ed. 1974. Waste-Water Management in the SanMaster Plan for Waste Water Management: Preliminary Summaryfirst San Francisco Waste Water Master Plan was released,

  15. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

  16. UNCOVERING BURIED VOLCANOES: NEW DATA FOR PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ASSESSMENT AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.V. Perry

    2005-10-13

    Basaltic volcanism poses a potential hazard to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository because multiple episodes of basaltic volcanism have occurred in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) in the past 11 Ma. Intervals between eruptive episodes average about 1 Ma. Three episodes have occurred in the Quaternary at approximately 1.1 Ma (5 volcanoes), 350 ka (2 volcanoes), and 80 ka (1 volcano). Because Yucca Mountain lies within the Basin and Range Province, a significant portion of the pre-Quaternary volcanic history of the YMR may be buried in alluvial-filled basins. An exceptionally high-resolution aeromagnetic survey and subsequent drilling program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in 2004 and is gathering data that will enhance understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns of Pliocene and Miocene volcanism in the region (Figure 1). DOE has convened a ten-member expert panel of earth scientists that will use the information gathered to update probabilistic volcanic hazard estimates originally obtained by expert elicitation in 1996. Yucca Mountain is a series of north-trending ridges of eastward-tilted fault blocks that are bounded by north to northeast-trending normal faults. Topographic basins filled with up to 500 m of alluvium surround it to the east, south and west. In the past several decades, nearly 50 holes have been drilled in these basins, mainly for Yucca Mountain Project Site Characterization and the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Several of these drill holes have penetrated relatively deeply buried (300-400 m) Miocene basalt; a Pliocene basalt dated at 3.8 Ma was encountered at a relatively shallow depth (100 m) in the northern Amargosa Desert (Anomaly B in Figure 1). The current drilling program is the first to specifically target and characterize buried basalt. Based on the new aeromagnetic survey and previous air and ground magnetic surveys (Connor et al. 2000; O'Leary et al. 2002), at least eight drill holes are planned with the goal of sampling each geographic subpopulation of magnetic anomalies in the region (Figure 1). This will result in a more complete characterization of the location, age, volume and composition of buried basaltic features for the purpose of updating the volcanic hazard assessment. Smith and Keenan (2005) suggested that volcanic hazard estimates might be 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than estimated by the DOE expert elicitation in 1996, based on (1) a proposed relationship between recurrence rates in the YMR and the Reveille-Lunar Crater volcanic field to the north, and (2) the implication that a number of so-far-undiscovered buried volcanoes would have a significant impact on hazard estimates. This article presents the new aeromagnetic data and an interpretation of the data that suggests magnetic anomalies nearest the proposed repository site represent buried Miocene basalt that will likely have only a minor impact on the volcanic hazard.

  17. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic Area Of Mt Etna (Sicily) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  18. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation,...

  19. A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico...

  20. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  1. A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and in investigating the behaviors of magma and volcanic fluids. We carried out audio-frequency magnetotelluric surveys around the craters of Naka-dake in 2004 and 2005 to...

  2. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  3. The Eyjafjallajkull volcanic system, Iceland: insights from electromagnetic measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    The Eyjafjallajökull volcanic system, Iceland: insights from electromagnetic measurements Journal; Iceland Geosurvey, Vilhjálmsson, Arnar; Iceland Geosurvey, Keywords: Magnetotellurics system, Iceland: insights from1 electromagnetic measurements2 Marion P. Miensopust1,2, , Alan G. Jones1

  4. Non-Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosol Trends: 1971 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshler, Terry

    et al., 1997]. The impact of sulfur rich volcanic eruptions then became obvious and these have been which began in the 1970s, have captured the complete cycle for three major eruptions with a global

  5. Effect of volcanic eruptions on the hydrological cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iles, Carley Elizabeth

    2014-11-27

    Large explosive volcanic eruptions inject SO2 into the stratosphere where it is oxidised to sulphate aerosols which reflect sunlight. This causes a reduction in global temperature and precipitation lasting a few years. ...

  6. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash: volcanic eruption aircraft volcanic plumes ash clouds During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days

  7. Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending Felipe Diaz-Alvarado1, Francisco Trespalacios2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending Felipe D´iaz-Alvarado1, Francisco Trespalacios2, 30 (4): 614-634. D´iaz-Alvarado, Trespalacios, Grossmann Scheduling of large scale crude oil blending, P. A Novel Priority-Slot Based Continuous-Time Formulation for Crude-Oil Scheduling Problems

  8. GridUnit: Software Testing on the Grid Alexandre Duarte, Walfredo Cirne, Francisco Brasileiro, Patrcia Machado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    GridUnit: Software Testing on the Grid Alexandre Duarte, Walfredo Cirne, Francisco Brasileiro testing is a fundamental part of system development. As software grows, its test suite becomes larger, there is the need to test software in a variety of environments. In this paper, we introduce GridUnit, an extension

  9. Environmental Research 105 (2007) 87100 The slow recovery of San Francisco Bay from the legacy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    , Livermore, CA 94551, USA c Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region, 1515 Clay St of the Bay from these inputs and predict its future improvement. Legacy pesticides enter the water contaminated sediment deposits, and dredging and disposal of dredged material. Runoff from small

  10. Space Use by Forster's Terns Breeding in South San Francisco Bay JILL BLUSO-DEMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colwell, Mark

    , sex- specific foraging behaviors among seabirds with negligible sexual size dimorphism (i that differ- ences reported in sexually dimorphic species are not mediated exclusively by differences in body 95616 4 Current address: San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory, 524 Valley Way, Milpitas, CA 95035 Internet

  11. Physics and Astronomy Department San Francisco State University Physics Readiness Exam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golterman, Maarten

    Physics and Astronomy Department San Francisco State University Physics Readiness Exam Math Qualification Test for Introductory Physics ­ Physics 111 or Physics 220 In addition to meeting course prerequisites, students wishing to enroll in Physics 111 or Physics 220 must demonstrate adequate competence

  12. Recipes from the Secret Book of Artephius San Francisco Bay Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, John

    Recipes from the Secret Book of Artephius Gold Team San Francisco Bay Area, California The Codex Leicester Introduction We seek the recipes contained in The Secret Book of Artephius, a text first. While in the possession of the Vatican, the recipes contained in the text were sold twice during

  13. Detection of Vulnerable Road Users in Smart Cities Francisco Guayante, Arnoldo Daz-Ramrez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia-Alvarez, Pedro

    that the population of a city grows, new problems arise, which include scarcity of resources, pollution, and traffic [1]. However, bigger cities generate new kinds of problems, such as scarcity of resources, pollutionDetection of Vulnerable Road Users in Smart Cities Francisco Guayante, Arnoldo Díaz

  14. Multipurpose Mobility Services for the Future Internet Francisco A. Gonzalez-Horta, 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia-Alvarez, Pedro

    1 Multipurpose Mobility Services for the Future Internet Francisco A. Gonzalez-Horta, 1 Pedro Mejia-Alvarez, 2 Eldamira Buenfil-Alpuche 3 1, 2 CINVESTAV-IPN, Computer Science Department, Mexico City 3 UNILA, Research Department, Cuernavaca, Mor., Mexico 1 fglez@computacion.cs.cinvestav.mx, 2 pmalvarez

  15. Context-Based Pedestrian Path Prediction Julian Francisco Pieter Kooij1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    Context-Based Pedestrian Path Prediction Julian Francisco Pieter Kooij1,2 , Nicolas Schneider1.F.P.Kooij,D.M.Gavrila}@uva.nl Abstract. We present a novel Dynamic Bayesian Network for pedestrian path prediction in the intelligent) to anticipate changes in the pedestrian dynamics. Using computer vision, situational awareness is assessed

  16. Kokes Awards for the 21st NAM Meeting (San Francisco, CA, 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, Alex

    2009-08-31

    The PI in this project Alexander Katz, UC Berkeley (askatz@berkeley.edu), in conjunction with the Kokes Awards subcommittee and conference organizing committee, used DOE grant DE-FG-02-08ER15993 to partially offset costs of attending the 21st North American Catalysis Society in San Francisco, California, for 30 graduate students from the United States

  17. Computational Biologist Department of Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Genentech Inc, South San Francisco, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    , proficiency in high-level programming languages (e.g. Perl, Python) and statistical computing (R) are highly San Francisco, CA The Position The position is in a statistical genetics group responsible in statistical/human genetics or bioinformatics/computational biology. A record of scientific publications

  18. Alkali and Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Gases on Io

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Schaefer; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2004-09-20

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of alkalis and halogens in volcanic gases emitted on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K) and pressure (10^-6 to 10^+1 bars) ranges, which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (T = 1760 K, P = 0.01 bars). About 230 compounds of 11 elements (O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, I) are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry of the alkalis and halogens in the volcanic plume. Based on this work and our prior modeling for Na, K, and Cl in a volcanic plume, we predict the major loss processes for the alkali halide gases are photolysis and/or condensation onto grains. On the basis of elemental abundances and photochemical lifetimes, we recommend searching for gaseous KCl, NaF, LiF, LiCl, RbF, RbCl, CsF, and CsCl around volcanic vents during eruptions. Based on abundance considerations and observations of brown dwarfs, we also recommend a search of Io's extended atmosphere and the Io plasma torus for neutral and ionized Li, Cs, Rb, and F.

  19. Revenue and Ridership Potential for a High-Speed Rail Service in the San Francisco/Sacramento-Los Angeles Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavitt, Daniel; Vaca, Erin; Hall, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Potential for a High-Speed Rail Service in the Francisco/Scenario 4 4 High-Speed Rail Revenue Station Pair by 4 ’51992 levels ,, High-speed rail could divert approximately 12

  20. Water transfers in Northern California : analyzing the termination of the San Francisco--Modesto Irrigation District water transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Keith (Keith Richard)

    2013-01-01

    From 2011 to 2012, the Modesto Irrigation District (MID) and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) attempted to broker a deal that would transfer water from the rural Central California district to the ...

  1. Precarious City: Marginal Workers, The State, And Working-Class Activism In Post-Industrial San Francisco, 1964-1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Laura Renata

    2014-01-01

    CA. PRIMARY SOURCES Arthur D. Little and Company. YerbaReport. San Francisco: Arthur D. Little and Company, May120 and 180. A 1965 Arthur D. Little report showed that 77

  2. The Cost of the Technological Sublime: Daring Ingenuity and the new San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frick, Karen Trapenberg

    2008-01-01

    Cruz. ‘Unity Towers East Bay Bridge‘, New East Span ProposalSubmitted to MTC Bay Bridge Design Task Force, 6 May.Francisco- Oakland Bay Bridge, T.Y. Lin International and

  3. Engaging Regions in Globalization: The Rise of the Economic Relationship between the San Francisco Bay Area and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volberding, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Solar Firm, Yingli Green Energy Americas to San Francisco. ”and Cleantech. US-China Green Energy Council Seminar. Palo85 In July 2009, Yingli Green Energy Americas announced its

  4. Modelling risk and risking models: the diffusive boundary between science and policy in volcanic risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Amy R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2014-11-27

    This article examines the science-policy interface in volcanic risk assessment. It analyses empirical data from research on Montserrat, where new volcanic risk assessment methodologies were pioneered. We discuss the ways in which these methods...

  5. Infrasonic observations of the June 2009 Sarychev Peak eruption, Kuril Islands: Implications for infrasonic monitoring of remote explosive volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    3):  1012-­?1032.   SVERT  (Sakhalin  Volcanic  Eruptions  Korea   Alexander  Rybin   Sakhalin  Volcanic  Eruptions  Paramushir,  Iturup  and  Sakhalin  at  distances  of  352  

  6. SO2 as a proxy for volcanic ash in aviation hazard avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    SO2 as a proxy for volcanic ash in aviation hazard avoidance Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer - IASI ABSTRACT: Airborne volcanic ash poses a significant danger to aircraft but is difficult accurately. This paper looks at the reliability of using SO2 as a proxy for the location of volcanic ash

  7. Measurement of the Optical Proper-ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Measurement of the Optical Proper- ties of Volcanic Ash: Current status. Daniel M. Peters and R. G project "Opti- cal Properties of Volcanic ash". This project sets out to measure the extinction spectra and size distribution of volcanic ash aerosol. The measurements will allow the calculation of aerosol cross

  8. Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr Volcanoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Scattering matrices of volcanic ash particles of Mount St. Helens, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr particles taken from seven samples of volcanic ashes corresponding to four different volcanic eruptions. The samples studied contain large mass fractions of fine particles and were chosen to represent ash that could

  9. Smart Parking Linked to Transit: Lessons Learned from the San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    communications, and a wireless parking lot counting system)the highway to the smart parking lot and addressing residentcounting system in the BART parking lot to provide data for

  10. Smart Parking Linked to Transit: Lessons Learned from the San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    2004, pp. 166-167. 9. Advanced Parking Management Systems: App. 41-42. 11. Arnott, S. Parking Tickets by Text, Smartcard14, 2007. 13. RingGo Parking System, First Great Western

  11. 1. INTRODUCTION Volcanic eruptions have been an important cause of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    opportunity to study the workings of the climate system, to test climate models, and to exam- ine the impacts aftermath will undoubtedly enhance our understanding of the climate system. Volcanism and the Earth was a large but relatively short- lived shock to the Earth's atmosphere. It thus provided an excellent

  12. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 VENUS GEOLOGY, VOLCANISM, TECTONICS, AND RESURFACING 3:00 p.m. Waterway. The Geological History of Venus: Constraints from Buffered Crater Densities [#1096] We apply buffered crater density technique to a new global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, 2008) and obtain robust constraints

  13. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  14. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

  15. Observations of Fallout from the Fukushima Reactor Accident in San Francisco Bay Area Rainwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric B. Norman; Christopher T. Angell; Perry A. Chodash

    2011-03-30

    We have observed fallout from the recent Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor accident in samples of rainwater collected in the San Francisco Bay area. Gamma ray spectra measured from these samples show clear evidence of fission products - 131,132I, 132Te, and 134,137Cs. The activity levels we have measured for these isotopes are very low and pose no health risk to the public.

