National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fractional sky cover

  1. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  2. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  3. ARM: Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

  4. Cool covered sky-splitting spectrum-splitting FK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohedano, Rubén; Chaves, Julio; Falicoff, Waqidi; Hernandez, Maikel; Sorgato, Simone; Miñano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Buljan, Marina

    2014-09-26

    Placing a plane mirror between the primary lens and the receiver in a Fresnel Köhler (FK) concentrator gives birth to a quite different CPV system where all the high-tech components sit on a common plane, that of the primary lens panels. The idea enables not only a thinner device (a half of the original) but also a low cost 1-step manufacturing process for the optics, automatic alignment of primary and secondary lenses, and cell/wiring protection. The concept is also compatible with two different techniques to increase the module efficiency: spectrum splitting between a 3J and a BPC Silicon cell for better usage of Direct Normal Irradiance DNI, and sky splitting to harvest the energy of the diffuse radiation and higher energy production throughout the year. Simple calculations forecast the module would convert 45% of the DNI into electricity.

  5. Fractional Snow-Cover Mapping Through Artificial Neural Network Analysis of MODIS Surface Reflectance. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobreva, Iliyana D.

    2010-07-14

    Accurate areal measurements of snow-cover extent are important for hydrological and climate modeling. The traditional method of mapping snow cover is binary where a pixel is approximated to either snow-covered or snow-free. Fractional snow cover...

  6. Clear sky fraction above Indonesia: an analysis for astronomical site selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidayat, T; Dermawan, B; Hadi, T W; Premadi, P W; Herdiwijaya, D

    2012-01-01

    We report a study of cloud cover over Indonesia based on meteorological satellite data, spanning over the past 15 years (from 1996 to 2010) in order to be able to select a new astronomical site capable to host a multi-wavelength astronomical observatory. High spatial resolution of meteorological satellite data acquired from {\\it Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5} ({\\it GMS 5}), {\\it Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 9} ({\\it GOES 9}), and {\\it Multi-functional Transport Satellite-1R} ({\\it MTSAT-1R}) are used to derive yearly average clear fractions over the regions of Indonesia. This parameter is determined from temperature measurement of the IR3 channel (water vapor, 6.7 $\\mu$m) for high altitude clouds (cirrus) and from the IR1 channel (10.7 $\\mu$m) for lower altitude clouds. Accordingly, an algorithm is developed to detect the corresponding clouds. The results of this study are then adopted to select the best possible sites in Indonesia to be analysed further by performing in situ m...

  7. aliphatic hydrocarbons constitute the largest fraction of cuticular wax in bees and cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    aliphatic hydrocarbons constitute the largest fraction of cuticular wax in bees and cover a highly hydrocarbons in the cuticular waxes of bees are widely assumed to func- tion as recognition cues (for nestmate discriminate cuticular waxes based on esters and polar components Birgit FRÖHLICHa, Markus RIEDERERa, Jürgen

  8. An observation-based formulation of snow cover fraction and its evaluation over large North American river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    An observation-based formulation of snow cover fraction and its evaluation over large North; accepted 23 July 2007; published 1 November 2007. [1] Snow cover strongly interacts with climate through snow albedo feedbacks. However, global climate models still are not adequate in representing snow cover

  9. Wide Blue Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Caroline Imani

    2011-01-01

    dressed neatly in a dark blue dress, its high neck trimmedIt was covered in a light blue fabric embellished with softOF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Wide Blue Sky A Thesis submitted in

  10. A comparison of methods for estimating fractional green vegetation cover within a desert-to-upland transition zone in central New Mexico, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3220, USA b Department of Geography and Curriculum in Ecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3220, USA Received., 2001; Tueller, 1987; Ward & Robinson, 2000). Thus, fractional green vegetation cover ( fc

  11. Influence of sky conditions on carbon dioxide uptake by forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dengel, Sigrid

    2009-01-01

    Sky conditions play an important role in the Earth’s climate system, altering the solar radiation reaching the Earth’s surface and determining the fraction of incoming direct and diffuse radiation. Sky conditions dictate ...

  12. Confusion of Diffuse Objects in the X-ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mark Voit; August E. Evrard; Greg L. Bryan

    2000-12-08

    Most of the baryons in the present-day universe are thought to reside in intergalactic space at temperatures of 10^5-10^7 K. X-ray emission from these baryons contributes a modest (~10%) fraction of the ~ 1 keV background whose prominence within the large-scale cosmic web depends on the amount of non-gravitational energy injected into intergalactic space by supernovae and AGNs. Here we show that the virialized regions of groups and clusters cover over a third of the sky, creating a source-confusion problem that may hinder X-ray searches for individual intercluster filaments and contaminate observations of distant groups.

  13. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  14. Sky coverage of orbital detectors. Analytical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Casadei

    2005-12-28

    Orbital detectors without pointing capability have to keep their field of view axis laying on their orbital plane, to observe the largest sky fraction. A general approach to estimate the exposure of each sky element for such detectors is a valuable tool in the R&D phase of a project, when the detector characteristics are still to be fixed. An analytical method to estimate the sky exposure is developed, which makes only few very reasonable approximations. The formulae obtained with this method are used to compute the histogram of the sky exposure of a hypothetical gamma-ray detector installed on the ISS. The C++ code used in this example is freely available on the http://cern.ch/casadei/software.html web page.

  15. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  16. Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pourbaix, D; Szkody, P; Ivezic, Z; Kleinman, S J; Long, D; Snedden, S A; Nitta, A; Harvanek, M; Krzesínski, J; Brewington, H J; Barentine, J C; Neilsen, E H; Brinkmann, J

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

  17. Candidate spectroscopic binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Pourbaix; G. R. Knapp; P. Szkody; Z. Ivezic; S. J. Kleinman; D. Long; S. A. Snedden; A. Nitta; M. Harvanek; J. Krzesinski; H. J. Brewington; J. C. Barentine; E. H. Neilsen; J. Brinkman

    2005-08-29

    We have examined the radial velocity data for stars spectroscopically observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) more than once to investigate the incidence of spectroscopic binaries, and to evaluate the accuracy of the SDSS stellar radial velocities. We find agreement between the fraction of stars with significant velocity variations and the expected fraction of binary stars in the halo and thick disk populations. The observations produce a list of 675 possible new spectroscopic binary stars and orbits for eight of them.

  18. Hacking the Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, R J

    2009-01-01

    In this article I present some special astronomical scripts created for Google Earth, Google Sky and Twitter. These 'hacks' are examples of the ways in which such tools can be used either alone, in on conjunction with online services. The result of a combination of multiple, online services to form a new facility is called a mash-up. Some of what follows falls into that definition. As we move into an era of online data and tools, it is the network as a whole that becomes important. Tools emerging from this network can be capable of more than the sum of their parts.

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce Margon

    1998-08-19

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an ambitious, multi-institutional project to create a huge digital imaging and spectroscopic data bank of 25% of the celestial sphere, approximately 10,000 deg^2 centred on the north galactic polar cap. The photometric atlas will be in 5 specially-chosen colours, covering the pi ster of the Survey area to a limiting magnitude of r~23.1, on 0.4" pixels, resulting in a 1 Tpixel map. This data base will be automatically analysed to catalog the photometric and astrometric properties of 10^8 stellar images, 10^8 galaxies, and 10^6 colour-selected QSO candidates; the galaxy data will in addition include detailed morphological data. The photometric data are used to autonomously and homogeneously select objects for the spectroscopic survey, which will include spectra of 10^6 galaxies, 10^5 QSOs, and 10^5 unusual stars. Although the project was originally motivated by the desire to study Large Scale Structure, we anticipate that these data will impact virtually every field of astronomy, from Earth-crossing asteroids to QSOs at z>6. In particular, the ~12 TByte multi-colour, precision calibrated imaging archive should be a world resource for many decades of the next century.

  20. Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. An Efficient Algorithm for Positioning Tiles in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Blanton; R. H. Lupton; F. Miller Maley; N. Young; I. Zehavi; J. Loveday

    2001-05-30

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will observe around 10^6 spectra from targets distributed over an area of about 10,000 square degrees, using a multi-object fiber spectrograph which can simultaneously observe 640 objects in a circular field-of-view (referred to as a ``tile'') 1.49 degrees in radius. No two fibers can be placed closer than 55'' during the same observation; multiple targets closer than this distance are said to ``collide.'' We present here a method of allocating fibers to desired targets given a set of tile centers which includes the effects of collisions and which is nearly optimally efficient and uniform. Because of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution (which form the bulk of the SDSS targets), a naive covering the sky with equally-spaced tiles does not yield uniform sampling. Thus, we present a heuristic for perturbing the centers of the tiles from the equally-spaced distribution which provides more uniform completeness. For the SDSS sample, we can attain a sampling rate greater than 92% for all targets, and greater than 99% for the set of targets which do not collide with each other, with an efficiency greater than 90% (defined as the fraction of available fibers assigned to targets).

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Whole Sky Imager Cloud Fraction Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring Single Column

  3. Big Sky Trust Fund (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Big Sky Trust Fund reimburses expenses incurred in the purchase, leasing, or relocation of real assets for direct use of the assisted business or employee training costs. A local or tribal...

  4. Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations Marjorie Palmer Spring 2008 #12;The UGA Land Use Clinic provides Road, Room 101 Athens, GA 30602-1510 (706) 583-0373 · Fax (706) 583-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;Lighting......................................................................................................................................1 II. Approaches to Lighting Regulation

  5. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  6. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Agüeros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

    2003-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

  7. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Sky Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky Energy Place:

  9. BIGGER AND BETTER BANGS IN THE SKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRIMBLE, V

    1982-01-01

    better hangs in the sky Supernovae are massive stars thatthe traditional prototype of supernovae; and its‘ remains,applicable to other supernovae and remnants. What do we know

  10. Contributions of artificial lighting sources on light pollution in Hong Kong measured through a night sky brightness monitoring network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason; Leung, Wai Yan; Wong, Chung Fai

    2014-01-01

    Light pollution is a form of environmental degradation in which excessive artificial outdoor lighting, such as street lamps, neon signs, and illuminated signboards, affects the natural environment and the ecosystem. Poorly designed outdoor lighting not only wastes energy, money, and valuable Earth resources, but also robs us of our beautiful night sky. Effects of light pollution on the night sky can be evaluated by the skyglow caused by these artificial lighting sources, through measurements of the night sky brightness (NSB). The Hong Kong Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (NSN) was established to monitor in detail the conditions of light pollution in Hong Kong. Monitoring stations were set up throughout the city covering a wide range of urban and rural settings to continuously measure the variations of the NSB. Over 4.6 million night sky measurements were collected from 18 distinct locations between May 2010 and March 2013. This huge dataset, over two thousand times larger than our previous survey, for...

  11. Back Cover Front Cover Office of Continuing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Back Cover Front Cover Office of Continuing Professional Education 2012­2013 Professional Landscape of Golf Course Irrigation Systems (p. 13) · Basics of Turf Management (p. 21) · Turfgrass Establishment (p

  12. Night-sky brightness monitoring in Hong Kong - a city-wide light pollution assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason

    2011-01-01

    Results of the first comprehensive light pollution survey in Hong Kong are presented. The night-sky brightness was measured and monitored around the city using a portable light sensing device called the Sky Quality Meter over a 15-month period beginning in March 2008. A total of 1,957 data sets were taken at 199 distinct locations, including urban and rural sites covering all 18 Administrative Districts of Hong Kong. The survey shows that the environmental light pollution problem in Hong Kong is severe - the urban night-skies (sky brightness at 15.0 mag per arcsec square) are on average ~100 times brighter than at the darkest rural sites (20.1 mag per arcsec square), indicating that the high lighting densities in the densely populated residential and commercial areas lead to light pollution. In the worst polluted urban location studied, the night-sky at 13.2 mag per arcsec square can be over 500 times brighter than the darkest sites in Hong Kong. The observed night-sky brightness is found to be affected by hu...

  13. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  14. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  15. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  16. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of...

  17. Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community...

  18. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    trace gases and atmospheric chemistry, in Climate Change2007 Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over2007), Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over

  19. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    randomly overlapped. Given the CFs in Figure 1, the MXRANin the vertical. [ 15 ] For the CFs shown in Figure 1, if wetroposphere cumulus with small CFs and relatively large ODs

  20. A Robotic Wide-Angle H-Alpha Survey of the Southern Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Gaustad; P. R. McCullough; W. Rosing; D. Van Buren

    2001-08-31

    We have completed a robotic wide-angle imaging survey of the southern sky (declination less than +15 degrees) at 656.3 nm wavelength, the H-alpha emission line of hydrogen. Each image of the resulting Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas (SHASSA) covers an area of the sky 13 degrees square at an angular resolution of approximately 0.8 arcminute, and reaches a sensitivity level of 2 rayleigh (1.2 x 10^-17 erg cm^-2 s^-1 arcsec^-2) per pixel, corresponding to an emission measure of 4 cm^-6 pc, and to a brightness temperature for microwave free-free emission of 12 microkelvins at 30 GHz. Smoothing over several pixels allows features as faint as 0.5 rayleigh to be detected.

  1. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  2. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  3. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  4. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  5. Ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the AKARI all-sky survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilerci Eser, E., E-mail: ecekilerci@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Goto, T. [National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Doi, Y., E-mail: tomo@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: doi@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Komaba 3-8-1, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    We present a new catalog of 118 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and one hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HLIRG) by cross-matching the AKARI all-sky survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10) and the final data release of the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. Forty of the ULIRGs and one HLIRG are new identifications. We find that ULIRGs are interacting pair galaxies or ongoing or postmergers. This is consistent with the widely accepted view: ULIRGs are major mergers of disk galaxies. We confirm the previously known positive trend between the active galactic nucleus fraction and infrared luminosity. We show that ULIRGs have a large offset from the main sequence up to z ? 1; their offset from the z ? 2 'main sequence' is relatively smaller. We find a result consistent with the previous studies showing that, compared to local star-forming SDSS galaxies of similar mass, local ULIRGs have lower oxygen abundances. We demonstrate for the first time that ULIRGs follow the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The scatter of ULIRGs around the FMR (0.09 dex-0.5 dex) is comparable to the scatter of z ? 2-3 galaxies. We provide the largest local (0.050

  6. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR1 was the first major data release, providing images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  7. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 5

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR5 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 2

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR2 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 4

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR4 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): Data Release 3

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy.Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. The SDSS used a dedicated 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, equipped with two powerful special-purpose instruments. SDSS data have supported fundamental work across an extraordinary range of astronomical disciplines, including the properties of galaxies, the evolution of quasars, the structure and stellar populations of the Milky Way, the dwarf galaxy companions of the Milky Way and M31, asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system, and the large scale structure and matter and energy contents of the universe. (Taken from home page of www.sdss.org). DR3 provides provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download.

  11. Fractional Heisenberg Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2008-04-03

    Fractional derivative can be defined as a fractional power of derivative. The commutator (i/h)[H, ], which is used in the Heisenberg equation, is a derivation on a set of observables. A derivation is a map that satisfies the Leibnitz rule. In this paper, we consider a fractional derivative on a set of quantum observables as a fractional power of the commutator (i/h)[H, ]. As a result, we obtain a fractional generalization of the Heisenberg equation. The fractional Heisenberg equation is exactly solved for the Hamiltonians of free particle and harmonic oscillator. The suggested Heisenberg equation generalize a notion of quantum Hamiltonian systems to describe quantum dissipative processes.

  12. SkyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky EnergySkyFuel Inc

  13. SkyPilot Networks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky EnergySkyFuel

  14. Fractional Classical Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Laskin

    2013-02-03

    Fractional classical mechanics has been introduced and developed as a classical counterpart of the fractional quantum mechanics. Lagrange, Hamilton and Hamilton-Jacobi frameworks have been implemented for the fractional classical mechanics. The Lagrangian of fractional classical mechanics has been introduced, and equation of motion has been obtained. Fractional oscillator model has been launched and solved in 1D case. A new equation for the period of oscillations of fractional classical oscillator has been found. The interplay between the energy dependency of the period of classical oscillations and the non-equidistant distribution of the energy levels for fractional quantum oscillator has been discussed. We discuss as well, the relationships between new equations of fractional classical mechanics and the well-known fundamental equations of classical mechanics.

  15. Automated Sky Search Max Doppke (RET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    of reliable software programs, a quality telescope, and a compatible CCD (charged coupling device) camera. My introductory period was spent working with the `SKY6' astronomy software by Software Bisque, Inc. This software an additional piece of software, called `Orchestrate'. Designed by #12;Software Bisque, it fully integrates

  16. Sublime endeavours : connecting earth to sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kain, Jacob E. (Jacob Evelyn), 1974-

    2000-01-01

    We live in an era in which we come closer everyday to conquering the elements, to a degree that earlier humans could scarcely dream of. Nearly one hundred years ago, we took to the skies, and learned to fly. Today the act ...

  17. NERSC Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | png | 729 KB AGU-WRR2015Cover.png Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tightshale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater:...

  18. COVER IMAGE Mechanical metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    COVER IMAGE Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures whose properties originate from a range of structural deformations. Letter p153; News & Views p95 IMAGE: JAYSON PAULOSE COVER DESIGN in elementary optical excitations of monolayer WSe2 Ajit Srivastava, Meinrad Sidler, Adrien V. Allain, Dominik S

  19. THE BLUE SKY CATASTROPHE ON THE KLEIN BOTTLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meirong

    THE BLUE SKY CATASTROPHE ON THE KLEIN BOTTLE Weigu Li and Meirong Zhang Department of Mathematics orbit, the so-called blue sky catastrophe. Let's begin with the definition. Definition 1 One-parameter family of vector fields on a compact manifold has a blue sky catastrophe if for all parameter values from

  20. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  1. Preliminary Analysis of ARM SGP Area Sky Cover and Downwelling SW Irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document w1.½tank

  2. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

    2011-08-31

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  3. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  4. Estimation of total cloud cover from solar radiation observations at Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Liancong; Hamilton, David; Han, Boping

    2010-03-15

    The DYRESM-CAEDYM model is a valuable tool for simulating water temperature for biochemical studies in aquatic ecosystem. The model requires inputs of surface short-wave radiation and long-wave radiation or total cloud cover fraction (TC). Long-wave radiation is often not measured directly so a method to determine TC from commonly measured short-wave solar irradiance (E{sub 0}) and theoretical short-wave solar irradiance under a clear sky (E{sub c}) has broad application. A more than 17-year (15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009) hourly solar irradiance data set was used to estimate the peak solar irradiance for each ordinal date over one year, which was assumed to be representative of solar irradiance in the absence of cloud. Comparison between these daily observed values and the modelled clear-sky solar radiation over one year was in close agreement (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.995 and root mean squared error, RMSE = 12.54 W m{sup -2}). The downloaded hourly cloudiness measurements from 15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009 was used to calculate the daily values for this period and then the calculated daily values over the 17 years were used to calculate the average values for each ordinal date over one year. A regression equation between (1 - E{sub 0}/E{sub c}) and TC produced a correlation coefficient value of 0.99 (p > 0.01, n = 71). The validation of this cloud cover estimation model was conducted with observed short-wave solar radiation and TC at two sites. Values of TC derived from the model at the Lake Rotorua site gave a reasonable prediction of the observed values (RMSE = 0.10, r = 0.86, p > 0.01, n = 61). The model was also tested at Queenstown (South Island of New Zealand) and it provided satisfactory results compared to the measurements (RMSE = 0.16, r = 0.67, p > 0.01, n = 61). Therefore the model's good performance and broad applicability will contribute to the DYRESM-CAEDYM accuracy of water temperature simulation when long-wave radiation is not available. (author)

  5. American Clean Skies Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:AmbataSkies Foundation Jump to:

  6. Sky Solar Global SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSky Energy

  7. SolarSkies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH JumpSloughInfraSolarSkies Jump to: navigation,

  8. Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGridDeepiSolar and WindQueen GeothermalSky

  9. New Sky Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,NationalJersey/Incentives <EnergyOrleansSky Energy Jump

  10. North Sky River | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd| OpenInformation 9thNorthNewton SchoolNorthSky

  11. Green Skies of Brazil |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low We want USDOE to vitrify allfromGreenGreen Skies

  12. Covering Walls With Fabrics. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    , grasscloth and many other textures and weaves are available in this type of wall covering. When selecting fabrics to apply to interior walls, consider pattern, color, amount of shrink age and weight. Check to see if the design is printed with the grain... several times over a 12-inch length until fabric is cut through and can be pulled away easily (see Figure 5) . Figure 5 To cover raw edges at top or bottom when . there is no molding, attach an attractive gimp, flat braid or decorative molding...

  13. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  15. Seeing the sky through Hubble's eye: The COSMOS SkyWalker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Jahnke; S. F. Sanchez; A. Koekemoer

    2006-07-23

    Large, high-resolution space-based imaging surveys produce a volume of data that is difficult to present to the public in a comprehensible way. While megapixel-sized images can still be printed out or downloaded via the World Wide Web, this is no longer feasible for images with 10^9 pixels (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys [ACS] images of the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs [GEMS] project) or even 10^10 pixels (for the ACS Cosmic Evolution Survey [COSMOS]). We present a Web-based utility called the COSMOS SkyWalker that allows viewing of the huge ACS image data set, even through slow Internet connections. Using standard HTML and JavaScript, the application successively loads only those portions of the image at a time that are currently being viewed on the screen. The user can move within the image by using the mouse or interacting with an overview image. Using an astrometrically registered image for the COSMOS SkyWalker allows the display of calibrated world coordinates for use in science. The SkyWalker "technique" can be applied to other data sets. This requires some customization, notably the slicing up of a data set into small (e.g., 256^2 pixel) subimages. An advantage of the SkyWalker is the use of standard Web browser components; thus, it requires no installation of any software and can therefore be viewed by anyone across many operating systems.

  16. Photometry from online Digitized Sky Survey Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bacher; S. Kimeswenger; P. Teutsch

    2005-07-22

    Online Digital Sky Survey (DSS) material is often used to obtain information on newly discovered variable stars for older epochs (e.g. Nova progenitors, flare stars, ...). We present here the results of an investigation of photometry on online digital sky survey material in small fields calibrated by CCD sequences. We compared different source extraction mechanisms and found, that even down near to the sensitivity limit, despite the H-compression used for the online material, photometry with an accuracy better than 0\\fm1 rms is possible on DSS-II. Our investigation shows that the accuracy depends strongly on the source extraction method. The SuperCOSMOS scans, although retrieved with an higher spatial resolution, do not give us better results. The methods and parameters presented here, allow the user to obtain good plate photometry in small fields down to the Schmidt plate survey limits with a few bright CCD calibrators, which may be calibrated with amateur size telescopes. Especially for the events mentioned above, new field photometry for calibration purposes mostly exists, but the progenitors were not measured photometrically before. Also the follow up whether stellar concentrations are newly detected clusters or similar work may be done without using mid size telescopes. The calibration presented here is a "local" one for small fields. We show that this method presented here gives higher accuracies than "global" calibrations of surveys (e.g. GSC-II, SuperCOSMOS and USNO-B)

  17. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  18. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  19. NREL Success Stories - SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Gee, Randy

    2013-05-29

    NREL Scientists and SkyFuel share a story about how their partnership has resulted in a revolutionary concentrating solar power technology ReflecTech Mirror Film.

  20. A discrete fractional random transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

    2006-05-20

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  1. Lattice template placement for coherent all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2014-12-22

    All-sky, broadband, coherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars are restricted by limited computational resources. Minimizing the number of templates required to cover the search parameter space, of sky position and frequency evolution, is one important way to reduce the computational cost of a search. We demonstrate a practical algorithm which, for the first time, achieves template placement with a minimal number of templates for an all-sky search, using the reduced supersky parameter-space metric of Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)]. The metric prescribes a constant template density in the signal parameters, which permits that templates be placed at the vertices of a lattice. We demonstrate how to ensure complete coverage of the parameter space, including in particular at its boundaries. The number of templates generated by the algorithm is compared to theoretical estimates, and to previous predictions by Brady et al. [Phys. Rev. D 57, 2101 (1998)]. The algorithm may be applied to any search parameter space with a constant template density, which includes semicoherent searches and searches targeting known low-mass X-ray binaries.

  2. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Hall, Patrick B.; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Anderson, Scott F.; Chen, Yuguang; Denney, Kelly D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Gao, Yang; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Kelly, Brandon C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ?4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ?2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ?10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

  3. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of longer-lived greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Here, we analyse spectrally resolved measurements of 0.48±0.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  4. Definitions of Clear-sky Fluxes and Implications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Abhishek

    2012-02-14

    .2 Clear-sky Fluxes : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3 2. SATELLITE-INFERRED CLEAR-SKY FLUXES : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 2.1 CERES Instrument : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5 2.1.1 CERES... observation systems such as satellite system, radiosonde, solar panels etc. and simulation results from model generated scenarios including climate-model, reanalysis with assimilation system, radiative transfer models, to name a few, have helped...

  5. The Night Sky A Super Full Moon & Meteor Shower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    and the morning of August 13. The moon phase is a thin crescent that night leaving a very dark sky, but can appear anywhere in the sky. The new moon in August will occur on the 14th , thus aiding with dark for our Astronomy open houses can be found on the web at http

  6. Monitoring the Sky with the Prototype All-Sky Imager on the LWA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obenberger, K S; Hartman, J M; Clarke, T E; Dowell, J; Dubois, A; Dubois, D; Henning, P A; Lazio, J; Michalak, S; Schinzel, F K

    2015-01-01

    We present a description of the Prototype All-Sky Imager (PASI), a backend correlator and imager of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1). PASI cross-correlates a live stream of 260 dual-polarization dipole antennas of the LWA1, creates all-sky images, and uploads them to the LWA-TV website in near real-time. PASI has recorded over 13,000 hours of all-sky images at frequencies between 10 and 88 MHz creating opportunities for new research and discoveries. We also report rate density and pulse energy density limits on transients at 38, 52, and 74 MHz, for pulse widths of 5 s. We limit transients at those frequencies with pulse energy densities of $>2.7\\times 10^{-23}$, $>1.1\\times 10^{-23}$, and $>2.8\\times 10^{-23}$ J m$^{-2}$ Hz$^{-1}$ to have rate densities $<1.2\\times10^{-4}$, $<5.6\\times10^{-4}$, and $<7.2\\times10^{-4}$ yr$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$

  7. ARM - Cover Competition Winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us agovInstrumentswrf-chemMeetingsCover Competition Winners Science

  8. PAGE Cover: Top Photo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - . . - - 4 v - r REQUESTCostPAGE Cover: Top

  9. Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

  10. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process. This project is designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. Clean fractionation separates a single feedstock into individual components cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

  11. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-07-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < {lambda} < 1.7 {micro}m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers.

  12. The variable sky of deep synoptic surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Matheson, Thomas; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85725 (United States); Howell, Steve B., E-mail: ridgway@noao.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, P.O. Box 1, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteria—a process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the sky—Galactic stars, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and asteroids. It is found that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be capable of discovering ?10{sup 5} high latitude (|b| > 20°) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20° is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100 per night within less than one year. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of AGNs and QSOs are each predicted to begin at ?3000 per night and decrease by 50 times over four years. Supernovae are expected at ?1100 per night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at >10{sup 5} per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, they will drop below 1000 per night within two years.

  13. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  14. South African night sky brightness during high aerosol epochs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Hartmut; Marang, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Sky conditions in the remote, dry north-western interior of South Africa are now the subject of considerable interest in view of the imminent construction of numerous solar power plants in this area. Furthermore, the part of this region in which the core of the SKA is to be located (which includes SALT) has been declared an Astronomical Advantage Zone, for which sky brightness monitoring will now be mandatory. In this project we seek to characterise the sky brightness profile under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Key factors are of course the lunar phase and altitude, but in addition the sky brightness is also significantly affected by the atmospheric aerosol loading, as that influences light beam scattering. In this paper we chose to investigate the sky characteristics soon after the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in 1991, which resulted in huge ash masses reaching the stratosphere (where they affected solar irradiance for several years). We re-reduced photometric sky measurements from the South Afric...

