National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for four-stage cluster sampling

  1. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in the Extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kale, Ruta; Cassano, Rossella; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, sandro; Dallacasa, Daniele; Zucca, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment on their radio properties. To decouple the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment in their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS). We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which was divided into two classes, depending on the dynamical state of the host cluster, i.e. merging (M) and relaxed (R). Among the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio-loud, and 31 are radio--quiet. The radio-loud sources are located favourably located in relaxed clusters (71\\%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, mostly located in merging systems (81\\%). The fraction...

  2. Investigating AGN Heating in a Sample of Nearby Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, R J H

    2006-01-01

    We analyse those objects in the Brightest 55 sample of clusters of galaxies which have a short central cooling time and a central temperature drop. Such clusters are likely to require some form of heating. Where clear radio bubbles are observed in these clusters, their energy injection is compared to the X-ray cooling rate. Of the 20 clusters requiring heating, at least 14 have clear bubbles, implying a duty cycle for the bubbling activity of at least 70 per cent. The average distance out to which the bubbles can offset the X-ray cooling, r_heat is given by r_heat/r_cool=0.86+/-0.11 where r_cool is defined as the radius as which the radiative cooling time is 3 Gyr. 10 out of 16 clusters have r_heat/r_cool>1, but there is a large range in values. The clusters which require heating but show no clear bubbles were combined with those clusters which have a radio core to form a second sub-sample. Using r_heat=0.86 r_cool we calculate the size of an average bubble expected in these clusters. In five cases (3C129.1, ...

  3. On the occurrence of Radio Halos in galaxy clusters - Insight from a mass-selected sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuciti, V; Brunetti, G; Dallacasa, D; Kale, R; Ettori, S; Venturi, T

    2015-01-01

    Giant radio halos (RH) are diffuse Mpc-scale synchrotron sources detected in a fraction of massive and merging galaxy clusters. An unbiased study of the statistical properties of RHs is crucial to constrain their origin and evolution. We aim at investigating the occurrence of RHs and its dependence on the cluster mass in a SZ-selected sample of galaxy clusters, which is as close as possible to be a mass-selected sample. Moreover, we analyse the connection between RHs and merging clusters. We select from the Planck SZ catalogue (Planck Collaboration XXIX 2014) clusters with $M\\geq 6\\times10^{14} M_\\odot$ at z=0.08-0.33 and we search for the presence of RHs using the NVSS for z<0.2 and the GMRT RH survey (GRHS, Venturi et al. 2007, 2008) and its extension (EGRHS, Kale et al. 2013, 2015) for 0.2clusters dynamical status. We confirm that RH clusters are merging systems while the majority of clusters without RH are relaxed, thus supp...

  4. Applying the logic of sample surveys to qualitative case studies: The case cluster method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Charles C.; Brannon, Diane; Maynard-Moody, Steven

    1986-03-01

    . Likewise, if one intends to quantify variables the initial codes will evolve (although one would want to minimize this). The highly in- teractive nature of these processes distinguishes the case cluster method from the standard sample survey. THREE FEATURES... statistics for categorial variables (e.g.. Bishop, Fien- berg, and Holland, 1975) could be of substantial benefit to the qualitative case study that employed the case cluster method. The term secondary analysis has several meanings each of which poses...

  5. Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

  6. Galaxy Clustering Evolution in the CNOC2 High-Luminosity Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; S. L. Morris; H. Lin; P. B. Hall; D. Patton; M. Sawicki; C. W. Shepherd

    2000-05-23

    The redshift evolution of the galaxy two-point correlation function is a fundamental cosmological statistic. To identify similar galaxy populations at different redshifts, we select a strict volume-limited sample culled from the 6100 cataloged CNOC2 galaxies. Our high-luminosity subsample selects galaxies having k-corrected and evolution-compensated R luminosities, M_R^{k,e}, above -20 mag (H_0=100 km/s/Mpc) where M_ast^{k,e}(R)simeq -20.3 mag. This subsample contains about 2300 galaxies distributed between redshifts 0.1 and 0.65 spread over a total of 1.55 square degrees of sky. A similarly defined low-redshift sample is drawn from the Las Campanas Redshift Survey. We find that the co-moving two-point correlation function can be described as xi(r|z) = (r_00/r)^gamma (1+z)^{-(3+epsilon-gamma)} with r_{00}=5.03+/-0.08/h Mpc, epsilon=-0.17+/- 0.18 and gamma=1.87+/-0.07 over the z=0.03 to 0.65 redshift range, for Omega_M=0.2, Lambda=0. The measured clustering amplitude and its evolution are dependent on the adopted cosmology. The measured evolution rates for Omega_M=1 and flat Omega_M=0.2 background cosmologies are epsilon=0.80+/-0.22 and epsilon=-0.81+/-0.19, respectively, with r_{00} of 5.30+/-0.1/h Mpc and 4.85+/-0.1/h Mpc, respectively. The sensitivity of the derived correlations to the evolution corrections and details of the measurements is presented. The analytic prediction of biased clustering evolution for only the low density, LambdaCDM cosmology is readily consistent with the observations, with biased clustering in an open cosmology somewhat marginally excluded and a biased Omega_M=1 model predicting clustering evolution that is more than 6 standard deviations from the measured value.

  7. Cosmological Implications and Physical Properties of an X-Ray Flux-Limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Reiprich

    2003-08-08

    The original abstract significantly exceeds the space available here, so here's a brief summary. The abstract is similar to the abstract of astro-ph/0111285 (ApJ, 567, 716) which describes the X-ray galaxy cluster sample HIFLUGCS, the X-ray luminosity--gravitational mass relation, the cluster mass function, and the derived cosmological constraints. Additionally, the fraction of the total gravitating mass in the universe which is contained in intracluster gas is quantified. Furthermore, physical properties of the cluster sample have been studied and analyses of relations between different cluster parameters (including the gas mass fraction, gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, gas mass, gravitational mass, beta, and core radius) are discussed. Also, results from an analysis of XMM-Newton performance verification phase data of Abell 1835 are described.

  8. A complete sample of twelve very X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z>0.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ebeling; E. Barrett; D. Donovan; C. -J. Ma; A. C. Edge; L. van Speybroeck

    2007-03-15

    We present the statistically complete and cosmologically most relevant subset of the twelve most distant galaxy clusters detected at z>0.5 by the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS). Ten of these systems are new discoveries; only two (MACSJ0018.5+1626 aka CL0016+1609, and MACSJ0454.1-0300 aka MS0451.6-0305) were previously known. We provide fundamental cluster properties derived from our optical and X-ray follow-up observations as well as the selection function in tabulated form to facilitate cosmological studies using this sample.

  9. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  10. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROPER MOTION (HSTPROMO) CATALOGS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION, DATA REDUCTION, AND NGC 7078 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Watkins, L. L.; King, I. R.; Bianchini, P.; Chanamé, J.; Chandar, R.; Cool, A. M.; Ferraro, F. R.; Massari, D.; Ford, H.

    2014-12-20

    We present the first study of high-precision internal proper motions (PMs) in a large sample of globular clusters, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained over the past decade with the ACS/WFC, ACS/HRC, and WFC3/UVIS instruments. We determine PMs for over 1.3 million stars in the central regions of 22 clusters, with a median number of ?60,000 stars per cluster. These PMs have the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the internal kinematics of globular clusters by extending past line-of-sight (LOS) velocity measurements to two- or three-dimensional velocities, lower stellar masses, and larger sample sizes. We describe the reduction pipeline that we developed to derive homogeneous PMs from the very heterogeneous archival data. We demonstrate the quality of the measurements through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We also discuss the PM errors introduced by various systematic effects and the techniques that we have developed to correct or remove them to the extent possible. We provide in electronic form the catalog for NGC 7078 (M 15), which consists of 77,837 stars in the central 2.'4. We validate the catalog by comparison with existing PM measurements and LOS velocities and use it to study the dependence of the velocity dispersion on radius, stellar magnitude (or mass) along the main sequence, and direction in the plane of the sky (radial or tangential). Subsequent papers in this series will explore a range of applications in globular-cluster science and will also present the PM catalogs for the other sample clusters.

  11. JOINT ANALYSIS OF CLUSTER OBSERVATIONS. II. CHANDRA/XMM-NEWTON X-RAY AND WEAK LENSING SCALING RELATIONS FOR A SAMPLE OF 50 RICH CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahdavi, Andisheh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94131 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Babul, Arif; Bildfell, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Jeltema, Tesla [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Henry, J. Patrick [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    We present a study of multiwavelength X-ray and weak lensing scaling relations for a sample of 50 clusters of galaxies. Our analysis combines Chandra and XMM-Newton data using an energy-dependent cross-calibration. After considering a number of scaling relations, we find that gas mass is the most robust estimator of weak lensing mass, yielding 15% {+-} 6% intrinsic scatter at r{sub 500}{sup WL} (the pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} yields a consistent scatter of 22% {+-} 5%). The scatter does not change when measured within a fixed physical radius of 1 Mpc. Clusters with small brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) to X-ray peak offsets constitute a very regular population whose members have the same gas mass fractions and whose even smaller (<10%) deviations from regularity can be ascribed to line of sight geometrical effects alone. Cool-core clusters, while a somewhat different population, also show the same (<10%) scatter in the gas mass-lensing mass relation. There is a good correlation and a hint of bimodality in the plane defined by BCG offset and central entropy (or central cooling time). The pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} does not discriminate between the more relaxed and less relaxed populations, making it perhaps the more even-handed mass proxy for surveys. Overall, hydrostatic masses underestimate weak lensing masses by 10% on the average at r{sub 500}{sup WL}; but cool-core clusters are consistent with no bias, while non-cool-core clusters have a large and constant 15%-20% bias between r{sub 2500}{sup WL} and r{sub 500}{sup WL}, in agreement with N-body simulations incorporating unthermalized gas. For non-cool-core clusters, the bias correlates well with BCG ellipticity. We also examine centroid shift variance and power ratios to quantify substructure; these quantities do not correlate with residuals in the scaling relations. Individual clusters have for the most part forgotten the source of their departures from self-similarity.

  12. X-ray Mass Estimates at $z\\sim0.3$ for the CNOC Cluster Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron D. Lewis; E. Ellingson; Simon L. Morris; R. G. Carlberg

    1999-01-06

    Results are presented from the analysis of ROSAT HRI and PSPC observations of the CNOC subsample of the EMSS high redshift galaxy clusters. X-ray surface brightness profiles of 14 clusters with $0.17 < z < 0.55$ are constructed and fit to isothermal $\\beta$ models. Where possible, we use both the HRI and PSPC data to constrain the fit. Under the assumptions of isothermality, hydrostatic equilibrium, and spherical symmetry, we derive total X-ray masses within a range of radii from 141 to $526 h^{-1}_{100}$ kpc. These masses are compared with both the dynamical masses obtained from galaxy velocities and the projected masses from published gravitational lensing studies. We find no systematic bias between X-ray and dynamical methods across the sample, with an average $M_{Dyn}/M_X=1.04\\pm0.07$, although individual clusters exhibit mass discrepancies up to a factor of 2. We estimate that the systematic effects due to cooling flows, non-equilibrium systems and temperature gradients affect the average mass ratio by no more than $15-20%$. Weak gravitational lensing masses appear to be systematically higher than X-ray results by factors of $\\sim50%$, while strong lensing estimates show larger discrepancies (factors of $\\sim2.5$). However, these comparisons are complicated by the need to extrapolate the X-ray data to larger or smaller radii. X-ray derived cluster gas masses are calculated, from which we obtain a cluster baryon fraction of $\\sim5%h^{-3/2}_{100}$, yielding $\\Omega_0 \\sim0.3h^{-1/2}_{100}$.

  13. Small-sample brain mapping: sparse recovery on spatially correlated designs with randomization and clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Small-sample brain mapping: sparse recovery on spatially correlated designs with randomization Abstract Functional neuroimaging can measure the brain's response to an external stimulus. It is used to perform brain mapping: identi- fying from these observations the brain re- gions involved. This problem

  14. Detailed abundances for a large sample of giant stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordero, M. J.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Astronomy Department, Indiana University Bloomington, Swain West 319, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Johnson, C. I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Simmerer, J., E-mail: majocord@indiana.edu, E-mail: catyp@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mcdonald@jb.man.ac.uk, E-mail: albert.zijlstra@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: jennifer@physics.utah.edu [University of Utah, Physics and Astronomy, 115 South 1400 East #201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and globular cluster (GC) formation in massive more metal-rich GCs, as it is the closest massive GC. We present chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu in 164 red giant branch stars in the massive GC 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multifiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4 m telescope and the FLAMES multiobject spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. We find an average [Fe/H] = –0.79 ± 0.09 dex, consistent with literature values, as well as overabundances of alpha-elements ([?/Fe] ? 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r process-dominated ([Eu/La] = +0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anticorrelation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ? –0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of asymptotic giant branch nucleosynthesis yields.

  15. Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, N; Miyatake, H; Hasselfield, M; Gralla, M B; Allison, R; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Crichton, D; Devlin, M J; Dunkley, J; Dünner, R; Erben, T; Ferrara, S; Halpern, M; Hilton, M; Hill, J C; Hincks, A D; Hložek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, J P; Kneib, J P; Kosowsky, A; Makler, M; Marriage, T A; Menanteau, F; Miller, L; Moodley, K; Moraes, B; Niemack, M D; Page, L; Shan, H; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Sifón, C; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Taylor, J; Thornton, R; van Waerbeke, L; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The average weak lensing mass is $\\left(4.8\\pm0.8\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of $\\left(4.70\\pm1.0\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously neglected.

  16. The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. IV. Validation with an Extended Sample of Galactic Globular and Open Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolinski, Jason P.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; An, Deokkeun; Bickerton, Steven J.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Loomis, Craig P.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric data for likely member stars of five Galactic globular clusters (M 3, M 53, M 71, M 92, and NGC 5053) and three open clusters (M 35, NGC 2158, and NGC 6791) are processed by the current version of the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP), in order to determine estimates of metallicities and radial velocities for the clusters. These results are then compared to values from the literature. We find that the mean metallicity (<[Fe/H]>) and mean radial velocity (hRVi) estimates for each cluster are almost all within 2{sigma} of the adopted literature values; most are within 1{sigma}. We also demonstrate that the new version of the SSPP achieves small, but noteworthy, improvements in <[Fe/H]> estimates at the extrema of the cluster metallicity range, as compared to a previous version of the pipeline software. These results provide additional confidence in the application of the SSPP for studies of the abundances and kinematics of stellar populations in the Galaxy.

  17. THE SEGUE STELLAR PARAMETER PIPELINE. IV. VALIDATION WITH AN EXTENDED SAMPLE OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR AND OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolinski, Jason P.; Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; An, Deokkeun; Bickerton, Steven J.; Loomis, Craig P.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian E-mail: lee@pa.msu.edu E-mail: deokkeun@ewha.ac.kr E-mail: cloomis@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: crockosi@ucolick.org E-mail: yanny@fnal.gov

    2011-03-15

    Spectroscopic and photometric data for likely member stars of five Galactic globular clusters (M3, M53, M71, M92, and NGC 5053) and three open clusters (M35, NGC 2158, and NGC 6791) are processed by the current version of the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP), in order to determine estimates of metallicities and radial velocities (RVs) for the clusters. These results are then compared to values from the literature. We find that the mean metallicity (([Fe/H])) and mean radial velocity ((RV)) estimates for each cluster are almost all within 2{sigma} of the adopted literature values; most are within 1{sigma}. We also demonstrate that the new version of the SSPP achieves small, but noteworthy, improvements in ([Fe/H]) estimates at the extrema of the cluster metallicity range, as compared to a previous version of the pipeline software. These results provide additional confidence in the application of the SSPP for studies of the abundances and kinematics of stellar populations in the Galaxy.