  16. San Francisco Turns Up The Heat In Push To Eliminate Old Boilers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -RobSSL INDepartment of Energy San Francisco Mayor's

  17. Planning for Climate Change in Low-Impact Development Projects: A Case Study of the Sunset Swales Parking Lot Retrofit in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Esther

    2011-01-01

    3. Swale in Sunset Swales Parking Lot, with ponding water.2007. “Sunset Swales Parking Lot Stormwater Retrofit Projectof the Sunset Swales Parking Lot Retrofit in San Francisco

  18. Planning for Climate Change in Low-Impact Development Projects: A Case Study of the Sunset Swales Parking Lot Retrofit in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Esther

    2011-01-01

    3. Swale in Sunset Swales Parking Lot, with ponding water.L. , 2007. “Sunset Swales Parking Lot Stormwater Retrofitof the Sunset Swales Parking Lot Retrofit in San Francisco

  19. Avian Communities in Tidal Salt Marshes of San Francisco Bay: A Review of Functional Groups by Foraging Guild and Habitat Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    2006). San Francisco Bay song spar- rows are adapted to highswallows (Hirundinidae), savannah spar- rows (Passerculussurvival in tidal-marsh song spar- rows was maximized when

  20. Avian Communities in Tidal Salt Marshes of San Francisco Bay: A Review of Functional Groups by Foraging Guild and Habitat Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    report on the Cargill Salt Ponds. Senate select committee onartificial salt evaporation ponds of the San Francisco BayMA. 2005. South Bay salt ponds restoration project short-

  1. Analysis and correlation of volcanic ash in marine sediments from the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201: explosive volcanic cycles of the north-central Andes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Shirley Dawn

    2007-04-25

    -1 ANALYSIS AND CORRELATION OF VOLCANIC ASH IN MARINE SEDIMENTS FROM THE PERU MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  2. RELEASE OF INFORMATION AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ovchinnikov, Sergei

    ). The university defines as "directory information" and normally makes public the following information from a student's record: Directory Information: SF State ID Student Name E-mail Major Field of Study Dates Earned Honors and Awards Received For Student Employees: Department Where Employed Employee Status (i

  3. Atmospheric correction for satellite-based volcanic ash mapping and retrievals using ``split window'' IR data from GOES and AVHRR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Atmospheric correction for satellite-based volcanic ash mapping and retrievals using ``split window 17 September 2001; published 29 August 2002. [1] Volcanic ash in volcanic clouds can be mapped in two of the volcanic cloud, and the mass of fine ash in the cloud. Both the mapping and the retrieval scheme are less

  4. Characteristics of the Zunil Geothermal Field (Western Guatemala)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethancourt, H.R.; Dominco, E.

    1982-10-01

    The Zunil geothermal field represents the marginal, shallow expression of a vast geothermal complex buried beneath active volcanic edifices (Cerro Quemado, Volcan Santa Maria, Western Guatemala) some kilometers to the west. The area lies at the edge of a tecto-volcanic depression where some 1,000 m of Tertiary and Quaternary volcanics are underlain by a granodioritic basement. High temperature geothermal fluids (over 280/sup 0/C) reach the field from the west, upflowing along the inclined contact between the granodioritic and the overlying volcanics, and along fractures in the basement itself. A conglomeratic layer at the volcanics/basement contact, and the underlying weathered cap of the basement form the only permeable horizon of the succession; this horizon forms the local reservoir tapped by the productive wells. Its reduced thickness (around 50 m) allows for a limited fluid storage such that field production relies on external recharge along the permeable horizon and underlying fractures in the granodiorite. Production testing and simulation models indicate a fairly rapid evolution of reservoir conditions from the liquid to the steam phase, due to pressure drawdown, in its turn due to a restricted inflow. The phenomenon determines an upgrading of the fluid enthalpy, but a decline of mass output. Simulated reinjection into the reservoir proved to be an effective measure to slow down such an evolution and optimize the field exploitation.

  5. Predicted Abundances of Carbon Compounds in Volcanic Gases on Io

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Schaefer; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2004-09-17

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of carbon in volcanic gases on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K), pressure (10^-8 to 10^+2 bars), and composition ranges (bulk O/S atomic ratios \\~0 to 3), which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (1760 K, 0.01 bar, O/S ~ 1.5). Bulk C/S atomic ratios ranging from 10^-6 to 10^-1 in volcanic gases are used with a nominal value of 10^-3 based upon upper limits from Voyager for carbon in the Loki plume on Io. Carbon monoxide and CO2 are the two major carbon gases under all conditions studied. Carbonyl sulfide and CS2 are orders of magnitude less abundant. Consideration of different loss processes (photolysis, condensation, kinetic reactions in the plume) indicates that photolysis is probably the major loss process for all gases. Both CO and CO2 should be observable in volcanic plumes and in Io's atmosphere at abundances of several hundred parts per million by volume for a bulk C/S ratio of 10^-3.

  6. Health Research & Policy is located in the Redwood Building at 150 Governor's Lane, 35 miles south of San Francisco and 20 miles north of San Jose.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    's Lane, 35 miles south of San Francisco and 20 miles north of San Jose. From San Francisco Airport (SFO) Allow 60 minutes travel Eme. Drive south on Highway or Stock Farm lots. From San Jose Airport (SJC) Allow 45 minutes travel Eme. Drive

  7. The Golden Gate Textile Barrier: Preserving California Bay of San Francisco from a Rising North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richart B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-02-04

    Climate change in California may require construction of a barrier separating the Pacific Ocean from San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento River-San Joaquin River Delta simply because Southern California is remarkably dependent on freshwater exported from the Delta. We offer a new kind of salt barrier, a macroproject built of impermeable textile materials stretched across the Golden Gate beneath the famous bridge. We anticipate it might eventually substitute for a recently proposed San Francisco In-Stream Tidal Power Plant harnessing a 1.7 m tide at the Bay entrance if future climate conditions Statewide is conducive. First-glance physics underpin our macroproject.

  8. The Golden Gate Textile Barrier: Preserving California Bay of San Francisco from a Rising North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathcart, R B; Bolonkin, Alexander A.; Cathcart, Richart B.

    2007-01-01

    Climate change in California may require construction of a barrier separating the Pacific Ocean from San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento River-San Joaquin River Delta simply because Southern California is remarkably dependent on freshwater exported from the Delta. We offer a new kind of salt barrier, a macroproject built of impermeable textile materials stretched across the Golden Gate beneath the famous bridge. We anticipate it might eventually substitute for a recently proposed San Francisco In-Stream Tidal Power Plant harnessing a 1.7 m tide at the Bay entrance if future climate conditions Statewide is conducive. First-glance physics underpin our macroproject.

  9. Tephrochronology and Stratigraphy of Eocene and Oligocene Volcanic Ashes of East and Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heintz, Mindi

    2013-12-02

    AND STRATIGRAPHY OF EOCENE AND OLIGOCENE VOLCANIC ASHES OF EAST AND CENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis by MINDI HEINTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Page Figure 1. Location of volcanic ash samples ..................................................................... 2 Figure 2. Stratigraphy for the study location showing the position of the volcanic ash beds studied in this report...

  10. A Field Demonstration of an Instrument Performing Automatic Classification of Geologic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -sensitive classifications of geologic surfaces in mesoscale scenes. A series of tests at the Cima Volcanic Fields in the Mojave Desert, California demonstrate mesoscale surficial mapping at two distinct sites of geologic

  11. The Long Valley/Mono Basin Volcanic Complex: A Preliminary Magnetotell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that such techniques are profoundly affected by the highly three-dimensional structures associated with these complicated volcanic terranes. We argue that while simple...

  12. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  13. Structure and anisotropy of the Mexico subduction zone based on Rayleigh-wave analysis and implications for the geometry of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stubailo, I; Beghein, C; Davis, PM

    2012-01-01

    across the central Mexican volcanic belt at 100 W: Spatialcentral Trans-Mexican volcanic belt, Chem. Geol. , 244(3–4),Trans-Mexican volcanic belt: Slab detachment in a subduction

  14. Model limits on the role of volcanic carbon emissions in regulating glacialinterglacial CO2 variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    Model limits on the role of volcanic carbon emissions in regulating glacial­interglacial CO2 (2009) proposed that an increase in volcanic activity provoked by ice sheet melting contributed emissions in regulating glacial­interglacial CO2 variations, but uncertainties prevent a firm conclusion

  15. MODIS and ASTER synergy for characterizing thermal volcanic activity S.W. Murphy a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    MODIS and ASTER synergy for characterizing thermal volcanic activity S.W. Murphy a, , R. Wright b in thermal activity due to the eruption of lava however intervening periods are characterized by weak or absent thermal anomalies. Láscar, on the other hand, provides an example of volcanic activity

  16. Volcanism, the atmosphere and climate through time anja schmidt and alan robock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    , 2003). Past episodes of continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism produced huge lava volumes discussed in Chapters 5 and 11, CFB volcanism is typified by numerous, recurring large-volume eruptive an entire CFB province are short-lived ­ typically about 1 Ma or less. For the assessment

  17. Satellite and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Satellite and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991, Philippines. The observed phenomena included deep convection resulting from (1) lower level eruptions, (2 and radar analysis of the volcanic-cumulonimbi at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, 1991, J. Geophys. Res., 110

  18. Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Late Quaternary constructional development of the Axial Volcanic Zone, eastern Snake River Plain volcanic ridge that trends northeast across the middle of the eastern Snake River Plain, and acts Snake River Plain: the AVZ, the Big Lost Trough to the north, and the Arco-Big Southern Butte (ABSB

  19. Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was dominated by marine, polluted, volcanic, and dust aerosols. Average total light scattering coefficients (sspMixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties). Aerosol hygroscopicity ranged from deliquescent with hysteresis (marine frequently and polluted variably

  20. Airborne Volcanic Ash--A Global Threat to Aviation U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airborne Volcanic Ash--A Global Threat to Aviation U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological on the aviation industry. Airborne volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even hundreds of miles from an eruption. Encounters with high-concentration ash clouds can diminish visibility, damage flight control

  1. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Hygroscopic Properties of Volcanic Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Hygroscopic Properties of Volcanic Ash observational data exists on the physical interac- tions between volcanic ash particles and water vapor; yet it is thought that these interactions can strongly impact the microphysical evolution of ash, with implications

  2. Surprising spread of volcanic ash key to solving Earth's mysteries: U of A grad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hao "Howard"

    Surprising spread of volcanic ash key to solving Earth's mysteries: U of A grad EDMONTON Volcanic ash, which can provide valuable snapshots of Earth's history, appears to drift much farther than of science that uses layers of "tephra," or ash, to link and date events in Earth's history. When a volcano

  3. Eos, Vol. 79, No. 42, October 20, 1998 Volcanic Ash Can Pose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    Eos, Vol. 79, No. 42, October 20, 1998 Volcanic Ash Can Pose Hazards to Air Traffic PAGES 505 and potentially deadly problems that can arise from volcanic ash clouds. The clouds can rise into the cruise the ash. The ash can ruin planes, and cause loss of thrust and even flameouts. It also can slicken runways

  4. GPS and Volcanic Ash Plumes: The eruptions of Okmok 2008 and Redoubt 2009, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    GPS and Volcanic Ash Plumes: The eruptions of Okmok 2008 and Redoubt 2009, Alaska Ronni Grapenthin Volcano in 2008 and Mt. Redoubt in 2009 produced significant ash plumes reaching over 15 km of altitude. It is known that the injection of volcanic ash in the at- mosphere induces phase delays not modeled by GPS

  5. Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Some Effects of Mt. St. Helens Volcanic Ash on Juvenile Salmon Smolts TIMOTHY W. NEWCOMB and THOMAS. Helens, which was completely decimated with vol- canic ash and mud slides. Heavy sediment loads smolts were exposed to various concentrations ofairborne volcanic ash from the 18 May 1980 eruption

  6. AO18: Satellite tracking of volcanic eruption plumes using ash and Candidate number: 782932

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    AO18: Satellite tracking of volcanic eruption plumes using ash and SO2 Candidate number: 782932 was to study, using satel- lite images, both ash and SO2 emitted from vol- canoes during eruptions, particularly to investi- gate whether the ash and SO2 in volcanic plumes are always collocated. If not, the aim

  7. Measurements of the complex dielectric constant of volcanic ash from 4 to 19 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perger, Warren F.

    Measurements of the complex dielectric constant of volcanic ash from 4 to 19 GHz R. J. Adams,1 W. F. Perger,2 W. I. Rose,3 and A. Kostinski4 Abstract Dielectric data in volcanic ash at weather radar wavelengths (centimeter range) are extremely sparse and are crucial for radar sensing of ash clouds

  8. Geologic constraints on the existence and distribution of West Antarctic subglacial volcanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemming, Sidney R

    the WAIS, heat supplied by subglacial eruptions and/or enhanced geothermal activity could melt enough ice [2] Geophysical studies suggest that subglacial volcanic activity and geothermal phenomena may help along the rift flanks of the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). This stage of volcanic activity started

  9. Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontbriand, Claire Willis

    2013-01-01

    Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-¹). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

  10. The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Robert Andrew

    2010-01-01

    optical log of dust, ash, and stratigraphy in South PoleContent and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice by RobertContent and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice by Robert

  11. Field Verification of Energy and Demand Savings of Two Injection Molding Machines Retrofitted with Variable Frequency Drives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, S. P.; Aguiar, D.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed field measurements of energy consumption (kWh) and demand (kW) are conducted on two injection molding machines (IMMs) used in a typical plastic manufacturing facility in the San Francisco Bay Area, with/without Variable Frequency Drives...