  15. Listing Unique Fractional Factorial Designs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrivastava, Abhishek Kumar

    2011-02-22

    Fractional factorial designs are a popular choice in designing experiments for studying the effects of multiple factors simultaneously. The first step in planning an experiment is the selection of an appropriate fractional ...

  16. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The US DOE Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R&D) that uses green feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. A consortium of five DOE national laboratories has been formed with the objectives of providing industry with a broad range of expertise and helping to lower the risk of new process development through federal cost sharing. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process, designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. The focus of the clean fractionation research is to demonstrate to industry that one technology can successfully separate all types of feedstocks into predictable types of chemical intermediates.

  17. First ground-based 200-um observing with THUMPER on JCMT - sky characterisation and planet maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Ward-Thompson; P. A. R. Ade; H. Araujo; I. Coulson; J. Cox; G. R. Davis; Rh. Evans; M. J. Griffin; W. K. Gear; P. Hargrave; P. Hargreaves; D. Hayton; B. J. Kiernan; S. J. Leeks; P. Mauskopf; D. Naylor; N. Potter; S. A. Rinehart; R. Sudiwala; C. R. Tucker; R. J. Walker; S. L. Watkin

    2005-09-22

    We present observations that were carried out with the Two HUndred Micron PhotometER (THUMPER) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii, at a wavelength of 200 um (frequency 1.5 THz). The observations utilise a small atmospheric window that opens up at this wavelength under very dry conditions at high-altitude observing sites. The atmosphere was calibrated using the sky-dipping method and a relation was established between the optical depth, tau, at 1.5 THz and that at 225 GHz: tau_1.5THz = (95 +/- 10)*tau_225GHz. Mars and Jupiter were mapped from the ground at this wavelength for the first time, and the system characteristics measured. A noise equivalent flux density (NEFD) of ~65 +/- 10 Jy (1 sigma 1 second) was measured for the THUMPER-JCMT combination, consistent with predictions based upon our laboratory measurements. The main-beam resolution of 14 arcsec was confirmed and an extended error-beam detected at roughly two-thirds of the magnitude of the main beam. Measurements of the Sun allow us to estimate that the fraction of the power in the main beam is ~15%, consistent with predictions based on modelling the dish surface accuracy. It is therefore shown that the sky over Mauna Kea is suitable for astronomy at this wavelength under the best conditions. However, higher or drier sites should have a larger number of useable nights per year.

  18. An Initial Survey of White Dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Harris; J. Liebert; S. J. Kleinman; A. Nitta; S. F. Anderson; G. R. Knapp; J. Krzesinski; G. Schmidt; M. A. Strauss; D. Vanden Berk; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; B. Margon; J. A. Munn; N. M. Silvestri; A. Smith; P. Szkody; M. J. Collinge; C. C. Dahn; X. Fan; P. B. Hall; D. P. Schneider; J. Brinkmann; S. Burles; J. E. Gunn; G. S. Hennessy; R. Hindsley; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; D. Q. Lamb; R. H. Lupton; R. C. Nichol; J. R. Pier; D. J. Schlegel; M. SubbaRao; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny; D. G. York

    2003-05-19

    An initial assessment is made of white dwarf and hot subdwarf stars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In a small area of sky (190 square degrees), observed much like the full survey will be, 269 white dwarfs and 56 hot subdwarfs are identified spectroscopically where only 44 white dwarfs and 5 hot subdwarfs were known previously. Most are ordinary DA (hydrogen atmosphere) and DB (helium) types. In addition, in the full survey to date, a number of WDs have been found with uncommon spectral types. Among these are blue DQ stars displaying lines of atomic carbon; red DQ stars showing molecular bands of C_2 with a wide variety of strengths; DZ stars where Ca and occasionally Mg, Na, and/or Fe lines are detected; and magnetic WDs with a wide range of magnetic field strengths in DA, DB, DQ, and (probably) DZ spectral types. Photometry alone allows identification of stars hotter than 12000 K, and the density of these stars for 15fraction of WDs rises to ~90% at g=20. The remainder are hot sdB and sdO stars.

  19. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  20. Ionization probability of atoms and molecules sputtered from a cesium covered silver surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wucher, Andreas

    Ionization probability of atoms and molecules sputtered from a cesium covered silver surface S that the dependence of the AgCs ion fraction on the cesium surface concentration does not follow the ionization conditions by a rastered 10 keV Xe ion beam and subsequently covered with cesium by deposition from

  1. Retrieval of subpixel snow covered area, grain size, and albedo from MODIS Thomas H. Painter a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Retrieval of subpixel snow covered area, grain size, and albedo from MODIS Thomas H. Painter a Keywords: Snow Grain size Albedo Spectral mixture analysis MODIS We describe and validate a model that retrieves fractional snow-covered area and the grain size and albedo of that snow from surface reflectance

  2. Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

  3. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  4. Covered Product Category: Commercial Ovens

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial ovens, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  5. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; M. Andersen; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; G. Ashton; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; V. Branco; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; M. D. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. R. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. Gonzalez; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; J. Hoelscher-Obermaier; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang; E. A. Huerta; D. Huet; B. Hughey

    2015-10-13

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between $-1.0 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s and $+1.5 \\times 10^{-11}$ Hz/s, and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), of length 8192 seconds, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, both in the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each dataset a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer FFTs followed by a further incoherent analysis. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90$\\%$ confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about $10^{-24}$ and $2\\times 10^{-23}$ at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of $\\sim$2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below $80~\\mathrm{Hz}$.

  6. National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing (NLCD). The NLCD is a 21-class land cover classification of the entire United States. It is derived from

  7. The Palomar-Quest Digital Synoptic Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Djorgovski; C. Baltay; A. A. Mahabal; A. J. Drake; R. Williams; D. Rabinowitz; M. J. Graham; C. Donalek; E. Glikman; A. Bauer; R. Scalzo; N. Ellman; J. Jerke

    2008-01-21

    We describe briefly the Palomar-Quest (PQ) digital synoptic sky survey, including its parameters, data processing, status, and plans. Exploration of the time domain is now the central scientific and technological focus of the survey. To this end, we have developed a real-time pipeline for detection of transient sources. We describe some of the early results, and lessons learned which may be useful for other, similar projects, and time-domain astronomy in general. Finally, we discuss some issues and challenges posed by the real-time analysis and scientific exploitation of massive data streams from modern synoptic sky surveys.

  8. SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL STORMWATER RUNOFF COVERS OVER SLIT TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L; Luther Hamm, L

    2008-12-18

    Solid Waste Management (SWM) commissioned this Special Analysis (SA) to determine the effects of placing operational stormwater runoff covers (referred to as covers in the remainder of this document) over slit trench (ST) disposal units ST1 through ST7 (the center set of slit trenches). Previously the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entered into an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to place covers over Slit Trenches 1 and 2 to be able to continue disposing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) solid waste (see USDOE 2008). Because the covers changed the operating conditions, DOE Order 435.1 (DOE 1999) required that an SA be performed to assess the impact. This Special Analysis has been prepared to determine the effects of placing covers over slit trenches at about years 5, 10 and 15 of the 30-year operational period. Because some slit trenches have already been operational for about 15 years, results from analyzing covers at 5 years and 10 years provide trend analysis information only. This SA also examined alternatives of covering Slit Trenches 1 and 2 with one cover and Slit Trenches 3 and 4 with a second cover versus covering them all with a single cover. Based on modeling results, minimal differences exist between covering Slit Trench groups 1-2 and 3-4 with two covers or one large cover. This SA demonstrates that placement of covers over slit trenches will slow the subsequent release and transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone in the early time periods (from time of placement until about 100 years). Release and transport of some radionuclides in the vadose zone beyond 100 years were somewhat higher than for the case without covers. The sums-of-fractions (SOFs) were examined for the current waste inventory in ST1 and ST2 and for estimated inventories at closure for ST3 through ST7. In all cases SOFs were less than one (except for one SOF for ST5 that remained at one), indicating that there should be no unacceptable impacts on operations from placing covers for the cover alternatives that were analyzed. Minimal operational limits provided in Table 4 should be used as the new set of limits for Slit Trenches 1 through 7. ST1 and ST2 are expected to be covered about 15 years after the first disposal in ST1. Because the time of actual placement of covers over the other slit trenches is unknown, this SA did not consider limit increases, only limit decreases. Thus, each minimal operational limit is the minimum of the Performance Assessment (PA) final limit and the limit calculated in this SA if covers were placed at about 5, 10 or 15 years. If other cover times are desired, further analysis will be required.

  9. Cover Crops for the Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

  10. Atmospheric ozone and colors of the Antarctic twilight sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Raymond L.

    Atmospheric ozone and colors of the Antarctic twilight sky Raymond L. Lee, Jr.,1, * Wolfgang Meyer absorption at longer wavelengths by ozone's Chappuis bands. Because stratospheric ozone is greatly depleted correlations between ozone concentration and twilight colors. We also used a spectroradiometer at a midlatitude

  11. The Night Sky Earth Farthest from Sun in July

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    The Night Sky Earth Farthest from Sun in July Although some may mistakenly believe it is the Earth's distance from the Sun that creates the seasons, we are actually farthest from the Sun in early July during summer. This year, the Earth reaches the point when it is most distant from the Sun, the aphelion of its

  12. Cover

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving, we hear and Decommissioning

  13. cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos AlamosSimulation Initiative798/%2A en NNSA announces retirement of

  14. Cover

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June2012 |DepartmentRemarks Prepared

  15. Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion's Belt in Great Basin Mythology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Catherine S

    1995-01-01

    2, pp. 146-152 (1995). Mountain Sheep in the Sky: Orion'sNevada, Reno, NV 89557-0006. Mountain Sheep in the Sky is ain the great himt for the Mountain Sheep. Muhwinti, Leader (

  16. Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held Oct. 28, 29 | ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Annual meeting of Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... meeting of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership to be held ... science policy and technology of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Panels ...

  17. AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE THERMAL RADIANCE OF CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul

    2012-01-01

    exposed to the sky. thermal Solar energy applications ofSolar Energy AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE THERMAL

  18. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. III. CLASSIFICATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palaversa, Lovro; Eyer, Laurent; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Ivezi?, Željko; Loebman, Sarah; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas; VanderPlas, Jacob; Westman, David; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruždjak, Domagoj; Sudar, Davor; Boži?, Hrvoje; Galin, Mario; Kroflin, Andrea; Mesari?, Martina; Munk, Petra; Vrbanec, Dijana; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott; Srdo?, Gregor; and others

    2013-10-01

    We describe the construction of a highly reliable sample of ?7000 optically faint periodic variable stars with light curves obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR across 10,000 deg{sup 2} of the northern sky. The majority of these variables have not been cataloged yet. The sample flux limit is several magnitudes fainter than most other wide-angle surveys; the photometric errors range from ?0.03 mag at r = 15 to ?0.20 mag at r = 18. Light curves include on average 250 data points, collected over about a decade. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based photometric recalibration of the LINEAR data for about 25 million objects, we selected ?200,000 most probable candidate variables with r < 17 and visually confirmed and classified ?7000 periodic variables using phased light curves. The reliability and uniformity of visual classification across eight human classifiers was calibrated and tested using a catalog of variable stars from the SDSS Stripe 82 region and verified using an unsupervised machine learning approach. The resulting sample of periodic LINEAR variables is dominated by 3900 RR Lyrae stars and 2700 eclipsing binary stars of all subtypes and includes small fractions of relatively rare populations such as asymptotic giant branch stars and SX Phoenicis stars. We discuss the distribution of these mostly uncataloged variables in various diagrams constructed with optical-to-infrared SDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry, and with LINEAR light-curve features. We find that the combination of light-curve features and colors enables classification schemes much more powerful than when colors or light curves are each used separately. An interesting side result is a robust and precise quantitative description of a strong correlation between the light-curve period and color/spectral type for close and contact eclipsing binary stars (? Lyrae and W UMa): as the color-based spectral type varies from K4 to F5, the median period increases from 5.9 hr to 8.8 hr. These large samples of robustly classified variable stars will enable detailed statistical studies of the Galactic structure and physics of binary and other stars and we make these samples publicly available.

  19. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Han Wei

    Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate ...

  20. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

  1. Error analysis in cross-correlation of sky maps: application to the ISW detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Cabre; Pablo Fosalba; Enrique Gaztanaga; Marc Manera

    2007-01-15

    Constraining cosmological parameters from measurements of the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect requires developing robust and accurate methods for computing statistical errors in the cross-correlation between maps. This paper presents a detailed comparison of such error estimation applied to the case of cross-correlation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and large-scale structure data. We compare theoretical models for error estimation with montecarlo simulations where both the galaxy and the CMB maps vary around a fiducial auto-correlation and cross-correlation model which agrees well with the current concordance LCDM cosmology. Our analysis compares estimators both in harmonic and configuration (or real) space, quantifies the accuracy of the error analysis and discuss the impact of partial sky survey area and the choice of input fiducial model on dark-energy constraints. We show that purely analytic approaches yield accurate errors even in surveys that cover only 10% of the sky and that parameter constraints strongly depend on the fiducial model employed. Alternatively, we discuss the advantages and limitations of error estimators that can be directly applied to data. In particular, we show that errors and covariances from the Jack-Knife method agree well with the theoretical approaches and simulations. We also introduce a novel method in real space that is computationally efficient and can be applied to real data and realistic survey geometries. Finally, we present a number of new findings and prescriptions that can be useful for analysis of real data and forecasts, and present a critical summary of the analyses done to date.

  2. Validation of MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using Whole Sky Imager Measurements at the Three ARM Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewingValidating extended MHDCERES/SARB DataSlope

  3. Corrugated cover plate for flat plate collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollands, K. G. Terry (Elora, CA); Sibbitt, Bruce (Waterloo, CA)

    1978-01-01

    A flat plate radiant energy collector is providing having a transparent cover. The cover has a V-corrugated shape which reduces the amount of energy reflected by the cover away from the flat plate absorber of the collector.

  4. Marine Fisheries On the cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover: The red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus (NMFS photograph). Articles 56(2), 1994 Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures Gregg R. Gitschlag AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION D. James Baker, Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere National Marine

  5. Clear sky atmosphere at cm-wavelengths from climatology data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lew, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    We utilise ground-based, balloon-born and satellite climatology data to reconstruct site and season-dependent vertical profiles of precipitable water vapour (PWV). We use these profiles to numerically solve radiative transfer through the atmosphere, and derive atmospheric brightness temperature ($T_{\\rm atm}$) and optical depth ($\\tau$) at the centimetre wavelengths. We validate the reconstruction by comparing the model column PWV, with photometric measurements of PWV, performed in the clear sky conditions towards the Sun. Based on the measurements, we devise a selection criteria to filter the climatology data to match the PWV levels to the expectations of the clear sky conditions. We apply the reconstruction to the location of the Polish 32-metre radio telescope, and characterise $T_{\\rm atm}$ and $\\tau$ year-round, at selected frequencies. We also derive the zenith distance dependence for these parameters, and discuss shortcomings of using planar, single-layer, and optically thin atmospheric model approxima...

  6. Cosmology using the Parkes Multibeam Southern-Sky HI Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Thomas

    1996-07-02

    I discuss the implications of the Parkes HI Multibeam Southern Sky Survey for cosmology. It will determine the local mass function of HI clouds, detecting several hundred per decade of mass. Each of these will come with a redshift and, for the more massive clouds, an estimate of the velocity width. This will provide an ideal database for peculiar motion studies and for measurements of biasing of galaxies relative to the underlying matter distribution.

  7. Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels ResearchofDerivative Classifiers Should KnowLandfillBright Skies

  8. Reliability of radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Takahiro; Daishido, Tsuneaki; Tanaka, Tai; Nakao, Ryota; Nomura, Naomi; Sugisawa, Kentaro; Niinuma, Kotaro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Kida, Sumiko

    2014-01-20

    This article reports on the reliability of 11 radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey. We derived false detection rates and evaluated the statistical significance of each transient source. A single source, labeled WJN J1443+3439, was statistically significant at the 10{sup –5} significance level; the other 10 sources were insignificant. On the basis of this single detection, the sky surface density of live radio transients was estimated to be 2{sub ?1.9}{sup +9}×10{sup ?6} deg{sup ?2} at a flux density above 3 Jy and a frequency of 1.42 GHz. Since this result is comparable with other survey results and known transients, WJN J1443+3439 could not be excluded. The sky surface density supported a power-law distribution of source count versus flux density. For transient events, the power-law exponent was approximately –3/2. These results are expected to assist radio variable/transient surveys in next-generation facilities such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 7, including the Legacy Survey

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The seventh data release (DR7) from the SDSS represents a completion of the overall, original project, though SDSS-III began in 2008 and will build upon the knowledge gained already. The SDSS Legacy Survey provided a uniform, well-calibrated map of more than 7,500 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap, and three stripes in the South Galactic Cap totaling 740 square degrees. The central stripe in the South Galactic Gap, Stripe 82, was scanned multiple times to enable a deep co-addition of the data and to enable discovery of variable objects. Legacy data supported studies ranging from asteroids and nearby stars to the large-scale structure of the universe. All of the imaging data have been processed to yield calibrated astrometric and photometric parameters and classifications. These parameters are available in one or more tables in a database accessible via the Catalog Archive Server (CAS) at http://cas.sdss.org/astro. [taken and edited from the Legacy page at http://www.sdss.org/legacy/index.html] All three surveys summarized are: 1) Legacy: an imaging survey in five bands over a contiguous 7646 deg2 high-latitude elliptical region in the Northern Galactic Cap, plus an additional 750 deg2 in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with spectroscopy of complete samples of galaxies and quasars covering about 8200 square degrees. The total imaging area in the Legacy survey is 8423 square degrees; 2) SEGUE: (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration): additional imaging of 3240 deg2 of sky at lower Galactic latitudes, together with spectroscopy of 240,000 stars towards 200 sight lines covering 1400 square degrees (spread throughout the Legacy and SEGUE imaging footprints), to study the structure of the Milky Way; 3) Supernova: the equivalent of about 80 repeated imaging scans of the Southern Equatorial Stripe (ra > 310 or ra < 59; -1.25 > dec < 1.25) obtained in variable weather conditions (some clouds) to search for supernovae in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.4. The catalog derived from the images includes more than 350 million celestial objects, and spectra of 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data are fully calibrated and reduced, carefully checked for quality, and publicly accessible through efficient databases. The data have been publicly released in a series of annual data releases, culminating in the final data release, DR7.

  10. Editor: Barbara Lorenz Cover Design: John Hobbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Barbara Lorenz Cover Design: John Hobbs Graphics: Ivan Lorenz John Hobbs Cover Photo: Ranch Road 337 Bandera County, Texas Cover Photo: Ranch Road 337 Bandera County, Texas Cover Photo: John Hobbs #12. Participation at national and in- ternational meetings and professional conferences is a critical part of our

  11. BRIGHTNESS AND FLUCTUATION OF THE MID-INFRARED SKY FROM AKARI OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyo, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Woong-Seob [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Matsumoto, Toshio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Matsuura, Shuji, E-mail: jhpyo@kasi.re.kr [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    We present the smoothness of the mid-infrared sky from observations by the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. AKARI monitored the north ecliptic pole (NEP) during its cold phase with nine wave bands covering from 2.4 to 24 {mu}m, out of which six mid-infrared bands were used in this study. We applied power-spectrum analysis to the images in order to search for the fluctuation of the sky brightness. Observed fluctuation is explained by fluctuation of photon noise, shot noise of faint sources, and Galactic cirrus. The fluctuations at a few arcminutes scales at short mid-infrared wavelengths (7, 9, and 11 {mu}m) are largely caused by the diffuse Galactic light of the interstellar dust cirrus. At long mid-infrared wavelengths (15, 18, and 24 {mu}m), photon noise is the dominant source of fluctuation over the scale from arcseconds to a few arcminutes. The residual fluctuation amplitude at 200'' after removing these contributions is at most 1.04 {+-} 0.23 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.05% of the brightness at 24 {mu}m and at least 0.47 {+-} 0.14 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.02% at 18 {mu}m. We conclude that the upper limit of the fluctuation in the zodiacal light toward the NEP is 0.03% of the sky brightness, taking 2{sigma} error into account.

  12. A 10 Year Climatology of Arctic Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing at Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Crosby, Kathryn; Long, Charles N.; Stone, R. S.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2010-09-15

    A 10-yr record of Arctic cloud fraction and surface radiation budget has been generated using data collected from June 1998 to May 2008 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site and the nearby NOAA Barrow Observatory (BRW). The record includes the seasonal variations of cloud fraction (CF), cloud liquid water path (LWP), precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface albedo, shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes and cloud radative forcings (CRFs), as well as their decadal variations. Values of CF derived from different instruments and methods agree well, having an annual average of ~0.74. Cloudiness increases from March to May, remains high (~0.8-0.9) from May to October, and then decreases over winter. More clouds and higher LWP and PWV occurred during the warm season (May-October) than the cold season (November-April). These results are strongly associated with southerly flow which transports warm, moist air masses to Barrow from the North Pacific and over area of Alaska already free of snow during the warm season and with a dipole pattern of pressure in which a high is centered over the Beaufort Sea and low over the Aleutians during the cold season. The monthly means of estimated clear-sky and measured allsky SW-down and LW-down fluxes at the two facilities are almost identical with the annual mean differences less than 1.6 W m-2. The downwelling and upwelling LW fluxes remain almost constant from January to March, then increase from March and peak during July-August. SW-down fluxes are primarily determined by seasonal changes in the intensity and duration of insolation over Northern Alaska, and are also strongly dependent on cloud fraction and optical depth, and surface albedo. The monthly variations of NET CRF generally follow the cycle of SW CRF, modulated by LW effects. On annual average, the negative SW CRF and positive LW CRF tend to cancel, resulting in annual average NET CRF of 2-4.5 Wm-2. Arctic clouds have a 3 net warming effect on the surface throughout the year, with exception of the snow-free period from middle June to middle September when there tends to be a cooling effect. The daily average surface albedos agree well at the two sites remaining high (>0.8) until late May, dropping below 0.2 after the snow melts around June and increasing during autumn once snow begins to accumulate. On the basis of long-term regression analyses CF has decreased by about 0.048 while temperature has risen by ?1.1 K over the 10-yr period, which can be characterized by tendencies of warming mainly during December and April. With regard to the 2007 record minimum Arctic ice extent, this study provides additional empirical evidence that decreased cloud cover and increased SW-down flux during summer contributed to anomalous ice melt in the region north of Barrow. At Barrow, average June-August CF decreased by 0.062 in 2007 from the 10-yr mean, while SW-down and NET fluxes increased by 28.4 Wm-2 and 11.3 Wm-2, respectively. The increase in the NET radiative flux during summer 2007 most likely contributed to an increase in surface air temperature of 1.6 K.

  13. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Tarantino; Netanel Lindner; Lukasz Fidkowski

    2015-06-22

    Topological order in two dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations - anyons - and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization - termed symmetry enriched topological (SET) order. When the global symmetry group $G$, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors - i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon - one can imagine a local version of the action of $G$ around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with $H^2(G,{\\cal A})$ being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group $G$ possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of $G$, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic `twist' defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele, we construct a wide class of exactly solved models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  14. The Bootstrap Fraction in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoang, G. T.

    1997-04-15

    The TRANSP plasma analysis code is used to calculate the bootstrap current generated during neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating for a wide variety of TFTR discharges. An empirical scaling relation is given for the bootstrap current fraction using the ratio of the peakedness of the thermal pressure and the total current density.

  15. Gauge Invariance and Fractional Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. P. Lima; R. R. Landim

    2006-10-04

    We present a new $(2+1)$-dimensional field theory showing exotic statistics and fractional spin. This theory is achieved through a redefinition of the gauge field $A_{\\mu}$. New properties are found. Another way to implement the field redefinition is used with the same results obtained.

  16. EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS FOR FRACTIONAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-11-17

    EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS FOR FRACTIONAL PARTIAL. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH VARIABLE COEFFICIENTS. ZHIPING MAO†

  17. The GMRT High Resolution Southern Sky Survey for pulsars and transients -I. Survey description and initial discoveries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Malenta, Mateusz; Roy, Jayanta; Chengalur, Jayaram N; Keith, Michael; Kudale, Sanjay; McLaughlin, Maura; Ransom, Scott M; Ray, Paul S; Stappers, Benjamin W

    2015-01-01

    We are conducting a survey for pulsars and transients using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The GMRT High Resolution Southern Sky (GHRSS) survey is an off-Galactic-plane (|b|>5) survey in the declination range -40 deg to -54 deg at 322 MHz. With the high time (up to 30.72 micro-sec) and frequency (up to 0.016275 MHz) resolution observing modes, the 5-sigma detection limit is 0.5 mJy for a 2 ms pulsar with 10% duty cycle at 322 MHz. Total GHRSS sky coverage of 2866 square-deg, will result from 1953 pointings, each covering 1.8 square-deg. The 10-sigma detection limit for a 5 ms transient burst is 1.6 Jy for the GHRSS survey. In addition, the GHRSS survey can reveal transient events like the rotating radio transients or the fast radio bursts. With 35% of the survey completed (i.e. 1000 square-deg), we report the discovery of 10 pulsars, one of which is a millisecond pulsar (MSP), this is one of the highest pulsar per square degree discovery rate for any off-Galactic plane survey. We re-detected 23 k...

  18. Fractional conservation laws in optimal control theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gastao S. F. Frederico; Delfim F. M. Torres

    2007-11-05

    Using the recent formulation of Noether's theorem for the problems of the calculus of variations with fractional derivatives, the Lagrange multiplier technique, and the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations, we prove a Noether-like theorem to the more general context of the fractional optimal control. As a corollary, it follows that in the fractional case the autonomous Hamiltonian does not define anymore a conservation law. Instead, it is proved that the fractional conservation law adds to the Hamiltonian a new term which depends on the fractional-order of differentiation, the generalized momentum, and the fractional derivative of the state variable.

  19. American Clean Skies Foundation | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:AmbataSkies Foundation Jump

  20. SkySails GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH Jump to:Idaho-Utah |RenovablesSixthPowerSkySails

  1. Big Sky, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)Daddy s BiodieselSky, Montana:

  2. Clear Skies Group Inc Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:ClayBurnVitaCleanstar EnergyClearLake,Skies

  3. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr\\Hoczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S

    2014-01-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO Science Run and the second and third Virgo Science Runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ~2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semi-major axes of the orbit from ~0.6e-3 ls to ~6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3e-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for ci...

  4. A deep proper motion catalog within the Sloan digital sky survey footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy M. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Hippel, Ted von [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Physical Sciences, 600 South Clyde Morris Boulevard Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3900 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin [University of Oklahoma, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Liebert, James W. [University of Arizona, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Williams, Kurtis A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, P.O. Box 3011, Commerce, TX 75429 (United States); DeGenarro, Steven [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Jeffery, Elizabeth, E-mail: jam@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: ted.vonhippel@erau.edu, E-mail: kilic@ou.edu, E-mail: jamesliebert@gmail.com, E-mail: kurtis.williams@tamuc.edu, E-mail: studiofortytwo@yahoo.com, E-mail: ejeffery@byu.edu [BYU Department of Physics and Astronomy, N283 ESC, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 m telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas year{sup ?1} at the bright end to 15 mas year{sup ?1} at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of six years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas year{sup ?1} for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2–4 mas year{sup ?1} for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.