  18. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara /LBL, Berkeley; Rozo, Eduardo; /Chicago U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Siegel, Seth R.; /Michigan U.; Becker, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Busha, Michael; /SLAC; Gerdes, David; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Fermilab; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  19. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2?, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  20. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

  1. Cluster generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donchev, Todor I. (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan G. (Champaign, IL)

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  2. The fundamental plane of clusters of galaxies: a quest for understanding cluster dynamics and morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Fritsch; Thomas Buchert

    1999-03-10

    We discuss implications of the fundamental plane parameters of clusters of galaxies derived from combined optical and X-ray data of a sample of 78 nearby clusters. In particular, we investigate the dependence of these parameters on the dynamical state of the cluster. We introduce a new concept of allocation of the fundamental plane of clusters derived from their intrinsic morphological properties, and put some theoretical implications of the existence of a fundamental plane into perspective.

  3. Cluster Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison Genepool

  4. Cluster Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison

  5. Young massive star clusters in nearby galaxies. I. Identification and general properties of cluster systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soeren S. Larsen; Tom Richtler

    1999-02-19

    Using ground-based UBVRI+Halpha CCD photometry we have been carrying out a search for young massive star clusters (YMCs) in a sample consisting of 21 nearby spiral galaxies. We find a large variety concerning the richness of the cluster systems, with some galaxies containing no YMCs at all and others hosting very large numbers of YMCs. Examples of galaxies with poor cluster systems are NGC 300 and NGC 4395, while the richest cluster systems are found in the galaxies NGC 5236, NGC 2997 and NGC 1313. The age distributions of clusters in these galaxies show no obvious peaks, indicating that massive star clusters are formed as an ongoing process rather than in bursts. This is in contrast to what is observed in starbursts and merger galaxies. The radial distributions of clusters follow the Halpha surface brightness. For the galaxies in our sample there is no correlation between the morphological type and the presence of YMCs

  6. Cosmography with cluster strong lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Gilmore; Priyamvada Natarajan

    2009-05-29

    By stacking an ensemble of strong lensing clusters, we demonstrate the feasibility of placing constraints on the dark energy equation of state. This is achieved by using multiple images of sources at two or more distinct redshift planes. The sample of smooth clusters in our simulations is based on observations of massive clusters and the distribution of background galaxies is constructed using the Hubble Deep Field. Our source distribution reproduces the observed redshift distribution of multiply imaged sources in Abell 1689. The cosmology recovery depends on the number of image families with known spectroscopic redshifts and the number of stacked clusters. Our simulations suggest that constraints comparable to those derived from other competing established techniques on a constant dark energy equation of state can be obtained using 10 to 40 clusters with 5 or more families of multiple images. We have also studied the observational errors in the image redshifts and positions. We find that spectroscopic redshifts and high resolution {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images are required to eliminate confidence contour relaxation relative to the ideal case in our simulations. This suggests that the dark energy equation of state, and other cosmological parameters, can be constrained with existing {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images of lensing clusters coupled with dedicated ground-based arc spectroscopy.

  7. Technique for fast and efficient hierarchical clustering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stork, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    A fast and efficient technique for hierarchical clustering of samples in a dataset includes compressing the dataset to reduce a number of variables within each of the samples of the dataset. A nearest neighbor matrix is generated to identify nearest neighbor pairs between the samples based on differences between the variables of the samples. The samples are arranged into a hierarchy that groups the samples based on the nearest neighbor matrix. The hierarchy is rendered to a display to graphically illustrate similarities or differences between the samples.

  8. Redshift Evolution of Galaxy Cluster Densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; S. L. Morris; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson

    1997-01-20

    The number of rich galaxy clusters per unit volume is a strong function of Omega, the cosmological density parameter, and sigma_8, the linear extrapolation to z=0 of the density contrast in 8/h Mpc spheres. The CNOC cluster redshift survey provides a sample of clusters whose average mass profiles are accurately known, which enables a secure association between cluster numbers and the filtered density perturbation spectrum. We select from the CNOC cluster survey those EMSS clusters with bolometric L_x>=10^45 erg/s and a velocity dispersion exceeding 800 km/s in the redshift ranges 0.18-0.35 and 0.35-0.55. We compare the number density of these subsamples with similar samples at both high and low redshift. Using the Press-Schechter formalism and CDM style structure models, the density data are described with sigma_8=0.75+/-0.1 and Omega=0.4+/-0.2 (90% confidence). The cluster dynamical analysis gives Omega=0.2+/-0.1$ for which sigma_8=0.95+/-0.1 (90% confidence). The predicted cluster density evolution in an \\Omega=1 CDM model exceeds that observed by more than an order of magnitude.

  9. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

    2000-01-01

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  10. Sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  12. Cosmological constraints from clustering properties of galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; N. Ercan; S. Yesilyurt

    2005-08-27

    In this paper, we discuss improvements of the Suto et al. (2000) model, in the light of recent theoretical developments (new theoretical mass functions, a more accurate mass-temperature relation and an improved bias model) to predict the clustering properties of galaxy clusters and to obtain constraints on cosmological parameters. We re-derive the two-point correlation function of clusters of galaxies for OCDM and LambdaCDM cosmological models, and we compare these results with the observed spatial correlation function for clusters in RASS1 (ROSAT All-Sky Survey 1), and in XBACs (X-RAY Brighest Abell-Type) samples. The comparison shows that the best agreement is obtained for the LambdaCDM model with Omega=0.3. The values of the correlation length obtained, (r_\\simeq 28.2 \\pm 5.2 \\rm h^{-1}} Mpc for LambdaCDM), are larger than those found in the literature and comparable with the results found in Borgani, Plionis & Kolokotronis (1999). (REST IN THE PAPER ABSTRACT)

  13. Evaluation and comparison of gene clustering methods in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, George C. "Chien-Cheng"

    disjoint clusters; i.e. C={C1 , ... , Ck} and .j k j CX 1== U Cluster genes (n: # of genes; p: # of samples. k has to be correctly estimated. .clusterofcentroids),( )( )( 1 2)( jxmeanx xxkW i Cx j k j Cx j i to the cluster centers. .clusterofmedoids),( )( )( 1 2)( jxmedianx xxkW i Cx j k j Cx j i ji ji = = -= #12

  14. Characterization of open cluster remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B Pavani; E. Bica

    2007-04-11

    Despite progress in the theoretical knowledge of open cluster remnants and the growing search for observational identifications in recent years, open questions still remain. The methods used to analyze open cluster remnants and criteria to define them as physical systems are not homogeneous. In this work we present a systematic method for studying these objects that provides a view of their properties and allows their characterization. Eighteen remnant candidates are analyzed by means of photometric and proper motion data. These data provide information on objects and their fields. We establish criteria for characterizing open cluster remnants, taking observational uncertainties into account. 2MASS J and H photometry is employed (i) to study structural properties of the objects by means of radial stellar density profiles, (ii) to test for any similarity between objects and fields with a statistical comparison method applied to the distributions of stars in the CMDs, and (iii) to obtain ages, reddening values, and distances from the CMD, taking an index of isochrone fit into account. The UCAC2 proper motions allowed an objective comparison between objects and large solid angle offset fields. The objective analysis based on the present methods indicates 13 open-cluster remnants in the sample. Evidence of the presence of binary stars is found, as expected for dynamically evolved systems. Finally, we infer possible evolutionary stages among remnants from the structure, proper motion, and CMD distributions. The low stellar statistics for individual objects is overcome by means of the construction of composite proper motion and CMD diagrams. The distributions of remnants in the composite diagrams resemble the single-star and unresolved binary star distributions of open clusters.

  15. The richness dependence of galaxy cluster correlations Results from a redshift survey of rich APM clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croft, R A C; Efstathiou, G P; Sutherland, W; Maddox, S J; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Efstathiou, George; Sutherland, Will; Maddox, Steve

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the spatial clustering properties of a new catalogue of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class $\\geq 1$ clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalogue demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function $\\xi_{cc}(r)$ for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maxmimum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to $\\xi_{cc}(r)$, and to estimate the correlation length $r_{0}$ (the value of $r$ at which $\\xi_{cc}(r)$ is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of $1.6\\times 10^{-6}\\hmpccc$ (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness $\\geq 2$ clusters), we find $r_{0}=21.3^{+11.1}_{-9.3} \\hmpc$ (95% confidence limits). Thi...

  16. CLUSTERING BY HYPERBOLIC SMOOTHING Cluster analysis ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-07-31

    Jul 31, 2007 ... Cluster analysis deals with the problems of classification of a set of patterns or observa- ..... tine Library (http://www.cse.scitech.ac.uk/nag/hsl/).

  17. The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VII. Relative Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Marin-Franch; Antonio Aparicio; Giampaolo Piotto; Alfred Rosenberg; Brian Chaboyer; Ata Sarajedini; Michael Siegel; Jay Anderson; Luigi R. Bedin; Aaron Dotter; Maren Hempel; Ivan King; Steven Majewski; Antonino P. Milone; Nathaniel Paust; I. Neill Reid

    2008-12-24

    The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury program designed to provide a new large, deep and homogeneous photometric database. Based on observations from this program, we have measured precise relative ages for a sample of 64 Galactic globular clusters by comparing the relative position of the clusters' main sequence turn offs, using main-sequence fitting to cross-compare clusters within the sample. This method provides relative ages to a formal precision of 2-7%. We demonstrate that the calculated relative ages are independent of the choice of theoretical model. We find that the Galactic globular cluster sample can be divided into two groups -- a population of old clusters with an age dispersion of ~5% and no age-metallicity relation, and a group of younger clusters with an age-metallicity relation similar to that of the globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. These results are consistent with the Milky Way halo having formed in two phases or processes. The first one would be compatible with a rapid (<0.8 Gyr) assembling process of the halo, in which the clusters in the old group were formed. Also these clusters could have been formed before reionization in dwarf galaxies that would later merge to build the Milky Way halo as predicted by Lambda-CDM cosmology. However, the galactocentric metallicity gradient shown by these clusters seems difficult to reconcile with the latter. As for the younger clusters, it is very tempting to argue that their origin is related to their formation within Milky Way satellite galaxies that were later accreted, but the origin of the age-metallicity relation remains unclear.

  18. The Twilight of the Modern World The Four Stages of the Post-Oil Breakdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Stephen L.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.3 Security gifts, And snatch them straight away? William Shakespeare (Pericles, Prince of Tyre Act III Scene I) 1. Before the Industrial Revolution, the world survived on renewables, either locally-based water

  19. Electron: Cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheidemann, A.A.; Kresin, V.V.; Knight, W.D.

    1994-02-01

    Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E {approximately} 0.1 to E {approximately} 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na{sub 8}, Na{sub 20}, Na{sub 40}. The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size.

  20. The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VII. Relative Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin-Franch, Antonio; Piotto, Giampaolo; Rosenberg, Alfred; Chaboyer, Brian; Sarajedini, Ata; Siegel, Michael; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R; Dotter, Aaron; Hempel, Maren; King, Ivan; Majewski, Steven; Milone, Antonino P; Paust, Nathaniel; Reid, I Neill

    2008-01-01

    The ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury program designed to provide a new large, deep and homogeneous photometric database. Based on observations from this program, we have measured precise relative ages for a sample of 64 Galactic globular clusters by comparing the relative position of the clusters' main sequence turn offs, using main-sequence fitting to cross-compare clusters within the sample. This method provides relative ages to a formal precision of 2-7%. We demonstrate that the calculated relative ages are independent of the choice of theoretical model. We find that the Galactic globular cluster sample can be divided into two groups -- a population of old clusters with an age dispersion of ~5% and no age-metallicity relation, and a group of younger clusters with an age-metallicity relation similar to that of the globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. These results are consistent with the Milky Way halo having formed in two phases ...

  1. Heating Rate Profiles in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward C. D. Pope; Georgi Pavlovski; Christian R. Kaiser; Hans Fangohr

    2006-01-05

    In recent years evidence has accumulated suggesting that the gas in galaxy clusters is heated by non-gravitational processes. Here we calculate the heating rates required to maintain a physically motived mass flow rate, in a sample of seven galaxy clusters. We employ the spectroscopic mass deposition rates as an observational input along with temperature and density data for each cluster. On energetic grounds we find that thermal conduction could provide the necessary heating for A2199, Perseus, A1795 and A478. However, the suppression factor, of the clasical Spitzer value, is a different function of radius for each cluster. Based on the observations of plasma bubbles we also calculate the duty cycles for each AGN, in the absence of thermal conduction, which can provide the required energy input. With the exception of Hydra-A it appears that each of the other AGNs in our sample require duty cycles of roughly $10^{6}-10^{7}$ yrs to provide their steady-state heating requirements. If these duty cycles are unrealistic, this may imply that many galaxy clusters must be heated by very powerful Hydra-A type events interspersed between more frequent smaller-scale outbursts. The suppression factors for the thermal conductivity required for combined heating by AGN and thermal conduction are generally acceptable. However, these suppression factors still require `fine-tuning` of the thermal conductivity as a function of radius. As a consequence of this work we present the AGN duty cycle as a cooling flow diagnostic.

  2. Blue Stragglers in Low-Luminosity Star Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric L. Sandquist

    2005-10-26

    We examine the blue straggler populations of 13 low-luminosity (M_V_t >~ -6) globular clusters and 2 old open clusters. These clusters test blue straggler formation in environments intermediate between higher luminosity (and usually higher density) clusters and the Galactic field. The anti-correlation between the relative frequency of blue stragglers (F_BSS = N_BSS / N_HB) and cluster luminosity continues to the lowest luminosity clusters, which have frequencies meeting or exceeding that of field stars. In addition we find that the anti-correlation between straggler frequency and central density disappears for clusters with density less than about 300 L_V,sun pc^-3, although this appears to be an artifact of the correlation between cluster luminosity and central density. We argue on observational (wide, eccentric binaries containing blue stragglers in M67, and the existence of very bright stragglers in most of the clusters in our sample) and theoretical grounds that stellar collisions still produce a significant fraction of the blue stragglers in low luminosity star clusters due to the long-term survival of wide binaries.

  3. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanfilippo, Antonio (Richland, WA); Calapristi, Augustin J. (West Richland, WA); Crow, Vernon L. (Richland, WA); Hetzler, Elizabeth G. (Kennewick, WA); Turner, Alan E. (Kennewick, WA)

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  4. Weighing Neutrinos with Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng Wang; Zoltan Haiman; Wayne Hu; Justin Khoury; Morgan May

    2005-05-19

    Large future galaxy cluster surveys, combined with cosmic microwave background observations, can achieve a high sensitivity to the masses of cosmologically important neutrinos. We show that a weak lensing selected sample of ~100,000 clusters could tighten the current upper bound on the sum of masses of neutrino species by an order of magnitude, to a level of 0.03 eV. Since this statistical sensitivity is below the best existing lower limit on the mass of at least one neutrino species, a future detection is likely, provided that systematic errors can be controlled to a similar level.