  12. Measuring volcanic plume and ash properties from space R. G. GRAINGER1*, D. M. PETERS1, G. E. THOMAS1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Measuring volcanic plume and ash properties from space R. G. GRAINGER1*, D. M. PETERS1, G. E *Corresponding author (e-mail: r.grainger@physics.ox.ac.uk) Abstract: The remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes of volcanic ash. To achieve this, a singular vector decomposition method has been developed for the MIPAS

  13. Detection of smoke and ash from forest fires and volcanic eruptions using the GOME-2 Absorbing Aerosol Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    Detection of smoke and ash from forest fires and volcanic eruptions using the GOME-2 Absorbing. Colours represent the smoke plume on the indicated days. 3. Detection of volcanic ash In April 2010, the GOME-2 AAI was able to follow the transport of volcanic ash from the Eyjafjalljokull volcano

  14. Analyses of in-situ airborne volcanic ash from the February 2000 eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    Analyses of in-situ airborne volcanic ash from the February 2000 eruption of Hekla Volcano, Iceland-8 NASA research aircraft inadvertently flew into an airborne volcanic ash plume from the 26 February spectrophotometer analyses. These analyses confirm that the DC-8 encountered airborne volcanic ash from Hekla

  15. Quantitative Shape Measurements of Distal Volcanic Ash Colleen M. Riley, William I. Rose, and Gregg J.S. Bluth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Quantitative Shape Measurements of Distal Volcanic Ash Colleen M. Riley, William I. Rose, and Gregg-7093; Email: colleenandahi@hotmail.com #12;2 Abstract Large-scale volcanic eruptions produce fine ash ( distances from the volcanic source, thus, becoming a hazard to aircraft and public health. Ash particles

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Determining the contribution of volcanic ash and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    of volcanic ash and Boundary Layer aerosol in backscatter lidar returns: a three-component atmosphere approach MARENCO AND HOGAN: VOLCANIC ASH AND BL AEROSOL IN LIDAR RETURNS Abstract. A solution of the lidar equation successfully applied to simultaneous observations of volcanic ash and Boundary Layer aerosol obtained in Exeter

  17. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

  18. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  19. Ground motion modeling of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake II: Ground motion estimates for the 1906 earthquake and scenario events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aagaard, B; Brocher, T; Dreger, D; Frankel, A; Graves, R; Harmsen, S; Hartzell, S; Larsen, S; McCandless, K; Nilsson, S; Petersson, N A; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Tkalcic, H; Zoback, M L

    2007-02-09

    We estimate the ground motions produced by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake making use of the recently developed Song et al. (2008) source model that combines the available geodetic and seismic observations and recently constructed 3D geologic and seismic velocity models. Our estimates of the ground motions for the 1906 earthquake are consistent across five ground-motion modeling groups employing different wave propagation codes and simulation domains. The simulations successfully reproduce the main features of the Boatwright and Bundock (2005) ShakeMap, but tend to over predict the intensity of shaking by 0.1-0.5 modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) units. Velocity waveforms at sites throughout the San Francisco Bay Area exhibit characteristics consistent with rupture directivity, local geologic conditions (e.g., sedimentary basins), and the large size of the event (e.g., durations of strong shaking lasting tens of seconds). We also compute ground motions for seven hypothetical scenarios rupturing the same extent of the northern San Andreas fault, considering three additional hypocenters and an additional, random distribution of slip. Rupture directivity exerts the strongest influence on the variations in shaking, although sedimentary basins do consistently contribute to the response in some locations, such as Santa Rosa, Livermore, and San Jose. These scenarios suggest that future large earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault may subject the current San Francisco Bay urban area to stronger shaking than a repeat of the 1906 earthquake. Ruptures propagating southward towards San Francisco appear to expose more of the urban area to a given intensity level than do ruptures propagating northward.

  20. Comparison of Petrophysical Rock Types from Core and Well-logs using Post-stack 3D Seismic Data: Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    : Field Example from Maracaibo-Venezuela Francisco Cheng* and Kumar Ramachandran, The University of Tulsa in an area located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela. The calculated petrophysical rock types were Description The study area is located on the West side of Lake Maracaibo-Venezuela, in shallow, transition

  1. Chronology and dynamics of a large silicic magmatic system. Central Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, B.F.; Wilson, C.J.N. (Wairakei Research Center, Taupo (New Zealand)); McWilliams, M.O. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Lanphere, M.A.; Pringle, M.S. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Weaver, S.D. (Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand)); Briggs, R.M. (Univ. of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand))

    1995-01-01

    The central Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand is a region of intense Quaternary silicic volcanism accompanying rapid extension of continental crust. At least 34 caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions have produced a complex sequence of relatively short-lived, nested, and/or overlapping volcanic centers over 1.6 m.y. Silicic volcanism at Taupo is similar to the Yellowstone system in size, longevity, thermal flux, and magma output rate. However, Taupo contrasts with Yellowstone in the exceptionally high frequency, but small size, of caldera-forming eruptions. This contrast reflects the thin, rifted nature of the crust, which precludes the development of long-term magmatic cycles at Taupo. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Collaborative Studies Target Volcanic Hazards in Central America Gregg J. S. Bluth and William I. Rose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluth, Gregg

    America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries. This agency is responsible for hazard education, as well as recommending evacuation routes and relief shelters

  3. Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). Ages were obtained from the original literature in all cases except for McKee...

  4. Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suckale, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

  5. Eruptive history and petrochemistry of the Bulusan volcanic complex: Implications for the hydrothermal system and volcanic hazards of Mt. Bulusan, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfin, F.G. Jr.; Panem, C.C.; Defant, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Two contrasting conceptual models of the postcaldera magmatic system of the Bulusan volcanic complex are constructed on the basis of a synthesis of volcanological, petrochemical, and petrologic data. These models predict that hydrothermal convection below the complex will occur either in discrete, structurally-focused zones or over a much broader area. Both models, however, agree that hydrothermal fluids at depth will be highly acidic and volcanic-related. Future ash-fall eruptions and mudflows are likely to affect the area previously chosen for possible drilling. Such risks, combined with the expected acidic character of the hydrothermal system, argue against drilling into this system.

  6. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  7. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Qualitymore »Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 ± 60 GgCH4 yr?¹ (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (2009–2012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.5–2.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.« less

  8. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville, Kentucky:Open Energy Information

  9. Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy|Gas and Electric

  10. Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on OpeneiAlbanianStudy)savings time.EnergyInformationOpen

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsource History View NewOpenEnergy

  12. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  13. A compound power-law model for volcanic eruptions: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1994-10-17

    Much of the ongoing debate on the use of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. centers on the safe disposal of the radioactive waste. Congress, aware of the importance of the waste issue, passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, requiring the federal government to develop a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high level radioactive wastes from civilian nuclear power plants. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in 1983 to identify potential sites. When OCRWM had selected three potential sites to study, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which directed the DOE to characterize only one of those sites, Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. For a site to be acceptable, theses studies must demonstrate that the site could comply with regulations and guidelines established by the federal agencies that will be responsible for licensing, regulating, and managing the waste facility. Advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Recent volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is readily recognized as an important factor in determining future public and environmental safety because of the possibility of direct disruption of a repository site by volcanism. In particular, basaltic volcanism is regarded as direct and unequivocal evidence of deep-seated geologic instability. In this paper, statistical analysis of volcanic hazard assessment at the Yucca Mountain site is discussed, taking into account some significant geological factors raised by experts. Three types of models are considered in the data analysis. The first model assumes that both past and future volcanic activities follow a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP).

  14. Transit-Based Smart Parking in the U.S.: Behavioral Analysis of San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2006-01-01

    and A. Johnston. Real Time Parking Management dor TransitSmirti 13. Willson, R. Parking Pricing Without Tears: TripP. H. L. Bovy. A Dynamic Parking Reservation System for City

  15. Smart Parking Linked to Transit: Lessons Learned from the Field Test in San Francisco Bay Area of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

    2008-01-01

    transit) and complements (i.e. parking services) for cars asCar commute cost (incl. parking) Non-car commute cost CarCar commute cost (incl. parking) Non-car commute cost Car

  16. Depositional environment of the Caballos Formation, San Francisco field, Neiva sub-basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneider, John Scott

    1988-01-01

    of the Cretaceous shales supply a ready source rock for oil generation (Macellari, 1985). Uplift during the early stages of the Andean orogeny resulted in a non-depositional episode which extended to the late Eocene. Continual uplift of the Central Cordillera... increases upward in the coset; 2542. 0 ft (774. 8 m). Coarsening upward coset of discontinuous wavy laminated sandstone. Coset continues in photograph G. Oil stain increases upward in the sandstone; 2542. 5 ft (775. 0 m). Interlaminated shale, siltstone...

  17. Transit-Based Smart Parking in the U.S.: Behavioral Analysis of San Francisco Bay Area Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan

    2006-01-01

    smart parking at Rockridge BART station from another station closer to or farther from home (smart parking instead of driving to a BART station that was closer to or farther from their home.home and work zip codes. TABLE 7 Change in Vehicle Miles Traveled with Smart

  18. Jurassic arc volcanism on Crimea (Ukraine): Implications for the paleo-subduction zone configuration of the Black Sea region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Jurassic arc volcanism on Crimea (Ukraine): Implications for the paleo-subduction zone margin. Crimea (Ukraine), a peninsula in the northern Black Sea, represents the northernmost region

  19. Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large-scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morata, Dobson, P.F., B.M. Kennedy, M. Reich, P. Sanchez, and D.

    2014-01-01

    of the Cordon Caulle geothermal system, southern Chile,?volcanic centers and geothermal systems in the CVZ wereHelium isotopes in geothermal systems: Iceland, The Geysers,

  20. San Francisco State University Region F'2009 F'2010 F'2011 F'2012 F'2013 F'2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco State University Headcount Region F'2009 F'2010 F'2011 F'2012 F'2013 F'2014 Bay Area2 2,917 2,633 2,525 2,572 2,310 2,195 San Diego 1,187 1,207 1,153 1,156 1,105 1,150 Southern CA 4.2% 5.1% Northern CA 9.6% 8.9% 8.5% 8.4% 7.7% 7.4% San Diego 3.9% 4.1% 3.9% 3.8% 3.7% 3.9% Southern CA

  1. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have years. · Mauna Loa, in Hawaii, is the world's largest active volcano. · The Cascade Range--home to more

  2. Evidence for explosive silicic volcanism on the Moon from the extended distribution of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J T; Massey, R J; Elphic, R C; Jolliff, B L; Lawrence, D J; Llewellin, E W; McElwaine, J N; Teodoro, L F A

    2014-01-01

    We reconstruct the abundance of thorium near the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex on the Moon, using data from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. We enhance the resolution via a pixon image reconstruction technique, and find that the thorium is distributed over a larger (40 km $\\times$ 75 km) area than the (25 km $\\times$ 35 km) high albedo region normally associated with Compton-Belkovich. Our reconstructions show that inside this region, the thorium concentration is 15 - 33 ppm. We also find additional thorium, spread up to 300 km eastward of the complex at $\\sim$2 ppm. The thorium must have been deposited during the formation of the volcanic complex, because subsequent lateral transport mechanisms, such as small impacts, are unable to move sufficient material. The morphology of the feature is consistent with pyroclastic dispersal and we conclude that the present distribution of thorium was likely created by the explosive eruption of silicic magma.

  3. Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

  4. Estimation of ash injection in the atmosphere by basaltic volcanic plumes: The case of the Eyjafjallajkull 2010 eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Estimation of ash injection in the atmosphere by basaltic volcanic plumes: The case explosive eruptions, volcanic plumes inject ash into the atmosphere and may severely affect air traffic, as illustrated by the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Quantitative estimates of ash injection can be deduced from

  5. Mass-independent isotopic signatures of volcanic sulfate from three supereruption ash deposits in Lake Tecopa, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Mass-independent isotopic signatures of volcanic sulfate from three supereruption ash deposits present oxygen and sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate in 48 volcanic ash samples, and 26 sediment samples from dry lake beds in the Tecopa basin, California, USA. These ash layers represent three

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO UCSD BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO UCSD BERKELEY · DAVIS · IRVINE · LOS ANGELES · MERCED · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA · SANTA CRUZ UC San Diego Dean's Office: (858) 822-1123 2016 Provider Proposal Guidelines Thank you for your interest in partnering with UC San Diego Global

  7. ""Dr. Eric Hsu, a math professor at San Francisco State University, employs two highly useful tools in his effort to win

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 #12;""Dr. Eric Hsu, a math professor at San Francisco State University, employs two highly useful tools in his effort to win funding for research grants on math education: Luck. And story telling the National Science Founda- tion (NSF) to research math teaching. "The number one reason I get these grants

  8. Report of the APN workshop on "Climate interactions and marine ecosystems" Francisco E. Werner, Bernard A. Megrey and Kenneth A. Rose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of climate change effects up the marine food-web; to quantify its effects on energy cycling and fish growth15 Report of the APN workshop on "Climate interactions and marine ecosystems" Francisco E. Werner, Bernard A. Megrey and Kenneth A. Rose A workshop on "Climate interactions and marine ecosystems" was held

  9. Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

  10. 1 Satellite remote sensing analysis of the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull 2 volcanic ash cloud over the North Sea during 418 May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    1 Satellite remote sensing analysis of the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull 2 volcanic ash cloud over) instrument, and BaE146 aircraft data sets, we provide an overview of 8 volcanic ash spatial distribution the North Sea. We describe spectral 10 signatures of volcanic ash, compare the MODIS-retrieved 550 nm

  11. Did melting glaciers cause volcanic eruptions in eastern California? Probing the mechanics of dike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Did melting glaciers cause volcanic eruptions in eastern California? Probing the mechanics of dike significant cross correlations between changes in eruption frequency and the first derivative of the glacial volume. Moreover, calculated time lags for the effects of glacial unloading on silicic and basaltic

  12. A new way to detect volcanic plumes Kristine M. Larson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    , is important both for public health and aircraft safety. A variety of geophysical tools and satellite data and limitations of the method are assessed using GPS data collected during the 2008 and 2009 eruptions with independently collected seismic and radar data. Citation: Larson, K. M. (2013), A new way to detect volcanic

  13. Influence of composition and thermal history of volcanic glasses on water content as determined by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of composition and thermal history of volcanic glasses on water content as determined for quantification of water content in natural glasses requires the assessment of the dependence of the technique content (H2OT) and of water speciation (H2Om/OH) requires the development of micro-analytical techniques

  14. GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF VOLCANIC ROCK ON THE ISLAND OF SABA (NETHERLANDS ANTILLES) Richard Rijkers 1 & Robert Hack 2 ABSTRACT A geomechanical analysis of a shallow small scale landslide, (NITG-TNO), Geomechanical Research, PO box 97, 2600 JA Delft, The Netherlands, tel.: +31 15 2697222, r

  15. Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    G21942 Using hydraulic equivalences to discriminate transport processes1 of volcanic flows1 2 Alain of hydraulic equivalence, we determined that deposits resulted from a combination of suspended-12 load fallout between transport mechanisms, hydraulic18 equivalences have a general applicability in geophysical flows

  16. Revised version Major natural hazards in a tropical volcanic island: a review for Mayotte Island,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Comoros archipelago, Indian Ocean Jean-Christophe Audru 1 , Adnand Bitri 2 , Jean-François Desprats 3 Mayotte is a French Overseas Territory of the Comoros archipelago. Since the 1980', Mayotte has developed, seismicity, storm surge, volcanic, alterites, Mayotte, Comoros hal-00530183,version1-27Oct2010 #12;Revised

  17. SIMULATION OF THE ICELAND VOLCANIC ERUPTION OF APRIL 2010 USING THE ENSEMBLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R.

    2011-05-10

    The Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in Iceland in April 2010 disrupted transportation in Europe which ultimately affected travel plans for many on a global basis. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) is responsible for providing guidance to the aviation industry of the transport of volcanic ash clouds. There are nine such centers located globally, and the London branch (headed by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, or UKMet) was responsible for modeling the Iceland volcano. The guidance provided by the VAAC created some controversy due to the burdensome travel restrictions and uncertainty involved in the prediction of ash transport. The Iceland volcanic eruption provides a useful exercise of the European ENSEMBLE program, coordinated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy. ENSEMBLE, a decision support system for emergency response, uses transport model results from a variety of countries in an effort to better understand the uncertainty involved with a given accident scenario. Model results in the form of airborne concentration and surface deposition are required from each member of the ensemble in a prescribed format that may then be uploaded to a website for manipulation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is the lone regular United States participant throughout the 10-year existence of ENSEMBLE. For the Iceland volcano, four separate source term estimates have been provided to ENSEMBLE participants. This paper focuses only on one of those source terms. The SRNL results in relation to other modeling agency results along with useful information obtained using an ensemble of transport results will be discussed.