  5. Variability of QSOs with variable regions in broad absorption troughs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhi-Cheng; Jiang, Xiao-Lei; Ge, Xue

    2015-01-01

    The variability of broad absorption lines is investigated for a sample of 188 broad-absorption-line (BAL) quasars (QSOs) ($z > 1.7$) with at least two-epoch observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), covering a time-scale of about 0.001 -- 3 years in the rest frame. Considering only the longest time-scale between epochs for each QSO, 73 variable regions in the \\civ BAL troughs are detected for 43 BAL QSOs. The proportion of BAL QSOs showing variable regions increases with longer time-interval than about 1 year in the rest frame. The velocity width of variable regions is narrow compared to the BAL-trough outflow velocity. For 43 BAL QSOs with variable regions, it is found that there is a medium strong correlation between the variation of the continuum luminosity at 1500 \\AA\\ and the variation of the spectral index. With respect to the total 188 QSOs, larger proportion of BAL QSOs with variable regions appears bluer during their brighter phases, which implies that the origin of BA...

  6. 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report Cover | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technologies Market Report Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications NOWEGIS Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo...

  7. The Effect of Grain Size on Spectral Mixture Analysis of Snow-Covered Area from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    The Effect of Grain Size on Spectral Mixture Analysis of Snow-Covered Area from AVIRIS Data Thomas to improve spectral mixture Results were verified with a high spatial resolution aerial analysis of snow of multiple snow endmembers. Snow reflectance of fraction under/overflow and residuals confirmed mix- in near

  8. Fractional Authorship in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritychenko, B

    2015-01-01

    Large, multi-institutional groups or collaborations of scientists are engaged in nuclear physics research projects, and the number of research facilities is dwindling. These collaborations have their own authorship rules, and they produce a large number of highly-cited papers. Multiple authorship of nuclear physics publications creates a problem with the assessment of an individual author's productivity relative to his/her colleagues and renders ineffective a performance metrics solely based on annual publication and citation counts. Many institutions are increasingly relying on the total number of first-author papers; however, this approach becomes counterproductive for large research collaborations with an alphabetical order of authors. A concept of fractional authorship (the claiming of credit for authorship by more than one individual) helps to clarify this issue by providing a more complete picture of research activities. In the present work, nuclear physics fractional and total authorships have been inv...

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  10. Dusty WDs in the WISE all sky survey ? SDSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Sara D.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R., E-mail: barber@nhn.ou.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    A recent cross-correlation between the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 White Dwarf Catalog with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky photometry at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 ?m performed by Debes et al. resulted in the discovery of 52 candidate dusty white dwarfs (WDs). However, the 6'' WISE beam allows for the possibility that many of the excesses exhibited by these WDs may be due to contamination from a nearby source. We present MMT+SAO Wide-Field InfraRed Camera J- and H-band imaging observations (0.''5-1.''5 point spread function) of 16 of these candidate dusty WDs and confirm that four have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) consistent with a dusty disk and are not accompanied by a nearby source contaminant. The remaining 12 WDs have contaminated WISE photometry and SEDs inconsistent with a dusty disk when the contaminating sources are not included in the photometry measurements. We find the frequency of disks around single WDs in the WISE ? SDSS sample to be 2.6%-4.1%. One of the four new dusty WDs has a mass of 1.04 M {sub ?} (progenitor mass 5.4 M {sub ?}) and its discovery offers the first confirmation that massive WDs (and their massive progenitor stars) host planetary systems.

  11. The Digital Sky Project: Prototyping Virtual Observatory Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J Brunner; T. Prince; J. Good; T. Handley; C. Lonsdale; S. G. Djorgovski

    2000-11-10

    Astronomy is entering a new era as multiple, large area, digital sky surveys are in production. The resulting datasets are truly remarkable in their own right; however, a revolutionary step arises in the aggregation of complimentary multi-wavelength surveys (i.e., the cross-identification of a billion sources). The federation of these large datasets is already underway, and is producing a major paradigm shift as Astronomy has suddenly become an immensely data-rich field. This new paradigm will enable quantitatively and qualitatively new science, from statistical studies of our Galaxy and the large-scale structure in the universe, to discoveries of rare, unusual, or even completely new types of astronomical objects and phenomena. Federating and then exploring these large datasets, however, is an extremely challenging task. The Digital Sky project was initiated with this task in mind and is working to develop the techniques and technologies necessary to solve the problems inherent in federating these large databases, as well as the mining of the resultant aggregate data.

  12. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT Citation...

  13. FIRST: Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (Data Catalogs from the Very Large Array (VLA) First Survey)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 27 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and cleaned using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). Data were collected from 1993 through 2002, with enhanced images produced up through 2011. The Data Catalogs have been cleaned and reissued over time, with the latest version coming out in March, 2014. They contain maps, images, and binary data. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  14. Fractional Inversion in Krylov Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bunk

    1998-05-28

    The fractional inverse $M^{-\\gamma}$ (real $\\gamma >0$) of a matrix $M$ is expanded in a series of Gegenbauer polynomials. If the spectrum of $M$ is confined to an ellipse not including the origin, convergence is exponential, with the same rate as for Chebyshev inversion. The approximants can be improved recursively and lead to an iterative solver for $M^\\gamma x = b$ in Krylov space. In case of $\\gamma = 1/2$, the expansion is in terms of Legendre polynomials, and rigorous bounds for the truncation error are derived.

  15. GALEX DIFFUSE OBSERVATIONS OF THE SKY: THE DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murthy, Jayant

    2014-08-01

    I present tabulations of the diffuse observations made by the GALEX spacecraft in two UV bands (FUV: 1539 Å and NUV: 2316 Å) from the (almost) final data release of the GALEX spacecraft (GR6/GR7). This data release includes all the FUV observations and the majority of the NUV observations. I discuss overall trends in the data but the primary purpose of this paper is to make the data available to the public. The data files described in this paper are hosted by the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes at the Space Telescope Science Insitute from whence they may be downloaded. For ease of use, I have also created maps of the diffuse radiation in both bands over the entire observed sky at 6' resolution.

  16. Ancient peoples had the benefit of dark skies and experienced the full spectacle of the starry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the sky in winter and high in summer, as well as giving the daily alternation of day and night. Some area low in the southern sky up to a few centuries before the digging of the ditch and bank. Ancient

  17. Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 1 Search for Dark Matter in the Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 1 Search for Dark Matter in the Sky Aldo Morselli INFN Roma Tor Vergata 14 Jun 2012 Dark Side of the Univers 2012 Buzios 10-15 June #12;Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma press/web releases. #12;Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata 10 The Fermi LAT gamma-ray sky 3-year all

  18. Time Fractional Formalism: Classical and Quantum Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosein Nasrolahpour

    2012-03-18

    In this review, we present some fundamental classical and quantum phenomena in view of time fractional formalism. Time fractional formalism is a very useful tool in describing systems with memory and delay. We hope that this study can provide a deeper understanding of the physical interpretations of fractional derivative.

  19. Fractional quantum Hall effect and nonabelian statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Read; G. Moore

    1992-02-03

    It is argued that fractional quantum Hall effect wavefunctions can be interpreted as conformal blocks of two-dimensional conformal field theory. Fractional statistics can be extended to nonabelian statistics and examples can be constructed from conformal field theory. The Pfaffian state is related to the 2D Ising model and possesses fractionally charged excitations which are predicted to obey nonabelian statistics.

  20. Proposed (to) EXIST: Hard X-ray Imaging All Sky Survey/Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Grindlay; T. A. Prince; F. Harrison; N. Gehrels; C. J. Hailey; B. Ramsey; M. C. Weisskopf; G. K. Skinner; P. Ubertini

    1998-01-01

    The hard x-ray (10-600 keV) sky is inherently time variable and yet has neither been surveyed nor monitored with a sensitive imaging telescope. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a mission concept, proposed for MIDEX, which would conduct the first imaging all-sky hard x-ray survey as well as provide a sensitive all sky monitor. With $\\sim 60%$ sky coverage each orbit, and full sky coverage each 50 days, hard x-ray studies of gamma-ray bursts, AGN, galactic transients, x-ray binaries and accretion-powered pulsars can be conducted over a wide range of timescales. We summarize the scientific objectives of EXIST for both the survey and monitoring objectives. We describe the mission concept and the instrumentation approach, which would incorporate a large area array of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors, as well as some of our ongoing development of CZT array detectors.

  1. Improved Approximation Algorithms for the Min-max Tree Cover and Bounded Tree Cover Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salavatipour, Mohammad R.

    ). In this paper we consider Min-Max k-Tree Cover Problem (MMkTC) and Bounded Tree Cover Problem (BTC) defined of the largest tree in the cover is minimized. In the Bounded Tree Cover problem (BTC), we are given the weight G

  2. Counts-in-Cylinders in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with Comparisons to N-Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrier, Heather D.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Berrier, Joel C.; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Wechsler, Risa H. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-12-16

    Environmental statistics provide a necessary means of comparing the properties of galaxies in different environments and a vital test of models of galaxy formation within the prevailing, hierarchical cosmological model. We explore counts-in-cylinders, a common statistic defined as the number of companions of a particular galaxy found within a given projected radius and redshift interval. Galaxy distributions with the same two-point correlation functions do not necessarily have the same companion count distributions. We use this statistic to examine the environments of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 4. We also make preliminary comparisons to four models for the spatial distributions of galaxies, based on N-body simulations, and data from SDSS DR4 to study the utility of the counts-in-cylinders statistic. There is a very large scatter between the number of companions a galaxy has and the mass of its parent dark matter halo and the halo occupation, limiting the utility of this statistic for certain kinds of environmental studies. We also show that prevalent, empirical models of galaxy clustering that match observed two- and three-point clustering statistics well fail to reproduce some aspects of the observed distribution of counts-in-cylinders on 1, 3 and 6-h{sup -1}Mpc scales. All models that we explore underpredict the fraction of galaxies with few or no companions in 3 and 6-h{sup -1} Mpc cylinders. Roughly 7% of galaxies in the real universe are significantly more isolated within a 6 h{sup -1} Mpc cylinder than the galaxies in any of the models we use. Simple, phenomenological models that map galaxies to dark matter halos fail to reproduce high-order clustering statistics in low-density environments.

  3. Properties of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Barber; A. Meiksin; T. Murphy

    2006-11-02

    We perform population synthesis modelling of a magnitude-limited sample of 4391 Luminous Red Galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4). We fit measured spectral indices using a large library of high resolution spectra, covering a wide range of metallicities and assuming an exponentially decaying star-formation rate punctuated by bursts, to obtain median-likelihood estimates for the light-weighted age, metallicity, stellar mass and extinction for the galaxies. The ages lie in the range 4-10 Gyr, peaking near 6 Gyr, with metallicities in the range -0.4<[Z/H]<0.4, peaking at [Z/H] ~ 0.2. Only a few per cent of the spectra are better fit allowing for a burst in addition to continuous star-formation. The total stellar masses of all the galaxies are confined to a very narrow range. Our results broadly agree with those of previous groups using an independent population synthesis code. We find, however, that our choice in priors results in ages 1-2 Gyr smaller, decreasing the peak star formation epoch from z=2.3 to z=1.3. We develop a metal evolution model incorporating stochastic star-formation quenching motivated by recent attempts to solve the `anti-hierarchical' formation problem of ellipticals. Two scenarios emerge, a closed box with an effective stellar yield of 0.26, and an accreting box with an effective stellar yield of 0.10. Both scenarios require an IMF weighted towards massive stars and characteristic star-formation quenching times of about 100 Myr, the expected lifetime of luminous QSOs. The models predict an anti-correlation between the age and mean metallicity similar to that observed.

  4. Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial refrigerators and freezers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  5. Cover Letter Formula Ready Reference F-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cover Letter Formula Ready Reference F-3 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Office

  6. Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial steam cookers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  7. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  8. SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08/27/03 Slide 1 Health Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepner, Jeremy

    © SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08/27/03 Slide 1 Health Management Complexity Input Output Input Output Compare #12;© SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights available) · Repair/Recovery #12;© SKY Computers, Inc. Company Confidential. All Rights Reserved 08

  9. Sensitivity of full-sky experiments to large scale cosmic ray anisotropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    The two main advantages of space-based observation of extreme energy ($\\gtrsim5\\times10^{19}$ eV) cosmic rays (EECRs) over ground based observatories are the increased field of view and the full-sky coverage with nearly uniform systematics across the entire sky. The former guarantees increased statistics, whereas the latter enables a clean partitioning of the sky into spherical harmonics. The discovery of anisotropies would help to identify the long sought origin of EECRs. We begin an investigation of the reach of a full-sky space-based experiment such as EUSO to detect anisotropies in the extreme-energy cosmic-ray sky compared to ground based partial-sky experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array. The technique is explained here, and simulations for a Universe with just two nonzero multipoles, monopole plus either dipole or quadrupole, are presented. These simulations quantify the advantages of space-based, all-sky coverage.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Anderson, Scott F.; Boroson, Todd A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W.N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Southampton U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-04-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of {approx} 9380 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than 4, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than 5. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i < 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1-inch rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.

  11. Centrifugal Modeling of Subsidence of Landfill Covers [abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Harry; Ronayne, Michael

    1984-01-01

    j "Centrifugal Moueling of Subsidence of Landfill Covers" bysites may result in subsidence of the soil cover system.Following subsidence, water flow through the cover may rise

  12. 2014 Wind Program Peer Review Report Cover | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cover 2014 Wind Program Peer Review Report.JPG More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report Cover Energy...

  13. DOE-L.__ PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS - COVER LETTER AND

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    L. PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS - COVER LETTER AND VOLUME I, OFFER AND OTHER DOCUMENTS (a) Instruction - Cover Letter. The cover letter shall include, but not be limited to,...

  14. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report Cover | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing & Supply Chain Cover Photo 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report Cover 2014 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo...

  15. Flow Field Flow Fractionation Method Development for Applied Bioanalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schachermeyer, Samantha Lynn

    2013-01-01

    E. ; Caldwell, K. , Field-Flow Fractionation Handbook. JohnJ. P. , Sedimentation field-flow-fractionation: emergence ofby sedimentation field-flow fractionation. Am. Lab. (

  16. New Approaches to Object Classification in Synoptic Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Donalek; A. Mahabal; S. G. Djorgovski; S. Marney; A. Drake; E. Glikman; M. J. Graham; R. Williams

    2008-10-27

    Digital synoptic sky surveys pose several new object classification challenges. In surveys where real-time detection and classification of transient events is a science driver, there is a need for an effective elimination of instrument-related artifacts which can masquerade as transient sources in the detection pipeline, e.g., unremoved large cosmic rays, saturation trails, reflections, crosstalk artifacts, etc. We have implemented such an Artifact Filter, using a supervised neural network, for the real-time processing pipeline in the Palomar-Quest (PQ) survey. After the training phase, for each object it takes as input a set of measured morphological parameters and returns the probability of it being a real object. Despite the relatively low number of training cases for many kinds of artifacts, the overall artifact classification rate is around 90%, with no genuine transients misclassified during our real-time scans. Another question is how to assign an optimal star-galaxy classification in a multi-pass survey, where seeing and other conditions change between different epochs, potentially producing inconsistent classifications for the same object. We have implemented a star/galaxy multipass classifier that makes use of external and a priori knowledge to find the optimal classification from the individually derived ones. Both these techniques can be applied to other, similar surveys and data sets.

  17. Optical Identification of the ASCA Large Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Akiyama; K. Ohta; T. Yamada; N. Kashikawa; M. Yagi; W. Kawasaki; M. Sakano; T. Tsuru; Y. Ueda; T. Takahashi; I. Lehmann; G. Hasinger; W. Voges

    2000-01-17

    We present results of optical identification of the X-ray sources detected in the ASCA Large Sky Survey. Optical spectroscopic observations were done for 34 X-ray sources which were detected with the SIS in the 2-7 keV band above 3.5 sigma. The sources are identified with 30 AGNs, 2 clusters of galaxies, and 1 galactic star. Only 1 source is still unidentified. The flux limit of the sample corresponds to 1 x 10^{-13} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} in the 2-10 keV band. Based on the sample, the paper discusses optical and X-ray spectral properties of the AGNs, contribution of the sources to the Cosmic X-ray Background, and redshift and luminosity distributions of the AGNs. An interesting result is that the redshift distribution of the AGNs suggests a deficiency of high-redshift (0.5 10^{44} erg s^{-1}) absorbed narrow-line AGNs (so called type 2 QSOs).

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Tucker; S. Kent; M. W. Richmond; J. Annis; J. A. Smith; S. S. Allam; C. T. Rodgers; J. L. Stute; J. K. Adelman-McCarthy; J. Brinkmann; M. Doi; D. Finkbeiner; M. Fukugita; J. Goldston; B. Greenway; J. E. Gunn; J. S. Hendry; D. W. Hogg; S. -I. Ichikawa; Z. Ivezic; G. R. Knapp; H. Lampeitl; B. C. Lee; H. Lin; T. A. McKay; A. Merrelli; J. A. Munn; E. H. Neilsen, Jr.; H. J. Newberg; G. T. Richards; D. J. Schlegel; C. Stoughton; A. Uomoto; B. Yanny

    2006-08-26

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the semi-automated PT factory, which runs MTPIPE in the day-to-day standard SDSS operations at Fermilab. Finally, we discuss the use of MTPIPE in current SDSS-related projects, including the Southern u'g'r'i'z' Standard Star project, the u'g'r'i'z' Open Star Clusters project, and the SDSS extension (SDSS-II).

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Monitor Telescope Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, D L; Richmond, M W; Annis, J; Smith, J A; Allam, S S; Rodgers, C T; Stute, J L; Adelman-McCarthy, J K; Brinkmann, J; Doi, M; Finkbeiner, D; Fukugita, M; Goldston, J; Greenway, B; Gunn, J E; Hendry, J S; Hogg, D W; Ichikawa, S I; Ivezic, Z; Knapp, G R; Lampeitl, H; Lee, B C; Lin, H; McKay, T A; Merrelli, A; Munn, J A; Neilsen, E H; Newberg, H J; Richards, G T; Schlegel, D J; Stoughton, C; Uomoto, A; Yanny, B

    2006-01-01

    The photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-step process which involves data from three different telescopes: the 1.0-m telescope at the US Naval Observatory (USNO), Flagstaff Station, Arizona (which was used to establish the SDSS standard star network); the SDSS 0.5-m Photometric Telescope (PT) at the Apache Point Observatory (APO), New Mexico (which calculates nightly extinctions and calibrates secondary patch transfer fields); and the SDSS 2.5-m telescope at APO (which obtains the imaging data for the SDSS proper). In this paper, we describe the Monitor Telescope Pipeline, MTPIPE, the software pipeline used in processing the data from the single-CCD telescopes used in the photometric calibration of the SDSS (i.e., the USNO 1.0-m and the PT). We also describe transformation equations that convert photometry on the USNO-1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system to photometry the SDSS 2.5m ugriz system and the results of various validation tests of the MTPIPE software. Further, we discuss the s...

  20. Relationships between expanding pinyonjuniper cover and topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Relationships between expanding pinyon­juniper cover and topography in the central conifer cover and topography. Location The central Great Basin in the state of Nevada, USA. Methods We­juniper woodland and topography can inform regional land management and improve projections of long-term ecosystem

  1. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : In the shallow waters where whitefish spawn, ice cover protects their eggs from destructive wind and wave action://coastwatch.glerl.noaa.gov/glsea/cur/glsea_cur.png #12;GLERL Research Forecast capability The capability to forecast and predict ice cover is important for recreational safety and rescue efforts as well as for navigation, weather forecasting, adapting to lake level

  2. WATER FRACTIONS IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jura, M.; Xu, S., E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    With the goal of using externally polluted white dwarfs to investigate the water fractions of extrasolar planetesimals, we assemble from the literature a sample that we estimate to be more than 60% complete of DB white dwarfs warmer than 13,000 K, more luminous than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} L{sub Sun }, and within 80 pc of the Sun. When considering all the stars together, we find that the summed mass accretion rate of heavy atoms exceeds that of hydrogen by over a factor of 1000. If so, this sub-population of extrasolar asteroids treated as an ensemble has little water and is at least a factor of 20 drier than CI chondrites, the most primitive meteorites. Furthermore, while an apparent 'excess' of oxygen in a single DB can be interpreted as evidence that the accreted material originated in a water-rich parent body, we show that at least in some cases, there can be sufficient uncertainties in the time history of the accretion rate that such an argument may be ambiguous. Regardless of the difficulty associated with interpreting the results from an individual object, our analysis of the population of polluted DBs provides indirect observational support for the theoretical view that a snow line is important in disks where rocky planetesimals form.

  3. Riemann-Liouville Fractional Einstein Field Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Munkhammar

    2010-03-18

    In this paper we establish a fractional generalization of Einstein field equations based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional generalization of the ordinary differential operator $\\partial_\\mu$. We show some elementary properties and prove that the field equations correspond to the regular Einstein field equations for the fractional order $\\alpha = 1$. In addition to this we show that the field theory is inherently non-local in this approach. We also derive the linear field equations and show that they are a generalized version of the time fractional diffusion-wave equation. We show that in the Newtonian limit a fractional version of Poisson's equation for gravity arises. Finally we conclude open problems such as the relation of the non-locality of this theory to quantum field theories and the possible relation to fractional mechanics.

  4. Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2015-02-14

    Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law non-locality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods of the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of non-integer order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

  5. Keck spectroscopy of gravitationally lensed z ? 4 galaxies: Improved constraints on the escape fraction of ionizing photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Tucker A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    The fraction of ionizing photons that escape from young star-forming galaxies is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the role of galaxies in cosmic reionization. Yet traditional techniques for measuring this fraction are inapplicable at the redshifts of interest due to foreground screening by the Ly? forest. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a reduction in the equivalent width of low-ionization absorption lines in composite spectra of Lyman break galaxies at z ? 4 compared to similar measures at z ? 3. This might imply a lower covering fraction of neutral gas and hence an increase with redshift in the escape fraction of ionizing photons. However, our spectral resolution was inadequate to differentiate between several alternative explanations, including changes with redshift in the outflow kinematics. Here we present higher quality spectra of three gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxies at z ? 4 with a spectral resolution sufficient to break this degeneracy of interpretation. We present a method for deriving the covering fraction of low-ionization gas as a function of outflow velocity and compare the results with similar quality data taken for galaxies at lower redshift. We find an interesting but tentative trend of lower covering fractions of low-ionization gas for galaxies with strong Ly? emission. In combination with the demographic trends of Ly? emission with redshift from our earlier work, our results provide new evidence for a reduction in the average H I covering fraction, and hence an increase in the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from Lyman break galaxies, with redshift.

  6. WEIGHTED NORM INEQUALITIES FOR FRACTIONAL MAXIMAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-19

    We study classical weighted Lp ? Lq inequalities for the fractional max- imal operators on Rd, proved originally by Muckenhoupt and Wheeden in the 70's. We

  7. 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications NOWEGIS Report Cover Water Power For...

  8. Monitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    such as land use data, spatial texture, and digital elevation models (DEMs) to obtain greater classificationMonitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to derive a land cover classification for the semiarid Phoenix

  9. Equivalence demonstration of an alternative cover system 307 EQUIVALENCE DEMONSTRATION OF AN ALTERNATIVE COVER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    at the Operating Industries, Inc. (OII) Superfund landfill in southern California. Infiltration control of the closure design show that an evapotranspirative cover is feasible at the site for a wide range engineered components of municipal and hazardous waste landfills is the cover system. The cover system should

  10. A Calibrated Measurement of the Near-IR Continuum Sky Brightness Using Magellan/FIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Peter William

    We characterize the near-IR sky background from 308 observations with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE) spectrograph at Magellan. A subset of 105 observations selected to minimize lunar and thermal effects gives ...

  11. A SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CALCULATING THE EFFECTS OF DAYLIGHT FROM CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Harvey J.

    2012-01-01

    Reflected Component or IRC). The total for these threeDaylight Factor SC + ERC + IRC The Sky Component: The skycomponent is given as: Average IRC where T Transmittance of

  12. OT 060420: A Seemingly Optical Transient Recorded by All-Sky Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lior Shamir; Robert J. Nemiroff

    2006-07-03

    We report on a ~5th magnitude flash detected for approximately 10 minutes by two CONCAM all-sky cameras located in Cerro Pachon - Chile and La Palma - Spain. A third all-sky camera, located in Cerro Paranal - Chile did not detect the flash, and therefore the authors of this paper suggest that the flash was a series of cosmic-ray hits, meteors, or satellite glints. Another proposed hypothesis is that the flash was an astronomical transient with variable luminosity. In this paper we discuss bright optical transient detection using fish-eye all-sky monitors, analyze the apparently false-positive optical transient, and propose possible causes to false optical transient detection in all-sky cameras.

  13. COLORS AND KINEMATICS OF L DWARFS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Sarah J.

    We present a sample of 484 L dwarfs, 210 of which are newly discovered from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic database. We combine this sample with known L dwarfs to investigate their ...

  14. Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of Secondary Gamma Rays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for Future Very High-Energy...

  15. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  16. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  17. OPTIMIZING OF SUMS AND PRODUCTS OF LINEAR FRACTIONAL FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPTIMIZING OF SUMS AND PRODUCTS OF LINEAR FRACTIONAL FUNCTIONS UNDER LINEAR CONSTRAINTS JOACHIM of two linear fractional functions under linear constraints. Results of computational experiments. Fractional programming, composite objective functions, linear fractional functions, Charnes

  18. Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Technologies Energy-Efficient Products Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting The Federal Energy Management Program...

  19. Milagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    transients, such as gamma-ray bursts, and all sky surveys are diÆcult. A new type of TeV -ray observatoryMilagro: A TeV Gamma-Ray Monitor of the Northern Hemisphere Sky B.L. Dingus 1 , R. Atkins 1 , W type of very high energy (> a few 100 GeV) gamma-ray observatory, Milagro, has been built with a large

  20. CORRELATIONS AMONG GALAXY PROPERTIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhongmu; Mao Caiyan, E-mail: zhongmu.li@gmail.com [Institute for Astronomy and History of Science and Technology, Dali University, Dali 671003 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies are complex systems with many properties. Correlations among galaxy properties can supply important clues for studying the formation and evolution of galaxies. Using principal component analysis and least-squares fitting, this paper investigates the correlations among galactic parameters involving more properties (color, morphology, stellar population, and absolute magnitude) than previous studies. We use a volume-limited sample (whole sample) of 75,423 galaxies that was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 and divided into two subsamples (blue and red samples) using a critical color of (g - r) = 0.70 mag. In addition to recovering some previous results, we also obtain some new results. First, all separators for dividing galaxies into two groups can be related via good parameter-first principal component (PC1) correlations. A critical PC1 that indicates whether or not stellar age (or the evolution of a stellar population over time) is important can be used to separate galaxies. This suggests that a statistical parameter, PC1, is helpful in understanding the physical separators of galaxies. In addition, stellar age is shown to be unimportant for red galaxies, while both stellar age and mass are dominating parameters of blue galaxies. This suggests that the various numbers of dominating parameters of galaxies may result from the use of different samples. Finally, some parameters are shown to be correlated, and quantitative fits for a few correlations are obtained, e.g., log(t) = 8.57 + 1.65 (g - r) for the age (log t) and color (g - r) of blue galaxies and log (M{sub *}) = 4.31 - 0.30 M{sub r} for the stellar mass (log M{sub *}) and absolute magnitude (M{sub r}) of red galaxies. The median relationships between various parameter pairs are also presented for comparison.

  1. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  2. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation Embodiments of the present invention provide devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation....