  5. The Baltimore and Utrecht models for cluster dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henny J. G. L. M. Lamers

    2008-04-14

    The analysis of the age distributions of star cluster samples of different galaxies has resulted in two very different empirical models for the dissolution of star clusters: the Baltimore model and the Utrecht model. I describe these two models and their differences. The Baltimore model implies that the dissolution of star clusters is mass independent and that about 90% of the clusters are destroyed each age dex, up to an age of about a Gyr, after which point mass-dependent dissolution from two-body relaxation becomes the dominant mechanism. In the Utrecht model, cluster dissolution occurs in three stages: (i) mass-independent infant mortality due to the expulsion of gas up to about 10 Myr; (ii) a phase of slow dynamical evolution with strong evolutionary fading of the clusters lasting up to about a Gyr; and (iii) a phase dominated by mass dependent-dissolution, as predicted by dynamical models. I describe the cluster age distributions for mass-limited and magnitude-limited cluster samples for both models. I refrain from judging the correctness of these models.

  6. A consistent approach to falsifying ?CDM with rare galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Ian; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-07-01

    We consider methods with which to answer the question ''is any observed galaxy cluster too unusual for ?CDM?'' After emphasising that many previous attempts to answer this question will overestimate the confidence level at which ?CDM can be ruled out, we outline a consistent approach to these rare clusters, which allows the question to be answered. We define three statistical measures, each of which are sensitive to changes in cluster populations arising from different modifications to the cosmological model. We also use these properties to define the ''equivalent mass at redshift zero'' for a cluster — the mass of an equally unusual cluster today. This quantity is independent of the observational survey in which the cluster was found, which makes it an ideal proxy for ranking the relative unusualness of clusters detected by different surveys. These methods are then used on a comprehensive sample of observed galaxy clusters and we confirm that all are less than 2? deviations from the ?CDM expectation. Whereas we have only applied our method to galaxy clusters, it is applicable to any isolated, collapsed, halo. As motivation for future surveys, we also calculate where in the mass redshift plane the rarest halo is most likely to be found, giving information as to which objects might be the most fruitful in the search for new physics.

  7. STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY MESSIER 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shuo; Li, Chengyuan [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); De Grijs, Richard [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Anders, Peter, E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution, multiple-passband Hubble Space Telescope images spanning the entire optical/near-infrared wavelength range, we obtained a statistically complete U-band-selected sample of 846 extended star clusters across the disk of the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Based on a careful analysis of the clusters' spectral energy distributions, we determined their galaxy-wide age and mass distributions. The M82 clusters exhibit three clear peaks in their age distribution, thus defining relatively young, log (t yr{sup –1}) ? 7.5, intermediate-age, log (t yr{sup –1}) in [7.5, 8.5], and old samples, log (t yr{sup –1}) ? 8.5. Comparison of the completeness-corrected mass distributions offers a firm handle on the galaxy's star cluster disruption history. The most massive star clusters in the young and old samples are (almost) all concentrated in the most densely populated central region, while the intermediate-age sample's most massive clusters are more spatially dispersed, which may reflect the distribution of the highest-density gas throughout the galaxy's evolutionary history, combined with the solid-body nature of the galaxy's central region.

  8. Prototypeless Fuzzy Clustering Christian Borgelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgelt, Christian

    Mieres, Asturias, Spain (email: christian.borgelt@softcomputing.es). The most common fuzzy clustering

  9. Data clustering with size constraints Shunzhi Zhu a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    such as image coding clustering, spa- tial clustering in geoinformatics, and document clustering [11

  10. A Cluster Deficit in the ROSAT NEP Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella Gioia

    1999-11-29

    We have used data from the deepest region of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) region, to produce a complete and unbiased X-ray selected sample of distant clusters to understand the nature of cluster evolution and determine implications for large scale structure models. In this contribution results are presented from a comparison between the number of the observed clusters in the NEP survey and the number of expected clusters assuming no-evolution models. There is a deficit by a factor of 2.5-4 of high luminosity, high redshift clusters with respect to the present. The evolution goes in the same direction as the original EMSS result, and the results from the CfA-IfA 160 deg^{2} survey by Vikhlini et al. 1998.

  11. Galaxy clusters and groups in the ALHAMBRA Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ascaso, Begoña; Fernández-Soto, Alberto; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; López-Sanjuan, Carlos; Molino, Alberto; Schoenell, William; Jiménez-Teja, Yolanda; Merson, Alexander I; Huertas-Company, Marc; Díaz-García, Luis Alberto; Martínez, Vicent J; Cenarro, A Javier; Dupke, Renato; Márquez, Isabel; Masegosa, Josefa; Nieves-Seoane, Lorena; Povic, Mirjana; Varela, Jesús; Viironen, Kerttu; Aguerri, J Alfonso L; Del Olmo, Ascensión; Moles, Mariano; Perea, Jaime; Alfaro, Emilio; Aparicio-Villegas, Teresa; Broadhurst, Tom; Cabrera-Caño, Jesús; Castander, Francisco J; Cepa, Jordi; Cerviño, Miguel; González~Delgado, Rosa M; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Hurtado-Gil, Lluis; Husillos, Cesar; Infante, Leopoldo; Prada, Francisco; Quintana, Jose María

    2015-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 348 galaxy clusters and groups with $0.2seven ALHAMBRA pointings ensure that this catalogue has better mass sensitivity and is less affected by cosmic variance than comparable samples. The detection has been carried out with the Bayesian Cluster Finder (BCF), whose performance has been checked in ALHAMBRA-like light-cone mock catalogues. Great care has been taken to ensure that the observable properties of the mocks photometry accurately correspond to those of real catalogues. From our simulations, we expect to detect galaxy clusters and groups with both $70\\%$ completeness and purity down to dark matter halo masses of $M_h\\sim3\\times10^{13}\\rm M_{\\odot}$ for $z<0.85$. Cluster redshifts are expected to be recovered with $\\sim0.6\\%$ precision for $z<1$. We also expect to measure cluster masses with $\\sigma_{M_h|M^*_{CL}}\\sim0.25-...

  12. Open Cluster Open Cluster Open Cluster A group of several thousand stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtold, Jill

    Open Cluster Open Cluster Open Cluster A group of several thousand stars which formed within the same nebula. The Pleides, or Seven Sisters, are the most visible stars in this cluster in the Milky Way. Mass:10-10,000 SM StarPower Points: 11 A group of several thousand stars which formed within the same

  13. Empirical comparison of network sampling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blagus, Neli; Bahec, Marko

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, the storage and analysis of large-scale and fast evolving networks present a great challenge. Therefore, a number of different techniques have been proposed for sampling large networks. In general, network exploration techniques approximate the original networks more accurately than random node and link selection. Yet, link selection with additional subgraph induction step outperforms most other techniques. In this paper, we apply subgraph induction also to random walk and forest-fire sampling. We analyze different real-world networks and the changes of their properties introduced by sampling. We compare several sampling techniques based on the match between the original networks and their sampled variants. The results reveal that the techniques with subgraph induction underestimate the degree and clustering distribution, while overestimate average degree and density of the original networks. Techniques without subgraph induction step exhibit exactly the opposite behavior. Hence, the pe...

  14. Zirconium, Barium, Lanthanum and Europium Abundances in Open Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, H R; 10.1088/0004-6256/145/4/107

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines per species via both equivalent width and spectrum synthesis techniques. We investigate cluster mean neutron-capture abundance trends as a function of cluster age and location in the Milky Way disk and compare them to results found in other studies in the literature. We find a statistically significant trend of increasing cluster [Ba/Fe] as a function of decreasing cluster age, in agreement with recent findings for other open cluster samples, supporting the increased importance of low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to the generation of s-process elements. However, the other s-process elements, [La/Fe] and [Zr/Fe], do not show similar dependences, in contrast to theoretical expectations and the limited observational data from other studies. Conversely, cluster [Eu/Fe] ratios show a slight ...

  15. Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksey Ilyin

    2014-10-30

    Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

  16. Thermodynamics of clusterized matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad. R. Raduta; F. Gulminelli

    2009-08-26

    Thermodynamics of clusterized matter is studied in the framework of statistical models with non-interacting cluster degrees of freedom. At variance with the analytical Fisher model, exact Metropolis simulation results indicate that the transition from homogeneous to clusterized matter lies along the $\\rho=\\rho_0$ axis at all temperatures and the limiting point of the phase diagram is not a critical point even if the surface energy vanishes at this point. Sensitivity of the inferred phase diagram to the employed statistical framework in the case of finite systems is discussed by considering the grand-canonical and constant-pressure canonical ensembles. A Wigner-Seitz formalism in which the fragment charge is neutralized by an uniform electron distribution allows to build the phase diagram of neutron star matter.

  17. Cluster Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison compute

  18. Cluster Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison

  19. Merging history of three bimodal clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurogordato, S; Bourdin, H; Cappi, A; Benoist, C; Ferrari, C; Mars, G; Houairi, K

    2010-01-01

    We present a combined X-ray and optical analysis of three bimodal galaxy clusters selected as merging candidates at z ~ 0.1. These targets are part of MUSIC (MUlti--Wavelength Sample of Interacting Clusters), which is a general project designed to study the physics of merging clusters by means of multi-wavelength observations. Observations include spectro-imaging with XMM-Newton EPIC camera, multi-object spectroscopy (260 new redshifts), and wide-field imaging at the ESO 3.6m and 2.2m telescopes. We build a global picture of these clusters using X-ray luminosity and temperature maps together with galaxy density and velocity distributions. Idealized numerical simulations were used to constrain the merging scenario for each system. We show that A2933 is very likely an equal-mass advanced pre-merger ~ 200 Myr before the core collapse, while A2440 and A2384 are post-merger systems ~ 450 Myr and ~1.5 Gyr after core collapse, respectively). In the case of A2384, we detect a spectacular filament of galaxies and gas ...

  20. Logistics clusters : prevalence and impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Virgüez, Myriam Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Governments around the world are investing significant resources in the development and expansion of logistics clusters. This dissertation analyzes the cluster phenomenon focusing on four topics. First, it develops a ...

  1. Multivariate Analysis of Globular Cluster's Horizontal Branch Morphology: searching for the second parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Recio-Blanco; A. Aparicio; G. Piotto; F. De Angeli; S. G. Djorgovski

    2005-11-24

    The interpretation of globular cluster horizontal branch (HB) morphology is a classical problem that can significantly blur our understanding of stellar populations. In this paper, we present a new multivariate analysis connecting the effective temperature extent of the HB with other cluster parameters. The work is based on Hubble Space Telescope photometry of 54 Galactic globular clusters. The present study reveals an important role of the total mass of the globular cluster on its HB morphology. More massive clusters tend to have HBs more extended to higher temperatures. For a set of three input variables including the temperature extension of the HB, [Fe/H] and M_V, the first two eigenvectors account for the 90% of the total sample variance. Possible effects of cluster self-pollution on HB morphology, eventually stronger in more massive clusters, could explain the results here derived.

  2. Clustering Chain Additional options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linial, Michal

    ProtoClass -rationale and concept ProtoNet in brief AND BEYOND: Functional roadmap in Proto-à-vis InterPro, SCOP, FSSP etc #12;6 ProtoClass Road-Maps A horizontal view provides `distances' between clusters. Those are the basis for creating Road-Maps. We test the biological content of those road maps

  3. A compilation of weak gravitational lensing studies of clusters of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Dahle

    2007-01-21

    We present a list of clusters that have had their dark matter content measured using weak gravitational lensing. The list consists of 139 clusters, with weak lensing measurements reported in 64 different publications. Details are provided about the selection criteria and some basic properties of the sample, such as the redshift distribution. An electronic, sortable version of this list with links to public database information on the clusters and publications is provided at http://folk.uio.no/hdahle/WLclusters.html

  4. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  5. Passive Evolution of Galaxy Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hee-Jong Seo; Daniel J. Eisenstein; Idit Zehavi

    2007-12-11

    We present a numerical study of the evolution of galaxy clustering when galaxies flow passively from high redshift, respecting the continuity equation throughout. While passive flow is a special case of galaxy evolution, it allows a well-defined study of galaxy ancestry and serves as an interesting limit to be compared to non-passive cases. We use dissipationless N-body simulations, assign galaxies to massive halos at z=1 and z=2 using various HOD models, and trace these galaxy particles to lower redshift while conserving their number. We find that passive flow results in an asymptotic convergence at low redshift in the HOD and in galaxy clustering on scales above ~3Mpc/h for a wide range of initial HODs. As galaxies become less biased with respect to mass asymptotically with time, the HOD parameters evolve such that M1/Mm decreases while alpha converges toward unity, where Mm is the characteristic halo mass to host a central galaxy, M1 is the halo mass to host one satellite galaxy, and alpha is the power-law index in the halo-mass dependence of the average number of satellites per halo. The satellite populations converge toward the Poisson distribution at low redshift. The convergence is robust for different number densities and is enhanced when galaxies evolve from higher redshift. We compare our results with the observed LRG sample from Sloan Digital Sky Survey that has the same number density. We claim that if LRGs have experienced a strict passive flow, their should be close to a power law with an index of unity in halo mass. Discrepancies could be due to dry galaxy merging or new members arising between the initial and the final redshifts. The spatial distribution of passively flowing galaxies within halos appears on average more concentrated than the halo mass profile at low redshift. (abridged)

  6. The Distribution of Barred Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Andersen

    1996-03-22

    A study of the distribution of barred and nonbarred disk galaxies in the Virgo cluster is presented in an attempt to use the frequency and spatial distribution of galaxies with specific morphological features to study the efficiency of various environmental effects on the evolution of disk galaxies in clusters. The velocity distribution of the barred spirals in the Virgo region is clearly different than that of the nonbarred spirals, suggesting that barred spirals are more common in the main condensation of the cluster. A sample cleansed of galaxies not belonging to the main cluster condensation using the subcluster assignments of Binggeli et al. [A&AS, 98, 275 (1993)] bears this out, showing that the radial distribution of barred spirals is more centrally condensed than that of nonbarred spirals. In contrast to the spiral galaxies, the distribution of barred S0 galaxies is statistically indistinguishable from that of nonbarred S0's. Consideration of the level of tidal perturbation due to the cluster mass distribution as compared to that due to individual galaxies suggests that tidal triggering by the cluster mass distribution is the most likely source of the enhanced fraction of barred spirals in the cluster center.

  7. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: coupon@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-07-20

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M{sub 200} {approx} 1.4-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the optically detected cluster samples, and M{sub 200} {approx} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration.

  8. Computational analysis of microarray gene expression profiles: clustering, classification, and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yang

    Computational analysis of microarray gene expression profiles: clustering, classification) the discovery of gene clusters, and (3) the classification of biological samples. In addition, we discuss how inch, and a library of thousands of genes is placed on a single chip. To probe the global gene

  9. The Recent Star Formation History of Galaxies in X--Ray Clusters Michael Lajos Balogh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balogh, Michael L.