  18. Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic landscape Mountain, whose tallest peak is 12,633 feet above sea level, the highest ele- vation in Arizona. Red Mountain rises about 1,000 feet above the surrounding landscape, and its crest is at 7,965 feet elevation

  19. GRAIL Gravity Observations of Lunar Volcanic Complexes Walter S. Kiefer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    GRAIL Gravity Observations of Lunar Volcanic Complexes Walter S. Kiefer1 , Patrick J. McGovern1 , Jeffrey C. Andrews-Hanna2 , James W. Head III3 , James G. Williams4 , Maria T. Zuber5 , and the GRAIL and Interior Labora- tory (GRAIL) mission markedly sharpened our view of the Moon's gravity [1]. The current

  20. Fission-track and 40Ar/39Ar dating and chemical correlation of volcanic strata ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Karl

    , the track of which is marked by the Snake River Plain, the Inter- mountain seismic belt and the metamorphic complex, development of major thrust faults in the Sevier belt, and volcanism in the Snake River Plain, have been defined and dated. In northeast Nevada, the highly exhumed rocks in the Ruby Mountains

  1. Experimental investigation of rates and mechanisms of isotope exchange (O, H) between volcanic ash and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Experimental investigation of rates and mechanisms of isotope exchange (O, H) between volcanic ash-term exposure experi- ments of distal 7700 BP Mt. Mazama ash (À149& d2 H, +7& d18 O, 3.8 wt.% H2O and d2 H in native and reacted ash that can be used in defining the protocols for natural sample

  2. Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Reinoud

    Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands region located History Several eruptions have taken place in the Canary Islands in the last 500 years, all of them, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION PAGES 61,65 Monitoring the Reawakening of Canary Islands'Teide Volcano

  3. Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed in Patagonia, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    and analyzed for major ions, trace metals, and rare earth elements (REE). The concentrations of REE in the RioHydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed to oxidation of sulfide minerals. D 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Rare earth elements

  4. The sulfur content of volcanic gases on Mars Fabrice Gaillard, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The sulfur content of volcanic gases on Mars Fabrice Gaillard, a and Bruno Scaillet1, a a CNRS sulfur contents of the martian regolith and lack of detection of extensive carbonate deposits suggest that the latest geological events that shaped the landscapes of Mars were dominated by acidic waters possibly

  5. SIMULATION NUMERIQUE DU TSUNAMI GENERE PAR UN EBOULEMENT DU FLANC DU VOLCAN CUMBRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    SIMULATION NUMERIQUE DU TSUNAMI GENERE PAR UN EBOULEMENT DU FLANC DU VOLCAN CUMBRE VIEJA (LA PALMA, CANARIES), PAR UNE APPROCHE COUPLEE NAVIER-STOKES / BOUSSINESQ NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE TSUNAMI Vieja (CVV) sur l'^ile de La Palma (Iles Canaries) g´en´ererait un m´ega- tsunami qui pourrait

  6. Field Guide Field Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    and demand in the U.S., with only part of the demand being met by U.S. production. Canola oil has achieved1 1 June 2011 A-1280 Canola Production Field Guide Canola Production Field Guide 2 2 Edited.....................................101 · Contributors to Canola Production Field Guide........102 · Resource Contact Information

  7. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

  8. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco Combined Heat and Power Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosfjord, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    Under collaboration between DOE and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. This packaged CHP system integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller, directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 RT of chilled water at a 59F ambient temperature.

  9. Modeling the Gila-San Francisco Basin using system dynamics in support of the 2004 Arizona Water Settlement Act.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Peplinski, William J.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2012-04-01

    Water resource management requires collaborative solutions that cross institutional and political boundaries. This work describes the development and use of a computer-based tool for assessing the impact of additional water allocation from the Gila River and the San Francisco River prescribed in the 2004 Arizona Water Settlements Act. Between 2005 and 2010, Sandia National Laboratories engaged concerned citizens, local water stakeholders, and key federal and state agencies to collaboratively create the Gila-San Francisco Decision Support Tool. Based on principles of system dynamics, the tool is founded on a hydrologic balance of surface water, groundwater, and their associated coupling between water resources and demands. The tool is fitted with a user interface to facilitate sensitivity studies of various water supply and demand scenarios. The model also projects the consumptive use of water in the region as well as the potential CUFA (Consumptive Use and Forbearance Agreement which stipulates when and where Arizona Water Settlements Act diversions can be made) diversion over a 26-year horizon. Scenarios are selected to enhance our understanding of the potential human impacts on the rivers ecological health in New Mexico; in particular, different case studies thematic to water conservation, water rights, and minimum flow are tested using the model. The impact on potential CUFA diversions, agricultural consumptive use, and surface water availability are assessed relative to the changes imposed in the scenarios. While it has been difficult to gage the acceptance level from the stakeholders, the technical information that the model provides are valuable for facilitating dialogues in the context of the new settlement.

  10. Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies, Department of Geoscience annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.I. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes our activities during the period October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990. Our goal was to develop an understanding of late-Miocene and Pliocene volcanism in the Great Basin by studying Pliocene volcanoes in the vicinity of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Field studies during this period concentrated on the Quaternary volcanoes in Crater Flat, Yucca Mountain, Fortification Hill, at Buckboard Mesa and Sleeping Butte, and in the Reveille Range. Also, a study was initiated on structurally disrupted basaltic rocks in the northern White Hills of Mohave County, Arizona. As well as progress reports of our work in Crater Flat, Fortification Hill and the Reveille Range, this paper also includes a summary of model that relates changing styles of Tertiary extension to changing magmatic compositions, and a summary of work being done in the White Hills, Arizona. In the Appendix, we include copies of published papers not previously incorporated in our monthly reports.

  11. Improved identification of volcanic features using Landsat 7 ETM+ Luke P. Flynn*, Andrew J.L. Harris, Robert Wright

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    to be useful for tracking the progress of eruptions in entire volcanic regions (e.g., Dean et al., 1998; Harris.L. Harris, Robert Wright HIGP/SOEST, University of Hawaii, 2525 Correa Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA

  12. An evaluation of the effect of volcanic eruption on the solar radiation at Australian and Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yatko, B.R.; Garrison, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    Peak (most probable) and average values of {angstrom}`s turbidity coefficient {beta} and peak (most probable) and average values of the diffuse index k{sub d} are obtained from the solar radiation data from 21 stations in Australia and 5 stations in Canada. These data exhibit clear increases in their values when the volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere increase following volcanic eruptions of sufficient magnitude. The effect of the eruptions of Fuego (1974), El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) are seen most clearly in the data. The effect of lesser eruptions is also seen. The store of volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere shifts with the season so that scattering by volcanic aerosols in the spring half of the year is stronger than in the fall.

  13. Triboelectric charging of volcanic ash from the 2011 Gr\\'{i}msv\\"{o}tn eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houghton, Isobel M P; Nicoll, Keri A

    2013-01-01

    Triboelectric charging of different size fractions of a sample of volcanic ash is studied experimentally. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the normalised span of the particle size distribution plays an important role in the magnitude of charging generated. Previous measurements of the volcanic plumes have shown that ash particles are electrically charged up to hundreds of km away from the vent, which indicates the the ash particles continue to be charged in the plume through the mechanism of triboelectrification [Harrison et al., Env. Res. Lett. 5 024004 (2010), Hatakeyama J. Met. Soc. Japan 27 372 (1949)]. The influence of the normalised span on plume charging suggests that all ash plumes are likely to be charged, with implications for remote sensing and plume lifetime.

  14. Genesis of large siliceous stromatolites at Frying Pan Lake, Waimangu geothermal field, North Island, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    Genesis of large siliceous stromatolites at Frying Pan Lake, Waimangu geothermal field, North by various microbes (Riding, 1991), are common in hot-spring systems in the geo- thermal areas of Yellowstone in the geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) on the North Island of New Zealand have been termed

  15. Environmental Field Surveys, EMF Rapid Program, Engineering Project No.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enertech Consultants

    1996-04-01

    The EMF Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) includes several engineering research in the area of exposure assessment and source characterization. RAPID engineering project No. 3: ''Environmental Field Surveys'' was performed to obtain information on the levels and characteristics of different environments, for which only limited data were available, especially in comparison to magnetic field data for the residential environment and for electric utility facilities, such as power lines and substations. This project was also to provide information on the contribution of various field sources in the surveyed environments. Magnetic field surveys were performed at four sites for each of five environments: schools, hospitals, office buildings, machine shops, and grocery stores. Of the twenty sites surveyed, 11 were located in the San Francisco Bay Area and 9 in Massachusetts. The surveys used a protocol based on magnetic field measurements and observation of activity patterns, designed to provide estimates of magnetic field exposure by type of people and by type of sources. The magnetic field surveys conducted by this project produced a large amount of data which will form a part of the EMF measurement database Field and exposure data were obtained separately for ''area exposure'' and ''at exposure points''. An exposure point is a location where persons engage in fixed, site specific activities near a local source that creates a significant increase in the area field. The area field is produced by ''area sources'', whose location and field distribution is in general not related to the location of the people in the area.

  16. San Francisco Bay Estuary and its Delta. It is the complex system of waterways at the head of the estuary, formed by the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers that drain California's Central Valley (~40% of the state's watershed). [GIS figur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Bay Estuary and its Delta. It is the complex system of waterways at the head of the estuary, formed by the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers that drain California's Central by the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board.] #12;Environmental Research 105 (2007) 1

  17. Hot Spring Monitoring at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California 1983-1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, Michael L.

    1986-01-21

    Data collected on several occasions between 1983 and 1985 as part of a hydrologic monitoring program by the U.S. Geological Survey permit preliminary estimation of the natural variability in the discharge characteristics of hydrothermal features in Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Lassen KGRA in northern California. The total rate of discharge of high-chloride hot springs along Mill Creek and Canyon Creek in the Lassen KGRA has averaged 20.9 {+-} 1.7 L/s, based on seven measurements of the flux of chloride in these streams. Measured chloride flux does not appear to increase with streamflow during the spring-summer snowmelt period, as observed at Yellowstone and Long Valley Caldera. The corresponding fluxes of arsenic in Mill Creek and Canyon Creek decrease within distances of about 2 km downstream from the hot springs by approximately 30%, most likely due to chemical absorption on streambed sediments. Within Lassen Volcanic National Park, measurements of sulfate flux in streams draining steam-heated thermal features at Sulphur Works and Bumpass Hell have averaged 7.5 {+-} 1.0 and 4.0 {+-} 1.5 g/s, respectively. Calculated rates of steam upflow containing, dissolved H{sub 2}S to supply these sulfate fluxes are 1.8 kg/s at Sulphur Works and 1.0 kg/s at Bumpass Hell.

  18. REMOVAL PROCESSES OF VOLCANIC ASH PARTICLES FROM THE ATMOSPHERE Gregg J.S. Bluth and William I. Rose, Michigan Technological University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluth, Gregg

    REMOVAL PROCESSES OF VOLCANIC ASH PARTICLES FROM THE ATMOSPHERE Gregg J.S. Bluth and William I information for mapping ash hazards, as well as the means to study and predict the fates of volcanic clouds provide information on how the size, size distribution, and total mass of fine ash particles evolve

  19. Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro-Mu~noz , Isneri Talavera, Robert P.W. Duin, Mauricio Orozco-Alzate and John Makario Londo~no-Bonilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro in a natural way. As an example, the classification of seismic volcanic events is used. It is shown features. Keywords-volcanic seismic data, three-way representation, dissimilarity representation

  20. LRO observations of morphology and surface roughness of volcanic cones and lobate lava flows in the Marius Hills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glotch, Timothy D.

    of the cones are found in local groupings or alignments. The wide range of volcanic features, from broad low and Head, 1977; Weitz and Head, 1999]. As such, the Marius Hills represent a significant episode of lunar.5 Ga) [McCauley, 1967a; Whitford-Stark and Head, 1977; Heather and Dunkin, 2002; Heather et al., 2003

  1. GEOLOGY | August 2014 | www.gsapubs.org 1 Explosive to effusive transition during the largest volcanic eruption of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonnermann, Helge

    is consistent with bubble collapse by permeable outgassing. Quantitative analysis indi- cates that outgassing persistent interconnected networks. This process, herein referred to as permeable outgassing, may reduce as to what extent permeable outgassing modulates volcanic erup- tions, in particular the transition between

  2. Coastal ecosystem responses to late stage Deccan Trap volcanism: the post KT boundary (Danian) palynofacies of Mumbai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, Robert A

    ) palynofacies of Mumbai (Bombay), west India J.A. Crippsa,*, M. Widdowsonb , R.A. Spicerb , D.W. Jolleyc and their palaeontological contents. The impact of late stage Deccan volcanism upon biota inhabiting Mumbai (Bombay) Island of this flood basalt episode. Mumbai Island Formation intertrappean faunal and floral communities

  3. A 100-year record of North Pacific volcanism in an ice core from Eclipse Icefield, Yukon Territory, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    for the development of longer ice core based records of paleovolcanism in the North Pacific rim. INDEX TERMS: 0305A 100-year record of North Pacific volcanism in an ice core from Eclipse Icefield, Yukon Territory Pacific over the last century has been developed using a glaciochemical record from Eclipse Icefield

  4. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash C. Textor a,*, H.F. Graf a,1 , M. Herzog a,2 , J.M. Oberhuber b,3 Available online 15 December 2005 Abstract The aggregation of volcanic ash particles within the eruption of ash in the atmosphere and the radiative properties of the umbrella cloud. However, the information

  5. Volcanic Ash Fall--A "Hard Rain" of Abrasive Particles U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V Volcanic Ash Fall--A "Hard Rain" of Abrasive Particles U.S. Department of the Interior U olcanic ash consists of tiny jagged particles of rock and natural glass blasted into the air by a volcano. Ash can threaten the health of people and live- stock, pose a hazard to flying jet aircraft, damage

  6. Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic reflection data in their flexural moat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Lithospheric response to volcanic loading by the Canary Islands: constraints from seismic the seismic stratigraphy of the flexural moat that flanks the Canary Islands. The moat stratigraphy has been the volcanoes that make up the Canary Islands progressively load the underlying lithosphere from east to west

  7. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  8. Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program.