  3. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. These graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.

  4. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. These graphical methods for evaluating covering arraysmore »are illustrated with a few examples.« less

  5. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  6. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

  7. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gas Heating Costs and Savings Use of a pool cover also can help reduce the size of a solar pool heating system, which can save money. How They Work Swimming pools lose energy in...

  8. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of heating pools with and without pool covers in different U.S. cities: Estimating Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heater Costs and Savings Estimating Swimming Pool Gas Heating Costs...

  9. FUNDAMENTAL GROUPS AND COVERING SPACES ETHAN JERZAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, J. Peter

    FUNDAMENTAL GROUPS AND COVERING SPACES ETHAN JERZAK Abstract. In this paper, I will briefly develop) Date: August 22, 2008. 1 #12;2 ETHAN JERZAK the structure of a group; the constant loop is the identity

  10. CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING LOWER TIER COVERED TRANSACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United StatesCERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING LOWER TIER COVERED TRANSACTIONS Applicants should review

  11. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with capacities of 20 to 120 gallons and maximum energy input of 12 kW. Residential heat pump and gas storage water heaters are covered by ENERGY STAR. Boilers, swimming pool...

  12. Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .............................................................................................Page 6 Fuel Prices Projections - Encouraging News .......................Page 7 Agronomy Notes VolumeFeatures . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation ..............................................................Page 5 Miscellaneous Large differences in nitrogen prices.......................................Page 6

  13. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-08-04

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  14. SPACE: the SPectroscopic All-sky Cosmic Explorer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cimatti, A; Baugh, C M; Beckwith, S V W; Content, R; Daddi, E; De Lucia, G; Garilli, B; Guzzo, L; Kauffmann, G; Lehnert, M; MacCagni, D; Martinez-Sansigre, A; Pasian, F; Reid, I N; Rosati, P; Salvaterra, R; Stiavelli, M; Wang, Y; Osorio, M Zapatero

    2008-01-01

    We describe the scientific motivations, the mission concept and the instrumentation of SPACE, a class-M mission proposed for concept study at the first call of the ESA Cosmic-Vision 2015-2025 planning cycle. SPACE aims to produce the largest three-dimensional evolutionary map of the Universe over the past 10 billion years by taking near-IR spectra and measuring redshifts for more than half a billion galaxies at 0DMDs) covering a total field of view of 0.4 deg2, and will perform large-multiplexing multi-object spectroscopy (e.g. ~6000 targets per pointi...

  15. The Phoenix survey: the pairing fraction of faint radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Georgakakis; B. Mobasher; L. Cram; A. Hopkins

    1999-10-07

    The significance of tidal interactions in the evolution of the faint radio population (sub-mJy) is studied using a deep and homogeneous radio survey (1.4 GHz), covering an area of 3.14 deg$^2$ and complete to a flux density of 0.4 mJy. Optical photometric and spectroscopic data are also available for this sample. A statistical approach is employed to identify candidate physical associations between radio sources and optically selected `field' galaxies. We find an excess of close pairs around optically identified faint radio sources, albeit at a low significance level, implying that the pairing fraction of the sub-mJy radio sources is similar to that of `field' galaxies (at the same magnitude limit) but higher than that of local galaxies.

  16. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  17. Determining the covering factor of Compton-thick active galactic nuclei with NuSTAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brightman, M; Stern, D; Arevalo, P; Ballantyne, D R; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Craig, W W; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Fuerst, F; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S; Puccetti, S; Rivers, E; Vasudevan, R; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    The covering factor of Compton-thick obscuring material associated with the torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is at present best understood through the fraction of sources exhibiting Compton-thick absorption along the line of sight ($N_{H}>1.5\\times10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) in the X-ray band, which reveals the average covering factor. Determining this Compton-thick fraction is difficult however, due to the extreme obscuration. With its spectral coverage at hard X-rays ($>$10 keV), NuSTAR is sensitive to the AGN covering factor since Compton scattering of X-rays off optically thick material dominates at these energies. We present a spectral analysis of 10 AGN observed with NuSTAR where the obscuring medium is optically thick to Compton scattering, so called Compton-thick (CT) AGN. We use the torus models of Brightman & Nandra which predict the X-ray spectrum from reprocessing in a torus and include the torus opening angle as a free parameter and aim to determine the covering factor of the Compton-thick gas i...

  18. RESOLVING THE BARYON-FRACTION PROFILE IN LENSING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Falco, Emilio E.

    2011-10-20

    The study of the distribution of baryonic matter within dark halos enriches our understanding of galaxy formation. We show the radial dependence of stellar baryon-fraction curves derived for 21 lensing galaxies from the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey (CASTLES) by means of stellar population synthesis and pixel-based mass reconstruction. The sample covers a stellar mass range of M{sub s} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (solar masses) which corresponds to a total enclosed mass range of M{sub L} {approx_equal} 7 x 10{sup 9}-3 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} on radial scales from 0.25R{sub e} to 5R{sub e} (effective radii). By examining the M{sub s} and M{sub L} dependence on radial distance to the center of each galaxy, we find that there are pairs of lenses on small to intermediate mass scales which approach at large radii the same values for their enclosed total mass but exhibit very different stellar masses and stellar baryon fractions. This peculiar behavior subsides for the most massive lensing galaxies. All the baryon-fraction profiles show that the dark matter halo overtakes the stellar content between 1.5 and 2.5R{sub e}. At 3R{sub e} most of the stellar component is enclosed. We find evidence for a stellar baryon fraction steadily declining over the full mass range. Furthermore, we shed light on the Fundamental Plane puzzle by showing that the slope of the M{sub L} (< R)-to-M{sub s} (< R) relation approaches the mass-to-light relation of recent Fundamental Plane studies at large radii. We also introduce novel concentration indices c = R90/R50 for stellar and total mass profiles (i.e., the ratio of radii enclosing 90% and 50% of the stellar or total mass). We show that the value c = 2.6 originally determined by light profiles which separates early-type galaxies from late-type galaxies also holds for stellar mass. In particular, less massive dark matter halos turn out to be influenced by the distribution of stellar matter on resolved scales below 10 kpc. The ongoing study of resolved baryon-fraction profiles will make it possible to evaluate the validity of star formation models as well as adiabatic contraction prescriptions commonly used in simulations.

  19. SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, D.; York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A.; Dalal, N. Paravastu; Cohen, A. S.; Erickson, W. C.

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

  20. Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

  1. Linear and multilinear fractional operators: weighted inequalities, sharp bounds, and other properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moen, Kabe

    2009-04-27

    In this work we consider various fractional operators, including the classical fractional integral operators, related fractional maximal functions, multilinear fractional integral operators, and multisublinear fractional ...

  2. The solar neighborhood. XXXV. Distances to 1404 M dwarf systems within 25 PC in the southern sky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, Jennifer G.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Dieterich, Sergio B., E-mail: winters@astro.gsu.edu, E-mail: jao@astro.gsu.edu, E-mail: dieterich@astro.gsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present trigonometric, photometric, and photographic distances to 1748 southern (??0{sup ?}) M dwarf systems with ??0{sub ?}{sup ??}18 yr{sup ?1}, of which 1404 are believed to lie within 25 pc of the Sun. The stars have 6.67?V{sub J}?21.38 and 3.50?(V{sub J}?K{sub s})?9.27, covering the entire M dwarf spectral sequence from M0.0 V through M9.5 V. This sample therefore provides a comprehensive snapshot of our current knowledge of the southern sky for the nearest M dwarfs that dominate the stellar population of the Galaxy. Roughly one-third of the 1748 systems, each of which has an M dwarf primary, have published high quality parallaxes, including 179 from the REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars astrometry program. For the remaining systems, we offer photometric distance estimates that have well-calibrated errors. The bulk of these (?700) are based on new V{sub J}R{sub KC}I{sub KC} photometry acquired at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9 m telescope, while the remaining 500 primaries have photographic plate distance estimates calculated using SuperCOSMOS B{sub J}R{sub 59F}I{sub IVN} photometry. Confirmed and candidate subdwarfs in the sample have been identified, and a census of companions is included.

  3. tionated the bubble gas sample through preferential consumption of '2C-CH4. Such fractionation may

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Asish R.

    - lying the methane production zone via molecular diffusion or to mthane bubbles that become lodged). The potential importance of carbon isotopic fractionation of methane during its trans- port up through occur to dissolve methane transported more slowly through the 7- to 25-cm-thick sedinent cover over

  4. CLOUD FRACTION STATISTICS DERIVED FROM 2YEARS OF HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR DATA ACQUIRED AT EUREKA, CANADA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    CLOUD FRACTION STATISTICS DERIVED FROM 2YEARS OF HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR DATA ACQUIRED(AHSRL) and the NOAA 8.6 mm wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). Both instruments have operated nearly continuously since Sept 2005. This paper presents a record of cloud cover, cloud altitude and cloud phase derived

  5. SPACE: the SPectroscopic All-sky Cosmic Explorer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Cimatti; M. Robberto; C. M. Baugh; S. V. W. Beckwith; R. Content; E. Daddi; G. De Lucia; B. Garilli; L. Guzzo; G. Kauffmann; M. Lehnert; D. Maccagni; A. Martinez-Sansigre; F. Pasian; I. N. Reid; P. Rosati; R. Salvaterra; M. Stiavelli; Y. Wang; M. Zapatero Osorio; the SPACE team

    2008-04-28

    We describe the scientific motivations, the mission concept and the instrumentation of SPACE, a class-M mission proposed for concept study at the first call of the ESA Cosmic-Vision 2015-2025 planning cycle. SPACE aims to produce the largest three-dimensional evolutionary map of the Universe over the past 10 billion years by taking near-IR spectra and measuring redshifts for more than half a billion galaxies at 0DMDs) covering a total field of view of 0.4 deg2, and will perform large-multiplexing multi-object spectroscopy (e.g. ~6000 targets per pointing) at a spectral resolution of R~400 as well as diffraction-limited imaging with continuous coverage from 0.8mum to 1.8mum.

  6. Integral equations, fractional calculus and shift operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Babusci; G. Dattoli; D. Sacchetti

    2010-07-29

    We present an extension of a previously developed method employing the formalism of the fractional derivatives to solve new classes of integral equations. This method uses different forms of integral operators that generalizes the exponential shift operator.

  7. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  8. Algebra of Fractions of Algebra with Conjugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleks Kleyn

    2012-05-09

    In the paper, I considered construction of algebra of fractions of algebra with conjugation. I also considered algebra of polynomials and algebra of rational mappings over algebra with conjugation.

  9. Unconventional Sequence of Fractional Quantum Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacoby, Amir

    Unconventional Sequence of Fractional Quantum Hall States in Suspended Graphene Benjamin E. Feldman- netic field B to a two-dimensional elec- tron gas (2DEG) gives rise to flat energy bands called Landau

  10. Extending Bauer's corollary to fractional derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Dreisigmeyer; Peter M. Young

    2004-02-11

    We comment on the method of Dreisigmeyer and Young [D. W. Dreisigmeyer and P. M. Young, J. Phys. A \\textbf{36}, 8297, (2003)] to model nonconservative systems with fractional derivatives. It was previously hoped that using fractional derivatives in an action would allow us to derive a single retarded equation of motion using a variational principle. It is proven that, under certain reasonable assumptions, the method of Dreisigmeyer and Young fails.

  11. Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekala, Malla R.

    1993-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

  12. Spatial Scaling of Land Cover Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Spatial networks of land cover are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. Continuous field proxies for human settlements, agriculture and forest cover have similar spatial scaling properties spanning 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Progressive segmentation of these continuous fields yields spatial networks with rank-size distributions having slopes near -1 for a wide range of thresholds. We consider a general explanation for this scaling that does not require different processes for each type of land cover. The same conditions that give rise to scale-free networks in general can produce power law distributions of component sizes for bounded spatial networks confined to a plane or surface. Progressive segmentation of a continuous field naturally results in growth of the network while the increasing perimeters of the growing components result in preferential attachment to the larger components with the longer perimeters. Progressive segmentation of two types of random continuous field results in progr...

  13. Covered Product Category: Light Fixtures (Luminaires)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including luminaires, or light fixtures. The luminaires product category is very broad and covers a wide variety of lighting products. Both ENERGY STAR® and FEMP provide programmatic guidance for various types of luminaires. See table 2 for more information about which types of light fixtures are covered by which program (FEMP or ENERGY STAR). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  14. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  15. INTEGRAL high energy sky: The keV to MeV cosmic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ubertini; A. De Rosa; A. Bazzano; L. Bassani; V. Sguera

    2008-02-03

    After almost 5 years of operation, ESA's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Space Observatory has unveiled a new soft Gamma ray sky and produced a remarkable harvest of results, ranging from identification of new high energy sources, to the discovery of dozens of variable sources to the mapping of the Aluminum emission from the Galaxy Plane to the presence of electrons and positrons generating the annihilation line in the Galaxy central radian. INTEGRAL is continuing the deep observations of the Galactic Plane and of the whole sky in the soft Gamma ray range. The new IBIS gamma ray catalogue contains more than 420 sources detected above 20 keV. We present a view of the INTEGRAL high energy sky with particular regard to sources emitting at high energy, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), HESS/MAGIC counterparts and new view of the cosmic gamma ray diffuse background.

  16. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and HydrologyHydrology Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University The Importance of Climate · Climate affects the environment and us ­ Ecology: vegetation and animals ­ Water Systems ­ People

  17. On the cOver efimov states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    On the cOver efimov states Two trimers to scale Article p586; News & Views p533 Supersolid helium literature news & Views 533 Few-body physics: giant trimers true to scale Vitaly Efimov 534 Supersolid helium: Stiffer but flowing Sébastien Balibar 535 Lunar science: in the moon's wake David Gevaux 536 cell

  18. Simulation of Synchronous Machines This chapter covers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Simulation of Synchronous Machines This chapter covers: (A) Sections 5.25.7: Determination of initial conditions (B) Section 5.8: Determination of machine parameters from manufacturers' data.3: Machine connected to an infinite bus through a line · Section 5.4: Machine connected

  19. 1CHANCELLOR'S REPORT 20112012 On the cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Renewable Energy Fueled by a Cell1CHANCELLOR'S REPORT 2011­2012 #12;2 On the cover Examining the role that marine microbes play and Education (C-MORE) at the University of Hawai`i at Mnoa. The first of its kind to focus on microbes, C

  20. EXCEPTIONAL COVERS AND BIJECTIONS ON RATIONAL POINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Michael

    EXCEPTIONAL COVERS AND BIJECTIONS ON RATIONAL POINTS ROBERT M. GURALNICK, THOMAS J. TUCKER proved by Davenport and Lewis [DL], Mac- Cluer [Mac], Williams [Wi], Cohen [Co], and Fried [Fr, Fr3, FGS was partially supported by NSF grant DMS-0140578. 1 #12;2 ROBERT M. GURALNICK, THOMAS J. TUCKER, AND MICHAEL E

  1. EXCEPTIONAL COVERS AND BIJECTIONS ON RATIONAL POINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zieve, Michael E.

    EXCEPTIONAL COVERS AND BIJECTIONS ON RATIONAL POINTS ROBERT M. GURALNICK, THOMAS J. TUCKER cases and weaker versions were previously proved by Davenport and Lewis [DL], Mac- Cluer [Mac], Williams was partially supported by NSF grant DMS-0140578. 1 #12;2 ROBERT M. GURALNICK, THOMAS J. TUCKER, AND MICHAEL E

  2. I. Cover Page Ubiquitous Smart Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abowd, Gregory D.

    I. Cover Page Ubiquitous Smart Spaces Topic Area: Smart Spaces Gregory Abowd, Chris Atkeson, Irfan. Ubiquitous Smart Spaces II.1 Innovative Capability Envisioned The next revolutionary advance in smart spaces research is to create and experiment with ubiquitous smart spaces. Current research has created isolated

  3. Fast Algorithm for Partial Covers in Words

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lonardi, Stefano

    Fast Algorithm for Partial Covers in Words Tomasz Kociumaka1 , Solon P. Pissis2,3 , Jakub Bad Herrenalb, June 17, 2013 T. Kociumaka, S. Pissis, J. Radoszewski, W. Rytter, T. Wale Fast are aligned. a a a a a a a a a a a ab b b b T. Kociumaka, S. Pissis, J. Radoszewski, W. Rytter, T. Wale Fast

  4. ibm.com/redbooks Front cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westall, James M.

    ibm.com/redbooks Front cover IBM XIV Storage System: Architecture, Implementation, and Usage Organization IBM XIV Storage System: Architecture, Implementation, and Usage September 2009 SG24-7659-01 #12 with IBM Corp. Second Edition (September 2009) This edition applies to Version 10, Release 1, of the XIV

  5. ibm.com/redbooks Front cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ibm.com/redbooks Front cover IBM System Blue Gene Solution: Application Development Gary L. Mullen Organization IBM System Blue Gene Solution: Application Development June 2007 SG24-7179-04 #12;© Copyright Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp

  6. Covered Product Category: Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including refrigerated beverage vending machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  7. Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle Midwest fields, waiting to rot or be processed into ethanol. Interestingly, the National Corn Growers

  8. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  9. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik J. Schwarz; David Bacon; Song Chen; Chris Clarkson; Dragan Huterer; Martin Kunz; Roy Maartens; Alvise Raccanelli; Matthias Rubart; Jean-Luc Starck

    2015-01-15

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  10. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Dominik J; Chen, Song; Clarkson, Chris; Huterer, Dragan; Kunz, Martin; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rubart, Matthias; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  11. FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy Deployment FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy Deployment December 7, 2015 - 5:06pm Addthis FEMP First...

  12. First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure May 28, 2015 -...

  13. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Snow-Covered Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    snow cover through shading, wind sheltering, and interception. Changes in snow cover associated and nitrogen cycling. Introduction Approximately 60% of the terrestrial earth surface experiences seasonal snow

  14. Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special Notice Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc...

  15. On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

  16. Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Particulate Matter on DPF Soot Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of...

  17. Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in Strained Graphene Prev Next Title: Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in...

  18. Intake fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions in US urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, J D; Teoh, S K; Nazaroff, William W

    2005-01-01

    fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions JD Marshall et al.and trends in motor vehicle emissions to monthly urbanExposure to motor vehicle emissions: An intake fraction

  19. Carbon isotope fractionation in autotrophic Chromatium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, William Wai-Lun

    1974-01-01

    . 8 and -27. 8 o/oo respect- 13 PDB ively. Fructose and glucose separated from the sugar fraction have an identical 6 C value of -21. 8 o/oo; 13 whereas aspartic acid, glutamic acid and alanine separated from the amino acid fraction have 6PDBC... ACETYL- Ca A F UKIARATE CITRATE ATP CO ATP DPNH 2 1 I TPNH CO GLYOX SUCCINATE ISOCITRATE YLATE + GLUTAMATE 16 led POLLER et al. (1961) and LOSADA et al. (1960) to believe that PEP carboxvlase is also active in the bacterium during...

  20. Selecting Fractionators for Product Composition Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, D. E.; Anderson, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    FRACTIONATORS FOR PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL D. E. Griffin and J. E. Anderson Applied Automation, Inc. Pawhuska Road Bartlesville, OK 74004 ABSTRACT The benefits resulting from computer control of fractionators have been proven in many installations... Progress 74,4, pp. 49-55. 3. Smith, D. E., W. S. Stewart and D. E. Griffin, February, 1978, "Distill With Composition Control, "Hydrocarbon Processing 57, 2, pp. 99-107. 4. Griffin, D. E., J. R. Parsons and D. E. Smith, "The Use of Process Analyzers...

  1. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  2. Reconstruction of Intensity From Covered Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Watkins, Thomas R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Burchell, Timothy D; Rosseel, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The safe handling of activated samples requires containment and covering the sample to eliminate any potential for contamination. Subsequent characterization of the surface with x-rays ideally necessitates a thin film. While many films appear visually transparent, they are not necessarily x-ray transparent. Each film material has a unique beam attenuation and sometimes have amorphous peaks that can superimpose with those of the sample. To reconstruct the intensity of the underlying activated sample, the x-ray attenuation and signal due to the film needs to be removed from that of the sample. This requires the calculation of unique deconvolution parameters for the film. The development of a reconstruction procedure for a contained/covered sample is described.

  3. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The conclusions of the optimization are found to be insensitive to all input parameters, the monetary value of the health detriment over a range of values from $200,000 to $15,000,000 per person-Sv, and the period of integration of collective dose. A 2.5 m (8.2 ft) closure cover at the Area 5 RWMS can meet all applicable regulatory requirements and maintain radionuclide releases ALARA.

  4. Fire in the sky: The southern lights in Indigenous oral traditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2015-01-01

    Parts of Australia have been privileged to see dazzling lights in the night sky as the Aurora Australis (known as the southern lights) puts on a show this year. Aurorae are significant in Australian Indigenous astronomical traditions. Aboriginal people associate aurorae with fire, death, blood, and omens, sharing many similarities with Native American communities.

  5. SkyHunter: A Multi-Surface Environment for Supporting Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Frank

    SkyHunter: A Multi-Surface Environment for Supporting Oil and Gas Exploration Teddy Seyed, Mario}@ucalgary.ca ABSTRACT The process of oil and gas exploration and its result, the decision to drill for oil in a specific show in this paper, many of the existing technologies and practices that support the oil and gas

  6. The Animated Gamma-ray Sky Revealed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Isabelle Grenier

    2010-01-08

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been observing the sky in gamma-rays since August 2008.  In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage (20 MeV-300 GeV) and angular resolution, the wide field of view of the Large Area Telescope enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and of the whole sky every three hours. It has revealed a very animated sky with bright gamma-ray bursts flashing and vanishing in minutes, powerful active galactic nuclei flaring over hours and days, many pulsars twinkling in the Milky Way, and X-ray binaries shimmering along their orbit. Most of these variable sources had not been seen by the Fermi predecessor, EGRET, and the wealth of new data already brings important clues to the origin of the high-energy emission and particles powered by the compact objects. The telescope also brings crisp images of the bright gamma-ray emission produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the interstellar medium, thus allowing to measure the cosmic nuclei and electron spectra across the Galaxy, to weigh interstellar clouds, in particular in the dark-gas phase. The telescope sensitivity at high energy will soon provide useful constraints on dark-matter annihilations in a variety of environments. I will review the current results and future prospects of the Fermi mission.

  7. WAHRSIS: A Low-cost, High-resolution Whole Sky Imager With Near-Infrared Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Stefan

    community for a variety of applications and domains, such as aviation, weather prediction, and solar energy Dev,a Florian M. Savoy,b Yee Hui Lee,a Stefan Winklerb aSchool of Electrical and Electronic of automatic whole sky imagers have been developed at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, University

  8. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsotti, Lisa

    This paper presents results of an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50,1?190]??Hz and with frequency derivative range of ?[-20,1.1]×10[superscript -10]??Hz?s[superscript -1] for the ...

  9. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  10. Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill Jorge G. Zornberg, M, Inc. OII Superfund landfill in southern California. This cover system constitutes the first ET cover flow analyses performed for closure design at the OII site show that an ET cover is feasible for a wide

  11. Color-magnitude distribution of face-on nearby galaxies in Sloan digital sky survey DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shuo-Wen; Feng, Long-Long; Gu, Qiusheng; Huang, Song; Shi, Yong

    2014-05-20

    We have analyzed the distributions in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of a large sample of face-on galaxies to minimize the effect of dust extinctions on galaxy color. About 300,000 galaxies with log (a/b) < 0.2 and redshift z < 0.2 are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 catalog. Two methods are employed to investigate the distributions of galaxies in the CMD, including one-dimensional (1D) Gaussian fitting to the distributions in individual magnitude bins and two-dimensional (2D) Gaussian mixture model (GMM) fitting to galaxies as a whole. We find that in the 1D fitting, two Gaussians are not enough to fit galaxies with the excess present between the blue cloud and the red sequence. The fitting to this excess defines the center of the green valley in the local universe to be (u – r){sub 0.1} = –0.121M {sub r,} 0{sub .1} – 0.061. The fraction of blue cloud and red sequence galaxies turns over around M {sub r,} {sub 0.1} ? –20.1 mag, corresponding to stellar mass of 3 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}. For the 2D GMM fitting, a total of four Gaussians are required, one for the blue cloud, one for the red sequence, and the additional two for the green valley. The fact that two Gaussians are needed to describe the distributions of galaxies in the green valley is consistent with some models that argue for two different evolutionary paths from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  12. Hamilton-Jacobi Fractional Sequential Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eqab M. Rabei; Bashar S. Ababneh

    2007-04-04

    As a continuation of Rabei et al. work [11], the Hamilton- Jacobi partial differential equation is generalized to be applicable for systems containing fractional derivatives. The Hamilton- Jacobi function in configuration space is obtained in a similar manner to the usual mechanics. Two problems are considered to demonstrate the application of the formalism. The result found to be in exact agreement with Agrawal's formalism.

  13. Measurement of the D -> pipi branching fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-09-01

    Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for D0 --> pi+pi-, and we present the first measurements of D0 --> pi0pi0 and of D+ --> pi+pi0, which is due to an isospin changing...

  14. AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE THERMAL RADIANCE OF CLEAR SKIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul

    2012-01-01

    from the covers of solar collectors and the exposed surfacesof heat loss from solar collector glazings, and building

  15. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodeur, Pierre (Smyrna, GA)

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  16. Radiotherapy Dose Fractionation under Parameter Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, Matt; Kim, Daero; Keller, Harald

    2011-11-30

    In radiotherapy, radiation is directed to damage a tumor while avoiding surrounding healthy tissue. Tradeoffs ensue because dose cannot be exactly shaped to the tumor. It is particularly important to ensure that sensitive biological structures near the tumor are not damaged more than a certain amount. Biological tissue is known to have a nonlinear response to incident radiation. The linear quadratic dose response model, which requires the specification of two clinically and experimentally observed response coefficients, is commonly used to model this effect. This model yields an optimization problem giving two different types of optimal dose sequences (fractionation schedules). Which fractionation schedule is preferred depends on the response coefficients. These coefficients are uncertainly known and may differ from patient to patient. Because of this not only the expected outcomes but also the uncertainty around these outcomes are important, and it might not be prudent to select the strategy with the best expected outcome.

  17. Fractional Quantum Hall States in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Jellal; Bellati Malika

    2011-04-27

    We quantum mechanically analyze the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene. This will be done by building the corresponding states in terms of a potential governing the interactions and discussing other issues. More precisely, we consider a system of particles in the presence of an external magnetic field and take into account of a specific interaction that captures the basic features of the Laughlin series \

  18. Excursions of diffusion processes and continued fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alain Comtet; Yves Tourigny

    2010-02-11

    It is well-known that the excursions of a one-dimensional diffusion process can be studied by considering a certain Riccati equation associated with the process. We show that, in many cases of interest, the Riccati equation can be solved in terms of an infinite continued fraction. We examine the probabilistic significance of the expansion. To illustrate our results, we discuss some examples of diffusions in deterministic and in random environments.