    .Sc., Math & Physics, McMaster University 1995 A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfillment there as they are in the cluster sample. If star formation is terminated in a galaxy after a short starburst, the spectrum that star formation is terminated in galaxies that are incorporated into these clusters. This termination

  10. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  11. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  12. Structure and kinematics of galaxy clusters I. The redshift catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Stein

    1996-01-12

    An extensive redshift survey has been conducted on a sample of 15 nearby (0.01 < z < 0.05) clusters of galaxies. A total number of 860 redshifts were determined by fitting of emission--lines and/or cross-correlation techniques. Of this sample, 735 galaxies are within 0.2--0.8 Mpc ($H_0$ = 50 km/s/Mpc) of the center of clusters. Approximate morphological types are available for most of the galaxies. A comparison of the present redshifts with published data allows an extensive error analysis. The agreement is excellent with the most modern data, showing a zero point error of 5 km/s and an overall consistency of the measurements and their uncertainties. We estimate our redshifts to have mean random errors around 30 km/s. A population analysis of the clusters will be given in a forthcoming paper.

  13. ARE THE EFFECTS OF STRUCTURE FORMATION SEEN IN THE CENTRAL METALLICITY OF GALAXY CLUSTERS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkholy, Tamer Y.

    A sample of 46 nearby clusters observed with Chandra is analyzed to produce radial density, temperature, entropy, and metallicity profiles, as well as other morphological measurements. The entropy profiles are computed to ...

  14. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF H? FILAMENTS IN COOL CORE CLUSTERS: KINEMATICS, REDDENING, AND SOURCES OF IONIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Michael A.

    We have obtained deep, high spatial and spectral resolution, long-slit spectra of the H? nebulae in the cool cores of nine galaxy clusters. This sample provides a wealth of information on the ionization state, kinematics, ...

  15. Large-Angular-Scale Clustering as a Clue to the Source of UHECRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas A. Berlind; Glennys R. Farrar

    2007-10-16

    We show that future Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray samples should be able to distinguish whether the sources of UHECRs are hosted by galaxy clusters or ordinary galaxies, or whether the sources are uncorrelated with the large-scale structure of the universe. Moreover, this is true independently of arrival direction uncertainty due to magnetic deflection or measurement error. The reason for this is the simple property that the strength of large-scale clustering for extragalactic sources depends on their mass, with more massive objects, such as galaxy clusters, clustering more strongly than lower mass objects, such as ordinary galaxies.

  16. Bootstrapping in a high dimensional but very low sample size problem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Juhee

    2006-08-16

    model having C clusters and 3C parameters to overcome the small sample size problem. Standardized data are pooled after assigning each data set to one of the mixture components. To get reasonable initial parameter estimates when density estimation...

  17. Clustering data over time using kernel spectral clustering with memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    clustering framework that adaptively estimates the optimal smoothing parameter using shrinkage estimation of being cast in a learning framework allows a precise model selection scheme and the out

  18. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  19. Cluster structures in Oxygen isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Furutachi; M. kimura; A. Doté; Y. Kanada-En'yo; S. oryu

    2007-06-01

    Cluster structure of 16O,18O and 20O is investigated by the antisymmettrized molecular dynamics (AMD) plus generator coordinate method (GCM). We have found the K^{\\pi}=0$_2^+$ and 0$_1^-$ rotational bands of 18O that have the prominent 14C+\\alpha cluster structure. Clustering systematics becomes richer in 20O. We suggest the K^{\\pi}=0$_2^+$ band that is the mixture of the 12C+\\alpha+4n and 14C+6He cluster structures, and the K^{\\pi}=0$_1^-$ band that has the 14C+6He cluster structure. The K^{\\pi}=0$_3^+$ and 0$_2^-$ bands that have the prominent 16C+\\alpha cluster structure are also found.

  20. Sample Environments at Sector 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Designs Two standard sample holder designs are below. Copper sample holder from ARS. ARS sample holde diagram picture Aluminum sample holder - custom design Al design Al pic...

  1. Intergalactic stars in the Fornax Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Theuns; S. J. Warren

    1996-09-10

    We have identified ten candidate intergalactic planetary nebulae in the Fornax galaxy cluster. These objects were found during observations in 1992 and 1993 in three fields chosen well away from any Fornax galaxy at 15 arcmin, 30 arcmin, and 45 arcmin from the centre of Fornax. We used the usual method of blinking images taken in a narrow OIII filter, with images taken in an adjacent broad filter. The measured fluxes in the narrow, broad, and I bands are consistent with these unresolved objects being planetary nebulae immersed in an intergalactic population of stars. Such a population is expected to arise as a consequence of tidal encounters between galaxies, and our findings strengthen the case for the existence of such tidal debris. The confirmation of some or all of these ten candidates as planetary nebulae would imply that intergalactic stars constitute a substantial fraction of all the stars in Fornax, up to an estimated 40 per cent. Intergalactic planetary nebulae could prove useful in probing the underlying cluster potential, since they would be far more abundant than galaxies. We discuss possible contamination of the sample by emission-line galaxies, but conclude that planetary nebulae is the most likely identification for the detected objects. keywords: intergalactic medium-- galaxies: interactions -- planetary nebulae: general -- clusters: individual: Fornax

  2. Cluster-subcluster Mergers and the Formation of Narrow-angle Tailed Radio Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bliton; E. Rizza; J. O. Burns; F. N. Owen; M. J. Ledlow

    1998-11-01

    We have examined the ROSAT PSPC X-ray properties of a sample of 15 Abell clusters containing 23 narrow-angle tailed (NAT) radio galaxies. We find that clusters with NATs show a significantly higher level of substructure than a similar sample of radio-quiet clusters, indicating that NAT radio sources are preferentially located in dynamically complex systems. Also, the velocity distribution of the NAT galaxies is similar to that of other cluster members; these velocities are inadequate for producing the ram pressure necessary to bend the radio jets. We therefore propose a new model for NAT formation, in which NATs are associated with dynamically complex clusters undergoing merger events. The U-shaped NAT morphology is produced in part by the merger-induced bulk motion of the ICM bending the jets.

  3. Analysis of Cluster Management Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Configuration Management Tools Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute Team: Evan Leeseberg, James Kang, Katherine Nystrom Mentors: Kevin Tegtmeier,...

  4. Promoting Advanced Manufacturing Clusters in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Promoting Advanced Manufacturing Clusters in Tennessee1 1 This report is supported, Economic Development Administration; and the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program, National.........................................................................................................................1 Context: Trends in Tennessee Manufacturing

  5. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.

  6. Star Formation in Cluster Galaxies at 0.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mike. L. Balogh; Simon L. Morris; H. K. C. Yee; R. G. Carlberg; E. Ellingson

    1997-07-30

    The rest frame equivalent width of the [OII]3727 emission line, W(OII), has been measured for cluster and field galaxies in the CNOC redshift survey of rich clusters at 0.210 A, as expected in a model of cluster formation in which star formation is truncated upon infall. Evidence of supressed star formation relative to the field is present in the whole cluster sample, out to 2 R_{200}, so the mechanism responsible for the differential evolution must be acting at a large distance from the cluster centre, and not just in the core. The mean star formation rate in the cluster galaxies with the strongest emission corresponds to an increase in the total stellar mass of less than about 4% if the star formation is due to a secondary burst lasting 0.1 Gyr.

  7. Differential Galaxy Evolution in Cluster and Field Galaxies at z=0.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael L. Balogh; S. L. Morris; H. K. C. Yee; R. G. Carlberg; E. Ellingson

    1999-06-29

    (abridged) We measure spectral indices for 1823 galaxies in the CNOC1 sample of fifteen X-ray luminous clusters at 0.18cluster and field environments. The radial trends of D4000, Hdelta and [OII] are all consistent with an age sequence, in the sense that the last episode of star formation occurred more recently in galaxies farthest from the cluster center. Throughout the cluster environment, galaxies show evidence for older mean stellar populations than field galaxies. From the subsample of galaxies more luminous than M_r=-18.8 + 5log h, we identify a sample of K+A galaxies, which may result from recently terminated star formation. Corrected for a systematic effect which results from the large uncertainties on individual spectral index measurements, we estimate that K+A galaxies make up only 1.5 +/- 0.8 % of the cluster sample, and 1.2 +/- 0.8 % of the field. We compare our data with spectrophotometric models and conclude that up to 1.9 +/- 0.8 % of the cluster population may have had its star formation recently truncated without a starburst. However, this is still not significantly greater than the fraction of such galaxies in the field, 3.1 +/- 1.0 %. Furthermore, we do not detect an excess of cluster galaxies that have unambiguously undergone a starburst within the last 1 Gyr. Our results imply that these cluster environments are not responsible for inducing starbursts; thus, the increase in cluster blue galaxy fraction with redshift may not be a strictly cluster--specific phenomenon. We suggest that the truncation of star formation in clusters may largely be a gradual process, perhaps due to the exhaustion of gas in the galactic disk over fairly long timescales.

  8. Chemistry of Tantalum Clusters in Solution And on SiO(2) Supports: Analogies And Contrasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemana, S.; Okamoto, N.L.; Browning, N.D.; Gates, B.C.

    2009-06-03

    Tantalum clusters have been synthesized from Ta(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 5} on the surface of porous fumed SiO{sub 2}. When these clusters are small, incorporating, on average, several Ta atoms, their chemistry is similar to that of molecular tantalum clusters (and other early transition-metal) clusters. For example, The Ta-Ta bonds in these small supported clusters have been characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), IR, and UV-vis spectroscopy, being similar to those in molecular analogues. The redox reactions of the supported clusters, characterized by X-ray absorption near-edge structure, are analogous to those of early transition-metal clusters in solution. In contrast to the largest of these clusters in solution and in the solid state, those supported on SiO{sub 2} are raftlike, facilitating the substantial metal-support-oxygen bonding that is evident in the EXAFS spectra. Samples consisting of tantalum clusters on SiO{sub 2} catalyze alkane disproportionation and the conversion of methane with n-butane to give other alkanes, but catalytic properties of analogous clusters in solution have barely been explored.

  9. KEYWORDS: geospatial clustering, web service, Web GIS, spatial data mining, clustering 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 KEYWORDS: geospatial clustering, web service, Web GIS, spatial data mining, clustering 1 objects based on their distance, GeoClustering: A Web Service for Geospatial Clustering J. Wang, X. Wang, we present a geospatial clustering web service called GeoClustering. With this service, users

  10. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  11. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  12. IDENTIFICATION Your Sample Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Ag Quad Ln, Blacksburg VA 24061, in sturdy, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and soluble salts) NoCharge $16.00 Organic Matter $4.00 $6.00 Fax with soil sample and form; make check or money order payable to "Treasurer, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE

  13. Free Standing Soil Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Free Standing Soil Sample Kiosks Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto of Richland County, Jackie Kopack Jordan has partnered with local garden centers to provide free standing soil sample collections sites. The free standing kiosks are located at three local garden centers. Woodley

  14. Cluster structures in $^{11}$B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadahiro Suhara; Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

    2012-03-07

    Structures of excited states in $^{11}$B are investigated with a method of $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ constraint antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in combination with the generator coordinate method. Various excited states with developed cluster core structures are suggested in positive- and negative-parity states. For negative-parity states, we suggest a band with a $2\\alpha+t$ cluster structure. This band starts from the $3/2^{-}_{3}$ state and can correspond to the experimental band observed recently. In positive-parity states, two $\\alpha$ core cluster structures with surrounding nucleons are found. A $K^\\pi=1/2^+$ band is suggested to be constructed from a remarkably developed cluster structure with a large prolate deformation. We discuss features of the cluster structure in association with molecular orbital structures of $^{10}$Be.

  15. Relative Ages of Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Puzia

    2002-10-18

    Ages of extragalactic globular clusters can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this contribution the photometric methods of age dating old globular cluster systems are summarised. The spectroscopic approach is reviewed with an emphasis of the right choice of age diagnostics. We present a new method of quantifying the relatively best age-sensitive spectroscopic index given the quality of a data set and a certain theoretical stellar synthesis model. The relatively best diagnostic plot is constructed from the set of Lick indices and used to age date globular clusters in several early-type galaxies which are part of a large spectroscopic survey of extragalactic globular cluster systems. We find that, independently of host galaxy, metal-poor ([Fe/H] 8 Gyr) and coeval. Metal-rich clusters show a wide range of ages from ~15 down to a few Gyr.

  16. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  17. Advanced Health Monitoring of Computer Cluster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Monitoring of Computer Clusters Presenter: Caleb Morse Team: Dylan Merrigan, Sherry Salas Mentors: Susan Coulter, Andree Jacobson, Kevin Tegtmeier LANL ISTIIAS Cluster...

  18. PRIMUS: Galaxy clustering as a function of luminosity and color at 0.2 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Smith, M. Stephen M.; Coil, Alison L.; Mendez, Alexander J.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Bray, Aaron D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Cool, Richard J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-04-01

    We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the Prism Multi-object Survey. We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, ?(r{sub p} , ?) and w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over ?130, 000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 deg{sup 2} of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1 Mpc h {sup –1} < r{sub p} < 1 Mpc h {sup –1}) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values of b {sub gal} ? 0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z ? 1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that 'cosmic variance' can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.

  19. Weak-strong clustering transition in renewing compressible flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajinkya Dhanagare; Stefano Musacchio; Dario Vincenzi

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of Lagrangian tracers transported by a time-correlated compressible renewing flow. We show that the preferential sampling of the phase space performed by tracers yields significant differences between the Lagrangian statistics and its Eulerian counterpart. In particular, the effective compressibility experienced by tracers has a non-trivial dependence on the time correlation of the flow. We examine the consequence of this phenomenon on the clustering of tracers, focusing on the transition from the weak- to the strong-clustering regime. We find that the critical compressibility at which the transition occurs is minimum when the time correlation of the flow is of the order of the typical eddy turnover time. Further, we demonstrate that the clustering properties in time-correlated compressible flows are non-universal and are strongly influenced by the spatio-temporal structure of the velocity field.

  20. Weak-strong clustering transition in renewing compressible flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhanagare, Ajinkya; Vincenzi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of Lagrangian tracers transported by a time-correlated compressible renewing flow. We show that the preferential sampling of the phase space performed by tracers yields significant differences between the Lagrangian statistics and its Eulerian counterpart. In particular, the effective compressibility experienced by tracers has a non-trivial dependence on the time correlation of the flow. We examine the consequence of this phenomenon on the clustering of tracers, focusing on the transition from the weak- to the strong-clustering regime. We find that the critical compressibility at which the transition occurs is minimum when the time correlation of the flow is of the order of the typical eddy turnover time. Further, we demonstrate that the clustering properties in time-correlated compressible flows are non-universal and are strongly influenced by the spatio-temporal structure of the velocity field.

  1. Blue Straggler Stars in Galactic Open Clusters and the Simple Stellar Population Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Xin; L. Deng; Z. Han

    2006-09-27

    Blue straggler stars present as secure members in the Galactic open clusters form a major challenge to the conventional picture of evolutionary population synthesis based on the stellar evolution theory of single stars, as illustrated in our previous work. Expansion of our sample in the current work to include younger age clusters provides a larger data base to expose the question raised for the simple stellar population model. The working sample now includes 97 Galactic open clusters of ages ranging from 0.1 to several Gyrs. The contributions of blue straggler stars to the integrated light of the host clusters are calculated on an individual cluster base. A data base of observational constrained simple stellar population model is made which has a larger age coverage than our previous work. It is shown in this work that the general existence of blue stragglers in star clusters of our sample dramatically altered the predictions of convectional stellar population model in terms of spectral energy distribution. The integrated spectral energy distributions of the synthetic spectra of the clusters are enhanced towards shorter wavelengths, therefore the results of the present work will cast new lights in understanding the properties of stellar populations.