  9. EA-1924: Consolidation and Relocation of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) OffSite Research Programs to a New Off-Site Location that also Allows for Future Growth, San Francisco East Bay Area, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to consolidate and relocate LBNL research programs that are currently in leased off-site buildings at various locations around the San Francisco East Bay Area in California, to a new single location that also provides room for future growth of LBNL research programs.

  10. SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS AND YOUNG SCIENTISTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM ENTITLED LANHTANIDES AND ACTINIDES: A CHEMISTS'S PERSPECTIVE MARCH 21-25, 2010 HELD IN SAN FRANCISCO, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CATHY S. CUTLER

    2011-02-01

    DOE Award DE-SC0003653 of $6,000.00 was used to support early career scientist to attend the Lanthanide and Actinide Symposium at the ACS meeting in March in San Francisco 2010. The award was for $6,000.00 and was used to support 12 early career scientists at $500.00/each.

  11. Field Trip is sponsored by San Francisco State University and U.C. Berkley MINORITY EDUCATION THROUGH TRAVELING AND LEARNING IN THE SCIENCES (METALS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    in Earth Science. The itinerary will include: A day in Yellowstone National Park exploring the geothermal

  12. San Francisco Operations Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Monthly/Effluent;AugustMarch

  13. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  14. ASHEE: a compressible, equilibrium-Eulerian model for volcanic ash plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerminara, Matteo; Berselli, Luigi Carlo

    2015-01-01

    A new fluid-dynamic model is developed to numerically simulate the non-equilibrium dynamics of polydisperse gas-particle mixtures forming volcanic plumes. Starting from the three-dimensional N-phase Eulerian transport equations for a mixture of gases and solid particles, we adopt an asymptotic expansion strategy to derive a compressible version of the first-order non-equilibrium model, valid for low concentration regimes and small particles Stokes $St<0.2$. When $St < 0.001$ the model reduces to the dusty-gas one. The new model is significantly faster than the Eulerian model while retaining the capability to describe gas-particle non-equilibrium. Direct numerical simulation accurately reproduce the dynamics of isotropic turbulence in subsonic regime. For gas-particle mixtures, it describes the main features of density fluctuations and the preferential concentration of particles by turbulence, verifying the model reliability and suitability for the simulation of high-Reynolds number and high-temperature ...

  15. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    , Princeton University, and Energy Alternatives AFRICA of Nairobi, Kenya conducted a study of the field performance of single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules in Kenya in 1999. The large in a paper titled "Field Performance Measurements of Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Modules in Kenya

  16. Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

    2008-11-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are still a significant hazard. Validation is the key to assessing the accuracy of any future predictions. The study highlights the use of multiple and complementary observations used in detecting the trajectory ash cloud, both at the surface and aloft within the atmosphere.

  17. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  18. Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gradient of < 50Ckm, grading into (ii) a geothermal field type of alteration in mining districts (laumontite subfacies with local transition to wairakite subfacies at...

  19. High field strength following the Kauai R-N geomagnetic reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, H.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The paleomagnetism of superposed lava flows on Kauai, Hawaii shows that the ancient geomagnetic field was unusually strong following a reverse-to-normal polarity transition that occurred about 4 million years ago. Paleointensities were determined by a standard experimental procedure (Thelliers' method) that recreates the process of remanence acquisition in volcanic rocks. This experiment makes it possible to infer the strength of the geomagnetic field present with each lava flow formed, thus producing an accurate picture of the ancient field's behavior after the reversal. Samples from 10 volcanic units yielded virtual dipole moments (VDMs) ranging from 7.4 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] to 14.5 [times] 10[sup 22] Am[sup 2] with an average of 11.1[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. This value is high in comparisons to the average VDM for the past 5 m.y., approximately 8.7[times]10[sup 22] Am[sup 2]. In contrast to the highly variable dipole moment observed following a 15 m.y. old reversal at Steen s Mountain, Oregon, the field following the Kauai transition was relatively steady. Surprisingly, the maximum dipole moments following the two reversals were nearly equal. This similarity hints that high field strength may be a systematic feature of the geodynamo immediately following a polarity reversal.

  20. Gigantic Ordovician volcanic ash fall in North America and Europe: Biological, tectonomagmatic, and event-stratigraphic significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Bergstroem, S.M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States)); Kolata, D.R. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Biostratigraphical, geochemical, isotopic, and paleogeographic data suggest that the Millbrig K-bentonite, one of the thickest and most widespread Ordovician volcanic ash beds in eastern North America, is the same as the so-called 'Big Bentonite' in Baltoscandia. This is the first time that the same K-bentonite has been identified in both North America and Europe, and it serves as a unique event-stratigraphic marker over a large portion of the Northern Hemisphere. This eruption produced at least 340 km[sup 3] of dense-rock-equivalent ash that was deposited in a layer up to 1-2 m thick over several million square kilometers. As much as 800 km[sup 3] of additional ash may have fallen into the Iapetus Ocean, for a total of 1,140 km[sup 3]. Trace element geochemistry shows that the ash was derived from a felsic calc-alkalic magmatic source characteristic of volcanism in a continental crust-based, destructive plate-margin setting. This is one of the largest, if not the largest, ash falls recorded in Earth's Phanerozoic stratigraphic record, but its recognizable effect on faunas and floras was minimal, and it did not result in a global extinction event. The Millbrig-Big Bentonite bed provides accurate time control for sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and paleogeographic reconstructions across plates positioned in tropical (Laurentia) and temperate (Baltica) latitudes during Middle Ordovician time.

  1. Student Worksheet Lanai Lookout Field Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Julia Eve

    the down-wind direction. Tuff is a volcanic rock made up of a mixture of volcanic rock and mineral tuff. Tuff forms when some combination of fragmented magma (ash), conduit rock, and mineral fragments or powerful eruptions produce "sheet-like" fall deposits. In the more intense Rifle Range event, material

  2. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmittedEcologist for a Day Field Guide Program

  3. Far-field aftershocks of the 1906 earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steeples, Don W.; Steeples, Dan D.

    1996-08-01

    During the 24 hr following the great San Francisco, California, earthquake of 18 April 1906, separate seismic events were felt at Paisley, Oregon; Phoenix, Arizona; Los Angeles, California; and Brawley, California (MMIX). Using probability theory...

  4. First evidence of a distal early Holocene ash layer in Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea sediments derived from the Anatolian volcanic province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    First evidence of a distal early Holocene ash layer in Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea sediments-4445, USA c Hacettepe University, Department of Geological Engineering, 06532 Beytepe-Ankara, Turkey d volcanic eruptions and distributed by tropospheric and stratospheric wind regimes and water currents can

  5. OCEAN VOLCANO CAUGHT ON FILM Footage of a volcanic eruption nearly 1,200 metres under the sea was unveiled on 17 December at a meeting of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    OCEAN VOLCANO CAUGHT ON FILM Footage of a volcanic eruption nearly 1,200 metres under the sea. The high-definition film of the West Mata volcano in the western Pacific is one of the first times to raise up to US$300 million. Founded in 2005, Solyndra makes thin- film cylindrical modules for use

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 44, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2006 3235 Volcanic Ash Cloud Retrieval by Ground-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    Ash Cloud Retrieval by Ground-Based Microwave Weather Radar Frank Silvio Marzano, Senior Member, IEEE-based microwave weather radar systems for volcanic ash cloud detection and quantitative retrieval is evaluated. The relationship between radar reflectivity factor, ash concentration, and fall rate is statistically derived

  7. Effects of Large Volcanic Eruptions on Global Summer Climate and East Asian Monsoon Changes during the Last Millennium: Analysis of MPI-ESM Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    the scattering of incoming solar radiation by aerosol particles produces an increase of the fraction of solar for Meteorology. The model was driven by up-to-date reconstructions of external forcing, including natural forcing (solar and volcanic) and anthropogenic forcing (land-cover change and greenhouse gases). Cooling

  8. AlongStrike Seismic Structure of the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland William Menke (1,2), Michael West (1,2), Brynds Brandsdttir (3) and David Sparks (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    1 Along­Strike Seismic Structure of the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland William Menke (1 Insitute, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland (Revised for Geophysical Journal International) SUMMARY Seismic data from the B96 array in northern Iceland are used to constrain the compressional and shear

  9. Sedimentation in theTonga forearc is dominated by the redeposition of volcaniclastic sediment from the arc volcanic front by mass flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    ABSTRACT Sedimentation in theTonga forearc is dominated by the redeposition of volcaniclastic sediment from the arc volcanic front by mass flows and turbidity currents onto the adjacent Tonga Platform, the shallow- est, flattest part of the forearc region.The greatest sediment thicknesses accumulate in debris

  10. Proximity and Provenance: A Lesson from the Sterling Cache, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Richard E.; Pavesic, Max G.

    2005-01-01

    Volcanic Field, Eastern Snake River Plain, Eastern Idaho andHeise Volcanic Field, Snake River Plain, Idaho, Western USA.

  11. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the HorseshoeLake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-11-20

    We investigate spatio-temporal relationships between soilCO2 flux (FCO2), meteorological variables, and topography over a ten-dayperiod (09/12/2006 to 09/21/2006) at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill,Mammoth Mountain, CA. Total CO2 discharge varied from 16 to 52 t d-1,suggesting a decline in CO2 emissions over decadal timescales. Weobserved systematic changes in FCO2 in space and time in association witha weather front with relatively high wind speeds from the west and lowatmospheric pressures. The largest FCO2 changes were observed inrelatively high elevation areas. The variations in FCO2 may be due todynamic coupling of wind-driven airflow through the subsurface and flowof source CO2 at depth. Our results highlight the influence of weatherfronts on volcanic gas flow in the near-surface environment and how thisinfluence can vary spatially within a study area.

  12. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at Intercontinental Hotel in San Francisco, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Curry, Ku'Uipo J.

    2010-11-01

    This document is a report of observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The program supports demonstrations of high-performance solid-state lighting (SSL) products in order to develop empirical data and experience with in-the-field applications of this advanced lighting technology. The DOE GATEWAY Demonstration Program focuses on providing a source of independent, third-party data for use in decision-making by lighting users and professionals; this data should be considered in combination with other information relevant to the particular site and application under examination. Each GATEWAY Demonstration compares SSL products against the incumbent technologies used in that location. Depending on available information and circumstances, the SSL product may also be compared to alternate lighting technologies. Though products demonstrated in the GATEWAY program have been prescreened and tested to verify their actual performance, DOE does not endorse any commercial product or in any way guarantee that users will achieve the same results through use of these products.

  13. 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Post-Valles Caldera Rhyolites, Jemez Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie,InformationSpeciesRegister2008§ 261Field,

  14. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  15. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01

    basalts: Characterization of mantle source reservoirs. Inbasalts: characterization of mantle source reservoirs.

  16. Accessory mineral U–Th–Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Justin I.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Renne, Paul R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Reid, Mary R.

    2009-01-01

    Axel K. Schmitt Æ Charles R. Bacon Æ Mary R. Reid Received:Los Angeles, CA, USA C. R. Bacon United States Geologicalbehavior evolves (e.g. , Bacon et al. 1981). In this paper

  17. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01

    in Icelandic geothermal systems: I. 3 He, gas chemistry, andisotopes in Icelandic geothermal systems: II. Helium–heatfrom Icelandic geothermal systems: geological constraints

  18. Accessory mineral U–Th–Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Justin I.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Renne, Paul R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Reid, Mary R.

    2009-01-01

    active magma and geothermal systems. Heat-?ow measurements (during the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment wererhyolite ?eld and active geothermal system are located in a

  19. Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

    2012-01-01

    an intrinsic part of the Iceland plume? Geochem. Geophys.whole mantle plume below Iceland, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. ,boundary in southwestern Iceland. J. Geophys. Res. 98 (B4),

  20. Accessory mineral U–Th–Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Justin I.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Renne, Paul R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Reid, Mary R.

    2009-01-01

    during the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment werein the Coso enhanced geothermal systems experiment. Geotherm

  1. Accessory mineral U–Th–Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Justin I.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Renne, Paul R.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Reid, Mary R.

    2009-01-01

    Contrib Mineral Petrol (2009) 158:421–446 DOIORIGINAL PAPER Accessory mineral U–Th–Pb ages and 40 Ar/ 39Flagstaff, AZ, USA Contrib Mineral Petrol (2009) 158:421–446

  2. Geochemistry of Mafic Magmas in the Hurricane Volcanic Field, Utah: Implications for Small? and Large?Scale Chemical Variability of the Lithospheric Mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Eugene I.; Sá nchez, Alexander; Walker, J. Douglas; Wang, Kefa

    1999-07-01

    ?style eruptions produced thin (10 m) a'a lava flows and 10 cinder and scoria cones that group geographically into five clusters. The five clusters can be further divided into four isotopic magma types that vary in 87Sr/86Sr from 0.7035 to 0.7049, ?Nd from 1...

  3. Heller Ehrman White & McAuliffe LLP 701 Fifth Avenue, Suite 6100 Seattle, WA 98104-7098 www.hewm.com Seattle Portland Anchorage San Francisco Silicon Valley Los Angeles San Diego New York Washington D.C. Montgomery Co., MD Madison, WI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .hewm.com Seattle Portland Anchorage San Francisco Silicon Valley Los Angeles San Diego New York Washington D's Purchases of Power from New Power Projects that are Being Developed by GNA's Affiliates to Replace a Portion of power from new generating resources that GNA affiliates are developing to help serve the portion of GNA

  4. Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz and M. A l t a f Mubaraki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX C Sulfur Emissions from Volcanic A c t i v i t y i n 1985 and 1990 Carmen M. Benkovitz). Global estimates o f anthropogenic emissions o f sulfur f o r 1985 are approximately 65 Tg S y-l (Benkovi Anthropogenic Sulfur Emissions f o r 1985 and 1990 i n t h i s report). Sulfur from biogenic sources i s emitted

  5. Briefing package for the Yucca Flat pre-emptive review, including overview, UZ model, SZ volcanics model and summary and conclusions sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keating, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-02

    Much progress has been made in the last several years in modeling radionuclide transport from tests conducted both in the unsaturated zone and saturated volcanic rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada. The presentations to the DOE NNSA pre-emptive review panel contained herein document the progress to date, and discuss preliminary conclusions regarding the present and future extents of contamination resulting from past nuclear tests. The presentations also discuss possible strategies for addressing uncertainty in the model results.

  6. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Bailey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  7. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  8. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    California, consuming an average of 5 billion kWhyr, more than 25 percent of the total electricity consumption for the entire state of New Mexico. 6 It's not just surface water...