  19. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emil J. Martinec

    2015-05-20

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  20. Tunable fractional-order Fourier transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyutin, A A [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-31

    A fractional two-dimensional Fourier transformer whose orders are tuned by means of optical quadrupoles is described. It is shown that in the optical scheme considered, the Fourier-transform order a element of [0,1] in one of the mutually orthogonal planes corresponds to the transform order (2-a) in another plane, i.e., to inversion and inverse Fourier transform of the order a. (laser modes and beams)

  1. The Fractional London Equation and The Fractional Pippard Model For Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José Weberszpil

    2012-07-23

    With the discovery of new superconductors there was a running to find the justifications for the new properties found in these materials. In order to describe these new effects some theories were adapted and some others have been tried. In this work we present an application of the fractional calculus to study the superconductor in the context of London theory. Here we investigated the linear London equation modified by fractional derivatives for non-differentiable functions, instead of integer ones, in a coarse grained scenario. We apply the fractional approach based in the modified Riemann-Liouville sense to improve the model in order to include possible non-local interactions and the media. It is argued that the e ects of non-locality and long memory, intrinsic to the formalism of the fractional calculus, are relevant to achieving a satisfactory phenomenological description. In order to compare the present results with the usual London theory, we calculated the magnetic field distribution for a mesoscopic superconductor system. Also, a fractional Pippard-like model is proposed to take into account the non-locality beside effects of interactions and the media. We propose that parameter alfa of fractionality can be used to create an alternative way to characterize superconductors.

  2. The First Calculation of Fractional Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Bertolini; Jesse Thaler; Jonathan R. Walsh

    2015-05-14

    In collider physics, jet algorithms are a ubiquitous tool for clustering particles into discrete jet objects. Event shapes offer an alternative way to characterize jets, and one can define a jet multiplicity event shape, which can take on fractional values, using the framework of "jets without jets". In this paper, we perform the first analytic studies of fractional jet multiplicity $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ in the context of $e^+e^-$ collisions. We use fixed-order QCD to understand the $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ cross section at order $\\alpha_s^2$, and we introduce a candidate factorization theorem to capture certain higher-order effects. The resulting distributions have a hybrid jet algorithm/event shape behavior which agrees with parton shower Monte Carlo generators. The $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ observable does not satisfy ordinary soft-collinear factorization, and the $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ cross section exhibits a number of unique features, including the absence of collinear logarithms and the presence of soft logarithms that are purely non-global. Additionally, we find novel divergences connected to the energy sharing between emissions, which are reminiscent of rapidity divergences encountered in other applications. Given these interesting properties of fractional jet multiplicity, we advocate for future measurements and calculations of $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ at hadron colliders like the LHC.

  3. The LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) I. Survey description and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, G H; Orrú, E; Breton, R P; Carbone, D; Ferrari, C; Hardcastle, M J; Jurusik, W; Macario, G; Mulcahy, D; Rafferty, D; Asgekar, A; Brentjens, M; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Toribio, M C; Adebahr, B; Arts, M; Bell, M R; Bonafede, A; Bray, J; Broderick, J; Cantwell, T; Carroll, P; Cendes, Y; Clarke, A O; Croston, J; Daiboo, S; de Gasperin, F; Gregson, J; Harwood, J; Hassall, T; Heesen, V; Horneffer, A; van der Horst, A J; Iacobelli, M; Jeli?, V; Jones, D; Kant, D; Kokotanekov, G; Martin, P; McKean, J P; Morabito, L K; Nikiel-Wroczy?ski, B; Offringa, A; Pandey, V N; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, M; Pratley, L; Riseley, C; Rowlinson, A; Sabater, J; Scaife, A M M; Scheers, L H A; Sendlinger, K; Shulevski, A; Sipior, M; Sobey, C; Stewart, A J; Stroe, A; Swinbank, J; Tasse, C; Trüstedt, J; Varenius, E; van Velzen, S; Vilchez, N; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S; Williams, W L; de Bruyn, A G; Nijboer, R; Wise, M; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Breitling, F; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; de Vos, M; Deller, A; Dettmar, R J; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Holties, H A; Intema, H; Jackson, N J; Jütte, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W F A; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Law, C; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Noordam, J E; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky LOFAR imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic multifrequency nature providing information about the spectral properties of the detected sources over more than two octaves (from 30 to 160 MHz). The broadband frequency coverage, together with the fast survey speed generated by LOFAR's multibeaming capabilities, make MSSS the first survey of the sort anticipated to be carried out with the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Two of the sixteen frequency bands included in the survey were chosen to exactly overlap the frequency coverage of large-area Very Large Array (VLA) and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) surveys at 74 MHz and 151 MHz respectively. The survey performance is illustrated within the "MSSS Verification Field" (MVF), a region of 100 square degrees centered at J...

  4. Film vs. magnetic tape recording for IRLS AN/AAD-5 for open skies imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V.; Saatzer, P.; Goede, W.

    1996-11-01

    The United States Government (USG) Full Operational Capability (FOC) Open Skies aircraft (OC-135) will be equipped with an Infrared Line Scanner AN/AAD-5, fully compliant with the treaty requirements. An extensive trade study is conducted to explore the possibility of switching from film recording to either analog or digital magnetic tape recording when the AAD-5 IRLS is flown in the Open Skies Aircraft. This paper presents preliminary trade study results and the overall conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis. A flight measurement program is now being carried out under the Follow On Sensor Evaluation Program (FOSEP) to evaluate the digital magnetic recording as compared to the film recording and the results of these fight measurement will be presented at a later date. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor projected onto the sky with reduced focal anisoplanatism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Butterley; G. D. Love; R. W. Wilson; R. M. Myers; T. J. Morris

    2006-02-10

    A method for producing a laser guide star wavefront sensor for adaptive optics with reduced focal anisoplanatism is presented. A theoretical analysis and numerical simulations have been carried out and the results are presented. The technique, named SPLASH (Sky-Projected Laser Array Shack-Hartmann), is shown to suffer considerably less from focal anisoplanatism than a conventional laser guide star system. The method is potentially suitable for large telescope apertures (~8m), and possibly for extremely large telescopes.

  6. Low-Mass Dwarf Template Spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John J. Bochanski; Andrew A. West; Suzanne L. Hawley; Kevin R. Covey

    2006-10-20

    We present template spectra of low-mass (M0-L0) dwarfs derived from over 4,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. These composite spectra are suitable for use as medium-resolution (R ~ 1,800) radial velocity standards. We report mean spectral properties (molecular bandhead strengths,equivalent widths) and use the templates to investigate the effects of magnetic activity and metallicity on the spectroscopic and photometric properties of low-mass stars.

  7. An All-Sky Search for Steady VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    The Milagrito water Cherenkov detector in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico took data from February 1997 to April 1998. Milagrito served as a prototype for the larger Milagro detector, which has just begun operations. Milagrito was the first large-aperture gamma-ray detector with sensitivity to gamma rays below 1 TeV. We report here on a search for steady emission from point sources over most of the northern sky using data from Milagrito.

  8. An All-Sky Search for Steady VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-23

    The Milagrito water Cherenkov detector in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico took data from February 1997 to April 1998. Milagrito served as a prototype for the larger Milagro detector, which has just begun operations. Milagrito was the first large-aperture gamma-ray detector with sensitivity to gamma rays below 1 TeV. We report here on a search for steady emission from point sources over most of the northern sky using data from Milagrito.

  9. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

  10. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

    2011-10-02

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  11. SkyMouse: A smart interface for astronomical on-line resources and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen-Zhou CUI; Hua-Ping SUN; Yong-Heng ZHAO; Yu LUO; Da-Zhi QI

    2007-11-27

    With the development of network and the World Wide Web (WWW), the Internet has been growing and changing dramatically. More and more on-line database systems and different kinds of services are available for astronomy research. How to help users find their way through the jungle of information services becomes an important challenge. Although astronomers have been aware of the importance of interoperability and introduced the concept of Virtual Observatory as a uniform environment for future astronomical on-line resources and services, transparent access to heterogeneous on-line information is still difficult. SkyMouse is a lightweight interface for distributed astronomical on-line resources and services, which is designed and developed by us, i.e., Chinese Virtual Observatory Project. Taking advantage of screen word-capturing technology, different kinds of information systems can be queried through simple mouse actions, and results are returned in a uniform web page. SkyMouse is an easy to use application, aiming to show basic information or to create a comprehensive overview of a specific astronomical object. In this paper current status of on-line resources and services access is reviewed; system architecture, features and functions of SkyMouse are described; challenges for intelligent interface for on-line astronomical resources and services are discussed.

  12. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0°, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ?19 km s{sup –1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  13. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III), Data Release 8

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III Collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search for extrasolar planets, and solve the mystery of dark energy. SDSS-III's first release, Data Release 8 (DR8), became available in the first half of 2012. DR8 contains all the images ever taken by the SDSS telescope. Together, these images make up the largest color image of the sky ever made. A version of the DR8 image is shown to the right. DR8 also includes measurements for nearly 500 million stars, galaxies, and quasars, and spectra for nearly two million. All of DR8's images, spectra, and measurements are available to anyone online. You can browse through sky images, look up data for individual objects, or search for objects anywhere using any criteria. SDSS-III will collect data from 2008 to 2014, using the 2.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. SDSS-III consists of four surveys, each focused on a different scientific theme. These four surveys are: 1) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS); 2) SEGUE-2 (Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration); 3) The APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE); and 4) The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). [Copied with edits from http://www.sdss3.org/index.php

  14. ANTISYMMETRY IN THE FARADAY ROTATION SKY CAUSED BY A NEARBY MAGNETIZED BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolleben, M.; Landecker, T. L.; Fletcher, A.; Carretti, E.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, M.; Reich, W.; Taylor, A. R.

    2010-11-20

    Rotation measures (RMs) of pulsars and extragalactic point sources have been known to reveal large-scale antisymmetries in the Faraday rotation sky with respect to the Galactic plane and halo that have been interpreted as signatures of the mean magnetic field in the Galactic halo. We describe Faraday rotation measurements of the diffuse Galactic polarized radio emission over a large region in the northern Galactic hemisphere. Through application of RM synthesis we achieve sensitive Faraday rotation maps with high angular resolution, capable of revealing fine-scale structures of {approx}1{sup 0} in the Faraday rotation sky. Our analysis suggests that the observed antisymmetry in the Faraday rotation sky at b>0{sup 0} is dominated by the magnetic field around a local H I bubble at a distance of 100 pc, and not by the magnetic field of the Galactic halo. We derive physical properties of the magnetic field of this shell, which we find to be 20-34 {mu}G strong. It is clear that the diffuse polarized radio emission contains important information about the local magneto-ionic medium, which cannot yet be derived from Faraday RMs of extragalactic sources or pulsars alone.

  15. Cover Heated, Open Vessels, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Cover Heated, Open Vessels Open vessels that contain heated liquids often have high heat loss due to surface evaporation. Both energy and liquid losses are reduced by covering...

  16. Forcing of the Arctic Oscillation by Eurasian Snow Cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Robert J; Zender, Charles S

    2011-01-01

    Springtime warming and reduced snow cover from carbonaceousrole of eastern Siberian snow and soil moisture anomalies inL. Gimeno, 2003: The role of snow cover fluctu- ations in

  17. Cover Image: The cover shows the crystal structure of the alanate NaAlH4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - p13 (top): The estimated power output from 10% efficient solar cells covering 1.7% of the land area, Argonne National Laboratory Michelle Buchanan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Panel Chairs: Production Tom efficiency of improved gasoline vehicles, this reduction in petroleum use would require the annual production

  18. Finding GIS data: Land cover and land use in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2006-12-08

    classes with no key to indicate class descriptions. The student understands how human actions modify the physical environment. The student helps create both a hard copy and digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student... helps create a digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student helps create a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class areas. The student creates e a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Regional Land Cover Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf of Mexico Regional Land Cover Change Report 1996­2010 #12;About This Report The Gulf of Mexico at www.coast.noaa.gov. #12;GULF OF MEXICO REGIONAL LAND COVER CHANGE REPORT, 1996­2010 THE GULF OF MEXICO REGION covers over 200,400 square miles and extends from Texas'border with Mexico in the west to the tip

  20. Galaxy Clusters in Hubble Volume Simulations: Cosmological Constraints from Sky Survey Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Evrard; T. J. MacFarland; H. M. P. Couchman; J. M. Colberg; N. Yoshida; S. D. M. White; A. R. Jenkins; C. S. Frenk; F. R. Pearce; J. A. Peacock; P. A. Thomas

    2002-03-12

    We use giga-particle N-body simulations to study galaxy cluster populations in Hubble Volumes of LCDM (Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7) and tCDM (Omega_m=1) world models. Mapping past light-cones of locations in the computational space, we create mock sky surveys of dark matter structure to z~1.4 over 10,000 sq deg and to z~0.5 over two full spheres. Calibrating the Jenkins mass function at z=0 with samples of ~1.5 million clusters, we show that the fit describes the sky survey counts to 5e13 Msun/h). Fitting the observed local temperature function determines the ratio beta of specific thermal energies in dark matter and intracluster gas. We derive a scaling with power spectrum normalization beta \\propto sigma8^{5/3}, and measure a 4% error on sigma8 arising from cosmic variance in temperature-limited cluster samples. Considering distant clusters, the LCDM model matches EMSS and RDCS X-ray-selected survey observations under economical assumptions for intracluster gas evolution. Using transformations of mass-limited cluster samples that mimic sigma8 variation, we explore SZ search expectations for a 10 sq deg survey complete above 10^{14} Msun/h. Cluster counts are shown to be extremely sensitive to sigma8 uncertainty while redshift statistics, such as the sample median, are much more stable. For LCDM, the characteristic temperature at fixed sky surface density is a weak function of redshift, implying an abundance of hot clusters at z>1. Assuming constant beta, four kT>8 keV clusters lie at z>2 and 40 kT>5 keV clusters lie at z>3 on the whole sky. Detection of Coma-sized clusters at z>1 violate LCDM at 95% confidence if their surface density exceeds 0.003 per sq deg, or 120 on the whole sky.

  1. Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

  2. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  3. Motility fractionation of bacteria by centrifugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Maggi; Alessia Lepore; Jacopo Solari; Alessandro Rizzo; Roberto Di Leonardo

    2013-10-10

    Centrifugation is a widespread laboratory technique used to separate mixtures into fractions characterized by a specific size, weight or density. We demonstrate that centrifugation can be also used to separate swimming cells having different motility. To do this we study self-propelled bacteria under the influence of an external centrifugal field. Using dynamic image correlation spectroscopy we measure the spatially resolved motility of bacteria after centrifugation. A significant gradient in swimming-speeds is observed for increasing centrifugal speeds. Our results can be reproduced by a model that treats bacteria as "hot" colloidal particles having a diffusion coefficient that depends on the swimming speed.

  4. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO); Padukone, Nandan (Denver, CO); Hatzis, Christos (Denver, CO); Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO)

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.

  5. Fractionation Development Center FDC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLC Jump to:EnergyMontana:Fox,Fractionation

  6. E-model for Transportation Problem of Linear Stochastic Fractional ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr.V.Charles

    2007-03-07

    Abstract: This paper deals with the so-called transportation problem of linear stochastic fractional programming, and ... sophisticated analysis. Stochastic ... circuit board of multi-objective LSFP, algorithm to identify redundant fractional objective ...

  7. Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui Sitindra S studied the controls on the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui, a halophilic archaea, in pure culture experiments by varying organic substrate, the hydrogen

  8. Assessing the impacts of fractionation on pointing-intensive spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Michael Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Fractionated spacecraft consist of physically independent, "free-flying" modules composed of various subsystems. Thus, a fractionated spacecraft might consist of one-module responsible for the power generation and storage, ...

  9. Numerical Chaos in a Fractional Order Logistic Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Munkhammar

    2010-11-10

    In this paper we investigate a fractional order logistic map and its discrete time dynamics. We show some basic properties of the fractional logistic map and numerically study its period-doubling route to chaos.

  10. Non-local fractional model of rate independent plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Sumelka

    2013-09-14

    In the paper the generalisation of classical rate independent plasticity using fractional calculus is presented. This new formulation is non-local due to properties of applied fractional differential operator during definition of kinematics. In the description small fractional strains assumption is hold together with additive decomposition of total fractional strains into elastic and plastic parts. Classical local rate independent plasticity is recovered as a special case.

  11. Soliton Solutions of Fractional order KdV-Burger's Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhammad Younis

    2013-08-31

    In this article, the new exact travelling wave solutions of the time-and space-fractional KdV-Burgers equation has been found. For this the fractional complex transformation have been implemented to convert nonlinear partial fractional differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, in the sense of the Jumarie's modified Riemann-Liouville derivative. Afterwards, the improved (G'/G)-expansion method can be implemented to celebrate the soliton solutions of KdV-Burger's equation of fractional order.

  12. An Epiperimetric Inequality Approach to the Thin and Fractional ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arshak Petrosyan(joint with Nicola Garofalo, Camelia Pop, and Mariana Smit Vega Garcia)

    2015-07-28

    Jun 15, 2015 ... An Epiperimetric Inequality. Approach to the Thin and. Fractional Obstacle Problems. Geometric Analysis. Free Boundary Problems. & Measure ...

  13. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

    1987-01-01

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  14. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  15. Some Applications of the Fractional Poisson Probability Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Laskin

    2011-11-17

    Physical and mathematical applications of fractional Poisson probability distribution have been presented. As a physical application, a new family of quantum coherent states has been introduced and studied. As mathematical applications, we have discovered and developed the fractional generalization of Bell polynomials, Bell numbers, and Stirling numbers. Appearance of fractional Bell polynomials is natural if one evaluates the diagonal matrix element of the evolution operator in the basis of newly introduced quantum coherent states. Fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind have been applied to evaluate skewness and kurtosis of the fractional Poisson probability distribution function. A new representation of Bernoulli numbers in terms of fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind has been obtained. A representation of Schlafli polynomials in terms of fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind has been found. A new representations of Mittag-Leffler function involving fractional Bell polynomials and fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind have been discovered. Fractional Stirling numbers of the first kind have been introduced and studied. Two new polynomial sequences associated with fractional Poisson probability distribution have been launched and explored. The relationship between new polynomials and the orthogonal Charlier polynomials has also been investigated. In the limit case when the fractional Poisson probability distribution becomes the Poisson probability distribution, all of the above listed developments and implementations turn into the well-known results of quantum optics, the theory of combinatorial numbers and the theory of orthogonal polynomials of discrete variable.

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used.6 lm) and small (0.2­1.6 lm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community

  17. Deviation probability bounds for fractional martingales and related remarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saussereau, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove exponential inequalities (also called Bernstein's inequality) for fractional martingales. As an immediate corollary, we will discuss weak law of large numbers for fractional martingales under divergence assumption on the $\\beta-$variation of the fractional martingale. A non trivial example of application of this convergence result is proposed.

  18. Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of systems within Caputo's fractional derivative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eqab M. Rabei; Ibtesam Almayteh; Sami I. Muslih; Dumitru Baleanu

    2007-03-26

    In this paper we develop a fractional Hamilton-Jacobi formulation for discrete systems in terms of fractional Caputo derivatives. The fractional action function is obtained and the solutions of the equations of motion are recovered. An example is studied in details.

  19. Clear Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t D e s iSitesA. A. lacis

  20. Cloudy Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j

  1. Cloudy Skies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o jJ. linn Space Science and

  2. Dark photons as fractional cosmic neutrino masquerader

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Tu, Huitzu; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang E-mail: huitzu@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    Recently, Weinberg proposed a Higgs portal model with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry in which Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos. We extend the model by gauging the U(1) symmetry. This gives rise to the so-called dark photon and dark Higgs. The dark photons can constitute about 0.912 (0.167) to the effective number of light neutrino species if they decouple from the thermal bath before the pions become non-relativistic and after (before) the QCD transition. Restriction on the parameter space of the portal coupling and the dark Higgs mass is obtained from the freeze-out condition of the dark photons. Combining with the collider data constraints on the invisible width of the standard model Higgs requires the dark Higgs mass to be less than a few GeV.

  3. Anomalous Topological Pumps and Fractional Josephson Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan Zhang; C. L. Kane

    2013-10-20

    We discover novel topological pumps in the Josephson effects for superconductors. The phase difference, which is odd under the chiral symmetry defined by the product of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, acts as an anomalous adiabatic parameter. These pumping cycles are different from those in the "periodic table", and are characterized by $Z\\times Z$ or $Z_2\\times Z_2$ strong invariants. We determine the general classifications in class AIII, and those in class DIII with a single anomalous parameter. For the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ topological pump in class DIII, one $Z_2$ invariant describes the coincidence of fermion parity and spin pumps whereas the other one reflects the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana Kramers pairs, leading to three distinct fractional Josephson effects.

  4. Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, R.C.

    1992-09-01

    As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches@to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved.

  5. Partial fractioning reduction of perturbative amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srednyak, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    A new method is presented for the simplification of loop integrals in one particle irreducible diagrams with large numbers of external lines, based on the partial fractioning of products of propagators. Whenever a loop diagram in $d$ dimensions has $d+1$ or more lines that carry the same linear combination of loop momenta, its integral can be reexpressed as a linear combination of integrals with no more than $d+1$ denominators for each such set of lines, of which $d$ are linear in the loop momenta and only one quadratic. In multiloop diagrams, the total number of linear denominators can be reduced further. In integrals with numerator momenta there may also be up to $d+1$ linear factors in the numerator.

  6. Partial fractioning reduction of perturbative amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Srednyak

    2011-12-23

    A new method is presented for the simplification of loop integrals in one particle irreducible diagrams with large numbers of external lines, based on the partial fractioning of products of propagators. Whenever a loop diagram in $d$ dimensions has $d+1$ or more lines that carry the same linear combination of loop momenta, its integral can be reexpressed as a linear combination of integrals with no more than $d+1$ denominators for each such set of lines, of which $d$ are linear in the loop momenta and only one quadratic. In multiloop diagrams, the total number of linear denominators can be reduced further. In integrals with numerator momenta there may also be up to $d+1$ linear factors in the numerator.

  7. Heat Equations with Fractional White Noise Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Y. [Department of Mathematics, University of Kansas, 405 Snow Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045-2142 (United States)], E-mail: hu@math.ukans.edu

    2001-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the following stochastic heat equations: ({partial_derivative}u{sub t}(x))/({partial_derivative}t=1/2 u{sub t}(x)+{omega}{sup H}.u{sub t}(x)), x element of {sup d}, t>0, where w{sup H} is a time independent fractional white noise with Hurst parameter H=(h{sub 1}, h{sub 2},..., h{sub d}) , or a time dependent fractional white noise with Hurst parameter H=(h{sub 0}, h{sub 1},..., h{sub d}) . Denote | H | =h{sub 1}+h{sub 2}+...+h{sub d} . When the noise is time independent, it is shown that if 1/2 d-1 , then the solution is in L{sub 2} and the L{sub 2} -Lyapunov exponent of the solution is estimated. When the noise is time dependent, it is shown that if 1/2 d- 2 /( 2h{sub 0}-1 ) , the solution is in L{sub 2} and the L{sub 2} -Lyapunov exponent of the solution is also estimated. A family of distribution spaces S{sub {rho}} , {rho} element of RR , is introduced so that every chaos of an element in S{sub {rho}} is in L{sub 2} . The Lyapunov exponents in S{sub {rho}} of the solution are also estimated.

  8. The fractional Poisson process and the inverse stable subordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark M. Meerschaert; Erkan Nane; P. Vellaisamy

    2011-02-23

    The fractional Poisson process is a renewal process with Mittag-Leffler waiting times. Its distributions solve a time-fractional analogue of the Kolmogorov forward equation for a Poisson process. This paper shows that a traditional Poisson process, with the time variable replaced by an independent inverse stable subordinator, is also a fractional Poisson process. This result unifies the two main approaches in the stochastic theory of time-fractional diffusion equations. The equivalence extends to a broad class of renewal processes that include models for tempered fractional diffusion, and distributed-order (e.g., ultraslow) fractional diffusion. The paper also establishes an interesting connection between the fractional Poisson process and Brownian time.

  9. Fractional Calculus in Hydrologic Modeling: A Numerical Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Benson; Mark M. Meerschaert; Jordan Revielle

    2012-01-01

    Fractional derivatives can be viewed either as a handy extension of classical calculus or, more deeply, as mathematical operators defined by natural phenomena. This follows the view that the diffusion equation is defined as the governing equation of a Brownian motion. In this paper, we emphasize that fractional derivatives come from the governing equations of stable Levy motion, and that fractional integration is the corresponding inverse operator. Fractional integration, and its multi-dimensional extensions derived in this way, are intimately tied to fractional Brownian (and Levy) motions and noises. By following these general principles, we discuss the Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical solutions to fractional partial differential equations, and Eulerian methods for stochastic integrals. These numerical approximations illuminate the essential nature of the fractional calculus.

  10. HAWC: A Next Generation All-Sky VHE Gamma-Ray Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sinnis; A. Smith; J. E. McEnery

    2004-03-03

    The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect short transients ($\\sim$15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength campaigns to study these objects. This paper describes the design and performance of a next generation water Cherenkov detector. To attain a low energy threshold and have high sensitivity the detector should be located at high altitude ($>$ 4km) and have a large area ($\\sim$40,000 m$^2$). Such an instrument could detect gamma ray bursts out to a redshift of 1, observe flares from active galaxies as short as 15 minutes in duration, and survey the overhead sky at a level of 50 mCrab in one year.

  11. A SOUTHERN SKY AND GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY FOR BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radoslaw; Soszynski, Igor; Szymanski, Michal K.; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Trujillo, Chadwick

    2011-10-15

    About 2500 deg{sup 2} of sky south of declination -25{sup 0} and/or near the Galactic Plane were surveyed for bright outer solar system objects. This survey is one of the first large-scale southern sky and Galactic Plane surveys to detect dwarf planets and other bright Kuiper Belt Objects in the trans-Neptunian region. The survey was able to obtain a limiting R-band magnitude of 21.6. In all, 18 outer solar system objects were detected, including Pluto which was detected near the Galactic center using optimal image subtraction techniques to remove the high stellar density background. Fourteen of the detections were previously unknown trans-Neptunian objects, demonstrating that the southern sky had not been well searched to date for bright outer solar system objects. Assuming moderate albedos, several of the new discoveries from this survey could be in hydrostatic equilibrium and thus could be considered dwarf planets. Combining this survey with previous surveys from the northern hemisphere suggests that the Kuiper Belt is nearly complete to around 21st magnitude in the R band. All the main dynamical classes in the Kuiper Belt are occupied by at least one dwarf-planet-sized object. The 3:2 Neptune resonance, which is the innermost well-populated Neptune resonance, has several large objects while the main outer Neptune resonances such as the 5:3, 7:4, 2:1, and 5:2 do not appear to have any large objects. This indicates that the outer resonances are either significantly depleted in objects relative to the 3:2 resonance or have a significantly different assortment of objects than the 3:2 resonance. For the largest objects (H < 4.5 mag), the scattered disk population appears to have a few times more objects than the main Kuiper Belt (MKB) population, while the Sedna population could be several times more than that of the MKB.

  12. HAWC: a next generation all-sky VHE gamma-ray telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinnis, G. (Gus); Smith, A.; McEnery, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the universe at energies above 100 GeV is a relatively new and exciting field. The current generation of pointed instruments have detected TeV gamma rays from at least 10 sources and the next generation of detectors promises a large increase in sensitivity. We have also seen the development of a new type of all-sky monitor in this energy regime based on water Cherenkov technology (Milagro). To fully understand the universe at these extreme energies requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could observe prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts and probe the limits of Lorentz invariance at high energies. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect shorthransients ({approx}15 minutes) from active galaxies and study the time structure of flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. Unlike pointed instruments a wide-field instrument can make an unbiased study of all active galaxies and enable many multi-wavelength campaigns to study these objects. This paper describes the design and performance of a next generation water Cherenkov detector. To attain a low energy threshold and have high sensitivity the detector should be located at high altitude (> 4km) and have a large area ({approx}40,000 m{sup 2}). Such an instrument could detect gamma ray bursts out to a redshift of 1, observe flares from active galaxies as short as 15 minutes in duration, and survey the overhead sky at a level of 50 mCrab in one year.