  2. The importance of interloper removal in galaxy clusters: saving more objects for the Jeans analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radoslaw Wojtak; Ewa L. Lokas

    2007-02-22

    We study the effect of contamination by interlopers in kinematic samples of galaxy clusters. We demonstrate that without the proper removal of interlopers the inferred parameters of the mass distribution in the cluster are strongly biased towards higher mass and lower concentration. The interlopers are removed using two procedures previously shown to work most efficiently on simulated data. One is based on using the virial mass estimator and calculating the maximum velocity available to cluster members and the other relies on the ratio of the virial and projected mass estimators. We illustrate the performance of the methods in detail using the example of A576, a cluster with a strong uniform background contamination, and compare the case of A576 to 15 other clusters with different degree of contamination. We model the velocity dispersion and kurtosis profiles obtained for the cleaned data samples of these clusters solving the Jeans equations to estimate the mass, concentration and anisotropy parameter. We present the mass-concentration relation for the total sample of 22 clusters.

  3. The Radio Luminosity Function of the NEP Distant Cluster Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Branchesi; I. M. Gioia; C. Fanti; R. Fanti; R. Perley

    2005-09-06

    A complete sample of 18 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies belonging to the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey has been observed with the Very Large Array at 1.4 GHz. These are the most distant clusters in the X-ray survey with redshift in the range 0.3 =0.17 mJy/beam, except for three sources, belonging to the same cluster, which have a higher peak brightness limit of 0.26 mJy/beam. The NEP field source counts are in good agreement with the source counts of a comparison survey, the VLA-VIRMOS deep field survey, indicating that the NEP sample is statistically complete. Thirty-two out of the 79 sources are within 0.2 Abell radii, twenty-two of them are considered cluster members based on spectroscopic redshifts or their optical magnitude and morphological classification. The cluster radio galaxies are used to construct the Radio Luminosity Function (RLF) of distant X-ray selected clusters. A comparison with two nearby cluster RLFs shows that the NEP RLF lies above the local ones, has a steeper slope at low radio powers (<= 10^(24) W/Hz) and shows no evidence for a break at about 6 X 10^(24) W/Hz which is observed in the nearby cluster RLFs. We discuss briefly the origin and possible explanations of the differences observed in the radio properties of nearby and distant clusters of galaxies. The main result of this study is that the RLF of the distant X-ray clusters is very different from that of the local rich Abell clusters.

  4. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  5. Liquid scintillator sampling calorimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudgeon, R. Greg

    1994-01-01

    This research was supported by the Department of Energy to investigate a new sampling calorimeter technology for the high intensity regions of the Superconducting Supercollider. The technology involved using liquid scintillator filled glass tubes...

  6. Sample Changes and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EIA-914 Survey and HPDI. Figure 2 shows how this could change apparent production. The blue line shows the reported sample production as it would normally be reported under the...

  7. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  8. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  9. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  10. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  11. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  12. A photometric investigation of the young open cluster Trumpler 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carraro, G

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present and analyze new CCD $UBVRI$ photometry down to $V\\approx$21 in the region of the young open cluster Trumpler~15, located in the Carina spiral feature. The cluster is rather compact and has a core radius of about 2$^{\\prime}$, which translates in about 1 pc at the distance of the cluster. We provide the first CCD investigation and update its fundamental parameters. We identify 90 candidate photometric members on the base of the position in the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. This sample allows us to obtain a distance of 2.4$\\pm$0.3 kpc from the Sun and a reddening E$(B-V)$=0.52$\\pm0.07$. We confirm that the cluster is young, and fix a upper limit of 6 million yrs to its age . In addition, we draw the attention on the lower part of the Main Sequence (MS) suggesting that some stars can be in contracting phase and on a gap in the MS, that we show to be a real feature, the $B1-B5$ gap found in other young open clusters. We finally study in details the extinction toward Trumpler~1...

  13. Radial velocities in the globular cluster omega Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Reijns; P. Seitzer; R. Arnold; K. C. Freeman; T. Ingerson; R. C. E. van den Bosch; G. van de Ven; P. T. de Zeeuw

    2005-09-08

    We have used the ARGUS multi-object spectrometer at the CTIO 4m Blanco telescope to obtain 2756 radial velocity measurements for 1966 individual stars in the globular cluster omega Centauri brighter than blue photographic magnitude of about 16.5. Of these, 1589 stars are cluster members. A comparison with two independent radial velocity studies, carried out by Suntzeff & Kraft and by Mayor et al., demonstrates that the median error of our measurements is below 2 km/s for the stars brighter than B-magnitude 15, which constitute the bulk of the sample. The observed velocity dispersion decreases from about 15 km/s in the inner few arcmin to about 6 km/s at a radius of 25 arcmin. The cluster shows significant rotation, with a maximum amplitude of about 6 km/s in the radial zone between 6 and 10 arcmin. In a companion paper by van de Ven et al., we correct these radial velocities for the perspective rotation caused by the space motion of the cluster, and combine them with the internal proper motions of nearly 8000 cluster members measured by van Leeuwen et al., to construct a detailed dynamical model of omega Centauri and to measure its distance.

  14. PHAT Stellar Cluster Survey. II. Andromeda Project Cluster Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, L Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Wallace, Matthew L; Simpson, Robert J; Lintott, Chris J; Kapadia, Amit; Skillman, Evan D; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F; Beerman, Lori C; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-01-01

    We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2,753 clusters and 2,270 background galaxies within ~0.5 deg$^2$ of PHAT imaging searched, or ~400 kpc$^2$ in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ~20,000 individual images (totaling ~7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ~6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ~8 ma...

  15. Quantum rejection sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maris Ozols; Martin Roetteler; Jérémie Roland

    2011-12-13

    Rejection sampling is a well-known method to sample from a target distribution, given the ability to sample from a given distribution. The method has been first formalized by von Neumann (1951) and has many applications in classical computing. We define a quantum analogue of rejection sampling: given a black box producing a coherent superposition of (possibly unknown) quantum states with some amplitudes, the problem is to prepare a coherent superposition of the same states, albeit with different target amplitudes. The main result of this paper is a tight characterization of the query complexity of this quantum state generation problem. We exhibit an algorithm, which we call quantum rejection sampling, and analyze its cost using semidefinite programming. Our proof of a matching lower bound is based on the automorphism principle which allows to symmetrize any algorithm over the automorphism group of the problem. Our main technical innovation is an extension of the automorphism principle to continuous groups that arise for quantum state generation problems where the oracle encodes unknown quantum states, instead of just classical data. Furthermore, we illustrate how quantum rejection sampling may be used as a primitive in designing quantum algorithms, by providing three different applications. We first show that it was implicitly used in the quantum algorithm for linear systems of equations by Harrow, Hassidim and Lloyd. Secondly, we show that it can be used to speed up the main step in the quantum Metropolis sampling algorithm by Temme et al.. Finally, we derive a new quantum algorithm for the hidden shift problem of an arbitrary Boolean function and relate its query complexity to "water-filling" of the Fourier spectrum.

  16. M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTER STRUCTURES AND THE PRESENCE OF X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agar, J. R. R.; Barmby, P., E-mail: pbarmby@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    The Andromeda galaxy, M31, has several times the number of globular clusters found in the Milky Way. It contains a correspondingly larger number of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) associated with globular clusters, and as such can be used to investigate the cluster properties that lead to X-ray binary formation. The best tracer of the spatial structure of M31 globulars is the high-resolution imaging available from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and we have used HST data to derive structural parameters for 29 LMXB-hosting M31 globular clusters. These measurements are combined with structural parameters from the literature for a total of 41 (of 50 known) LMXB clusters and a comparison sample of 65 non-LMXB clusters. Structural parameters measured in blue bandpasses are found to be slightly different (smaller core radii and higher concentrations) than those measured in red bandpasses; this difference is enhanced in LMXB clusters and could be related to stellar population differences. Clusters with LMXBs show higher collision rates for their mass compared to clusters without LMXBs, and collision rates estimated at the core radius show larger offsets than rates estimated at the half-light radius. These results are consistent with the dynamical formation scenario for LMXBs. A logistic regression analysis finds that, as expected, the probability of a cluster hosting an LMXB increases with increasing collision rate and proximity to the galaxy center. The same analysis finds that probability of a cluster hosting an LMXB decreases with increasing cluster mass at a fixed collision rate, although we caution that this could be due to sample selection effects. Metallicity is found to be a less important predictor of LMXB probability than collision rate, mass, or distance, even though LMXB clusters have a higher metallicity on average. This may be due to the interaction of location and metallicity: a sample of M31 LMXBs with a greater range in galactocentric distance would likely contain more metal-poor clusters and make it possible to disentangle the two effects.

  17. A wide-field photometric study of the globular cluster system of NGC 4636

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Dirsch; Ylva Schuberth; Tom Richtler

    2005-03-13

    We investigate the unusually rich cluster system of NGC4636 with wide-field Washington photometry. The globular cluster luminosity function can be followed roughly 1 mag beyond the turn-over magnitude. This corresponds to a distance modulus of m-M=31.24+-0.17, 0.4 mag larger than the distance determined from surface brightness fluctuations. The high specific frequency is confirmed, yet the exact value remains uncertain because of the uncertain distance: it varies between 5.6+-1.2 and 8.9+-1.2. The globular cluster system has a clearly bimodal color distribution. The color peak positions show no radial dependence and are in good agreement with the values found for other galaxies studied in the same filter system. However, a luminosity dependence is found: brighter clusters with an ``intermediate'' color exist. The clusters exhibit a shallow radial distribution within 7'.Within the same radial interval, the galaxy light has a distinctly steeper profile. Because of the difference in the cluster and light distribution the specific frequency increases considerably with radius. At 7' and 9' the density profiles of the red and blue clusters, respectively, change strongly which indicates that we reach the outer rim of the cluster system at approximately 11'. This feature is seen for the first time in a globular cluster system. While the radial distribution of the cluster and field populations are rather different, this is not true for the ellipticity of the system: the elongation as well as the position angle of the cluster system agree well with the galaxy light. We compare the radial distribution of globular clusters with the light profiles for a sample of elliptical galaxies. The difference observed in NGC 4636 is typical of an elliptical galaxy of this luminosity.

  18. Kinematics of the southern galaxy cluster Abell 3733

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Solanes; P. Stein

    1998-03-16

    We report radial velocities for 99 galaxies with projected positions within 30 arcmin of the center of the cluster A3733 obtained with the MEFOS multifiber spectrograph at the 3.6-m ESO telescope. These measurements are combined with 39 redshifts previously published by Stein (1996) to built a collection of 112 galaxy redshifts in the field of A3733, which is used to examine the kinematics and structure of this cluster. We assign cluster membership to 74 galaxies with heliocentric velocities in the interval 10500-13000 km/s. From this sample of cluster members, we infer a heliocentric systemic velocity for A3733 of 11653{+74}{-76} km/s, which implies a mean cosmological redshift of 0.0380, and a velocity dispersion of 614{+42}{-30} km/s. The application of statistical substructure tests to a magnitude-limited subset of the latter sample reveals evidence of non-Gaussianity in the distribution of ordered velocities in the form of lighter tails and possible multimodality. Spatial substructure tests do not find, however, any significant clumpiness in the plane of the sky, although the existence of subclustering along the line-of-sight cannot be excluded.

  19. Clustering Analysis of Seismicity and Aftershock Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-06-26

    Jun 30, 2008 ... ... a statistical methodology for clustering analysis of seismicity in the time-space-

  20. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  1. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  2. Clustering in the biotechnology industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic P

    2006-01-01

    the world to attract high-technology industry. The mostare attempts to create high-technology industrial clusters,institutes because high-technology firms frequently spin-off

  3. Clusters and the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rien van de Weygaert

    2006-07-24

    We discuss the intimate relationship between the filamentary features and the rare dense compact cluster nodes in this network, via the large scale tidal field going along with them, following the cosmic web theory developed Bond et al. The Megaparsec scale tidal shear pattern is responsible for the contraction of matter into filaments, and its link with the cluster locations can be understood through the implied quadrupolar mass distribution in which the clusters are to be found at the sites of the overdense patches. We present a new technique for tracing the cosmic web, identifying planar walls, elongated filaments and cluster nodes in the galaxy distribution. This will allow the practical exploitation of the concept of the cosmic web towards identifying and tracing the locations of the gaseous WHIM. These methods, the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) and the Morphology Multiscale Filter (MMF) find their basis in computational geometry and visualization.

  4. Lightest Kaonic Nuclear Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya; Takibayev, Nurgali Zh

    2015-01-01

    We present our study of kaonic three-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$, $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ and $KK\\overset{\\_}{K}$ and four-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}% NNN $, $\\ $and $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$ clusters within the framework of a potential model using the method of hyperspherical functions in momentum representation. To perform a numerical calculations for the bound state energy of the light kaonic system, we use a set of different potentials for the nucleon-nucleon and $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ interactions, as well as for the kaon-kaon interaction. The calculations show that a quasibound state energy is not sensitive to the $NN$ interaction, and it shows very strong dependence on the $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ potential. We also compare our results with those obtained using different theoretical approaches. The theoretical discrepancies in the binding energy and width for the lightest kaonic system related to the different $NN$ and $\\overset{\\_% }{K}N$ interactions are addressed.

  5. Dust cluster explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxena, Vikrant [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Avinash, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

    2012-09-15

    A model for the dust cluster explosion where micron/sub-micron sized particles are accelerated at the expense of plasma thermal energy, in the afterglow phase of a complex plasma discharge is proposed. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations of dust particles in a confining potential. The nature of the explosion (caused by switching off the discharge) and the concomitant dust acceleration is found to depend critically on the pressure of the background neutral gas. At low gas pressure, the explosion is due to unshielded Coulomb repulsion between dust particles and yields maximum acceleration, while in the high pressure regime it is due to shielded Yukawa repulsion and yields much feebler acceleration. These results are in agreement with experimental findings. Our simulations also confirm a recently proposed electrostatic (ES) isothermal scaling relation, P{sub E}{proportional_to}V{sub d}{sup -2} (where P{sub E} is the ES pressure of the dust particles and V{sub d} is the confining volume).

  6. Adhesive Gravitational Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Buchert; Alvaro Dominguez

    2005-06-21

    The notion of `adhesion' has been advanced for the phenomenon of stabilization of large-scale structure emerging from gravitational instability of a cold medium. Recently, the physical origin of adhesion has been identified: a systematic derivation of the equations of motion for the density and the velocity fields leads naturally to the key equation of the `adhesion approximation' - however, under a set of strongly simplifying assumptions. In this work, we provide an evaluation of the current status of adhesive gravitational clustering and a clear explanation of the assumptions involved. Furthermore, we propose systematic generalizations with the aim to relax some of the simplifying assumptions. We start from the general Newtonian evolution equations for self-gravitating particles on an expanding Friedmann background and recover the popular `dust model' (pressureless fluid), which breaks down after the formation of density singularities; then we investigate, in a unified framework, two other models which, under the restrictions referred to above, lead to the `adhesion approximation'. We apply the Eulerian and Lagrangian perturbative expansions to these new models and, finally, we discuss some non-perturbative results that may serve as starting points for workable approximations of non-linear structure formation in the multi-stream regime. In particular, we propose a new approximation that includes, in limiting cases, the standard `adhesion model' and the Eulerian as well as Lagrangian first-order approximations.