  9. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 3-1. Chemical processes upon resuspension caused by dredging ................................................................................21 Figure 3-4. Processes controlling the bioavailability of organic contaminants upon resuspension

  10. SAN FRANCISCO ESTUARY INSTITUTE CONTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at seven RMP sites samples over seven years (66 samples) and from one BPTCP sample collected in San Leandro Phase 2 currently underway in the Delta. Others are included in the RMP Exposure and Effects Work Group

  11. University of California San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Gail

    the challenges of global health #12;Large cover image: The corona virus that causes SARS, first identified as infectious--among them, heart disease, cancer, and asthma. This theory can now be more fully explored, thanks that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), this tool--called the microarray--has dramatically

  12. Francisco Sermeno EE 290/Kachroo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    ). Bill of Materials: - 1 Arduino Duemilanove micro controller - 1 AC/DC adapter for the Arduino (or any ports to ground when connecting all the parts to the Arduino. Next, connect the Ground port on the sensor to the 5V port on the Arduino with a wire. Do this for the 5V port on the sensor to Ground port

  13. Energy San Francisco Operations Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T:..) ".. _,; ,' . ' ,

  14. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping into Funding forFY'17 Projects forgray vanGuidelines

  15. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  16. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F

    2010-11-01

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  17. The Bulalo geothermal field, Philippines: Reservoir characteristics and response to production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemente, W.C.; Villadolid-Abrigo, F.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Bulalo geothermal field has been operating since 1979, and currently has 330 MWe of installed capacity. The field is associated with a 0.5 Ma dacite dome on the southeastern flank of the Late Pliocene to Quaternary Mt. Makiling stratovolcano. The reservoir occurs within pre-Makiling andesite flows and pyroclastic rocks capped by the volcanic products of Mt. Makiling. Initially, the reservoir was liquid-dominated with a two-phase zone overlying the neutral-pH liquid. Exploitation has resulted in an enlargement of the two-phase zone, return to the reservoir of separated waste liquid that has been injected, scaling in the wellbores and rock formation, and influx of cooler groundwaters. Return of injected waters to the reservoir and scaling have been the major reservoir management concerns. These have been mitigated effectively by relocating injection wells farther away from the production area and by dissolving scale from wells with an acid treatment.

  18. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  19. Conditions for oceans on Earth-like planets orbiting within the habitable zone: importance of volcanic CO{sub 2} degassing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadoya, S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Kiban Bldg. 408, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Tajika, E., E-mail: kadoya@astrobio.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: tajika@astrobio.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Kiban Bldg. 409, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Earth-like planets in the habitable zone (HZ) have been considered to have warm climates and liquid water on their surfaces if the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working as on Earth. However, it is known that even the present Earth may be globally ice-covered when the rate of CO{sub 2} degassing via volcanism becomes low. Here we discuss the climates of Earth-like planets in which the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working, with focusing particularly on insolation and the CO{sub 2} degassing rate. The climate of Earth-like planets within the HZ can be classified into three climate modes (hot, warm, and snowball climate modes). We found that the conditions for the existence of liquid water should be largely restricted even when the planet is orbiting within the HZ and the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is working. We show that these conditions should depend strongly on the rate of CO{sub 2} degassing via volcanism. It is, therefore, suggested that thermal evolution of the planetary interiors will be a controlling factor for Earth-like planets to have liquid water on their surface.

  20. Strong Field, Noncommutative QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Ilderton; Joakim Lundin; Mattias Marklund

    2010-05-26

    We review the effects of strong background fields in noncommutative QED. Beginning with the noncommutative Maxwell and Dirac equations, we describe how combined noncommutative and strong field effects modify the propagation of fermions and photons. We extend these studies beyond the case of constant backgrounds by giving a new and revealing interpretation of the photon dispersion relation. Considering scattering in background fields, we then show that the noncommutative photon is primarily responsible for generating deviations from strong field QED results. Finally, we propose a new method for constructing gauge invariant variables in noncommutative QED, and use it to analyse the physics of our null background fields.

  1. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  2. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  3. The Ness field: An integrated field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasek, R.M.; Kean, K.R.; Richards, M.L. (Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (England))

    1990-05-01

    The Ness oil field, located in UK Block 9/13, was discovered in May 1986 by well 9/13b-28A. The field comprises a high-quality Middle Jurassic reservoir with an average 148-ft oil column trapped in a west-dipping, fault-bounded closure. The oil is substantially undersaturated. The field was brought on production as a subsea satellite development tied back to the Beryl B Platform. Oil was first delivered on August 11, 1987, just over a year from discovery. Initial producing rates from the 9/13B-28A well averaged about 10,000 BOPD. Since this well, another producer and water injector have been completed. Based on the frequent and accurate pressure data available from permanent downhole gauges installed in all three wells of the Ness field, material balance was used to calculate initial oil in place. These calculations gave an oil in place value consistent with recent calculations of 87 {times} 166 STB after less than 3% of the oil-in-place had been produced, compared with 55 {times} 106 STB initially mapped. Pressure monitoring enabled reservoir drive mechanisms to be tracked and a high offtake rate to be maintained by balancing water injection with withdrawals. A reevaluation of the mapped structure was prompted by a revision of the geological model following the 9/13b-38/38Z appraisal wells, together with the discrepancy between the oil in place from mapping and material balance. The seismic data was reinterpreted using the additional well control, and the field remapped. This resulted in a revised volume of 129 {times} 106 STB. Additional insight into the differentiation between oil and water volumes in this low compressibility system and a resolution of the differences between material balance and volumetrics were obtained through a black-oil simulation.

  4. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  5. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  6. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  7. Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic) Opposite magnetic poles attract like magnetic poles repel #12;Like the electric field lines

  8. Microfabricated Field Calibration Assembly

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-03-19

    Reliable determination of the presence and/or quantity of a particular analyte in the field can be greatly enhanced if the analytical instrument is equipped with a time-of-use calibration standard. While proper calibration is necessary for reliability and accuracy, it can be challenging and cumbersome to provide such calibration in the field using conventional methods found in analytical laboratories....

  9. Scalar Field Inhomogeneous Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Feinstein; J. Ibáñez; P. Labraga

    1995-11-24

    Some exact solutions for the Einstein field equations corresponding to inhomogeneous $G_2$ cosmologies with an exponential-potential scalar field which generalize solutions obtained previously are considered. Several particular cases are studied and the properties related to generalized inflation and asymptotic behaviour of the models are discussed.

  10. Emergent Gauge Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter G. O. Freund

    2010-08-24

    Erik Verlinde's proposal of the emergence of the gravitational force as an entropic force is extended to abelian and non-abelian gauge fields and to matter fields. This suggests a picture with no fundamental forces or forms of matter whatsoever.

  11. Topological quantum field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Schwarz

    2000-11-29

    Following my plenary lecture on ICMP2000 I review my results concerning two closely related topics: topological quantum field theories and the problem of quantization of gauge theories. I start with old results (first examples of topological quantum field theories were constructed in my papers in late seventies) and I come to some new results, that were not published yet.

  12. Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-04-30

    Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

  13. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  14. Cosmology of Bifundamental Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2008-12-17

    If a field theory contains gauged, non-Abelian, bi-fundamental fields i.e. fields that are charged under two separate non-Abelian gauge groups, the transition from a deconfined phase to a hadronic phase may be frustrated. Similar frustration may occur in non-Abelian gauge models containing matter only in higher dimensional representations e.g. models with pure glue, or if ordinary quarks are confined by two flux tubes, as implied in the triangular configuration of baryons within QCD. In a cosmological setting, such models can lead to the formation of a web of confining electric flux tubes that can potentially have observational signatures.

  15. dfield8 Direction Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-05

    dfield8 Direction Fields. • The routine dfield8 is already loaded on all ITaP machines as standard software. To access MAtlAB from any ITaP machine: Start

  16. Gravitational Field Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Barnett

    2014-12-05

    We present a tensorial relative of the familiar affine connection and argue that it should be regarded as the gravitational field tensor. Remarkably, the Lagrangian density expressed in terms of this tensor has a simple form, which depends only on the metric and its first derivatives and, moreover, is a true scalar quantity. The geodesic equation, moreover, shows that our tensor plays a role that is strongly reminiscent of the gravitational field in Newtonian mechanics and this, together with other evidence, which we present, leads us to identify it as the gravitational field tensor. We calculate the gravitational field tensor for the Schwarzschild metric. We suggest some of the advantages to be gained from applying our tensor to the study of gravitational waves.

  17. Gauge Fields and Unparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2008-02-03

    We show that a rigorous path integral method of introducing gauge fields in the UnParticle lagrangian leads to somewhat different and more complicated vertexes than those currently used.

  18. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  19. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  20. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  1. Quantum field tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Steffens; C. A. Riofrío; R. Hübener; J. Eisert

    2014-11-06

    We introduce the concept of quantum field tomography, the efficient and reliable reconstruction of unknown quantum fields based on data of correlation functions. At the basis of the analysis is the concept of continuous matrix product states, a complete set of variational states grasping states in quantum field theory. We innovate a practical method, making use of and developing tools in estimation theory used in the context of compressed sensing such as Prony methods and matrix pencils, allowing us to faithfully reconstruct quantum field states based on low-order correlation functions. In the absence of a phase reference, we highlight how specific higher order correlation functions can still be predicted. We exemplify the functioning of the approach by reconstructing randomised continuous matrix product states from their correlation data and study the robustness of the reconstruction for different noise models. We also apply the method to data generated by simulations based on continuous matrix product states and using the time-dependent variational principle. The presented approach is expected to open up a new window into experimentally studying continuous quantum systems, such as encountered in experiments with ultra-cold atoms on top of atom chips. By virtue of the analogy with the input-output formalism in quantum optics, it also allows for studying open quantum systems.

  2. Sports Field Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L.

    1995-07-31

    by the ryegrasses adds to the enjoyment of the players and fans. To prepare for overseeding, thin the bermudagrass turf with a flail mower or dethatching mower. Sweep or vacuum the field after mowing to remove grass clip- pings and thatch. Where common bermudagrass...

  3. Near-field/altered-zone models report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, E. L., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is studying Yucca Mountain as the possible site for the first underground repository for permanent disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors as well as for other types high-level nuclear waste. Emplacement of high-level radioactive waste, especially commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), in Yucca Mountain will release a large amount of heat into the rock above and below the repository. The heating rate will decrease with time, creating a thermal pulse. Over a period of several thousand years, the rock temperature will rise initially, then drop when the production of decay heat falls below the rate at which heat escapes from the hot zone. Besides raising the rock temperature, much of this heat will vaporize water, which will then condense in cooler regions. The condensate is likely to form a gravity-driven heat pipe above the repository, creating the possibility that water may drain back onto the waste packages (WPs) or that it may ''shed'' through the pillars between emplacement drifts. The long-term importance of these effects has been investigated through the development, testing, and application of thermohydrologic (TH) models. Other effects, such coupled chemical and mechanical processes, may also influence the movement of water above, within, and below the emplacement drifts. A recent report on thermally driven coupled processes (Hardin and Chesnut, 1997) provides a qualitative assessment of the probable significance of these processes for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) and is the phenomenological framework for the present report. This report describes the conceptual and numerical models that have been developed to predict the thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and chemical responses to the cumulative heat production of the potential host rock at Yucca Mountain. As proposed, the repository horizon will be situated within the Topopah Spring tuff, in the adjacent middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal units. These units are made up of moderately to densely welded, devitrified, fractured tuff. The rock's chemical composition is comparable to that of typical granite, but has textural features and mineralogical characteristics of large-scale, silicic volcanism. Because the repository horizon will be approximately 300 m below the ground surface and 200 m above the water table, the repository will be partially saturated. The welded tuff matrix in the host units is highly impermeable, but water and gas flow readily through fractures. The degree of fracturing in these units is highly variable, and the hydrologic significance of fracturing is an important aspect of site investigation. This report describes the characterization and modeling of a region around the potential repository--the altered zone--a region in which the temperature will be increased significantly by waste-generated heat. Numerical simulation has shown that, depending on the boundary conditions, rock properties, and repository design features incorporated in the models, the altered zone (AZ) may extend from the water table to the ground surface. This report also describes models of the near field, the region comprising the repository emplacement drifts and the surrounding rock, which are critical to the performance of engineered components. Investigations of near-field and altered-zone (NF/AZ) processes support the design of underground repository facilities and engineered barriers and also provide constraint data for probabilistic calculations of waste-isolation performance (i.e., performance assessment). The approach to investigation, which is an iterative process involving hypothesis testing and experimentation, has relied on conceptualizing engineered barriers and on performance analysis. This report is a collection, emphasizing conceptual and numerical models, of the recent results contributed from studies of NF/AZ processes and of quantitative measures of NF/AZ performance. The selection and presentation of contributions are intended to show the iterative development of understand

  4. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  5. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  6. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  7. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  8. Nature of Electric and Magnetic Fields; How the Fields Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the proofs are given that the electric and magnetic fields are properly defined vectors on the four-dimensional (4D) spacetime (the 4-vectors in the usual notation) and not the usual 3D fields. Furthermore, the proofs are presented that under the mathematically correct Lorentz transformations (LT), e.g., the electric field vector transforms as any other vector transforms, i.e., again to the electric field vector; there is no mixing with the magnetic field vector B, as in the usual transformations (UT) of the 3D fields. The derivations of the UT from some well-known textbooks are discussed and objected.

  9. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  10. Nature of Electric and Magnetic Fields; How the Fields Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomislav Ivezic

    2015-08-10

    In this paper the proofs are given that the electric and magnetic fields are properly defined vectors on the four-dimensional (4D) spacetime (the 4-vectors in the usual notation) and not the usual 3D fields. Furthermore, the proofs are presented that under the mathematically correct Lorentz transformations (LT), e.g., the electric field vector transforms as any other vector transforms, i.e., again to the electric field vector; there is no mixing with the magnetic field vector B, as in the usual transformations (UT) of the 3D fields. The derivations of the UT from some well-known textbooks are discussed and objected.

  11. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2004-05-19

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/03 to 3/18/04. During this time, significant advancement in the 3-D gravity forward modeling code was made. Testing of the numerical accuracy of the code was undertaken using both a sheet of mass and a frustum of a cone for test cases. These were chosen because of our ability to do an analytic calculation of gravity for comparison. Tests were also done to determine the feasibility of using point mass approximations rather than cuboids for the forward modeling code. After determining that the point mass approximation is sufficient (and over six times faster computationally), several CO{sub 2} models were constructed and the time-lapse gravity signal was calculated from each. From these models, we expect to see a gravity change ranging from 3-16 {micro}Gal/year, depending on reservoir conditions and CO{sub 2} geometry. While more detailed modeling needs to be completed, these initial results show that we may be able to learn a great deal about the state of the CO{sub 2} from the time-lapse gravity results. Also, in December of 2003, we presented at the annual AGU meeting in San Francisco.