  13. Automated Classification of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stellar Spectra using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdi Bazarghan; Ranjan Gupta

    2008-04-26

    Automated techniques have been developed to automate the process of classification of objects or their analysis. The large datasets provided by upcoming spectroscopic surveys with dedicated telescopes urges scientists to use these automated techniques for analysis of such large datasets which are now available to the community. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of such surveys releasing massive datasets. We use Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) for automatic classification of about 5000 SDSS spectra into 158 spectral type of a reference library ranging from O type to M type stars.

  14. Cataclysmic Variables From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. VI. the Sixth Year (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szkody, Paula; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Henden, Arne; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /AAVSO, Cambridge; Mannikko, Lee; Mukadam, Anjum; /Washington U., Seattle,; Schmidt, Gary D.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bochanski, John J.; Agueros, Marcel; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; /Washington U., Seattle,; Dahab, William E.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Oguri, Masamune; /Princeton U. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Shin,; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; /Princeton U. Observ.; West, Andrew A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.

    2007-06-15

    The 28 cataclysmic variables found in 2005 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are presented with their coordinates, magnitudes and spectra. Five of these systems are previously known CVs (HH Cnc, SX LMi, QZ Ser, RXJ1554.2+2721 and HS1016+3412) and the rest are new discoveries. Additional spectroscopic, photometric and/or polarimetric observations of 10 systems were carried out, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for seven of the new binaries. The 23 new CVs include one eclipsing system, one new Polar and five systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.

  15. Magnetic white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Gaensicke; F. Euchner; S. Jordan

    2002-08-26

    We have identified 7 new magnetic DA white dwarfs in the Early Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our selection strategy has also recovered all the previously known magnetic white dwarfs contained in the SDSS EDR, KUV03292+0035 and HE0330-0002. Analysing the SDSS fibre spectroscopy of the magnetic DA white dwarfs with our state-of-the-art model spectra, we find dipole field strengths 1.5<=B_d<=63MG and effective temperatures 8500<=Teff<=39000K. As a conservative estimate, we expect that the complete SDSS will increase the number of known magnetic white dwarfs by a factor 3.

  16. Organic waste amendments effect on zinc fraction of two soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, L.M.

    1999-10-01

    Organic soil amendments can ameliorate metal toxicity to plants by redistributing metals to less available fractions. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of organic amendments on Zn distribution among soil fractions. Two soils were amended with five organic waste materials (some of which contained Zn) or commercial humic acid with and without 400 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Zn, incubated, and fractionated using a sequential extraction technique. Where no Zn was added most of the metals were in the residual fraction. Commercial compost, poultry litter, and industrial sewage sludge increased Zn in the exchangeable (EXC), organic (OM), and manganese oxide (MnOx) fractions due to Zn in the materials. Spent mushroom compost (SMC) redistributed Zn from the EXC fraction to the MnOx fraction for the coarse-textured soil. Where Zn was added, most of the metal was in the EXC and OM fractions. The SMC and humic acid lowered Zn in the EXC fraction and increased Zn in the other fractions. Effects of the organic materials on Zn in soil fractions were more evident for the sandy soil dominated by quartz in the clay than for the finer-textured soil dominated by kaolinite in the clay-size fraction. It was concluded that organic materials high in Zn can increase Zn in the EXC, OM, and MnOx fractions where the soil is not contaminated and others such as SMC and HA can lower the potential availability of Zn in contaminated soils by redistributing it from the EXC to less soluble fractions.

  17. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Chillers Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency...

  18. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    www.mdpi.comjournalremotesensing Article Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Jungho Im 1, *, John R....

  19. A Centrifuge Modeling Procedure for Landfill Cover Subsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Harry J; Ronayne, Michael C

    1984-01-01

    J,, Evaluation of Trench Subsidence and Stabilization attor Landfill Cower Subsidence by Harr y J. Sterling 1 and02 ABSTRACT Trench cover subsidence has been a common and

  20. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contents FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  1. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

  2. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Ice Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for air-cooled ice machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  3. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

  4. Microsoft Word - DOE_Staffing_Study_Cover.doc | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Word - DOEStaffingStudyCover.doc More Documents & Publications 2010 DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan - Report to the White House Council on Environmental...

  5. Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Pump Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal...

  6. Machine learning techniques for astrophysical modelling and photometric redshift estimation of quasars in optical sky surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Daniel Kumar

    2009-01-06

    Machine learning techniques are utilised in several areas of astrophysical research today. This dissertation addresses the application of ML techniques to two classes of problems in astrophysics, namely, the analysis of individual astronomical phenomena over time and the automated, simultaneous analysis of thousands of objects in large optical sky surveys. Specifically investigated are (1) techniques to approximate the precise orbits of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn given Earth-based observations as well as (2) techniques to quickly estimate the distances of quasars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Learning methods considered include genetic algorithms, particle swarm optimisation, artificial neural networks, and radial basis function networks. The first part of this dissertation demonstrates that GAs and PSO can both be efficiently used to model functions that are highly non-linear in several dimensions. It is subsequently demonstrated in the second part that ANNs and RBFNs can be used as effective predictors of spectroscopic redshift given accurate photometry, especially in combination with other learning-based approaches described in the literature. Careful application of these and other ML techniques to problems in astronomy and astrophysics will contribute to a better understanding of stellar evolution, binary star systems, cosmology, and the large-scale structure of the universe.

  7. Evidence of cross-correlation between the CMB lensing and the gamma-ray sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Fornengo; L. Perotto; M. Regis; S. Camera

    2015-03-02

    We report the measurement of the angular power spectrum of cross-correlation between the unresolved component of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sky-maps and the CMB lensing potential map reconstructed by the Planck satellite. The matter distribution in the Universe determines the bending of light coming from the last scattering surface. At the same time, the matter density drives the growth history of astrophysical objects, including their capability at generating non-thermal phenomena, which in turn give rise to gamma-ray emissions. The Planck lensing map provides information on the integrated distribution of matter, while the integrated history of gamma-ray emitters is imprinted in the Fermi-LAT sky maps. We report here the first evidence of their correlation. We find that the multipole dependence of the cross-correlation measurement is in agreement with current models of the gamma-ray luminosity function for AGN and star forming galaxies, with a statistical evidence of 3.0$\\sigma$. Moreover, its amplitude can in general be matched only assuming that these extra-galactic emitters are also the bulk contribution of the measured isotopic gamma-ray background (IGRB) intensity. This leaves little room for a big contribution from galactic sources to the IGRB measured by Fermi-LAT, pointing toward a direct evidence of the extragalactic origin of the IGRB.

  8. Far-IR Detection Limits I: Sky Confusion Due to Galactic Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woong-Seob Jeong; Hyung Mok Lee; Soojong Pak; Takao Nakagawa; Suk Minn Kwon; Chris P. Pearson; Glenn J. White

    2004-11-16

    Fluctuations in the brightness of the background radiation can lead to confusion with real point sources. Such background emission confusion will be important for infrared observations with relatively large beam sizes since the amount of fluctuation tends to increase with angular scale. In order to quantitively assess the effect of the background emission on the detection of point sources for current and future far-infrared observations by space-borne missions such as Spitzer, ASTRO-F, Herschel and SPICA, we have extended the Galactic emission map to higher angular resolution than the currently available data. Using this high resolution map, we estimate the sky confusion noise due to the emission from interstellar dust clouds or cirrus, based on fluctuation analysis and detailed photometry over realistically simulated images. We find that the confusion noise derived by simple fluctuation analysis agrees well with the result from realistic simulations. Although the sky confusion noise becomes dominant in long wavelength bands (> 100 um) with 60 - 90cm aperture missions, it is expected to be two order of magnitude smaller for the next generation space missions with larger aperture sizes such as Herschel and SPICA.

  9. The star formation histories of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Panter; Raul Jimenez; Alan F. Heavens; Stephane Charlot

    2007-04-24

    We present the results of a MOPED analysis of ~3 x 10^5 galaxy spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Three (SDSS DR3), with a number of improvements in data, modelling and analysis compared with our previous analysis of DR1. The improvements include: modelling the galaxies with theoretical models at a higher spectral resolution of 3\\AA; better calibrated data; an extended list of excluded emission lines, and a wider range of dust models. We present new estimates of the cosmic star formation rate, the evolution of stellar mass density and the stellar mass function from the fossil record. In contrast to our earlier work the results show no conclusive peak in the star formation rate out to a redshift around 2 but continue to show conclusive evidence for `downsizing' in the SDSS fossil record. The star formation history is now in good agreement with more traditional instantaneous measures. The galaxy stellar mass function is determined over five decades of mass, and an updated estimate of the current stellar mass density is presented. We also investigate the systematic effects of changes in the stellar population modelling, the spectral resolution, dust modelling, sky lines, spectral resolution and the change of data set. We find that the main changes in the results are due to the improvements in the calibration of the SDSS data, changes in the initial mass function and the theoretical models used.

  10. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Wette

    2015-10-28

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely-used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semicoherent all-sky searches require orders of magnitude more templates than previously predicted.

  11. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, Hiroaki; Prieto, Carlos Allende; An, Deokkeun; Anderson, Scott F.; Aubourg, Eric; Balbinot, Eduardo; Beers, Timothy C.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U., CCPP /Penn State U.

    2011-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly{alpha} forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around {approx}8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes 5-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg{sup 2} in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg{sup 2}, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.

  12. EXIST: A High Sensitivity Hard X-ray Imaging Sky Survey Mission for ISS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grindlay; L. Bildsten; D. Chakrabarty; M. Elvis; A. Fabian; F. Fiore; N. Gehrels; C. Hailey; F. Harrison; D. Hartmann; T. Prince; B. Ramsey; R. Rothschild; G. Skinner; S. Woosley

    1999-12-18

    A deep all-sky imaging hard x-ray survey and wide-field monitor is needed to extend soft (ROSAT) and medium (ABRIXAS2) x-ray surveys into the 10-100 keV band (and beyond) at comparable sensitivity (~0.05 mCrab). This would enable discovery and study of >3000 obscured AGN, which probably dominate the hard x-ray background; detailed study of spectra and variability of accreting black holes and a census of BHs in the Galaxy; Gamma-ray bursts and associated massive star formation (PopIII) at very high redshift and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters throughout the Local Group; and a full galactic survey for obscured supernova remnants. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed array of 8 x 1m^2 coded aperture telescopes fixed on the International Space Station (ISS) with 160deg x 40deg field of view which images the full sky each 90 min orbit. EXIST has been included in the most recent NASA Strategic Plan as a candidate mission for the next decade. An overview of the science goals and mission concept is presented.

  13. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  14. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  15. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  16. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  17. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  18. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  19. Power variation of some integral fractional processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corcuera, José Manuel; Nualart, David; Woerner, Jeannette H.C.

    2006-08-01

    Power variation of some integral fractional processes J O S E´ M A N U E L C O R C U E R A 1,* , DAV I D N UA L A RT 1,* * and JEANNETTE H.C. WOERNER2 1Universitat de Barcelona, Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes 585, 08007 Barcelona, Spain. E... ð t 0 jusj p ds ¼ m#1;1þ pH X[mt] j¼1 #3;#3;#3;#3; ð( j=m) ( j#1;1)=m) us dB H s #3;#3;#3;#3; p #1; ju( j#1;1)=m(B Hj=m #1; B H( j#1;1)=m)j p ! þ m#1;1þ pH X[mt] j¼1 ju( j#1;1)=m(B Hj=m #1; B H( j#1;1)=m)j p #1; X[nt] i¼1 ju(i#1;1)=nj p X j2 I n...

  20. Fractionalization of Interstitials in Curved Colloidal Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William T. M. Irvine; Mark J. Bowick; Paul M. Chaikin

    2013-10-11

    Understanding the out-of equilibrium behaviour of point defects in crystals, yields insights into the nature and fragility of the ordered state, as well as being of great practical importance. In some rare cases defects are spontaneously healed - a one-dimensional crystal formed by a line of identical charged particles, for example, can accommodate an interstitial (extra particle) by a re-adjusting all particle positions to even out the spacing. In sharp contrast, particles organized into a perfect hexagonal crystal in the plane cannot accommodate an interstitial by a simple re-adjustment of the particle spacing - the interstitial remains instead trapped between lattice sites and diffuses by hopping, leaving the crystal permanently defected. Here we report on the behavior of interstitials in colloidal crystals on curved surfaces. Using optical tweezers operated independently of three dimensional imaging, we insert a colloidal interstitial in a lattice of similar particles on flat and curved (positively and negatively) oil-glycerol interfaces and image the ensuing dynamics. We find that, unlike in flat space, the curved crystals self-heal through a collective rearrangement that re-distributes the increased density associated with the interstitial. The self-healing process can be interpreted in terms of an out of equilibrium interaction of topological defects with each other and with the underlying curvature. Our observations suggest the existence of "particle fractionalization" on curved surface crystals.

  1. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-10-12

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative.

  2. Power-law Spatial Dispersion from Fractional Liouville Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2013-07-18

    A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.

  3. Projective synchronization in fractional order chaotic systems and its control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chunguang Li

    2006-04-24

    The chaotic dynamics of fractional (non-integer) order systems have begun to attract much attention in recent years. In this paper, we study the projective synchronization in two coupled fractional order chaotic oscillators. It is shown that projective synchronization can also exist in coupled fractional order chaotic systems. A simple feedback control method for controlling the scaling factor onto a desired value is also presented.

  4. Power-law spatial dispersion from fractional Liouville equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)] [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.

  5. Fluorescent spectra of chromatographic fractions of crude oils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, William Samuel

    1952-01-01

    of Results, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ 25 XI. Bibliography. ~ . "" o" . . ". .. . . . ~ 26 XII. Appendix PURPOSE This invest1gation ?as undertaken in an effort to develop a means of the chromatographic separation of a crude oil~ and to examine... these fractions by spectro;ra hic means to determines (l) v'hether there are differences in the fluorescent spectra of the various chromatographic fractions oi a given crude oil, and (2) whether there are differ- ences between similar chromatographic fractions...

  6. ON THE FRONT COVER Kristen Barnes | Fifth year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Moul | Third year Sheridan Fuller | Third year Harry Whelchel | Fourth year ON THE BACK COVER Lukef a c t b o ok2012 #12;ON THE FRONT COVER Kristen Barnes | Fifth year Darren Daniels | First year William R. Richardson | Third year Alyson Richardson | Third year Chris Bergin | First year Shakye Jones

  7. HIDDEN SYMMETRIES OF CYCLIC BRANCHED COVERINGS OF 2-BRIDGE KNOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIDDEN SYMMETRIES OF CYCLIC BRANCHED COVERINGS OF 2-BRIDGE KNOTS MARCO RENI AND ANDREI VESNIN hyperbolic 3-manifolds Mn(K), which are n- fold cyclic branched coverings of 2-bridge knots K. We show the symmetry groups of knots and links (see [BZ], [Ka]). Particularly, the class of 2-bridge knots

  8. Robert B. Laughlin and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Quantum Hall Effect Resources with Additional Information Robert B. Laughlin Photo Courtesy of LLNL Robert B. Laughlin shared the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physics with Horst...

  9. Singular perturbation problem in boundary/fractional combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-08-18

    reaction-diffusion equation, where the reaction term is of combustion type. ... Free boundary problem, combustion theory, boundary reaction- diffusion, fractional ...

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II), Data Release 6, including Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Yanny, Brian; Rockosi, Constance; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Knapp, Gillian R.

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (see www.sdss.org for general information) will map one-quarter of the entire sky and perform a redshift survey of galaxies, quasars and stars. The DR6 is the sixth major data release and provides images, imaging catalogs, spectra, and redshifts for download. It is the first data release of SDSS-II, an extension of the original SDSS consisting of three subprojects: Legacy, SEGUE and a Supernova survey. Be sure to check out the separate page for SEGUE also at http://classic.sdss.org/dr6/start/aboutsegue.html.

  11. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  12. All-sky sensitivity of HAWC to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a ground-based TeV gamma-ray observatory in the state of Puebla, Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m. Its 22,000 m$^2$ instrumented area, wide field of view ($\\sim$2 sr), and >95% uptime make it an ideal instrument for discovering gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission at $\\sim$100 GeV. Such a discovery would provide key information about the origins of prompt GRB emission as well as constraints on extra-galactic background light (EBL) models and the violation of Lorentz invariance. We will present prospects for discovering GRB emission at $\\sim$100 GeV with a simple, all-sky search algorithm using HAWC data that is most sensitive to short GRBs. The search algorithm presented here can also be used to detect other short transients with timescales and fluxes similar to short GRBs.

  13. Parameter-space metric for all-sky semicoherent searches for gravitational-wave pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wette, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of all-sky searches for gravitational-wave pulsars is primarily limited by the finite availability of computing resources. Semicoherent searches are a widely-used method of maximizing sensitivity to gravitational-wave pulsars at fixed computing cost: the data from a gravitational-wave detector are partitioned into a number of segments, each segment is coherently analyzed, and the analysis results from each segment are summed together. The generation of template banks for the coherent analysis of each segment, and for the summation, requires knowledge of the metrics associated with the coherent and semicoherent parameter spaces respectively. We present a useful approximation to the semicoherent parameter-space metric, analogous to that presented in Wette and Prix [Phys. Rev. D 88, 123005 (2013)] for the coherent metric. The new semicoherent metric is compared to previous work in Pletsch [Phys. Rev. D 82, 042002 (2010)], and Brady and Creighton [Phys. Rev. D 61, 082001 (2000)]. We find that semi...

  14. Science with the EXTraS Project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, A; Tiengo, A; D'Agostino, D; Watson, M G; Haberl, F

    2015-01-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) will characterise the temporal behaviour of the largest ever sample of objects in the soft X-ray range (0.1-12 keV) with a complex, systematic and consistent analysis of all data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton X-ray observatory since its launch. We will search for, and characterize variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. We will also search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis. Our analysis will be completed by multiwavelength characterization of new discoveries and phenomenological classification of variable sources. All results and products will be made available to the community in a public archive, serving as a reference for a broad range of astrophysical investigations.

  15. A Proper Motion Survey Using the First Sky Pass of NEOWISE-Reactivation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Adam C; Cushing, Michael C; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Mainzer, Amy; Gelino, Christopher R; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio B; Bauer, James

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) was reactivated in December of 2013 (NEOWISE) to search for potentially hazardous near-Earth objects. We have conducted a survey using the first sky pass of NEOWISE data and the AllWISE catalog to identify nearby stars and brown dwarfs with large proper motions ($\\mu_{\\rm total}$ $\\gtrsim$ 250 mas yr$^{-1}$). A total of 20,548 high proper motion objects were identified, 1,006 of which are new discoveries. This survey has uncovered a significantly larger sample of fainter objects (W2 $\\gtrsim$13 mag) than the previous WISE motion surveys of Luhman (2014a) and Kirkpatrick et al. (2014). Many of these objects are predicted to be new L and T dwarfs based on near- and mid-infrared colors. Using estimated spectral types along with distance estimates, we have identified several objects likely belonging to the nearby Solar neighborhood (d $potentially nea...

  16. Eolian cover sands: a sedimentologic model and paleoenvironmental implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lea, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    In periglacial areas, accumulations of eolian sand commonly form low-relief blankets without well-developed dunes. Internally, these sandsheet deposits exhibit subhorizontal lamination rather than high-angle cross-bedding. Such cover sands of late-Pleistocene age mantle extensive areas in northern Europe, but have been reported more rarely from North America. The processes by which cover sands, as opposed to dunes, accumulate have not yet been determined conclusively. Wind ripples and sand dunes do not form a continuum; flow separation and avalanching and negligible in the former and vital in the latter. Accretion of a sand patch into a mound sufficient to cause flow separation and dune growth requires a consistently available supply of loose sand. In cover-sand areas, sand may be immobilized prior to dune development by several factors: (1) a sparse vegetation cover, (2) moist ground conditions, (3) snow cover, and (4) a shallow permafrost table and/or an ice-cemented active layer. Detailed sedimentologic studies may allow discrimination among these various controls. The importance of the individual controlling factors can vary seasonally in a given deposit, as well as between deposits in different paleogeographic settings. However, all factors imply more mesic conditions than those associated with many dune deposits. The association of cover sands with paraboloid dunes is also consistent with somewhat moist conditions. The relatively mesic nature of cover sands controls their Pleistocene distribution; they become decreasingly important relative to dunes in maritime-to-continental transects across Alaska and northern Europe.

  17. DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT Vincent E. Larson1 1 that accounts for how liquid water varies with both total water content and temperature. The variable s has- ter content, ql , and cloud fraction, C. This provides in- formation about partial cloudiness. Tiedtke

  18. Fractional embedding of differential operators and Lagrangian systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fractional embedding of differential operators and Lagrangian systems Jacky CRESSON Institut des/30 #12;FRACTIONAL EMBEDDING OF DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS AND LAGRANGIAN SYSTEMS by Jacky CRESSON Abstract. -- This paper is a contribution to the general program of embedding theories of dynamical systems. Following our

  19. Mechanism design for fractional scheduling on unrelated George Christodoulou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoupias, Elias

    Mechanism design for fractional scheduling on unrelated machines George Christodoulou Elias and randomized approximation algorithms. The mechanism design version of the scheduling problem was introduced by Nisan and Ronen [23]. In this paper1 , we consider the mechanism design version of the fractional

  20. Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs Andrew P. Mullhaupt #3 if and only if A is triangular and AA #3; + BB #3; = I n , where I n is the identity matrix. Input normal and A is a matrix fraction, A = M 1 N , where M and N are triangular matrices of low bandwidth. For single input

  1. A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -years-old database for solar irradiance (W.m-2 ). So it is important to determine Luminous Efficacy in order to find illuminance from solar irradiance (or luminance from solar radiance). The measured data. Keywords Global and diffuse luminous efficacy, different sky conditions, solar irradiance, solar

  2. A SKY-HIGH CHALLENGE: THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AVIATION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, AND MEASURES TO MITIGATE IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    A SKY-HIGH CHALLENGE: THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AVIATION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, AND MEASURES but not subnational scale. In this thesis, I present what seems to be the first detailed analysis of the carbon footprint (CF) of civil aviation at a subnational level together with an assessment of what key stakeholders

  3. The Emu in the Sky and Other Stories When Europeans arrived in Australia in 1788, their navigators probably knew less

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Ray

    stretching across the Milky Way. It's easy to make out the emu in a dark autumn sky, and once you've seen it appears to be aligned on the equinox and solstice sunsets, and we are trying to understand a possible

  4. In situ observations of the "preexisting auroral arc" by THEMIS all sky imagers and the FAST spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ) The preexisting arc is located 1 $2 poleward of the equatorward edge of the 1 keV electron plasma sheetIn situ observations of the "preexisting auroral arc" by THEMIS all sky imagers and the FAST involve brightening followed by poleward expansion of a discrete auroral arc. The arc that brightens

  5. DISCOVERIES FROM A NEAR-INFRARED PROPER MOTION SURVEY USING MULTI-EPOCH TWO MICRON ALL-SKY SURVEY DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    We have conducted a 4030 deg[superscript 2] near-infrared proper motion survey using multi-epoch data from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). We find 2778 proper motion candidates, 647 of which are not listed in SIMBAD. ...

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky: Formation Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosu, Daniel

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky for cloud resources. The cloud providers' available resources may not be sufficient enough to cope with such demands. Therefore, the cloud providers need to reshape their business structures and seek to improve

  7. Assessing the effect of modified accessibility on land cover change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, James E

    2009-11-26

    Policies taken towards transportation influence patterns of land cover change and in recent years, significant investments have been made in rail infrastructure in England. The introduction of high speed rail services, ...

  8. INTRODUCTION Continuous cover forestry (CCF) regimes are increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTRODUCTION Continuous cover forestry (CCF) regimes are increasingly favoured in British Edinburgh EH12 7AT www.forestry.gov.uk Below-canopy light levels are commonly expressed as a proportion

  9. Cover Heated, Open Vessels - Steam Tip Sheet #19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    This revised AMO steam tip sheet on covering heated, open vessels provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  10. Frobenius n-homomorphisms, transfers and branched coverings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees E.G.; Buchstaber V.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose is to characterise continuous maps that are n-branched coverings in terms of induced maps on the rings of functions. The special properties of Frobenius nhomomorphisms between two function spaces that ...

  11. Marine Fisheries On the cover: Transmission electron micro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@~ On the cover: Transmission electron micro- graph of a myxosporidian. Kudoa by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington. DC 20402. Prices are: Single copy. $3. Washington. DC 20260. #12;

  12. Linking Siberian Snow Cover to Precursors of Stratospheric Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Judah

    Previous research has linked wintertime Arctic Oscillation (AO) variability to indices of Siberian snow cover and upward wave activity flux in the preceding fall season. Here, daily data are used to examine the surface and ...

  13. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

  14. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

  15. This overview covers: Connecting to a Chado Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    This overview covers: · Connecting to a Chado Database · Reading From the Database · iBatis Database Mapping · Gene Representation · Gene Building · Gene merging and splitting · Transfer Annotation Tool · Writing To The Database · Opening the Standalone Gene Builder · Community Annotation · Writing

  16. Marine Fisheries On the cover: An adult male

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@\\YJD@W On the cover: An adult male northern fur seal, Callorhinus ursinus., in San Francisco Bay Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility

  17. Second midterm review sheet The second midterm covers all the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-10-25

    The second midterm covers all the material from chapters 3 – 5, and you may use results from chapters 1 – 5 without proof. Most of the midterm will consist of ...

  18. Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachie, Oli Gurmu

    2011-01-01

    Cover Crop. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 186, 145-149 Allisonresistance in cowpea. Crop Science 40:611-618. Finch S. andProduction. J. Agronomy & Crop Science 191: 172— Krueger

  19. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-06-29

    A process is described for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm[sup 3

  20. The Impacts of Land Cover Change on Climate over China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liang

    2015-06-22

    experienced significant land cover changes, such as urbanization (Hua et al. 2008; Zhou et al. 2004), agricultural expansion (Zhang 2000), and desertification (Wang et al. 2006a; Xue 1996). Even though there have been several studies focusing on land... processes (Kalnay and Cai 2003). By using the OMR method, Zhang et al. (2005) suggest that urbanization in southern China, deforestation, and desertification in northern China may increase surface temperature, while vegetation cover increases may decrease...

  1. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1985-01-01

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  2. Final covering of the Ronneburg uranium mining site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoepfner, Uwe [LAGB Halle (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The rehabilitation of WISMUT's former Ronneburg uranium mining site involves backfilling of waste rock to the Lichtenberg open pit. The relocation project comprises about 110 million m{sup 3} of sulphide-bearing and AMD-generating waste rock which makes it the most important and most cost-intensive single surface restoration project conducted by WISMUT at the Ronneburg site. The backfilled waste rock has to be covered on an area of about 220 ha to control water infiltration and gas diffusion. Design planning for the final cover placement which began in 2004 had to be based on a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis as well on field tests of alternative cover options which are in compliance with legal requirements. An intensive testing program concerning the vadose zone of soil covers has therefore been started in 2000. The paper presents an overview of the monitoring program and the results of the vadose zone measurements. The water of soil covers have to be predicted for extended evaluation periods. Therefore water balance simulations of single layer covers (storage and evaporation concept) taking current and future soil and climate conditions into account are performed with the HYDRUS 2D code. (author)

  3. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  4. Expansion fractionation capacity of the LPG-ULE plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morin, L.M.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Western Division of PDVSA has among other facilities a NGL Fractionation Complex located onshore in Ul'e. The complex consists of three plants, the first and second older plants, LPG-1 and LPG-2, which fractionate the NGL to produce propane, a butane mix and natural gasoline. The third plant, LPG-3, fractionates the butane mix from the LPG-1 and 2 plants to produce iso and normal butane. Several optimization projects already in progress will increase the NGL production to 12,200 b/d. For this reason it was decided to conduct a study of the existing fractionation facilities and utilities systems to determine their capacities. This evaluation revealed that some of the fractionation towers would have some limitations in the processing of the expected additional production. The study recommended an option to increase the capacity of the fractionation towers by lowering their operating pressure, in order to take advantage of relative volatility increase between the key components, which allows easier separation, as well as reducing the heat duty required. The completed study also determined that this option is more economically convenient than the replacement of the existing fractionation towers.