  7. Lightest Kaonic Nuclear Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Shalva M. Tsiklauri; Nurgali Zh. Takibayev

    2015-10-02

    We present our study of kaonic three-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$, $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ and $KK\\overset{\\_}{K}$ and four-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}% NNN $, $\\ $and $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$ clusters within the framework of a potential model using the method of hyperspherical functions in momentum representation. To perform a numerical calculations for the bound state energy of the light kaonic system, we use a set of different potentials for the nucleon-nucleon and $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ interactions, as well as for the kaon-kaon interaction. The calculations show that a quasibound state energy is not sensitive to the $NN$ interaction, and it shows very strong dependence on the $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ potential. We also compare our results with those obtained using different theoretical approaches. The theoretical discrepancies in the binding energy and width for the lightest kaonic system related to the different $NN$ and $\\overset{\\_% }{K}N$ interactions are addressed.

  8. DEXA'11, Toulouse, France, 31.08.2011 Sampling National Deep Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    DEXA'11, Toulouse, France, 31.08.2011 Sampling National Deep Web Denis Shestakov, fname-IP cluster random sampling Results Conclusions #12;Background Deep Web: web content behind search, the science and practice of deep web crawling is in its infancy" (in 'Web crawling', Olston&Najork, 2010) #12

  9. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  10. Towards ensemble asteroseismology of the young open clusters Chi Persei and NGC 6910

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saesen, S; Carrier, F; Michalska, G; Aerts, C; De Ridder, J; Briquet, M; Handler, G; Kolaczkowski, Z; Acke, B; Bauwens, E; Beck, P G; Blom, Y; Blommaert, J; Broeders, E; Cherix, M; Davignon, G; Debosscher, J; Degroote, P; Decin, L; Dehaes, S; De Meester, W; Deroo, P; Desmet, M; Drummond, R; Eggen, J R; Fu, J; Gazeas, K; Gelven, G A; Gielen, C; Huygen, R; Jiang, X; Kalomeni, B; Kim, S -L; Kim, D H; Kopacki, G; Kwon, J -H; Ladjal, D; Lee, C -U; Lee, Y -J; Lefever, K; Leitner, A; Lenz, P; Liakos, A; Lorenz, D; Narwid, A; Niarchos, P; Oestensen, R; Poretti, E; Prins, S; Provencal, J; Antolin, E Puga; Puschnig, J; Raskin, G; Reed, M D; Reyniers, M; Schmidt, E; Schmitzberger, L; Spano, M; Steininger, B; Steslicki, M; Uytterhoeven, K; Vanautgaerden, J; Vandenbussche, B; Van Helshoecht, V; Vanhollebeke, E; Van Winckel, H; Verhoelst, T; Vuckovic, M; Waelkens, C; Wolf, G W; Yakut, K; Zhang, C; Zima, W

    2010-01-01

    As a result of the variability survey in Chi Persei and NGC6910, the number of Beta Cep stars that are members of these two open clusters is increased to twenty stars, nine in NGC6910 and eleven in Chi Persei. We compare pulsational properties, in particular the frequency spectra, of Beta Cep stars in both clusters and explain the differences in terms of the global parameters of the clusters. We also indicate that the more complicated pattern of the variability among B type stars in Chi Persei is very likely caused by higher rotational velocities of stars in this cluster. We conclude that the sample of pulsating stars in the two open clusters constitutes a very good starting point for the ensemble asteroseismology of Beta Cep-type stars and maybe also for other B-type pulsators.

  11. Massive galaxy clusters and the origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Pierpaoli; Glennys Farrar

    2005-11-22

    We investigate whether ultra--high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may be preferentially produced in massive galaxy clusters, by looking for correlations between UHECR directions and those of x-ray clusters. We find an excess-above-random of high energy cosmic rays which correlate with massive galaxy cluster positions. For cosmic rays with energies above 50 EeV the observed correlation is the strongest or angles of 1.2-1.6 degrees where it has a chance probability of about 0.1%. Including lower energy cosmic rays in the sample causes the angle where the most significant correlation is found to increase, as would be expected by virtue of instrumental and magnetic smearing increasing at lower energy. These results suggest that some UHECR are produced in galaxy clusters, or in objects that preferentially populate galaxy clusters.

  12. Photometry of Star Clusters in the M31 Galaxy. Aperture Size Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Narbutis; V. Vansevicius; K. Kodaira; A. Bridzius; R. Stonkute

    2007-12-23

    A study of aperture size effects on star cluster photometry in crowded fields is presented. Tests were performed on a sample of 285 star cluster candidates in the South-West field of the M31 galaxy disk, measured in the Local Group Galaxy Survey mosaic images (Massey et al. 2006). In the majority of cases the derived UBVRI photometry errors represent the accuracy of cluster colors well, however, for faint objects, residing in crowded environments, uncertainties of colors could be underestimated. Therefore, prior to deriving cluster parameters via a comparison of measured colors with SSP models, biases of colors, arising due to background crowding, must be taken into account. A comparison of our photometry data with Hubble Space Telescope observations of the clusters by Krienke and Hodge (2007) is provided.

  13. Some Remarks on Extragalactic Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Richtler

    2005-12-21

    I comment (in a review fashion) on a few selected topics in the field of extragalactic globular clusters with strong emphasis on recent work. The topics are: bimodality in the colour distribution of cluster systems, young massive clusters, and the brightest old clusters. Globular cluster research, perhaps more than ever, has lead to important (at least to astronomers) progress and problems in galaxy structure and formation.

  14. Structure and kinematics of galaxy clusters II. Substructures and luminosity segregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Stein

    1996-06-25

    A homogeneous sample of galaxy redshifts in the core regions (R < 0.5 h$^{-1}$ Mpc) of 12 clusters is used to measure the frequency of substructure with different tests. In 50 % of the cases substructure is detected, a frequency which agrees well with previous studies of cluster cores. Magnitude information and rough morphological classes are also available for 80 % of the sample, allowing us to confirm that bright galaxies (M < -22 mag) have a significantly lower velocity dispersion than the rest. Elliptical galaxies are the main responsibles for this luminosity segregation in velocity space, whereas no segregation can be seen for spiral galaxies. Given the coincidence of substructure and luminosity segregation, a cluster model with an old population of ellipticals which are under the effect of dynamical friction in each subcluster is thus favoured by these observations. Spiral galaxies seem to be late arrivals, or are passing in front or behind the core of the cluster.

  15. The Radio Luminosity Function of the NEP Distant Cluster Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branchesi, M; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Perley, R

    2005-01-01

    A complete sample of 18 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies belonging to the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey has been observed with the Very Large Array at 1.4 GHz. These are the most distant clusters in the X-ray survey with redshift in the range 0.3 =0.17 mJy/beam, except for three sources, belonging to the same cluster, which have a higher peak brightness limit of 0.26 mJy/beam. The NEP field source counts are in good agreement with the source counts of a comparison survey, the VLA-VIRMOS deep field survey, indicating that the NEP sample is statistically complete. Thirty-two out of the 79 sources are within 0.2 Abell radii, twenty-two of them are considered cluster members based on spectroscopic redshifts or their optical magnitude and morphological classification. The cluster radio galaxies are used to construct the Radio Luminosity Function (RLF) of distant X-ray selected clusters. A comparison with two nearby cluster RLFs shows that the NEP RLF lies above the local ones, has a steeper slope at lo...

  16. A Comprehensive HST BVI Catalogue Of Star Clusters In Five Hickson Compact Groups Of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedotov, K; Durrell, P R; Bastian, N; Konstantopoulos, I S; Charlton, J; Johnson, K E; Chandar, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a photometric catalogue of star cluster candidates in Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 7, 31, 42, 59, and 92, based on observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The catalogue contains precise cluster positions (right ascension and declination), magnitudes, and colours in the BVI filters. The number of detected sources ranges from 2200 to 5600 per group, from which we construct the high-confidence sample by applying a number of criteria designed to reduce foreground and background contaminants. Furthermore, the high-confidence cluster candidates for each of the 16 galaxies in our sample are split into two sub-populations: one that may contain young star clusters and one that is dominated by globular older clusters. The ratio of young star cluster to globular cluster candidates varies from group to group, from equal numbers to the extreme of HCG 31 which has a ratio of 8 to 1, due to a recent starburst induced by interactions in the grou...

  17. Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-5-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2005-02-01

    Well Cluster ER-5-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The cluster consists of two wells, positioned about 30 meters apart on the same drill pad, constructed as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments for the well cluster are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 156 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 192 meters in both boreholes, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 122 samples. Well ER-5-4 penetrated approximately 1,120 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium before reaching total depth in Tertiary volcanic rocks at 1,137.5 meters. The deeper Well ER-5-4 No.2 penetrated 1,120.4 meters of alluvial sediments, and was terminated within Tertiary volcanic rocks at a depth of 2,133.6 meters, indicating that Paleozoic rocks are deeper than expected at this site.

  18. The GALEX Ultraviolet Virgo Cluster Survey (GUViCS). VI: The UV luminosity function of the Virgo cluster and its surrounding regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boselli, A; Voyer, E; Ferrarese, L; Consolandi, G; Cortese, L; Cote, P; Cuillandre, J C; Gavazzi, G; Gwyn, S; Heinis, S; Ilbert, O; MacArthur, L; Roehlly, Y

    2015-01-01

    We use the GALEX data of the GUViCS survey to construct the NUV luminosity function of the Virgo cluster over ~ 300 deg.2, an area covering the cluster and its surrounding regions up to ~ 1.8 virial radii. The NUV luminosity function is also determined for galaxies of different morphological type and NUV-i colour, and for the different substructures within the cluster. These luminosity functions are robust vs. statistical corrections since based on a sample of 833 galaxies mainly identified as cluster members with spectroscopic redshift (808) or high-quality optical scaling relations (10). We fit these luminosity functions with a Schechter function, and compare the fitted parameters with those determined for other nearby clusters and for the field. The faint end slope of the Virgo NUV luminosity function (alpha = -1.19), here sampled down to ~ NUV = -11.5 mag, is significantly flatter than the one measured in other nearby clusters and similar to the field one. Similarly M* = -17.56 is one-to-two magnitudes fa...

  19. Tailed Radio Galaxies as Probes of Cluster Physics in the Square Kilometre Array Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehghan, S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the use of tailed radio galaxies as environmental probes has gained momentum as a method for galaxy cluster detection, examining the dynamics of individual clusters, measuring the density and velocity flows in the intra-cluster medium, and for probing cluster magnetic fields. To date instrumental limitations in terms of resolution and sensitivity have confined this research to the local (z < 0.7) Universe. The advent of SKA-1 surveys however will allow detection of well over 1 million tailed radio galaxies and their associated galaxy clusters out to redshifts of 2 or more. This is in fact ten times more than the current number of known clusters in the Universe. Such a substantial sample of tailed galaxies will provide an invaluable tool not only for detecting clusters, but also for characterizing their intra-cluster medium, magnetic fields and dynamical state as a function of cosmic time. In this paper we present an analysis of the usability of tailed radio galaxies as tracers of dense env...

  20. Big Fish in Small Ponds: massive stars in the low-mass clusters of M83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, J. E.; Calzetti, D.; McElwee, Sean [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Chandar, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Elmegreen, B. G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Kim, Hwihyun [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Krumholz, Mark R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lee, J. C.; Whitmore, B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); O'Connell, R. W., E-mail: jandrews@astro.umass.edu, E-mail: callzetti@astro.umass.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We have used multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 data of the starbursting spiral galaxy M83 in order to measure variations in the upper end of the stellar initial mass function (uIMF) using the production rate of ionizing photons in unresolved clusters with ages ? 8 Myr. As in earlier papers on M51 and NGC 4214, the uIMF in M83 is consistent with a universal IMF, and stochastic sampling of the stellar populations in the ?<10{sup 3} M {sub ?} clusters are responsible for any deviations in this universality. The ensemble cluster population, as well as individual clusters, also imply that the most massive star in a cluster does not depend on the cluster mass. In fact, we have found that these small clusters seem to have an over-abundance of ionizing photons when compared to an expected universal or truncated IMF. This also suggests that the presence of massive stars in these clusters does not affect the star formation in a destructive way.

  1. Big Fish in Small Ponds: Massive Stars in the Low Mass Clusters of M83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, J E; Chandar, R; Elmegreen, B G; Kennicutt, R C; Kim, Hwihyun; Krumholz, Mark R; Lee, J C; McElwee, Sean; O'Connell, R W; Whitmore, B

    2014-01-01

    We have used multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 data of the starbursting spiral galaxy M83 in order to measure variations in the upper end of the stellar initial mass function (uIMF) using the production rate of ionizing photons in unresolved clusters with ages $\\leq$ 8 Myr. As in earlier papers on M51 and NGC 4214, the upper end of the stellar IMF in M83 is consistent with an universal IMF, and stochastic sampling of the stellar populations in the $\\lessapprox$ 10$^{3}$ Msun clusters are responsible for any deviations in this universality. The ensemble cluster population, as well as individual clusters, also imply that the most massive star in a cluster does not depend on the cluster mass. In fact, we have found that these small clusters seem to have an over-abundance of ionizing photons when compared to an expected universal or truncated IMF. This also suggests that the presence of massive stars in these clusters does not affect the star formation in a destructive way.

  2. Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 L L N L - X X X X - X X X X X Sampling Report for May- June, 2014 WIPP Samples UNCLASSIFIED Forensic Science Center January 8, 2015 Sampling Report for May-June, 2014 WIPP...

  3. Chalcogen-Rich Lanthanide Clusters: Cluster Reactivity and the Influence of Ancillary Ligands on Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    Chalcogen-Rich Lanthanide Clusters: Cluster Reactivity and the Influence of Ancillary Ligands that highly electronegative, sterically saturating ancillary ligands (e.g. Cp*) are not a prerequisite

  4. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-25

    The exciton energy deposited in an argon cluster, (Arn ,< n=20>) using VUV radiation is transferred to softly ionize doped water clusters, ((H2O)n, n=1-9) leading to the formation of non-fragmented clusters. Following the initial excitation, electronic energy is channeled to ionize the doped water cluster while evaporating the Ar shell, allowing identification of fragmented and complete water cluster ions. Examination of the photoionization efficiency curve shows that cluster evaporation from excitons located above 12.6 eV are not enough to cool the energized water cluster ion, and leads to their dissociation to (H2O)n-2H+ (protonated) clusters.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) [0.1981], 0.1895(9) [0.1874(4)], 0.1530(34) [0.1599(73)], 0.1664(37) [0.1724(110)], 0.1613(43) [0.1675(110)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) [0.0203(12)], 0.0188(10) [0.0220(21)], 0.0247(8) [0.0310(12)], 0.0253(8) [0.0351(8)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  6. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Merten, Julian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Bartelmann, Matthias [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Balestra, Italo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Benítez, Narciso [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Camino Bajo de Huétor 24, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Bouwens, Rychard [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: bpatel02@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); and others

    2014-05-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ?1.0 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ?0.2 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log{sub 10}?): 0.83 ± 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 ± 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 ± 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  7. CANDIDATE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AT z > 1.3 IDENTIFIED IN THE SPITZER SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE DEEP FIELD SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rettura, A.; Stern, D.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Mei, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Bartlett, J. G.