  12. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium MarketingYear Jan Feb Mar OIL & GAS FIELD

  13. Hybrid conformal field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bertolini; Ilarion V. Melnikov; M. Ronen Plesser

    2013-07-26

    We describe a class of (2,2) superconformal field theories obtained by fibering a Landau-Ginzburg orbifold CFT over a compact Kaehler base manifold. While such models are naturally obtained as phases in a gauged linear sigma model, our construction is independent of such an embedding. We discuss the general properties of such theories and present a technique to study the massless spectrum of the associated heterotic compactification. We test the validity of our method by applying it to hybrid phases of linear models and comparing spectra among the phases.

  14. ARM - AMIE Field Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See EnergyCurrent : 0.0 Waiting for0govField

  15. ARM - Field Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENAField Participants Campaign Details News Field Participants

  16. Field Office, Osk Ridge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I551 - g-- !Field

  17. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  18. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  19. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, Allen R. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  20. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  1. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  2. The quantum character of physical fields. Foundations of field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. I. Petrova

    2006-03-15

    The existing field theories are based on the properties of closed exterior forms, which are invariant ones and correspond to conservation laws for physical fields. Hence, to understand the foundations of field theories and their unity, one has to know how such closed exterior forms are obtained. In the present paper it is shown that closed exterior forms corresponding to field theories are obtained from the equations modelling conservation (balance)laws for material media. It has been developed the evolutionary method that enables one to describe the process of obtaining closed exterior forms. The process of obtaining closed exterior forms discloses the mechanism of evolutionary processes in material media and shows that material media generate, discretely, the physical structures, from which the physical fields are formed. This justifies the quantum character of field theories. On the other hand, this process demonstrates the connection between field theories and the equations for material media and points to the fact that the foundations of field theories must be conditioned by the properties of material media. It is shown that the external and internal symmetries of field theories are conditioned by the degrees of freedom of material media. The classification parameter of physical fields and interactions, that is, the parameter of the unified field theory, is connected with the number of noncommutative balance conservation laws for material media.

  3. Effective Field Theory out of Equilibrium: Brownian quantum fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Boyanovsky

    2015-06-19

    The emergence of an effective field theory out of equilibrium is studied in the case in which a light field --the system-- interacts with very heavy fields in a finite temperature bath. We obtain the reduced density matrix for the light field, its time evolution is determined by an effective action that includes the \\emph{influence action} from correlations of the heavy degrees of freedom. The non-equilibrium effective field theory yields a Langevin equation of motion for the light field in terms of dissipative and noise kernels that obey a generalized fluctuation dissipation relation. These are completely determined by the spectral density of the bath which is analyzed in detail for several cases. At $T=0$ we elucidate the effect of thresholds in the renormalization aspects and the asymptotic emergence of a local effective field theory with unitary time evolution. At $T\

  4. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  5. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  6. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  7. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Bradley K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  8. Rainwater Harvesting in San Francisco Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bintliff, Jacob M.

    2011-01-01

    of American cities to rely on a combined sewer system.In a combined sewer system, both stormwater and householdpipe network. 3 A Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) refers to

  9. san francisco | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:WizardYatescloud Home Dc'sSolar and Windlandpublicsan

  10. Rainwater Harvesting in San Francisco Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bintliff, Jacob M.

    2011-01-01

    and planned rain- water harvesting (RWH) systems areadopted the Rain- water Harvesting Guidelines in ear- lywater management education was matched with a de- SFUSD Rainwater Harvesting

  11. Clean Cities: San Francisco Clean Cities coalition

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    is managing a two-year state-funded alternative fuel planning grant and spearheading a strategic planning process to improve the Coalition's organizational sustainability and...

  12. Rainwater Harvesting in San Francisco Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bintliff, Jacob M.

    2011-01-01

    including sewage and greywater are transported, treated, andRWH applications and greywater and recycled water systems,

  13. ZERH Training Session: San Francisco, CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be recognized...

  14. Rainwater Harvesting in San Francisco Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bintliff, Jacob M.

    2011-01-01

    et al. Applied Rainwater Harvesting Education: An AustralianNatasha et al. Rainwater Harvesting for Non-Potable Use inPorter, Dana et al. Rainwater Harvesting. American Rainwater

  15. Introduccin a la Programacin Paralela Francisco Almeida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    programación paralela PARTE II: NOCIONES DE ALGORITMOS Y PROGRAMACI�N PARALELA 4. Análisis de algoritmos paralelos 5. Metodología de la programación paralela 6. Esquemas algorítmicos paralelos PARTE

  16. UNIVERSIDAD AUTONOMA DE ZACATECAS FRANCISCO GARCIA SALINAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIFERENT ES CONST RUCCIONES T EORICAS EN EL ESPACIO DE REPRESENT ACION (j, 0) (0, j) TESIS que presenta JESUS ALBERTO CAZARES MONTES para obtener el t´itulo de LICENCIADO EN FISICA asesor de tesis DR. VALERI la tesis. Sin embargo, estoy en gran deuda · Con mis padres y familiares, por todo el apoyo que me

  17. Like many professorsin San Francisco State University's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The course Arek Goetz pioneered at SF State solves these problems with the new wave of technology that has with its abstract concepts. Applying both energy and originality, Arek Goetz has created an online distance

  18. Rainwater Harvesting in San Francisco Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bintliff, Jacob M.

    2011-01-01

    Protection. Bay Area Stormwater Management Agencies Assewer system, both stormwater and household dischargesof only partially treated stormwater runoff into a natural

  19. University of San Francisco February 1, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    Merit Scholars #12; 4 Session 1 (1:45 ­ 2:50) 1. Room 101 Pedagogical Projects for Social Change-Kucher (University of Pennsylvania Faculty) This workshop "Pedagogical Projects for Social Change" will offer participants background information and sample lessons from two ongoing projects: one related to preventing

  20. Rainwater Harvesting in San Francisco Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bintliff, Jacob M.

    2011-01-01

    installed and planned rain- water harvesting (RWH) systemsFour of these schools have rain- water barrel systems. Asthe district adopted the Rain- water Harvesting Guidelines

  1. UNIVERSIDAD AUTNOMA DE ZACATECAS "FRANCISCO GARCA SALINAS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EN FÍSICA PRESENTA: MARÍA DE GUADALUPE CALDERA CABRAL ASESOR DR. VALERI V. DVOEGLAZOV 15 de Abril de familia, a mi papá José Germán Caldera Perales, a mi mamá María del Refugio Cabral Álvarez y a mis hermanas María Libertad Caldera Cabral y Gabriela Alejandra Caldera Cabral por siempre creer que podía

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Francisco Flores-Espino

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:NewsWebmasterWorkingElla Zhou PhotoEthan

  3. San Francisco Biodiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUD Wind FarmSmartSociety JumpBiodiesel Jump

  4. San Francisco Biofuels Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUD Wind FarmSmartSociety JumpBiodiesel

  5. San Francisco Community Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUD Wind FarmSmartSociety

  6. San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecadeSign063790 2.734 2.717 2.768

  7. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  8. The Electromagnetic Field as a Synchrony Gauge Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Bock

    2015-09-24

    Building on our previous work, we investigate the identification of the electromagnetic field as a local gauge field of a restricted group of synchrony transformations. We begin by arguing that the inability to measure the one-way speed of light independent of a synchronization scheme necessitates that physical laws must be reformulated without distant simultaneity. As a result, we are forced to introduce a new operational definition of time which leads to a fundamental space-time invariance principle that is related to a subset of the synchrony group. We identify the gauge field associated with this new invariance principle with the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the electromagnetic field acquires a space-time interpretation, as suggested in our previous work. In addition, we investigate the static, spherically symmetric solution of the resulting field equations. Also, we discuss implications of the present work for understanding the tension between classical and quantum theory.

  9. The Electromagnetic Field as a Synchrony Gauge Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bock, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Building on our previous work, we investigate the identification of the electromagnetic field as a local gauge field of a restricted group of synchrony transformations. We begin by arguing that the inability to measure the one-way speed of light independent of a synchronization scheme necessitates that physical laws must be reformulated without distant simultaneity. As a result, we are forced to introduce a new operational definition of time which leads to a fundamental space-time invariance principle that is related to a subset of the synchrony group. We identify the gauge field associated with this new invariance principle with the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the electromagnetic field acquires a space-time interpretation, as suggested in our previous work. In addition, we investigate the static, spherically symmetric solution of the resulting field equations. Also, we discuss implications of the present work for understanding the tension between classical and quantum theory.

  10. Electronic field permeameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

    1989-01-01

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  11. Interagency Field Test & Evaluation: Field Test 2 Public Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Connor

    2013-03-30

    This fact sheet summarizes the second field tests of technologies intended to address wind turbine interference with land-based surveillance radar, which took place in Lubbock, TX.

  12. Gravity as field - field oriented framework reproducing General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Ogonowski; Piotr Skindzier

    2015-09-21

    In the last article we have created foundations for gravitational field oriented framework (DaF) that reproduces GR. In this article we show, that using DaF approach, we can reproduce Schwarzschild solution with orbit equations, effective potential and constants of motion. Next we generalize results to other GR solutions and show, how gravitational field affects spacetime curvature and intrinsic spin of the bodies. It also appears, that field oriented approach requests to assign some spin value to the massless particles. Derived DaF framework has therefore significant meaning for searching for field based interpretation of gravity requested by quantum gravity.

  13. Volcanic Eruption, Tambora Alan Robock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    their vacation on the shores of Lake Geneva in Switzerland. Rather than the normally delightful weather'd into a selfish prayer for light: And they did live by watchfires ­ and the thrones, The palaces of crowned kings were gather'd round their blazing homes To look once more into each other's face; . . . The summer

  14. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  15. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hubrig; M. Schoeller; M. Briquet; M. A. Pogodin; R. V. Yudin; J. F. Gonzalez; T. Morel; P. De Cat; R. Ignace; P. North; G. Mathys; G. J. Peters

    2007-12-02

    We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  16. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Briquet, M; Pogodin, M A; Yudin, R V; González, J F; Morel, T; De Cat, P; Ignace, R; North, P; Mathys, G; Peters, G J

    2007-01-01

    We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  17. Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdin, C.T.

    2009-01-01

    those employed in seismic data interpretation under the nameseismic nature, these techniques power implicit in the at least two decades of continued field and interpretation

  18. Conservation laws. Generation of physical fields. Principles of field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. I. Petrova

    2007-04-19

    In the paper the role of conservation laws in evolutionary processes, which proceed in material systems (in material media) and lead to generation of physical fields, is shown using skew-symmetric differential forms. In present paper the skew-symmetric differential forms on deforming (nondifferentiable) manifolds were used in addition to exterior forms, which have differentiable manifolds as a basis. Such skew-symmetric forms (which were named evolutionary ones since they possess evolutionary properties), as well as the closed exterior forms, describe the conservation laws. But in contrast to exterior forms, which describe conservation laws for physical fields, the evolutionary forms correspond to conservation laws for material systems. The evolutionary forms possess an unique peculiarity, namely, the closed exterior forms are obtained from these forms. It is just this that enables one to describe the process of generation of physical fields, to disclose connection between physical fields and material systems and to resolve many problems of existing field theories.

  19. Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with spinor field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

    2010-08-12

    We consider an interacting system of spinor and electromagnetic field, explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced non-trivial rest-mass. This system of interacting spinor and scalar fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

  20. Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

    2010-04-21

    We consider an interacting system of massless scalar and electromagnetic field, with the Lagrangian explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced nonzero rest-mass. This system of interacting fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

  1. Cosmic Electromagnetic Fields due to Perturbations in the Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop Mongwane; Peter K. S. Dunsby; Bob Osano

    2012-10-21

    We use non-linear gauge-invariant perturbation theory to study the interaction of an inflation produced seed magnetic field with density and gravitational wave perturbations in an almost Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We compare the effects of this coupling under the assumptions of poor conductivity, infinite conductivity and the case where the electric field is sourced via the coupling of velocity perturbations to the seed field in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime, thus generalizing, improving on and correcting previous results. We solve our equations for long wavelength limits and numerically integrate the resulting equations to generate power spectra for the electromagnetic field variables, showing where the modes cross the horizon. We find that the rotation of the electric field dominates the power spectrum on small scales, in agreement with previous arguments.

  2. The Origin of Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    is an aerodynamic drag force resisting motion of the tube through the external, field­free plasma. The mag­ netic of Sun's X­ray Emission: #12; Emerging Active Regions -- what we see at the photo­ sphere: (from Cauzzi buoyancy force, FT is the force due to magnetic tension (field line bending), FC represents the Coriolis

  3. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  4. Exceptional geometry and tensor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Cederwall; Joakim Edlund; Anna Karlsson

    2013-03-21

    We present a tensor calculus for exceptional generalised geometry. Expressions for connections, torsion and curvature are given a unified formulation for different exceptional groups E_n(n). We then consider "tensor gauge fields" coupled to the exceptional generalised gravity. Many of the properties of forms on manifolds are carried over to these fields.

  5. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  6. Primordial Magnetic Fields in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain A. Brown

    2008-12-09

    Magnetic fields have been observed in galaxies, clusters of galaxies and probably in superclusters. While mechanisms exist to generate these in the late universe, it is possible that magnetic fields have existed since very early times. This thesis is concerned with methods to predict the form of such imprints. We review in detail a standard, linearised cosmology before introducing an electromagnetic field. We then consider the intrinsic statistics of the magnetic stresses in two ways, analytically and via static realisations. We construct the power spectra, some of which we present for the first time. At the one- and three-point level we find significant intrinsic non-Gaussianities. Finally we turn to the observable impacts a primordial magnetic field. Assuming coherence, the statistics of the source can be mapped onto the CMB in a simple manner. We demonstrate that our approach is valid by reproducing the signals for Gaussian power law fields on the microwave sky. [ABRIDGED

  7. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  8. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  9. Enigmatic compressional structures in an extensional province: Eku field, OML 67, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinones, M.; Evans, R. (Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)); Alofe, K.; Onyeise, B. (Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria))

    1996-01-01

    Acquisition of 3-D seismic data over OML 67-70 and a detailed reservoir description study done on the Eku field, have allowed identification of previously unrecognized compressional features. Situated within a depocenter between arcuate normal growth faults, the Eku structure consists of a shale-cored anticlinal fold and fold-and-thrust separated by a zone of lateral displacement. The crests of the folds have been eroded at a major unconformity at the base of the Qua Iboe shale (Early Pliocene). In the absence of definitive biostratigraphic data, correlations among the various fault-blocks are based on the character of sedimentary packages and sequences on wireline logs. Combined with analysis of the geometry of faults and folds, the correlations support a description of pulsatory movement of folding and faulting, that ultimately culminated in extensional reactivation of earlier regional extension and the not coincident. The effect of the anticipated reservoir sections, and deformation, both compressional, was gravity-driven and on shale detachments. A working hypothesis to explain the disparity in direction of earlier extension and subsequent compression is that thermal expansion that accompanied formation of the Cameroon volcanic line to the east of the Niger Delta in Miocene time, caused a change in the direction of structuring, allowing downslope gravity-driven compression to be superimposed on pre-existing extensional features.