  5. Obscuring Fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei: Implications from Radiation-driven Fountain Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wada, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are believed to be obscured by an optical thick "torus" that covers a large fraction of solid angles for the nuclei. However, the physical origin of the tori and the differences in the tori among AGNs are not clear. In a previous paper based on three-dimensional radiation-hydorodynamic calculations, we proposed a physics-based mechanism for the obscuration, called "radiation-driven fountains," in which the circulation of the gas driven by central radiation naturally forms a thick disk that partially obscures the nuclear emission. Here, we expand this mechanism and conduct a series of simulations to explore how obscuration depends on the properties of AGNs. We found that the obscuring fraction f_obs for a given column density toward the AGNs changes depending on both the AGN luminosity and the black hole mass. In particular, f_obs for N_H \\geq 10^22 cm^-2 increases from ~0.2 to ~0.6 as a function of the X-ray luminosity L_X in the 10^{42-44} ergs/s range, but f_obs becomes small (...

  6. Can photo-ionization explain the decreasing fraction of X-ray obscured AGN with luminosity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Akylas; I. Georgantopoulos

    2008-01-30

    Chandra and XMM surveys show that the fraction of obscured AGN decreases rapidly with increasing luminosity. Although this is usually explained by assuming that the covering factor of the central engine is much smaller at luminous QSOs, the exact origin of this effect remains unknown. We perform toy simulations to test whether photo-ionisation of the obscuring screen in the presence of a strong radiation field can reproduce this effect. In particular, we create X-ray spectral simulations using a warm absorber model assuming a range of input column densities and ionization parameters. We fit instead the simulated spectra with a simple cold absorption power-law model that is the standard practice in X-ray surveys. We find that the fraction of absorbed AGN should fall with luminosity as $L^{-0.16\\pm0.03}$ in rough agreement with the observations. Furthermore, this apparent decrease in the obscuring material is consistent with the dependence of the FeK$\\alpha$ narrow-line equivalent width on luminosity, ie. the X-ray Baldwin effect.

  7. Standard test method for measurement of 235U fraction using enrichment meter principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of the fraction of 235U in uranium using measurement of the 185.7 keV gamma-ray produced during the decay of 235U. 1.2 This test method is applicable to items containing homogeneous uranium-bearing materials of known chemical composition in which the compound is considered infinitely thick with respect to 185.7 keV gamma-rays. 1.3 This test method can be used for the entire range of 235U fraction as a weight percent, from depleted (0.2 % 235U) to highly enriched (97.5 % 235U). 1.4 Measurement of items that have not reached secular equilibrium between 238U and 234Th may not produce the stated bias when low-resolution detectors are used with the computational method listed in Annex A2. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety co...

  8. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2015-07-10

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In-situ observations of snow cover fraction since the 1960s suggest that the snow pack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2–2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean–atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover fraction to various anthropogenic factors. Atmore »the Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. Especially, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow are coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.« less

  9. Statistical mechanics based on fractional classical and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korichi, Z.; Meftah, M. T.

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this work is to study some problems in statistical mechanics based on the fractional classical and quantum mechanics. At first stage we have presented the thermodynamical properties of the classical ideal gas and the system of N classical oscillators. In both cases, the Hamiltonian contains fractional exponents of the phase space (position and momentum). At the second stage, in the context of the fractional quantum mechanics, we have calculated the thermodynamical properties for the black body radiation, studied the Bose-Einstein statistics with the related problem of the condensation and the Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  10. Fractional Calculus for Continuum Mechanics - anisotropic non-locality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Sumelka

    2015-02-06

    In this paper the generalisation of previous author's formulation of fractional continuum mechanics to the case of anisotropic non-locality is presented. The considerations include the review of competitive formulations available in literature. The overall concept bases on the fractional deformation gradient which is non-local, as a consequence of fractional derivative definition. The main advantage of the proposed formulation is its analogical structure to the general framework of classical continuum mechanics. In this sense, it allows, to give similar physical and geometrical meaning of introduced objects.

  11. Condensate fraction of cold gases in a nonuniform external potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astrakharchik, G. E.; Krutitsky, K. V.

    2011-09-15

    Exact calculation of the condensate fraction in multidimensional inhomogeneous interacting Bose systems in a confining potential of arbitrary shape is a difficult computational problem. We have developed an iterative procedure which allows us to calculate the condensate fraction as well as the corresponding eigenfunction of the one-body density matrix. We successfully validate this procedure in diffusion Monte Carlo simulations of a Bose gas in an optical lattice at zero temperature. We also discuss the relation between different criteria used for testing coherence in cold Bose systems, such as the fraction of particles that are superfluid, condensed, or in the zero-momentum state.

  12. INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by impeding or stopping navigation, interfering with power plants and cooling water intakes, and damaging was virtually free of any significant ice cover in 1998 and, with the exception of portions of January, the same

  13. SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF COLOR SPACES AND COMPONENTS FOR THE SEGMENTATION OF SKY/CLOUD IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Stefan

    ) is a cost-effective means to understanding cloud cover and weather patterns. The accurate segmentation the most suit- able color components for this task. Index Terms-- Remote sensing, Image segmentation, Color in weather prediction, climate modeling, solar irradiation measurement for renew- able energy generation

  14. Ethnic fractionalization and Sub-Saharan violence, 1970-1996.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seale, Josiah (Josiah Q.)

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the statistical correlations between metrics of ethnic fractionalization and categories of violence in Sub-Saharan Africa from 1970 to 1995. By examining these correlations both prior to and after ...

  15. Measurement of the relative fraction of ttbar events produced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    produced via gluon fusion in ppbar collision at s**(12) 1.96 TeV at CDF In this thesis we present a measurement of the relative fraction of tbar t events produced via...

  16. Deriving emissions time series from sparse atmospheric mole fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigby, Matthew

    A growth-based Bayesian inverse method is presented for deriving emissions of atmospheric trace species from temporally sparse measurements of their mole fractions. This work is motivated by many recent studies that have ...

  17. Fractional Mellin Transform -- A possible application in CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treumann, R A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a fractional variant of Mellin's transform which may find an application in the Conformal Field Theory. Its advantage is the presence of an arbitrary parameter which may substantially simplify calculations and help adjusting convergence.

  18. Physiology of multiple sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Min Sub

    2012-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) utilizes sulfate as an electron acceptor and produces sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to starting sulfate. The fractionation of S-isotopes is commonly used ...

  19. Analysis of the diurnal behavior of Evaporative Fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the diurnal behavior of Evaporative Fraction (EF) was examined. EF was shown to exhibit a typical concave-up shape, with a minimum usually reached in the middle of the day. The influence of the vegetation ...

  20. ON WEIGHTED INEQUALITIES FOR FRACTIONAL INTEGRALS OF RADIAL FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Nápoli, Pablo Luis

    for this operator (also called weighted Hardy-Little- wood-Sobolev inequalities) go back to G. H. Hardy and J. E for the fractional integral with general weights were later stud- ied by several people, see for example [8

  1. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Amendt, P.; Divol, L.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Rozmus, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  2. Understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from a one-year Senior Council Tier-1 LDRD project that focused on understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall effect state. We first give a...

  3. Notes on the two-dimensional fractional Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudoin, Fabrice; Nualart, David

    2006-02-17

    We study the two-dimensional fractional Brownian motion with Hurst parameter H>½. In particular, we show, using stochastic calculus, that this process admits a skew-product decomposition and deduce from this representation some asymptotic properties...

  4. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  5. Quantifying intra- and inter-fractional motion in breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scott; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Owen, Rebecca; Ramsay, Jonathan

    2015-03-15

    The magnitude of intra- and inter-fractional variation in the set up of breast cancer patients treated with tangential megavoltage photon beams was investigated using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Daily cine-EPID images were captured during delivery of the tangential fields for ten breast cancer patients treated in the supine position. Measurements collected from each image included the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), superior axial measurement (SAM) and the inferior axial measurement (IAM). The variation of motion within a fraction (intra-fraction) and the variation between fractions (inter-fraction) was analysed to quantify set up variation and motion due to respiration. Altogether 3775 EPID images were collected from 10 patients. The effect of respiratory motion during treatment was <0.1 cm standard deviation (SD) in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. The inter-fraction movement caused by variations in daily set up was larger at 0.28 cm SD in the AP direction. Superior–inferior (SI) variation was more difficult to summarise and proved unreliable as the measurements were taken to an ambiguous point on the images. It was difficult to discern true SI movement from that implicated by AP movement. There is minimal intra-fractional chest wall motion due to respiration during treatment. Inter-fractional variation was larger, however, on average it remained within departmental tolerance (0.5 cm) for set up variations. This review of our current breast technique provides confidence in the feasibility of utilising advanced treatment techniques (field-in-field, intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) following a review of the current imaging protocol.

  6. TDR calibration for the alternative landfill cover demonstration (ALCD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, J.; Dwyer, S.F.; Swanson, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration is a large scale field test that compares the performance of various landfill cover designs in dry environments. An important component of the comparison is the change in the moisture content of the soils throughout the different cover test plots. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is the primary method for the measurement of the volumetric moisture content. Each of the covers is composed of layers of varying types and densities of soils. The probes are therefore calibrated to calculate the volumetric moisture content in each of the different soils in order to gain the optimum performance of the TDR system. The demonstration plots are constructed in two phases; a different probe is used in each phase. The probe that is used in Phase 1 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, compacted native soil mixed with 6% sodium bentonite by weight, and sand. The probe that is used in Phase 2 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, and sand. In addition, the probes are calibrated for the varying cable lengths of the TDR probes. The resulting empirically derived equations allow for the calculation of in-situ volumetric moisture content of all of the varying soils throughout the cover test plots in the demonstration.

  7. Evolution of environment dependent galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ana Laura O'Mill; Nelson Padilla; Diego Garcia Lambas

    2008-06-26

    We use photometric redshifts to analyse the effect of local environment on galaxy colours at redshifts z < 0.63 in the SDSS data release 6. We construct mock SDSS-DR6 catalogues using semi-analytic galaxies to study possible systematic effects on the characterisation of environment and colour statistics due to the uncertainty in the determination of redshifts. We use the projected galaxy density derived from the distance to the nearest neighbours with a suitable radial velocity threshold to take into account the uncertainties in the photometric redshift estimates. Our findings indicate that the use of photometric redshifts greatly improves estimates of projected local galaxy density when galaxy spectra are not available. We find a tight relationship between spectroscopic and photometric derived densities, both in the SDSS-DR6 data (up to z=0.3) and mock catalogues (up to z=0.63). At z=0, faint galaxies show a clear increase of the red galaxy fraction as the local density increases. Bright galaxies, on the other hand, show a constant red galaxy fraction. We are able to track the evolution of this fraction to z=0.55 for galaxies brighter than M_r=-21.5 and find that the fraction of blue galaxies with respect to the total population progressively becomes higher as the redshift increases, at a rate of 15% Gyr. Also, at any given redshift, bright galaxies show a larger red population, indicating that the star-formation activity shifts towards smaller objects as the redshift decreases.

  8. RELATIVE ORIENTATION OF PAIRS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxton, Jesse; Ryden, Barbara S., E-mail: buxton.45@osu.edu, E-mail: ryden@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    From our study of binary spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6, we find that the relative orientation of disks in binary spiral galaxies is consistent with their being drawn from a random distribution of orientations. For 747 isolated pairs of luminous disk galaxies, the distribution of {phi}, the angle between the major axes of the galaxy images, is consistent with a uniform distribution on the interval [0 Degree-Sign , 90 Degree-Sign ]. With the assumption that the disk galaxies are oblate spheroids, we can compute cos {beta}, where {beta} is the angle between the rotation axes of the disks. In the case that one galaxy in the binary is face-on or edge-on, the tilt ambiguity is resolved, and cos {beta} can be computed unambiguously. For 94 isolated pairs with at least one face-on member, and for 171 isolated pairs with at least one edge-on member, the distribution of cos {beta} is statistically consistent with the distribution of cos i for isolated disk galaxies. This result is consistent with random orientations of the disks within pairs.

  9. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner}, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 \\times 10^-9, 1.1 \\times 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 15...

  10. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C

    2007-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

  11. Morphological Classification of Galaxies by Shapelet Decomposition in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon C. Kelly; Timothy A. McKay

    2003-10-16

    We describe application of the `shapelet' linear decomposition of galaxy images to morphological classification using images of $\\sim$ 3000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After decomposing the galaxies we perform a principal component analysis to reduce the number of dimensions of the shapelet space to nine. We find that each of these nine principal components contains unique morphological information, and give a description of each principal component's contribution to a galaxy's morphology. We find that galaxies of differing Hubble type separate cleanly in the shapelet space. We apply a Gaussian mixture model to the 9-dimensional space spanned by the principal components and use the results as a basis for classification. Using the mixture model, we separate galaxies into seven classes and give a description of each class's physical and morphological properties. We find that several of the mixture model classes correlate well with the traditional Hubble types both in their morphology and their physical parameters (e.g., color, velocity dispersions, etc.). In addition, we find an additional class of late-type morphology but with high velocity dispersions and very blue color; most of these galaxies exhibit post-starburst activity. This method provides an objective and quantitative alternative to traditional and subjective visual classification.

  12. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Ensemble Spectroscopic Variability of Quasar Broad Emission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mouyuan; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Dawson, Kyle; Denney, Kelly D; Hall, Patrick B; Ho, Luis C; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Richards, Gordon T; Schneider, Donald P; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    We explore the variability of quasars in the MgII and Hbeta broad emission lines and UV/optical continuum emission using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM). This is the largest spectroscopic study of quasar variability to date: our study includes 29 spectroscopic epochs from SDSS-RM over $6$ months, containing 357 quasars with MgII and 41 quasars with Hbeta . On longer timescales, the study is also supplemented with two-epoch data from SDSS-I/II. The SDSS-I/II data include an additional $2854$ quasars with MgII and 572 quasars with Hbeta. The MgII emission line is significantly variable ($\\Delta f/f$ 10% on 100-day timescales), indicating that it is feasible to use the broad MgII line for reverberation mapping studies. The data also confirm that continuum variability increases with timescale and decreases with luminosity, and the continuum light curves are consistent with a damped random-walk model on rest-frame timescales of $\\gtrsim 5$ days. We compare the emission-line and...

  13. Optical Identification of the Hardest X-ray Source in the ASCA Large Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Akiyama; K. Ohta; T. Yamada; M. Eracleous; J. P. Halpern; N. Kashikawa; M. Yagi; W. Kawasaki; M. Sakano; T. Tsuru; Y. Ueda; T. Takahashi

    1998-01-18

    We report the optical identification of the hardest X-ray source (AX J131501+3141) detected in an unbiased wide-area survey in the 0.5--10 keV band, the ASCA Large Sky Survey. The X-ray spectrum of the source is very hard and is well reproduced by a power-law component (Gamma = 1.5^+0.7_-0.6) with N_H = 6^+4_-2 *10^22 cm^-2 (Sakano et al. 1998). We have found a galaxy with R=15.62 mag near the center of the error circle for the X-ray source. The optical spectrum of the galaxy shows only narrow emission lines whose ratios correspond to those of a type 2 Seyfert galaxy at z = 0.072, implying an absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity of 2*10^43 erg sec^-1 (2--10 keV) and M_B = -20.93 mag. A radio point source is also associated with the center of the galaxy. We thus identify the X-ray source with this galaxy as an obscured AGN. The hidden nature of the nucleus of the galaxy in the optical band is consistent with the X-ray spectrum. These results support the idea that the obscured AGNs/QSOs contribute significantly to the cosmic X-ray background in the hard band at the faint flux level.

  14. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  15. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CO-ADD: A GALAXY PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2012-03-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Co-add Data. We use the artificial neural network (ANN) technique to calculate the photo-z and the nearest neighbor error method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx}13 million objects classified as galaxies in the co-add with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx}83,000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey, the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3, the VIsible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph-Very Large Telescope Deep Survey, and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.031. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  16. South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS): Data Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun; Fan, Xiaohui; Fan, Zhou; He, Boliang; Jing, Yipeng; Lesser, Michael; Li, Cheng; Nie, Jundan; Shen, Shiyin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS) is a deep u-band imaging survey in the Southern Galactic Cap, using the 90Prime wide-field imager on the 2.3m Bok telescope at Kitt Peak. The survey observations started in 2010 and ended in 2013. The final survey area is about 5000 deg2 with a median 5-sigma point source limiting magnitude of about 23.2. This paper describes the survey data reduction process, which includes basic imaging processing, astrometric and photometric calibrations, image stacking, and photometric measurements. Survey photometry is performed on objects detected both on SCUSS u-band images and in the SDSS database. Automatic, aperture, point-spread function (PSF), and model magnitudes are measured on stacked images. Co-added aperture, PSF, and model magnitudes are derived from measurements on single-epoch images. We also present comparisons of the SCUSS photometric catalog with those of the SDSS and CFHTLS.

  17. New white dwarf and subdwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepler, S O; Koester, Detlev; Ourique, Gustavo; Romero, Alejandra Daniela; Reindl, Nicole; Kleinman, Scot J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Valois, A Dean M; Amaral, Larissa A

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 6576 new spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf and subdwarf stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12. We obtain Teff, log g and mass for hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAs) and helium atmosphere white dwarf stars (DBs), estimate the calcium/helium abundances for the white dwarf stars with metallic lines (DZs) and carbon/helium for carbon dominated spectra DQs. We found one central star of a planetary nebula, one ultra-compact helium binary (AM CVn), one oxygen line dominated white dwarf, 15 hot DO/PG1159s, 12 new cataclysmic variables, 36 magnetic white dwarf stars, 54 DQs, 115 helium dominated white dwarfs, 148 white dwarf+main sequence star binaries, 236 metal polluted white dwarfs, 300 continuum spectra DCs, 230 hot subdwarfs, 2936 new hydrogen dominated white dwarf stars, and 2675 cool hydrogen dominated subdwarf stars. We calculate the mass distribution of all 5883 DAs with S/N>15 in DR12, including the ones in DR7 and DR10, with an average S/N=26, correc...

  18. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; Heiser, John; Yoo, Shinjae; Kalb, Paul

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together intomore »larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.« less

  19. An all-sky search for long-duration gravitational wave transients with LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. B. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. V. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; N. Arnaud; K. G. Arun; G. Ashton; M. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; S. E. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; D. Barta; J. Bartlett; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; M. Bazzan; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. J. Bell; B. K. Berger; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Birney; S. Biscans; A. Bisht; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; R. M. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; A. Bohe; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; A. Bozzi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; P. Brockill; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; C. C. Buchanan; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; C. Cahillane; J. Calderón Bustillo; T. Callister; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; E. Capocasa; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; J. Casanueva Diaz; C. Casentini; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; L. Cerboni Baiardi; G. Cerretani; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; M. Chan; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; H. Y. Chen; Y. Chen; C. Cheng; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. G. Collette; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; L. Conti; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; S. Cortese; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. B. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. T. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; T. Dal Canton; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; N. S. Darman; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. P. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. C. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; M. Di Giovanni; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. E. Dwyer; T. B. Edo; M. C. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. M. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; W. Engels; R. C. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. M. Evans; R. Everett; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; H. Fair; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Fletcher; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; V. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; H. A. G. Gabbard; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. G. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; G. Gaur; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; J. George; L. Gergely; V. Germain; A. Ghosh; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; K. Gill; A. Glaefke; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; J. M. Gonzalez Castro; A. Gopakumar; N. A. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. E. Gossan; M. Gosselin; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; G. Greco; A. C. Green; P. Groot; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; X. Guo; A. Gupta; M. K. Gupta; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. J. Hacker; B. R. Hall; E. D. Hall; G. Hammond; M. Haney; M. M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. J. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; J. Hennig; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; D. E. Holz; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. A. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; S. Huang

    2015-11-13

    We present the results of a search for long-duration gravitational wave transients in two sets of data collected by the LIGO Hanford and LIGO Livingston detectors between November 5, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010, with a total observational time of 283.0 days and 132.9 days, respectively. The search targets gravitational wave transients of duration 10 - 500 seconds in a frequency band of 40 - 1000 Hz, with minimal assumptions about the signal waveform, polarization, source direction, or time of occurrence. All candidate triggers were consistent with the expected background; as a result we set 90% confidence upper limits on the rate of long-duration gravitational wave transients for different types of gravitational wave signals. We also report upper limits on the source rate density per year per Mpc^3 for specific signal models. These are the first results from an all-sky search for unmodeled long-duration transient gravitational waves.

  20. Bright Lyman Break Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Weinberg, D H; Bentz, Misty C.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Weinberg, David H.

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of six compact, starburst galaxies with redshifts 2.3 < z < 2.8 and r-band magnitudes 19.8-20.5 in the Quasar Catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release (SDSS DR1). The SDSS spectra of these objects resemble the composite spectrum of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z \\approx 3, but the galaxies are 4-5 magnitudes brighter than an ``L*'' LBG and 2-3 magnitudes brighter than the most luminous objects in typical LBG spectroscopic surveys. Star formation rates inferred from the UV continuum luminosities are about 300-1000 M_sun yr^-1 with no correction for dust extinction. Such rates are similar to those inferred for ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but in these UV-bright objects the star formation is evidently not obscured by high dust column densities. The SDSS images show no evidence of multiple imaging or foreground lensing structures, but amplification by gravitational lensing (as in the case of MS 1512-cB58) cannot be ruled out with the present data. Assuming tha...

  1. Correlating anomalies of the microwave sky: The Good, the Evil and the Axis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandar Rakic; Dominik J. Schwarz

    2007-05-11

    At the largest angular scales the presence of a number of unexpected features has been confirmed by the latest measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Among them are the anomalous alignment of the quadrupole and octopole with each other as well as the stubborn lack of angular correlation on scales >60deg. We search for correlations between these two phenomena and demonstrate their absence. A Monte Carlo likelihood analysis confirms previous studies and shows that the joint likelihood of both anomalies is incompatible with the best-fit Lambda Cold Dark Matter model at >99.95% C.L. At the same time, a presumed special axis (the `Axis of Evil') identified on the microwave sky demands additional contributions to multipole power on top of the primordial standard inflationary ones. We find that the notion of a preferred axis in the CMB is misleading and inconsistent with three-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). Rather the data require a preferred plane, whereupon the axis is just the normal direction to that plane. Rotational symmetry within that plane is inconsistent with the observations and is ruled out at high confidence.

  2. Testing the Randomness in the Sky-Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Vavrek; L. G. Balázs; A. Mészáros; I. Horváth; Z. Bagoly

    2008-06-24

    We studied the complete randomness of the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE. Since GRBs seem to be a mixture of objects of different physical nature we divided the BATSE sample into 5 subsamples (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2) based on their durations and peak fluxes and studied the angular distributions separately. We used three methods, Voronoi tesselation, minimal spanning tree and multifractal spectra to search for non-randomness in the subsamples. To investigate the eventual non-randomness in the subsamples we defined 13 test-variables (9 from the Voronoi tesselation, 3 from the minimal spanning tree and one from the multifractal spectrum). Assuming that the point patterns obtained from the BATSE subsamples are fully random we made Monte Carlo simulations taking into account the BATSE's sky-exposure function. The MC simulations enabled us to test the null hypothesis i.e. that the angular distributions are fully random. We tested the randomness by binomial test and introducing squared Euclidean distances in the parameter space of the test-variables. We concluded that the short1, short2 groups deviate significantly (99.90%, 99.98%) from the fully randomness in the distribution of the squared Euclidean distances but it is not the case at the long samples. At the intermediate group the squared Euclidean distances also give significant deviation (98.51%).

  3. Deep Chandra observation and numerical studies of the nearest cluster cold front in the sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, N; Zhuravleva, I; Ichinohe, Y; Simionescu, A; Allen, S W; Markevitch, M; Fabian, A C; Keshet, U; Roediger, E; Ruszkowski, M; Sanders, J S

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a very deep (500 ks) Chandra observation, along with tailored numerical simulations, of the nearest, best resolved cluster cold front in the sky, which lies 90 kpc (19 arcmin) to the northwest of M 87. The northern part of the front appears the sharpest, with a width smaller than 2.5 kpc (1.5 Coulomb mean free paths; at 99 per cent confidence). Everywhere along the front, the temperature discontinuity is narrower than 4-8 kpc and the metallicity gradient is narrower than 6 kpc, indicating that diffusion, conduction and mixing are suppressed across the interface. Such transport processes can be naturally suppressed by magnetic fields aligned with the cold front. However, the northwestern part of the cold front is observed to have a nonzero width. The broadening is consistent with the presence of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) on length scales of a few kpc. Based on comparison with simulations, the presence of KHI would imply that the effective viscosity of the intra-cluster medi...

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  5. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-Area Sky Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, T S; Marshall, J L; Tucker, D; Kessler, R; Annis, J; Bernstein, G M; Boada, S; Burke, D L; Finley, D A; James, D J; Kent, S; Lin, H; Marriner, J; Mondrik, N; Nagasawa, D; Rykoff, E S; Scolnic, D; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Abbott, T M C; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; Melchior28, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Vikram, V

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example...

  6. PROBING THE DARK AGES AT z ? 20: THE SCI-HI 21 cm ALL-SKY SPECTRUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voytek, Tabitha C.; Natarajan, Aravind; Peterson, Jeffrey B. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Jáuregui García, José Miguel; López-Cruz, Omar, E-mail: tcv@andrew.cmu.edu [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electrónica (INAOE), Coordinación de Astrofísica, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1 Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla, 72840 Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-02-10

    We present first results from the SCI-HI experiment, which we used to measure the all-sky-averaged 21 cm brightness temperature in the redshift range 14.8 < z < 22.7. The instrument consists of a single broadband sub-wavelength size antenna and a sampling system for real-time data processing and recording. Preliminary observations were completed in 2013 June at Isla Guadalupe, a Mexican biosphere reserve located in the Pacific Ocean. The data was cleaned to excise channels contaminated by radio frequency interference, and the system response was calibrated by comparing the measured brightness temperature to the Global Sky Model of the Galaxy and by independent measurement of Johnson noise from a calibration terminator. We present our results, discuss the cosmological implications, and describe plans for future work.

  7. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalberla, Peter M W

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic All-Sky Survey is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3-D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscil...

  8. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  9. Spatial variations in the spectral index of polarized synchrotron emission in the 9 yr WMAP sky maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuskeland, U.; Eriksen, H. K.; Næss, S. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K., E-mail: unnif@astro.uio.no, E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no, E-mail: s.k.nass@astro.uio.no, E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We estimate the spectral index, ?, of polarized synchrotron emission as observed in the 9 yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe sky maps using two methods, linear regression ({sup T}-T plot{sup )} and maximum likelihood. We partition the sky into 24 disjoint sky regions and evaluate the spectral index for all polarization angles between 0° and 85° in steps of 5°. Averaging over polarization angles, we derive a mean spectral index of ?{sup all-sky} = –2.99 ± 0.01 in the frequency range of 23-33 GHz. We find that the synchrotron spectral index steepens by 0.14 from low to high Galactic latitudes, in agreement with previous studies, with mean spectral indices of ?{sup plane} = –2.98 ± 0.01 and ?{sup high-lat} = –3.12 ± 0.04. In addition, we find a significant longitudinal variation along the Galactic plane with a steeper spectral index toward the Galactic center and anticenter than toward the Galactic spiral arms. This can be well modeled by an offset sinusoidal, ?(l) = –2.85 + 0.17sin (2l – 90°). Finally, we study synchrotron emission in the BICEP2 field, in an attempt to understand whether the claimed detection of large-scale B-mode polarization could be explained in terms of synchrotron contamination. Adopting a spectral index of ? = –3.12, typical for high Galactic latitudes, we find that the most likely bias corresponds to about 2% of the reported signal (r = 0.003). The flattest index allowed by the data in this region is ? = –2.5, and under the assumption of a straight power-law frequency spectrum, we find that synchrotron emission can account for at most 20% of the reported BICEP2 signal.