    2014-12-20

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg{sup 2} Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z ? 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density n{sub c}=(0.7{sub ?0.6}{sup +6.3})×10{sup ?7} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup ?3} and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r {sub 0} = (32 ± 7) h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M {sub min}, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than M{sub min}=1.5{sub ?0.7}{sup +0.9}×10{sup 14} h{sup ?1} M{sub ?}. We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to M{sub mean}=1.9{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.0}×10{sup 14} h{sup ?1} M{sub ?}; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of present-day massive galaxy clusters.

  8. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  9. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  10. Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

    We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

  11. Sample Environments at Sector 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample holder designs are below. Aluminum sample holder - custom design Al design Al pic click drawing for .pdf-file Aluminum sample holder - custom design Al design Al pic...

  12. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  13. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  14. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  15. The L_X--M relation of Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Rykoff; A. E. Evrard; T. A. McKay; M. R. Becker; D. E. Johnston; B. P. Koester; B. Nord; E. Rozo; E. S. Sheldon; R. Stanek; R. H. Wechsler

    2008-03-27

    We present a new measurement of the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and total mass for 17,000 galaxy clusters in the maxBCG cluster sample. Stacking sub-samples within fixed ranges of optical richness, N_200, we measure the mean 0.1-2.4 keV X-ray luminosity, , from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The mean mass, , is measured from weak gravitational lensing of SDSS background galaxies (Johnston et al. 2007). For 9 /10^42 h^-2 erg/s = (12.6+1.4-1.3 (stat) +/- 1.6 (sys)) (/10^14 h^-1 M_sun)^1.65+/-0.13. The slope agrees to within 10% with previous estimates based on X-ray selected catalogs, implying that the covariance in L_X and N_200 at fixed halo mass is not large. The luminosity intercent is 30%, or 2\\sigma, lower than determined from the X-ray flux-limited sample of Reiprich & Bohringer (2002), assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. This difference could arise from a combination of Malmquist bias and/or systematic error in hydrostatic mass estimates, both of which are expected. The intercept agrees with that derived by Stanek et al. (2006) using a model for the statistical correspondence between clusters and halos in a WMAP3 cosmology with power spectrum normalization sigma_8 = 0.85. Similar exercises applied to future data sets will allow constraints on the covariance among optical and hot gas properties of clusters at fixed mass.

  16. The L_X-M relation of Clusters of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rykoff, E.S.; Evrard, A.E.; McKay, T.A.; Becker, M.R.; Johnston, D.E.; Koester, B.P.; Nord, B.; Rozo, E.; Sheldon, E.S.; Stanek, R.; Wechsler, R.H.

    2008-05-16

    We present a new measurement of the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and total mass for 17,000 galaxy clusters in the maxBCG cluster sample. Stacking sub-samples within fixed ranges of optical richness, N200, we measure the mean 0.1-2.4 keV X-ray luminosity, , from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. The mean mass, , is measured from weak gravitational lensing of SDSS background galaxies (Johnston et al. 2007). For 9 {le} N{sub 200} < 200, the data are well fit by a power-law, /10{sup 42} h{sup -2} ergs{sup -1} = (12.6{sub -1.3}{sup +1.4}(stat) {+-} 1.6 (sys)) (/10{sup 14} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}){sup 1.65{+-}0.13}. The slope agrees to within 10% with previous estimates based on X-ray selected catalogs, implying that the covariance in L{sub X} and N{sub 200} at fixed halo mass is not large. The luminosity intercept is 30%, or 2{sigma}, lower than determined from the X-ray flux-limited sample of Reiprich & Boehringer (2002), assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. This slight difference could arise from a combination of Malmquist bias and/or systematic error in hydrostatic mass estimates, both of which are expected. The intercept agrees with that derived by Stanek et al. (2006) using a model for the statistical correspondence between clusters and halos in a WMAP3 cosmology with power spectrum normalization {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.85. Similar exercises applied to future data sets will allow constraints on the covariance among optical and hot gas properties of clusters at fixed mass.

  17. Clustering of exponentially separating trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wilkinson; B. Mehlig; K. Gustavsson; E. Werner

    2010-01-16

    It might be expected that trajectories for a dynamical system which has no negative Lyapunov exponent (implying exponential growth of small separations will not cluster together. However, clustering can occur such that the density $\\rho(\\Delta x)$ of trajectories within distance $\\Delta x$ of a reference trajectory has a power-law divergence, so that $\\rho(\\Delta x)\\sim \\Delta x^{-\\beta}$ when $\\Delta x$ is sufficiently small, for some $0<\\beta<1$. We demonstrate this effect using a random map in one dimension. We find no evidence for this effect in the chaotic logistic map, and argue that the effect is harder to observe in deterministic maps.

  18. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  19. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  20. Small sample feature selection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sima, Chao

    2007-09-17

    that the correction factor is a function of the dimensionality. The estimated standard deviations for the bolstering kernels are thus given by: ?i = ˆd(yi) ?p,i , for i = 1,...,n. (2.8) Clearly, as the number of samples in the training data increases, the standard de..., the DeArray software of the National Human Genome Research Institute calculates a multi-faceted quality metric for each spot [25]. This quality problem is a result of imperfections in RNA preparation, hybridization to the arrays, scanning, and also...

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe: SUBJIHX:ontineSampling at

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe: SUBJIHX:ontineSampling

  3. 2003 CBECS Sample Design

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic MonthlyTechnical Information > Sample

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at the

  5. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at

  6. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at4

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling at4and

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling Rifle,

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 theGroundwater Sampling4

  12. Entanglement sampling and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frédéric Dupuis; Omar Fawzi; Stephanie Wehner

    2015-06-15

    A natural measure for the amount of quantum information that a physical system E holds about another system A = A_1,...,A_n is given by the min-entropy Hmin(A|E). Specifically, the min-entropy measures the amount of entanglement between E and A, and is the relevant measure when analyzing a wide variety of problems ranging from randomness extraction in quantum cryptography, decoupling used in channel coding, to physical processes such as thermalization or the thermodynamic work cost (or gain) of erasing a quantum system. As such, it is a central question to determine the behaviour of the min-entropy after some process M is applied to the system A. Here we introduce a new generic tool relating the resulting min-entropy to the original one, and apply it to several settings of interest, including sampling of subsystems and measuring in a randomly chosen basis. The sampling results lead to new upper bounds on quantum random access codes, and imply the existence of "local decouplers". The results on random measurements yield new high-order entropic uncertainty relations with which we prove the optimality of cryptographic schemes in the bounded quantum storage model.

  13. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  14. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  15. Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution Max Buot Donald Richards Xavier statistical models which have been proposed for luminosity distributions for the globular clusters galaxies were well fit by Gaussian distributions, subsequent investigations suggested

  16. Architectural support for enhancing security in clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Man Hee

    2009-05-15

    Cluster computing has emerged as a common approach for providing more comput- ing and data resources in industry as well as in academia. However, since cluster computer developers have paid more attention to performance ...

  17. Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy SHARE Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy ORNL has a 40-year history in R&D on fiber-reinforced composite materials, and has been leading DOE's low-cost...

  18. Perspectives for logistics clusters development in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tantsuyev, Andriy

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a normative work aimed at identifying locations in Russia with high, medium and unclear potentials for logistics cluster development. As a framework this work uses four different models of logistics clusters: ...

  19. The soft X-ray Cluster-AGN spatial cross-correlation function in the ROSAT-NEP survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Cappelluti; H. Boehringer; P. Schuecker; E. Pierpaoli; C. R. Mullis; I. M. Gioia; J. P. Henry

    2006-11-17

    X-ray surveys facilitate investigations of the environment of AGNs. Deep Chandra observations revealed that the AGNs source surface density rises near clusters of galaxies. The natural extension of these works is the measurement of spatial clustering of AGNs around clusters and the investigation of relative biasing between active galactic nuclei and galaxies near clusters. The major aims of this work are to obtain a measurement of the correlation length of AGNs around clusters and a measure of the averaged clustering properties of a complete sample of AGNs in dense environments. We present the first measurement of the soft X-ray cluster-AGN cross-correlation function in redshift space using the data of the ROSAT-NEP survey. The survey covers 9x9 deg^2 around the North Ecliptic Pole where 442 X-ray sources were detected and almost completely spectroscopically identified. We detected a > 3 sigma significant clustering signal on scales s<50 h_70^-1 Mpc. We performed a classical maximum-likelihood power-law fit to the data and obtained a correlation length s_0=8.7^+1.2_-0.3 h70^-1 Mpc and a slope gamma=1.7^+0.2_-0.7 (1 sigma errors). This is a strong evidence that AGNs are good tracers of the large scale structure of the Universe. Our data were compared to the results obtained by cross-correlating X-ray clusters and galaxies. We observe, with a large uncertainty, a similar behaviour of the AGNs clustering around clusters similar to the clustering of galaxies around clusters.

  20. Preliminary Experiment for the Control of Cluster Vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Cluster Vibration for the Control of Cluster Vibration 99 7 20 1. 15 3 http-harmonic generation from laser irradiated clusters, it has been proved that laser induced cluster vibration

  1. POLYPHONIC INSTRUMENT RECOGNITION SPECTRAL CLUSTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzanetakis, George

    POLYPHONIC INSTRUMENT RECOGNITION USING SPECTRAL CLUSTERING Luis Gustavo Martins Telecommunications]@uvic.ca ABSTRACT The identification of the instruments playing in a poly- phonic music signal is an important source separation and tim- bre classification of polyphonic, multi-instrumental music signals. The sound

  2. Gravitational `Convergence' and Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-12-01

    Two colour photometry of the cluster A1689 reveals a `relative magnification-bias' between lensed blue and red background galaxies, arising from a dependence of the faint galaxy count-slope on colour. The colour distribution is skewed blueward of the far field, allowing us to measure the cluster magnification and to understand the notorious blueness of large arcs. We show that the magnification information can be combined with the usual image distortion measurements to isolate the local `convergence' component of lensing and hence derive the projected mass. This is achieved through a simple local relation between the convergence and the observables, which can be applied generally over the surface a cluster. In the weak lensing limit, the convergence reduces to a dependence on the magnification alone, so that in the outskirts of clusters the surface-density of matter is obtained directly from the surface-density of background galaxies. Hence, useful lensing work requires colour information but not necessarily good seeing. Interestingly, convergence varies slowly at high redshift, saturating at a level depending on the Horizon distance, allowing a useful model-independent measurement of the Global Geometry.

  3. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  4. Modeling the Energy Efficiency of Heterogeneous Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    are an alternative for energy-efficient clusters [18], [20], [23]. On the contrary, other researchersModeling the Energy Efficiency of Heterogeneous Clusters Lavanya Ramapantulu, Bogdan Marius Tudor analyze the energy efficiency of mixing high-performance and low-power nodes in a cluster. Using a model

  5. Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beszedes, Árpád

    Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality Béla Csaba, Lajos Schrettner, Árpád Beszédes clusters and software quality. Such attempts are hindered by a number of difficulties: there are problems in assessing the quality of software, measuring the degree of clusterization of software and finding the means

  6. Charpy Impact Data The Charpy energy of the sample after heattreatment was significantly higher than the aswelded sample when the Vnotches were located 1 or 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Charpy Impact Data The Charpy energy of the sample after heat­treatment was significantly higher­notch was located on FL, the improvement in toughness from the heat treatment was not so obvious with no enhancement crystallographic grain size persisted after heat­treatment. The accompanying stereogram shows clusters of grains

  7. Observation of neutral sulfuric acid-amine containing clusters in laboratory and ambient measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang C.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J. N.; Eisele, F. L.; Chen, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-11-02

    Recent ab initio calculations showed that amines can enhance atmospheric sulfuric acid-water nucleation more effectively than ammonia, and this prediction has been substantiated in laboratory measurements. Laboratory studies have also shown that amines can effectively displace ammonia in several types of ammonium clusters. However, the roles of amines in cluster formation and growth at a microscopic molecular scale (from molecular sizes up to 2 nm) have not yet been well understood. Processes that must be understood include the incorporation of amines into sulfuric acid clusters and the formation of organic salts in freshly nucleated particles, which contributes significantly to particle growth rates. We report the first laboratory and ambient measurements of neutral sulfuric acid-amine clusters using the Cluster CIMS, a recently-developed mass spectrometer designed for measuring neutral clusters formed in the atmosphere during nucleation. An experimental technique, which we refer to as Semi-Ambient Signal Amplification (SASA), was employed. Sulfuric acid was added to ambient air, and the concentrations and composition of clusters in this mixture were analyzed by the Cluster CIMS. This experimental approach led to significantly higher cluster concentrations than are normally found in ambient air, thereby increasing signal-to-noise levels and allowing us to study reactions between gas phase species in ambient air and sulfuric acid containing clusters. Mass peaks corresponding to clusters containing four H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} molecules and one amine molecule were clearly observed, with the most abundant sulfuric acid-amine clusters being those containing a C2- or C4-amine (i.e. amines with masses of 45 and 73 amu). Evidence for C3- and C5-amines (i.e. amines with masses of 59 and 87 amu) was also found, but their correlation with sulfuric acid tetramer was not as strong as was observed for the C2- and C4-amines. The formation mechanisms for those sulfuric acid-amine clusters were investigated by varying the residence time in the inlet. It was concluded that the amines react directly with neutral clusters and that ion-induced clustering of sulfuric acid cluster ions with amines was not a dominant process. Results from ambient measurements using the Cluster CIMS without addition of sulfuric acid have shown that the sulfuric acid-amine clusters were reasonably well correlated with sulfuric acid tetramer and consistent with the SASA experiments at the same Boulder sampling site. Also, clusters that contain C2- or C4-amines were more abundant and better correlated with sulfuric acid tetramer than other types of amine containing clusters. However, ambient measurements of sulfuric acid-amine clusters remain difficult and highly uncertain because their concentrations are only slightly above background levels, even during nucleation events.