  10. Charge, from EM fields only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Collins

    2007-03-04

    Consider the electric field E about an electron. Its source has been thought a substance called charge, enclosed within a small volume that defines the size of the electron. Scattering experiments find no size at all. Charge is useful, but mysterious. This study concludes that charge is not real. Useful, but not real. Absent real charge, the electric field must look to a different source. We know another electric field, vxB, not sourced by charge. A simple model of the electron, using EM fields only, has been found that generates an electric field vxB very like E. Gauss' law finds the model contains charge, but div vxB cannot find the charge density. The model contains a permanent magnetic flux quantum, configured as a dipole. The dipolar B fields spin around the symmetry axis, accounting for angular momentum. Spin stabilizes the magnetic flux quantum, and creates the vxB electric field. Stability in this model is dynamic. Energy is exchanged between the dipolar magnetic moment and an encircling toroidal displacement current, at the Compton frequency, mc^2/h = 1.24x10^20 Hz. The electric field undulates at this rate, instead of being static like E associated with charge. Absent any real charge, we have to abandon the notion that size of a charged particle is that of a small sack full of charge. The only electric field is vxB, and its source is not charge. What is the size of an electron? Coulomb scattering finds it point-like, but its spinning B fields extend to infinity.

  11. Reduced MHD in Nearly Potential Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Hank

    Reduced MHD in Nearly Potential Magnetic Fields H.R. Strauss Courant Institute of Mathematical that the magnetic field is close to a potential field. The potential field can have an arbitrary three dimensional. It is also the case in solar and stellar coronal magnetic fields, and in regions of the geomagnetic field

  12. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  13. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  15. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalit Engelhardt; Ben Freivogel; Nabil Iqbal

    2015-05-24

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole". We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a non-perturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U(1) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  16. Field ionization from carbon nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeoti, Bosun J

    2008-01-01

    The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

  17. Quantum Field Theory of Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Gripaios; Dave Sutherland

    2015-04-23

    The quantum theory of fields is largely based on studying perturbations around non-interacting, or free, field theories, which correspond to a collection of quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillators. The quantum theory of an ordinary fluid is `freer', in the sense that the non-interacting theory also contains an infinite collection of quantum-mechanical free particles, corresponding to vortex modes. By computing a variety of correlation functions at tree- and loop-level, we give evidence that a quantum perfect fluid can be consistently formulated as a low-energy, effective field theory. We speculate that the quantum behaviour is radically different to both classical fluids and quantum fields, with interesting physical consequences for fluids in the low temperature regime.

  18. Reverse Engineering Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Oeckl

    2012-10-02

    An approach to the foundations of quantum theory is advertised that proceeds by "reverse engineering" quantum field theory. As a concrete instance of this approach, the general boundary formulation of quantum theory is outlined.

  19. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  20. Computer usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Fuchs, Heidi; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Claybaugh, Erin; Beraki, Bereket; Nagaraju, Mythri; Price, Sarah; Young, Scott

    2014-12-01

    The electricity consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads (MELs) in the home has grown in recent years, and is expected to continue rising. Consumer electronics, in particular, are characterized by swift technological innovation, with varying impacts on energy use. Desktop and laptop computers make up a significant share of MELs electricity consumption, but their national energy use is difficult to estimate, given uncertainties around shifting user behavior. This report analyzes usage data from 64 computers (45 desktop, 11 laptop, and 8 unknown) collected in 2012 as part of a larger field monitoring effort of 880 households in the San Francisco Bay Area, and compares our results to recent values from the literature. We find that desktop computers are used for an average of 7.3 hours per day (median = 4.2 h/d), while laptops are used for a mean 4.8 hours per day (median = 2.1 h/d). The results for laptops are likely underestimated since they can be charged in other, unmetered outlets. Average unit annual energy consumption (AEC) for desktops is estimated to be 194 kWh/yr (median = 125 kWh/yr), and for laptops 75 kWh/yr (median = 31 kWh/yr). We estimate national annual energy consumption for desktop computers to be 20 TWh. National annual energy use for laptops is estimated to be 11 TWh, markedly higher than previous estimates, likely reflective of laptops drawing more power in On mode in addition to greater market penetration. This result for laptops, however, carries relatively higher uncertainty compared to desktops. Different study methodologies and definitions, changing usage patterns, and uncertainty about how consumers use computers must be considered when interpreting our results with respect to existing analyses. Finally, as energy consumption in On mode is predominant, we outline several energy savings opportunities: improved power management (defaulting to low-power modes after periods of inactivity as well as power scaling), matching the rated power of power supplies to computing needs, and improving the efficiency of individual components.

  1. Canonical quantization of substrate-less fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerold Gründler

    2015-09-12

    An inconsistency of quantum field theory, regarding the sign of the vacuum energy of elementary fields, is pointed out. An improved law for the canonical quantization of fields is presented, which is based on the distinction between fields which have material substrates, and substrate-less fields. Remarkably, the improved quantization method removes not only the inconsistency of quantum field theory, but at the same time solves the (old) cosmological constant problem for all fields of the standard model of elementary particles, but not for the hypothetical inflaton fields, without compromising any of the achievements of established quantum field theory.

  2. PAH fate in the San Francisco Estuary A PAH Fate Model For San Francisco Bay3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentrations increased in the early 20th-century as historic sources were10 augmented by coal burning which chemical properties strongly1 influence long-term fate. Chemical properties, such as Henry's law

  3. San Francisco folio, Tamalpais, San Francisco, Concord, San Mateo, and Haywards quadrangles, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Andrew C. (Andrew Cowper), 1861-1952.

    1914-01-01

    POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD) SYMPTOMS AS PREDICTORS OF SUICIDE BEHAVIOR AMONG VETERANS WITH AND WITHOUT A HISTORY OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) A Dissertation by EDGAR JAVIER VILLARREAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate... Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms as Predictors of Suicide Behavior among Veterans with and without a History of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Copyright 2012 Edgar Javier Villarreal POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD) SYMPTOMS AS PREDICTORS OF SUICIDE...

  4. From Public Housing to Regulated Public Environments: The Redevelopment of San Francisco’s Public Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rongerude, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Housing and Urban Development (HUD). It was first enacted inself-sufficiency. Although HUD provides the funding, theHousing and Urban Development (HUD) provides federal aid to

  5. From Public Housing to Regulated Public Environments: The Redevelopment of San Francisco’s Public Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rongerude, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Gentrification, Public Housing and the Limits of Newof Families in Public Housing. Dissertation. University ofJeff. 2003. “The End of Public Housing as We Know It. ” The

  6. Finite Temperature Field Theory Joe Schindler 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    energy spectrum. #12;Field Thermodynamics Example For a free boson field at thermal equilibrium, calculate energy spectrum. #12;Field Thermodynamics Example For a free boson field at thermal equilibriumFinite Temperature Field Theory Joe Schindler 2015 #12;Part 1: Basic Finite Temp Methods #12

  7. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afed feed families |fff |

  8. Inflating with large effective fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, C.P. [PH-TH Division, CERN, CH-1211, Genève 23 (Switzerland); Cicoli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Quevedo, F. [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Williams, M., E-mail: cburgess@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it, E-mail: f.quevedo@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: mwilliams@perimeterinsititute.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V ? ?{sup 2}) and exponential potentials, V(?) = ?{sub k}V{sub x}e{sup ?k?/M}. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |?| || ? and so predict r ? (8/3)(1-n{sub s}); consequently n{sub s} ? 0.96 gives r ? 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and n{sub s} improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  9. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  10. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  11. Negative Energies and Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-11-20

    The assumption that the vacuum is the minimum energy state, invariant under unitary transformations, is fundamental to quantum field theory. However, the assertion that the conservation of charge implies that the equal time commutator of the charge density and its time derivative vanish for two spatially separated points is inconsistent with the requirement that the vacuum be the lowest energy state. Yet, for quantum field theory to be gauge invariant, this commutator must vanish. This essay explores how this conundrum is resolved in quantum electrodynamics.

  12. field | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th Annual Conference on FossilFateOctober 2013field | National

  13. "Cold Venal Advocate": Henry Fielding's lawyers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joshua R

    2013-02-22

    Henry Fielding wrote frequently and harshly about lawyers. While many commentators have noted Fielding's criticism of lawyers and studied Fielding's concern with legal institutions generally, none have yet undertaken a ...

  14. Nevada Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Nevada Field Office Nevada Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  15. Sandia Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Sandia Field Office Sandia Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  16. Livermore Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Livermore Field Office Livermore Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year...

  17. Pantex Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Pantex Field Office Pantex Field Office FY12 Semi Annual Report FY11 Year End...

  18. San Martino Archaeological Field School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    San Martino Archaeological Field School Torano di Borgorose, Italy The San Martino Archaeological at the San Martino site as well as through lab work, assisting in geophysical studies, lectures, readings, and applications from prospective participants at other universities are welcome. #12;The San Martino Site The San

  19. Fields of Education and Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasýrcý, Vasýf

    ISCED 97 contains 25 two-digit fields of education. The classification presented here uses a three-digit SWEDEN December 1999 #12;2 Contents Page Introduction 3 Structure and Rationale of the Classification 5 Relation to other classifications and ISCED 97 dimensions 10 Iinter-disciplinary and broad programmes 12

  20. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  1. Covariant Geometric Prequantization of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanatchikov, I V

    2002-01-01

    A geometric prequantization formula for the Poisson-Gerstenhaber bracket on forms found within the DeDonder-Weyl Hamiltonian formalism earlier is presented. The related aspects of covariant geometric quantization of field theories are sketched. In particular, the importance of the framework of Clifford and spinor bundles and superconnections in this context is underlined.

  2. Covariant Geometric Prequantization of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Kanatchikov

    2001-01-04

    A geometric prequantization formula for the Poisson-Gerstenhaber bracket of forms found within the DeDonder-Weyl Hamiltonian formalism earlier is presented. The related aspects of covariant geometric quantization of field theories are sketched. In particular, the importance of the framework of Clifford and spinor bundles and superconnections in this context is underlined.

  3. Quantum Field Theory Mark Srednicki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    The Spin-Statistics Theorem (3) 45 5 The LSZ Reduction Formula (3) 49 6 Path Integrals in Quantum Mechanics Quantization of Spinor Fields II (38) 246 40 Parity, Time Reversal, and Charge Conjugation (23, 39) 254 #12, 59) 369 #12;6 63 The Vertex Function in Spinor Electrodynamics (62) 378 64 The Magnetic Moment

  4. Scalar field potentials for cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor H. Cardenas; Sergio del Campo

    2004-01-05

    We discuss different aspects of modern cosmology through a scalar field potential construction method. We discuss the case of negative potential cosmologies and its relation with oscillatory cosmic evolution, models with a explicit interaction between dark energy and dark matter which address the coincidence problem and also the case of non-zero curvature space.

  5. Field of Expertise Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -occupational univer- sity course "Paper and Pulp Technology", those working in the field can undertake further of Expertise "Advanced Materials Science" is strongly oriented to the needs of the Austrian industry and international research partners in order to keep Austrian high-technology industry, scientific production

  6. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  7. Quantum Field Theory in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Fialkovsky; D. V. Vassilevich

    2011-11-18

    This is a short non-technical introduction to applications of the Quantum Field Theory methods to graphene. We derive the Dirac model from the tight binding model and describe calculations of the polarization operator (conductivity). Later on, we use this quantity to describe the Quantum Hall Effect, light absorption by graphene, the Faraday effect, and the Casimir interaction.

  8. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN THE MICROWAVE FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    . EDLs Hg-EDLs: I2- and P-EDLs S-EDL vs. solar radiation flux Literature: 1. P. Klán V. Církva, MicrowavePHOTOCHEMISTRY IN THE MICROWAVE FIELD P. Müller, J. Literák, V. Církva, Petr Klán* Department distinctive kinds of electromagnetic radiation, microwave (MW) and ultraviolet/visible: energy of MW radiation

  9. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  10. Improvements in Low Field MRI 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogier, Stephen E

    2013-02-01

    for this system, which has a static magnetic field in an unconventional direction. The stronger gradient allows for the selection of thin slices with RF pulses of reasonable length. The third effort was in low-noise RF coils. Typical MRI systems are enclosed...

  11. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  12. AdS Field Theory from Conformal Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Liam Fitzpatrick; Jared Kaplan

    2012-08-01

    We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for a Conformal Field Theory to have a description in terms of a perturbative Effective Field Theory in AdS. The first two conditions are well-known: the existence of a perturbative `1/N' expansion and an approximate Fock space of states generated by a finite number of low-dimension operators. We add a third condition, that the Mellin amplitudes of the CFT correlators must be well-approximated by functions that are bounded by a polynomial at infinity in Mellin space, or in other words, that the Mellin amplitudes have an effective theory-type expansion. We explain the relationship between our conditions and unitarity, and provide an analogy with scattering amplitudes that becomes exact in the flat space limit of AdS. The analysis also yields a simple connection between conformal blocks and AdS diagrams, providing a new calculational tool very much in the spirit of the S-Matrix program. We also begin to explore the potential pathologies associated with higher spin fields in AdS by generalizing Weinberg's soft theorems to AdS/CFT. The AdS analog of Weinberg's argument constrains the interactions of conserved currents in CFTs, but there are potential loopholes that are unavailable to theories of massless higher spin particles in flat spacetime.

  13. Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

  14. Stable Magnetic Fields in Static Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gruzinov

    2008-01-28

    We prove that static fluid stars can stably support magnetic fields (within the ideal MHD approximation).

  15. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  16. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  17. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  18. Quantum fields with classical perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derezi?ski, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Derezinski@fuw.edu.pl [Department of Mathematical Methods in Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 74, 00-682 Warszawa (Poland)

    2014-07-15

    The main purpose of these notes is a review of various models of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) involving quadratic Lagrangians. We discuss scalar and vector bosons, spin 1/2 fermions, both neutral and charged. Beside free theories, we study their interactions with classical perturbations, called, depending on the context, an external linear source, mass-like term, current or electromagnetic potential. The notes may serve as a first introduction to QFT.

  19. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  20. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.