  10. Analysis of S. 485, the Clear Skies Act of 2003, and S. 843, the Clean Air Planning Act of 2003

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    On July 30, 2003, Senator James M. Inhofe requested the Energy Information Administration to undertake analyses of S.843, The Clean Air Planning Act of 2003, introduced by Senator Thomas Carper, and S.485, Clear Skies Act of 2003. Senator Inhofe also asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to analyze S. 485 without the mercury provisions and S. 843 without the mercury and carbon dioxide provisions. This service report responds to both requests.

  11. Our Star, The Sun Looking up at the sky with the naked eye, the Sun seems static, constant. It provides the warmth and light that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    #12;Our Star, The Sun Looking up at the sky with the naked eye, the Sun seems static, constant's surface, the corona is only visible to the naked eye during a total solar eclipse. Complicated magnetic

  12. Our Star, The Sun Looking up at the sky with the naked eye, the Sun seems static, constant. It provides the warmth and light that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    #12;Our Star, The Sun Looking up at the sky with the naked eye, the Sun seems static, constant into space. Thin and faint com- pared to the Sun's surface, the corona is only visible to the naked eye

  13. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  14. On-Line Machine Covering Yossi Azar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azar, Yossi

    On-Line Machine Covering Yossi Azar1 ,Leah Epstein2 1 Dept. of Computer Science, Tel of scheduling a sequence of jobs to m parallel machines as to maximize the minimum load over the machines. This situation corresponds to a case that a system which consists of the m machines is alive (i.e. productive

  15. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    of continuous values, and are more often used for predict- ing species distributions (Guisan & Zim- mermann regions. The structural complexity of vegetation and the relative proportion of cover in the understorey scattering data, both of which provide a much greater range of continuous data values than vegetation

  16. DDR sends cover letter with accommodation request to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    Approve DDR sends cover letter with accommodation request to employee/applicant; disseminate copies an accommodation. Need help? DDR informs employee of disability accommodation process, rights and responsibilities. Employee completes disability accommodation request form and sends it to DDR. Modify or Deny Consult

  17. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  18. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  19. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  20. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  1. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  2. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  3. Output-increasing, protective cover for a solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerbacher, Milfred D. (Dallas, TX)

    1995-11-21

    A flexible cover (14) for a flexible solar cell (12) protects the cell from the ambient and increases the cell's efficiency. The cell(12)includes silicon spheres (16) held in a flexible aluminum sheet matrix (20,22). The cover (14) is a flexible, protective layer (60) of light-transparent material having a relatively flat upper, free surface (64) and an irregular opposed surface (66). The irregular surface (66) includes first portions (68) which conform to the polar regions (31R) of the spheres (16) and second convex (72) or concave (90) portions (72 or 90) which define spaces (78) in conjunction with the reflective surface (20T) of one aluminum sheet (20). Without the cover (14) light (50) falling on the surface (20T) between the spheres (16) is wasted, that is, it does not fall on a sphere (16). The surfaces of the second portions are non-parallel to the direction of the otherwise wasted light (50), which fact, together with a selected relationship between the refractive indices of the cover and the spaces, result in sufficient diffraction of the otherwise wasted light (50) so that about 25% of it is reflected from the surface (20T) onto a sphere (16).

  4. Moduli of Galois p-covers in mixed characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramovich, Dan

    2010-01-01

    We define a proper moduli stack for degree $p$ covers $f:Y \\to \\cX$ where $\\cX$ is a twisted stable curve in the sense of [5] and [4], and $Y$ is a stable curve which via $f$ is a torsor over $\\cX$ under a finite flat group scheme $\\cG \\to \\cX$.

  5. SAMPLE COVER LETTER for BIOTECH INTERNSHIP Aaron Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Timothy J.

    SAMPLE COVER LETTER for BIOTECH INTERNSHIP Aaron Smith 12 Echo Street Cambridge, MA 55555 September 14, 20xx Ms. Caroline Burnett Boston Biotech Company Somewhere, MA 55555 Dear Ms. Burnett job listings at the Brandeis University Career Center. Boston Biotech is a leader in the advancement

  6. Network Analyzer Basics This presentation covers the principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    one-box) testers VSA Vector signal analyzer SA Spectrum analyzer VNA Vector signal analyzer TG/SA Tracking generator/spectrum analyzer SNA Scalar network analyzer NF Mtr. Noise-figure meter Imped. AnAgilent Network Analyzer Basics #12;2 Abstract This presentation covers the principles of measuring

  7. INVARIANT RADON MEASURES FOR HOROCYCLE FLOWS ON ABELIAN COVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarig, Omri

    INVARIANT RADON MEASURES FOR HOROCYCLE FLOWS ON ABELIAN COVERS OMRI SARIG Dedicated to the memory of M. Babillot Abstract. We classify the ergodic invariant Radon measures for horocycle flows on Zd those supported on periodic orbits. There are however invariant Radon measures. Burger [Bu] classified

  8. (plexiglass) covers (negligible transmittance at 290320 nm). NOx emission decreased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (plexiglass) covers (negligible transmittance at 290­320 nm). NOx emission decreased from shoots, and the compensation point was estimated to be around 1 p.p.b. As ultraviolet radiation induces NOx emission from P exposure to ultraviolet light and NOx emission, and between the ambient con- centration of NOx and its

  9. DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy This policy applies to all non to discipline, suspend with or without pay, or terminate employees for just cause. Just cause includes to discipline or termination for just cause, the University reserves the right to demote, suspend or terminate

  10. GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the early fifteenth centllry. in central Japan. southern Germany,and Switzerland." I National Oceanographic hydropower production and cooling water intakes, and damaging shore structures. Ice cover also impacts, and spring energy exchanges between the lake and the planetary boundary layer. Although observations of shore

  11. Operational Experience of Continuous Cover Forestry: UK Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    practical value. In addition, the information sources used in the management of the sites were assessed but frustration was expressed by some managers that there are no formal mechanisms for information sharing betweenOperational Experience of Continuous Cover Forestry: UK Case Studies INTERNAL PROJECT INFORMATION

  12. Covering Note INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    Covering Note for INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS (Updated) The Inter-Academy Report on GM crops the main conclusions and recommendations. The literature on GM crops is voluminous. More than a hundred seek to enunciate a national strategy on GM crops. The rest deals with concerns, surveillance etc. #12

  13. COVERING THEORY FOR LINEAR CATEGORIES WITH APPLICATION TO DERIVED CATEGORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shiping

    COVERING THEORY FOR LINEAR CATEGORIES WITH APPLICATION TO DERIVED CATEGORIES RAYMUNDO BAUTISTA-Schmidt categories preserves irreducible morphisms and almost splits sequences. Specializing to derived categories between the bounded derived categories of finite dimensional modules. As an application, we show that each

  14. MONITORING THE PERFORMANCE OF AN ALTERNATIVE COVER USING CAISSON LYSIMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Smith, G.M.; Mushovic, P.S.; none,

    2004-02-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8, collaborated on a series of field lysimeter studies to design and monitor the performance of an alternative cover for a uranium mill tailings disposal cell at the Monticello, Utah, Superfund Site. Because groundwater recharge is naturally limited at Monticello in areas with thick loess soils, DOE and EPA chose to design a cover for Monticello using local soils and a native plant community to mimic this natural soilwater balance. Two large drainage lysimeters fabricated of corrugated steel culvert lined with high-density polyethylene were installed to evaluate the hydrological and ecological performance of an alternative cover design constructed in 2000 on the disposal cell. Unlike conventional, lowpermeability designs, this cover relies on (1) the water storage capacity of a 163-cm soil “sponge” layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to retain precipitation while plants are dormant and (2) native vegetation to remove precipitation during the growing season. The sponge layer consists of a clay loam subsoil compacted to 1.65 g/cm2 in one lysimeter and a loam topsoil compacted to 1.45 g/cm2 in the other lysimeter, representing the range of as-built conditions constructed in the nearby disposal cell cover. About 0.1 mm of drainage occurred in both lysimeters during an average precipitation year and before they were planted, an amount well below the EPA target of <3.0 mm/yr. However, the cover with less compacted loam topsoil sponge had a 40% greater water storage capacity than the cover with overly compacted clay loam subsoil sponge. The difference is attributable in part to higher green leaf area and water extraction by plants in the loam topsoil. The lesson learned is that seemingly subtle differences in soil types, sources, and compaction can result in salient differences in performance. Diverse, seeded communities of predominantly native perennial species were established on both lysimeters during an extended 3-yr drought, highlighting the importance of a sound understanding of the local ecology and of implementing the science and methods of disturbed-land revegetation.

  15. Morphological Classification of Galaxies by Shapelet Decomposition in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II: Multiwavelength Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Kelly; T. A. McKay

    2004-12-15

    We describe the application of the `shapelet' linear decomposition of galaxy images to multi-wavelength morphological classification using the $u,g,r,i,$ and $z$-band images of 1519 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We utilize elliptical shapelets to remove to first-order the effect of inclination on morphology. After decomposing the galaxies we perform a principal component analysis on the shapelet coefficients to reduce the dimensionality of the spectral morphological parameter space. We give a description of each of the first ten principal component's contribution to a galaxy's spectral morphology. We find that galaxies of different broad Hubble type separate cleanly in the principal component space. We apply a mixture of Gaussians model to the 2-dimensional space spanned by the first two principal components and use the results as a basis for classification. Using the mixture model, we separate galaxies into three classes and give a description of each class's physical and morphological properties. We find that the two dominant mixture model classes correspond to early and late type galaxies, respectively. The third class has, on average, a blue, extended core surrounded by a faint red halo, and typically exhibits some asymmetry. We compare our method to a simple cut on $u-r$ color and find the shapelet method to be superior in separating galaxies. Furthermore, we find evidence that the $u-r=2.22$ decision boundary may not be optimal for separation between early and late type galaxies, and suggest that the optimal cut may be $u-r \\sim 2.4$.

  16. A plausible (overlooked) super-luminous supernova in the Sloan digital sky survey stripe 82 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Koz?owski, Szymon; Wyrzykowski, ?ukasz [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Djorgovski, S. George; Mahabal, Ashish A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Koposov, Sergey, E-mail: zkostrzewa@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: simkoz@astrouw.edu.pl, E-mail: wyrzykow@astrouw.edu.pl [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    We present the discovery of a plausible super-luminous supernova (SLSN), found in the archival data of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, called PSN 000123+000504. The supernova (SN) peaked at m {sub g} < 19.4 mag in the second half of 2005 September, but was missed by the real-time SN hunt. The observed part of the light curve (17 epochs) showed that the rise to the maximum took over 30 days, while the decline time lasted at least 70 days (observed frame), closely resembling other SLSNe of SN 2007bi type. The spectrum of the host galaxy reveals a redshift of z = 0.281 and the distance modulus of ? = 40.77 mag. Combining this information with the SDSS photometry, we found the host galaxy to be an LMC-like irregular dwarf galaxy with an absolute magnitude of M{sub B} = –18.2 ± 0.2 mag and an oxygen abundance of 12+log?[O/H]=8.3±0.2; hence, the SN peaked at M {sub g} < –21.3 mag. Our SLSN follows the relation for the most energetic/super-luminous SNe exploding in low-metallicity environments, but we found no clear evidence for SLSNe to explode in low-luminosity (dwarf) galaxies only. The available information on the PSN 000123+000504 light curve suggests the magnetar-powered model as a likely scenario of this event. This SLSN is a new addition to a quickly growing family of super-luminous SNe.

  17. Performance characteristics of a perforated shadow band under clear sky conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Michael J.

    2010-12-15

    A perforated, non-rotating shadow band is described for separating global solar irradiance into its diffuse and direct normal components using a single pyranometer. Whereas shadow bands are normally solid so as to occult the sensor of a pyranometer throughout the day, the proposed band has apertures cut from its circumference to intermittently expose the instrument sensor at preset intervals. Under clear sky conditions the device produces a saw tooth waveform of irradiance data from which it is possible to reconstruct separate global and diffuse curves. The direct normal irradiance may then be calculated giving a complete breakdown of the irradiance curves without need of a second instrument or rotating shadow band. This paper describes the principle of operation of the band and gives a mathematical model of its shading mask based on the results of an optical ray tracing study. An algorithm for processing the data from the perforated band system is described and evaluated. In an extended trial conducted at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, the band coupled with a thermally corrected Eppley PSP produced independent curves for diffuse, global and direct normal irradiance with low mean bias errors of 5.6 W/m{sup 2}, 0.3 W/m{sup 2} and -2.6 W/m{sup 2} respectively, relative to collocated reference instruments. Random uncertainties were 9.7 W/m{sup 2} (diffuse), 17.3 W/m{sup 2} (global) and 19.0 W/m{sup 2} (direct). When the data processing algorithm was modified to include the ray trace model of sensor exposure, uncertainties increased only marginally, confirming the effectiveness of the model. Deployment of the perforated band system can potentially increase the accuracy of data from ground stations in predominantly sunny areas where instrumentation is limited to a single pyranometer. (author)

  18. The Mass Function of the Stellar Component of Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Panter; Alan Heavens; Raul Jimenez

    2004-06-11

    Using the MOPED algorithm we determine non-parametrically the Stellar Mass Function of 96,545 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release one. By using the reconstructed spectrum due to starlight we can eliminate contamination from either emission lines or AGN components. Our results give excellent agreement with previous works, but extend their range by more than two decades in mass to 10^{7.5} < M_s/h^{-2}M_\\odot < 10^{12}. We present both a standard Schechter fit and a fit modified to include an extra, high-mass contribution, possibly from cluster cD galaxies. The Schechter fit parameters are $\\phi^*=(7.7\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-3} h^3 Mpc^{-3}$, $M^*=(7.53 \\pm 0.04) \\times 10^{10} h^{-2}M_\\odot$ and $\\alpha=-1.167\\pm 0.004$. Our sample also yields an estimate for the contribution from baryons in stars to the critical density of $\\Omega_{b*}h=(2.40 \\pm 0.04) \\times 10^{-3}$, in good agreement with other indicators. Error bars are statistical and a Salpeter IMF is assumed throughout. We find no evolution of the mass function in the redshift range $0.05 < z < 0.34$ indicating that almost all present day stars were already formed at $z \\sim 0.34$ with little or no star formation activity since then and that the evolution seen in the luminosity function must be largely due to stellar fading.

  19. Sixty-seven Additional L Dwarfs Discovered by the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Davy Kirkpatrick; I. Neill Reid; James Liebert; John E. Gizis; Adam J. Burgasser; David G. Monet; Conard C. Dahn; Brant Nelson; Rik J. Williams

    2000-03-22

    We present JHKs photometry, far red spectra, and spectral classifications for an additional 67 L dwarfs discovered by the Two Micron All Sky Survey. One of the goals of this new search was to locate more examples of the latest L dwarfs. Of the 67 new discoveries, 17 have types of L6 or later. Analysis of these new discoveries shows that H-alpha emission has yet to be convincingly detected in any L dwarf later than type L4.5, indicating a decline or absence of chromospheric activity in the latest L dwarfs. Further analysis shows that 16 (and possibly 4 more) of the new L dwarfs are lithium brown dwarfs and that the average line strength for those L dwarfs showing lithium increases until roughly type L6.5 V then declines for later types. This disappearance may be the first sign of depletion of atomic lithium as it begins to form into lithium-bearing molecules. Another goal of the search was to locate nearer, brighter L dwarfs of all subtypes. Using absolute magnitudes for 17 L dwarf systems with trigonometric parallax measurements, we develop spectrophotometric relations to estimate distances to the other L dwarfs. Of the 67 new discoveries, 21 have photometric distances placing them within 25 parsecs of the Sun. A table of all known L and T dwarfs believed to lie within 25 parsecs - 53 in total - is also presented. Using the distance measurement of the coolest L dwarf known, we calculate that the gap in temperature between L8 and the warmest known T dwarfs is less than 350K and probably much less. If the transition region between the two classes spans a very small temperature interval, this would explain why no transition objects have yet been uncovered. This evidence, combined with model fits to low-resolution spectra of late-M and early-L dwarfs, indicates that L dwarfs span the range 1300K < Teff < 2000K.

  20. Red giant stars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. The general field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Carrell, K.; Zhao, J. K.; Tan, K. F.; Nissen, P. E.; Wei, P. E-mail: pen@phys.au.dk

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained a sample of ?22,000 red giant branch (RGB) stars based on stellar parameters, provided by the ninth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the CH(G)/MgH indices, measured from the included spectra. The Galactic rest-frame velocity of V {sub gsr} versus longitude for the sample shows the existence of several groups of stars from globular clusters and known streams. Excluding these substructures, a sample of ?16,000 RGB stars from the general field is used to investigate the properties of the thick disk, the inner halo, and the outer halo of our Galaxy. The metallicity and rotational velocity distributions are investigated for stars at 0 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. It is found that the canonical thick disk dominates at 0 kpc < |Z| < 2 kpc and its contribution becomes negligible at |Z| > 3 kpc. The MWTD is present and overlaps with the inner halo at 1 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc. The inner halo starts at 2 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc and becomes the dominated population for 4 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. For halo stars with |Z| > 5 kpc, bimodal metallicity distributions are found for 20 kpc < |Z| < 25 kpc and 35 kpc < RR < 45 kpc, which suggests a dual halo, the inner and the outer halo, as reported in Carollo et al. at low |Z| values. The peak of metallicity for the inner halo is at [Fe/H] ? –1.6 and appears to be at [Fe/H] ? –2.3 for the outer halo. The transition point from the inner to the outer halo is located at |Z| ? 20 kpc and RR ? 35 kpc.

  1. From rational numbers to algebra: Separable contributions of decimal magnitude and relational understanding of fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWolf, M; Bassok, M; Holyoak, KJ

    2015-01-01

    disseminated broadly. OTO fraction PWR NOTO fraction Decimala part- to-whole ratio (PWR) is the relation between theof relationships. The PWR is a conventional relationship for

  2. M. Stimp J. Ganguly G. Molin -Mg order-disorder in orthopyroxene: equilibrium fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganguly, Jibamitra

    from its potential application to the determination of cooling rates of terrestrial accurate data on the equilibrium site fractionation and the kinetics of the fractionation process

  3. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, R. M. da; Domínguez, D.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  4. Implementation of Quantum and Classical Discrete Fractional Fourier Transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffen Weimann; Armando Perez-Leija; Maxime Lebugle; Robert Keil; Malte Tichy; Markus Gräfe; Rene Heilmann; Stefan Nolte; Hector Moya-Cessa; Gregor Weihs; Demetrios N. Christodoulides; Alexander Szameit

    2015-07-31

    Fourier transforms are ubiquitous mathematical tools in basic and applied sciences. We here report classical and quantum optical realizations of the discrete fractional Fourier transform, a generalization of the Fourier transform. In the integrated configuration used in our experiments, the order of the transform is mapped onto the longitudinal coordinate, thus opening up the prospect of simultaneously observing all Transformation orders. In the context of classical optics, we implement discrete fractional Fourier transforms, both integer and fractional, of exemplary wave functions and experimentally demonstrate the shift theorem. Moreover, we apply this approach in the quantum realm to transform separable and highly entangled biphoton wave functions. The proposed approach is versatile and could find applications in various fields where Fourier transforms are essential tools, such as quantum chemistry and biology, physics and mathematics.

  5. Prediction of pool void fraction by new drift flux correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kataoka, I; Ishii, M

    1986-06-01

    A void fraction for a bubbling or boiling pool system is one of the important parameters in analyzing heat and mass transfer processes. Using the drift flux formulation, correlations for the pool void fraction have been developed in collaboration with a large number of experimental data. It has been found that the drift velocity in a pool system depends upon vessel diameter, system pressure, gas flux and fluid physical properties. The results show that the relative velocity and void fraction can be quite different from those predicted by conventional correlations. In terms of the rise velocity, four different regimes are identified. These are bubbly, churn-turbulent, slug and cap bubble regimes. The present correlations are shown to agree with the experimental data over wide ranges of parameters such as vessel diameter, system pressure, gas flux and physical properties. 39 refs., 41 figs.

  6. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kullberg, A. Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, ?, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  7. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Kreibich, Roland E. (Auburn, WA)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm.sup.3 ].sup.1/2 with polar components in the 1.8-3.0 range and hydrogen bonding components in the 2-4.8 range and the recovery of the product extract from the solvent with no further purification being needed for use in adhesives and molding compounds. The product extract is characterized as being a mixture of very different compounds having a wide variety of chemical functionalities, including phenolic, carbonyl, aldehyde, methoxyl, vinyl and hydroxyl. The use of the product extract on phenol-formaldehyde thermosetting resins is shown to have advantages over the conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins.

  8. Improving fractionation lowers butane sulfur level at Saudi gas plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harruff, L.G.; Martinie, G.D.; Rahman, A. [Saudi Arabian Oil Co., Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1998-10-12

    Increasing the debutanizer reflux/feed ratio to improve fractionation at an eastern Saudi Arabian NGL plant reduced high sulfur in the butane product. The sulfur resulted from dimethyl sulfide (DMS) contamination in the feed stream from an offshore crude-oil reservoir in the northern Arabian Gulf. The contamination is limited to two northeastern offshore gas-oil separation plants operated by Saudi Arabian Oil Co. (Saudi Aramco) and, therefore, cannot be transported to facilities outside the Eastern Province. Two technically acceptable solutions for removing this contaminant were investigated: 13X molecular-sieve adsorption of the DMS and increased fractionation efficiency. The latter would force DMS into the debutanizer bottoms.

  9. The quantum chaos conjecture and generalized continued fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pustyl'nikov, L D [M.V. Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-04-30

    The proof of the quantum chaos conjecture is given for a class of systems including as a special case the model of a rotating particle under the action of periodic impulse perturbations. (The distribution of the distances between adjacent energy levels is close to the Poisson distribution and differs from it by terms of the third order of smallness.) The proof reduces to a result in number theory on the distribution of the distances between adjacent fractional parts of values of a polynomial, while the estimate of the remainder term is based on the new theory of generalized continued fractions for vectors.

  10. Critical dynamics in systems controlled by fractional kinetic equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Batalov; A. A. Batalova

    2012-05-23

    The article is devoted to the dynamics of systems with an anomalous scaling near a critical point. The fractional stochastic equation of a Lanvevin type with the $\\varphi^3$ nonlinearity is considered. By analogy with the model A the field theoretic model is built, and its propagators are calculated. The nonlocality of the new action functional in the coordinate representation is caused by the involving of the fractional spatial derivative. It is proved that the new model is multiplicatively renormalizable, the Gell-Man-Low function in the one-loop approximation is evaluted. The existence of the scaling behavior in the framework of the $\\varepsilon$-expansion for a superdiffusion is established.

  11. Chaotic vibrations of the duffing system with fractional damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syta, Arkadiusz; Litak, Grzegorz [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Lublin University of Technology, Nadbystrzycka 36, PL-20-618 Lublin (Poland)] [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Lublin University of Technology, Nadbystrzycka 36, PL-20-618 Lublin (Poland); Lenci, Stefano [Department of Civil and Building Engineering, and Architecture, Polytechnic University of Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)] [Department of Civil and Building Engineering, and Architecture, Polytechnic University of Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Scheffler, Michael [Institut für Festkörpermechanik, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Institut für Festkörpermechanik, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    We examined the Duffing system with a fractional damping term. Calculating the basins of attraction, we demonstrate a broad spectrum of non-linear behaviour connected with sensitivity to the initial conditions and chaos. To quantify dynamical response of the system, we propose the statistical 0-1 test as well as the maximal Lyapunov exponent; the application of the latter encounter a few difficulties because of the memory effect due to the fractional derivative. The results are confirmed by bifurcation diagrams, phase portraits, and Poincaré sections.

  12. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Seitz, Robert R.; Suttora, Linda C.

    2014-09-18

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time frames of 1,000 years for compliance and potentially thousands of years based on the wastes to test the robustness of the system. Experience has shown that there are a range of expectations and perspectives from the different regulators involved at different sites when reviewing assumptions related to cover and liner/leachate collection system performance. However for HW disposal alone under RCRA the design standards are typically considered sufficient by the regulators without a requirement to assess long-term performance thus avoiding the need to consider the details addressed in this report. This report provides suggestions for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a DOE Order 435.1 PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations, and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. The emphasis is on water balances and management in such assessments. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information was then synthesized into suggestions for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system. Numerous references are provided for sources of information to help describe the basis for performance of individual components of cover and liner systems.

  13. Anisotropic capillary barrier for waste site surface covers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormont, John C. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Waste sites are capped or covered upon closure. The cover structure incorporates a number of different layers each having a contributory function. One such layer is the barrier layer. Traditionally the barriers have been compacted soil and geosynthetics. These types of barriers have not been successfully implemented in unsaturated ground conditions like those found in dry climates. Capillary barriers have been proposed as barrier layers in dry environments, but the divergence length of these barriers has been found to be inadequate. An alternative to the capillary barrier is a anisotropic capillary barrier. An anisotropic capillary barrier has an increased divergence length which results in more water being diverted laterally preventing the majority of water from percolating in a downward direction through the barrier.

  14. Branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for b -> s gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2001-12-01

    We have measured the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for the radiative penguin process b --> s gamma. We find B(b --> s gamma) = (3.21 +/- 0.43 +/- 0.27(-0.10)(+0.18)) x 10(-4), where the errors are statistical, ...

  15. The Topsy-Turvy World of Continued Fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Joseph H.

    .996594406685719888923060 . . . . Now we substitute this into the earlier formula, which gives a double-decker frac- tion, = 3 + 1 7.0034172310133726034641468 . . . #12;[Chap. 47] The Topsy-Turvy World of Continued Fractions [online] 412 to get the triple-decker

  16. The Lamb-Bateman integral equation and the fractional derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Babusci; G. Dattoli; D. Sacchetti

    2010-06-08

    The Lamb-Bateman integral equation was introduced to study the solitary wave diffraction and its solution was written in terms of an integral transform. We prove that it is essentially the Abel integral equation and its solution can be obtained using the formalism of fractional calculus.

  17. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and M-Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vafa, Cumrun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a unifying model for FQHE which on the one hand connects it to recent developments in string theory and on the other hand leads to new predictions for the principal series of experimentally observed FQH systems with filling fraction $\

  18. Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Branch length distribution in TREF fractionated polyethylene Ramnath Ramachandran a , Gregory Keywords: Polyethylene Branching Neutron scattering a b s t r a c t Commercial polyethylene is typically and catalyst activity. Further, processing of polyethylene after polymerization may also result in changes

  19. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and M-Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cumrun Vafa

    2015-11-12

    We propose a unifying model for FQHE which on the one hand connects it to recent developments in string theory and on the other hand leads to new predictions for the principal series of experimentally observed FQH systems with filling fraction $\

  20. Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila Sitindra S Accepted 7 September 2013 Available online 16 September 2013 a b s t r a c t Hydrogen isotope ratio values from recording the hydrogen isotope composition of ambient water, dD values of lipids also depend