  8. A Clustering Topology Control Algorithms For Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    of cluster head. I. INTRODUCTION. The rapid development in small, low-power, low-cost microelectronic degree of cluster-heads by up to 75% and translate power o f cluster-heads by up to 75%, implying with a cluster- head, forming a direct link between cluster-head and cluster- members. Note that the links can

  9. Constraint-based Graph Clustering through Node Sequencing and Partitioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Kang

    -input in the clustering process, clustering criteria can be classified into two categories: user-centric and data-centric clustering method should be both user-centric and data-centric, e.g., in most clustering algorithms at the centers of clusters. In Fig. 1 (a), we can see that a correct and "good" data-centric clustering algorithm

  10. The Evolution of Structure in Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    The Evolution of Structure in Clusters of Galaxies with C. Canizares, M. Bautz, and D. Buote · The observed evolution of cluster morphology ­ Introduction: cosmology with clusters cluster mergers. · Constrain m and 8 from evolution in cluster number density and cluster baryon fraction. #12;· High

  11. The Phoenix Deep Survey: Extremely Red Galaxies and Cluster Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony G. Smith; Andrew M. Hopkins; Richard W. Hunstead; Samuel J. Schmidt; José Afonso; Antonis E. Georgakakis; Lawrence E. Cram; Bahram Mobasher; Mark Sullivan

    2008-04-24

    We present the results of a study of a sample of 375 Extremely Red Galaxies (ERGs) in the Phoenix Deep Survey, 273 of which constitute a subsample which is 80% complete to K_s = 18.5 over an area of 1160 arcmin^2. The angular correlation function for ERGs is estimated, and the association of ERGs with faint radio sources explored. We find tentative evidence that ERGs and faint radio sources are associated at z > 0.5. A new overdensity-mapping algorithm has been used to characterize the ERG distribution, and identify a number of cluster candidates, including a likely cluster containing ERGs at 0.5 4 criterion is more efficient than R - K_s > 5 at selecting dusty star-forming galaxies, rather than passively evolving ERGs.

  12. Galaxy Clusters in Hubble Volume Simulations: Cosmological Constraints from Sky Survey Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Evrard; T. J. MacFarland; H. M. P. Couchman; J. M. Colberg; N. Yoshida; S. D. M. White; A. R. Jenkins; C. S. Frenk; F. R. Pearce; J. A. Peacock; P. A. Thomas

    2002-03-12

    We use giga-particle N-body simulations to study galaxy cluster populations in Hubble Volumes of LCDM (Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7) and tCDM (Omega_m=1) world models. Mapping past light-cones of locations in the computational space, we create mock sky surveys of dark matter structure to z~1.4 over 10,000 sq deg and to z~0.5 over two full spheres. Calibrating the Jenkins mass function at z=0 with samples of ~1.5 million clusters, we show that the fit describes the sky survey counts to 5e13 Msun/h). Fitting the observed local temperature function determines the ratio beta of specific thermal energies in dark matter and intracluster gas. We derive a scaling with power spectrum normalization beta \\propto sigma8^{5/3}, and measure a 4% error on sigma8 arising from cosmic variance in temperature-limited cluster samples. Considering distant clusters, the LCDM model matches EMSS and RDCS X-ray-selected survey observations under economical assumptions for intracluster gas evolution. Using transformations of mass-limited cluster samples that mimic sigma8 variation, we explore SZ search expectations for a 10 sq deg survey complete above 10^{14} Msun/h. Cluster counts are shown to be extremely sensitive to sigma8 uncertainty while redshift statistics, such as the sample median, are much more stable. For LCDM, the characteristic temperature at fixed sky surface density is a weak function of redshift, implying an abundance of hot clusters at z>1. Assuming constant beta, four kT>8 keV clusters lie at z>2 and 40 kT>5 keV clusters lie at z>3 on the whole sky. Detection of Coma-sized clusters at z>1 violate LCDM at 95% confidence if their surface density exceeds 0.003 per sq deg, or 120 on the whole sky.

  13. Dark energy constraints from lensing-detected galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Marian; Gary M. Bernstein

    2006-05-31

    We study the ability of weak lensing surveys to detect galaxy clusters and constrain cosmological parameters, in particular the equation of state of dark energy. There are two major sources of noise for weak lensing cluster measurements: the ``shape noise'' from the intrinsic ellipticities of galaxies; and the large scale projection noise. We produce a filter for the shear field which optimizes the signal-to-noise of shape-noise-dominated shear measurements. Our Fisher-matrix analysis of this projected-mass observable makes use of the shape of this mass function, and takes into account the Poisson variance, sample variance, shape noise, and projected-mass noise, and also the fact that the conversion of the shear signal into mass is cosmology-dependent. The Fisher analysis is applied to both a nominal 15,000 square degree ground-based survey and a 1000 square degree space-based survey. Assuming a detection threshold of S/N=5, we find both experiments detect \\~20,000 clusters, and yield 1-sigma constraints of ~0.07 for w0 and ~0.2 for wa when combined with CMB data (for flat universe). The projection noise exceeds the shape noise only for clusters at z<=0.1 and has little effect on the derived dark-energy constraints. Sample variance does not significantly affect either survey. Finally, we note that all these results are extremely sensitive to the noise levels and detection thresholds that we impose. They can be significantly improved if we combine ground and space surveys as independent experiments and add their corresponding Fisher matrices.

  14. An Atlas of Halpha and R Images and Radial Profiles of 63 Bright Virgo Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Koopmann; J. D. P. Kenney; J. Young

    2001-06-19

    Narrow-band Halpha and broadband R images and radial profiles are presented for 63 bright spiral galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. The sample is complete for Sb-Scd galaxies with B magnitude less than 12 and inclination less than 75 degrees. Isophotal radii, disk scalelengths, concentration parameters, and integrated fluxes are derived for the sample galaxies.

  15. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  16. Cluster synchronization induced by one-node clusters in networks with asymmetric negative couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jianbao [School of Science, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)] [School of Science, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Ma, Zhongjun, E-mail: mzj1234402@163.com [School of Mathematics and Computing Science, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)] [School of Mathematics and Computing Science, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Zhang, Gang [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)] [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2013-12-15

    This paper deals with the problem of cluster synchronization in networks with asymmetric negative couplings. By decomposing the coupling matrix into three matrices, and employing Lyapunov function method, sufficient conditions are derived for cluster synchronization. The conditions show that the couplings of multi-node clusters from one-node clusters have beneficial effects on cluster synchronization. Based on the effects of the one-node clusters, an effective and universal control scheme is put forward for the first time. The obtained results may help us better understand the relation between cluster synchronization and cluster structures of the networks. The validity of the control scheme is confirmed through two numerical simulations, in a network with no cluster structure and in a scale-free network.

  17. Hierarchical Clustering and Active Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Hatziminaoglou; G. Mathez; A. Manrique

    2000-09-18

    The growth of Super Massive Black Holes and the parallel development of activity in galactic nuclei are implemented in an analytic code of hierarchical clustering. The evolution of the luminosity function of quasars and AGN will be computed with special attention paid to the connection between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. One of the major interests of the model is the parallel study of quasar formation and evolution and the History of Star Formation.

  18. Environmental Effects on Real-Space and Redshift-Space Galaxy Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying Zu; Zheng Zheng; G. T. Zhu; Y. P. Jing

    2008-06-13

    Galaxy formation inside dark matter halos, as well as the halo formation itself, can be affected by large-scale environments. Evaluating the imprints of environmental effects on galaxy clustering is crucial for precise cosmological constraints with data from galaxy redshift surveys. We investigate such an environmental impact on both real-space and redshift-space galaxy clustering statistics using a semi-analytic model derived from the Millennium Simulation. We compare clustering statistics from original SAM galaxy samples and shuffled ones with environmental influence on galaxy properties eliminated. Among the luminosity-threshold samples examined, the one with the lowest threshold luminosity (~0.2L_*) is affected by environmental effects the most, which has a ~10% decrease in the real-space two-point correlation function (2PCF) after shuffling. By decomposing the 2PCF into five different components based on the source of pairs, we show that the change in the 2PCF can be explained by the age and richness dependence of halo clustering. The 2PCFs in redshift space are found to change in a similar manner after shuffling. If the environmental effects are neglected, halo occupation distribution modeling of the real-space and redshift-space clustering may have a less than 6.5% systematic uncertainty in constraining beta from the most affected SAM sample and have substantially smaller uncertainties from the other, more luminous samples. We argue that the effect could be even smaller in reality. In the Appendix, we present a method to decompose the 2PCF, which can be applied to measure the two-point auto-correlation functions of galaxy sub-samples in a volume-limited galaxy sample and their two-point cross-correlation functions in a single run utilizing only one random catalog.

  19. Hot Outflows in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, C C

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analyzed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using {\\it Chandra X-ray Observatory} observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the "iron radius") and jet power is found with the form $R_{\\rm Fe} \\propto P_{\\rm jet}^{0.45}$. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed $100 ~\\rm M_\\odot ~yr^{-1}$ in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10% to 20% of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at ...

  20. Evolution of Nuclear Star Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2009-01-05

    Two-body relaxation times of nuclear star clusters are short enough that gravitational encounters should substantially affect their structure in 10 Gyr or less. In nuclear star clusters without massive black holes, dynamical evolution is a competition between core collapse, which causes densities to increase, and heat input from the surrounding galaxy, which causes densities to decrease. The maximum extent of a nucleus that can resist expansion is derived numerically for a wide range of initial conditions; observed nuclei are shown to be compact enough to resist expansion, although there may have been an earlier generation of low-density nuclei that were dissolved. An evolutionary model for NGC 205 is presented which suggests that the nucleus of this galaxy has already undergone core collapse. Adding a massive black hole to a nucleus inhibits core collapse, and nuclear star clusters with black holes always expand, due primarily to heat input from the galaxy and secondarily to heating from stellar disruptions. The expansion rate is smaller for larger black holes due to the smaller temperature difference between galaxy and nucleus when the black hole is large. The rate of stellar tidal disruptions and its variation with time are computed for a variety of initial models. The disruption rate generally decreases with time due to the evolving nuclear density, particularly in the faintest galaxies, assuming that scaling relations derived for luminous galaxies can be extended to low luminosities.

  1. 3 - DJ : sampling as design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Sayjel Vijay

    2015-01-01

    3D Sampling is introduced as a new spatial craft that can be applied to architectural design, akin to how sampling is applied in the field of electronic music. Through the development of 3-DJ, a prototype design software, ...

  2. COMPARING DENSE GALAXY CLUSTER REDSHIFT SURVEYS WITH WEAK-LENSING MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Zahid, H. Jabran [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, V. Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Rines, Kenneth J., E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: harus.zahid@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We use dense redshift surveys of nine galaxy clusters at z ? 0.2 to compare the galaxy distribution in each system with the projected matter distribution from weak lensing. By combining 2087 new MMT/Hectospec redshifts and the data in the literature, we construct spectroscopic samples within the region of weak-lensing maps of high (70%-89%) and uniform completeness. With these dense redshift surveys, we construct galaxy number density maps using several galaxy subsamples. The shape of the main cluster concentration in the weak-lensing maps is similar to the global morphology of the number density maps based on cluster members alone, mainly dominated by red members. We cross-correlate the galaxy number density maps with the weak-lensing maps. The cross-correlation signal when we include foreground and background galaxies at 0.5z {sub cl} < z < 2z {sub cl} is 10%-23% larger than for cluster members alone at the cluster virial radius. The excess can be as high as 30% depending on the cluster. Cross-correlating the galaxy number density and weak-lensing maps suggests that superimposed structures close to the cluster in redshift space contribute more significantly to the excess cross-correlation signal than unrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight. Interestingly, the weak-lensing mass profiles are not well constrained for the clusters with the largest cross-correlation signal excesses (>20% for A383, A689, and A750). The fractional excess in the cross-correlation signal including foreground and background structures could be a useful proxy for assessing the reliability of weak-lensing cluster mass estimates.

  3. Host-IP Clustering Technique for Deep Web Characterization Denis Shestakov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Host-IP Clustering Technique for Deep Web Characterization Denis Shestakov Department of Media databases. This part of the Web, known as the deep Web, is to date relatively unexplored and even major are aimed at more accurate estimation of main parameters of the deep Web by sampling one national web domain

  4. FT-ICR Study of Precursor Clusters of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    vaporization of Ni/Co and Ni/Y doped graphite samples used for the macroscopic laser-oven production of SWNTs production techniques. Experiment The FT-ICR mass spectrometer and chemical reaction system implemented gas was injected to the nozzle. In the atmosphere of helium gas, vaporized atoms condensed to clusters

  5. Characterization of surface and layered films with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhen

    2009-05-15

    Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of layer-by-layer thin films were performed to investigate the depth/volume of SI emission and accuracy of the SI signal. The thin-layered samples were assembled by alternate adsorption...

  6. Cluster structures and superdeformation in $^{28}$Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasutaka Taniguchi; Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo; Masaaki Kimura

    2009-10-13

    We have studied positive-parity states of $^{28}$Si using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) and multi-configuration mixing (MCM) with constrained variation. Applying constraints to the cluster distance and the quadrupole deformation of the variational calculation, we have obtained basis wave functions that have various structures such as $\\alpha$-$^{24}$Mg and $^{12}$C-$^{16}$O cluster structures as well as deformed structures. Superposing those basis wave functions, we have obtained a oblate ground state band, a $\\beta$ vibration band, a normal-deformed prolate band, and a superdeformed band. It is found that the normal-deformed and superdeformed bands contain large amounts of the $^{12}$C-$^{16}$O and $\\alpha$-$^{24}$Mg cluster components, respectively. The results also suggest the presence of two excited bands with the developed $\\alpha$-$^{24}$Mg cluster structure, where the inter-cluster motion and the $^{24}$Mg-cluster deformation play important roles.

  7. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogarty, Kevin; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains ten brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant ($>$5 $\\sigma$) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and H$\\alpha$+[NII] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH HST observations. These measurements are supplemented with [OII], [OIII], and H$\\beta$ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. Reddening-corrected UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs are broadly consistent with H$\\alpha$-derived SFRs. Five BCGs exhibit SFRs $>$10 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and an additional two have a SFR $>$ 100 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence for a LINER-like contribution. Using Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation ...

  8. The Morphology Dependence of Luminosity Segregation in the Coma Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kashikawa; M. Sekiguchi; M. Doi; Y. Komiyama; S. Okamura; K. Shimasaku; M. Yagi; N. Yasuda

    1998-02-28

    We carry out CCD photometry of galaxies in the 5.25 square region centered on Coma cluster down to $M_R=-16.0$, beyond the limit of conventional morphological classification. We use the angular two-point correlation function as well as radial profiles in order to characterize the luminosity segregation. We find strong luminosity segregation for our total sample over the magnitude range of $-20 \\leq M_R \\leq -16$, which is not entirely accounted for in terms of the morphology-density relation that is known to exist only for bright galaxies. We use a single consistent parameter, the degree of luminosity concentration, to parameterize the morphology of galaxies over the wide magnitude range, where both giant and dwarf galaxies are included. Galaxies with high central concentration (HCC) show strong luminosity segregation, i.e. their clustering strength depends strongly on luminosity while those with low central concentration (LCC) show almost no luminosity segregation. Radial density profile shows that brighter HCC-type galaxies tend to more strongly concentrate near the cluster center while LCC-type galaxies do not show such a dependence on luminosity. We show that these results are tenable against the contamination by field galaxies and uncertainties in our method of classification.

  9. The soft X-ray Cluster-AGN spatial cross-correlation function in the ROSAT-NEP survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappelluti, N; Schücker, P; Pierpaoli, E; Mullis, C R; Gioia, I M; Henry, J P

    2006-01-01

    X-ray surveys facilitate investigations of the environment of AGNs. Deep Chandra observations revealed that the AGNs source surface density rises near clusters of galaxies. The natural extension of these works is the measurement of spatial clustering of AGNs around clusters and the investigation of relative biasing between active galactic nuclei and galaxies near clusters. The major aims of this work are to obtain a measurement of the correlation length of AGNs around clusters and a measure of the averaged clustering properties of a complete sample of AGNs in dense environments. We present the first measurement of the soft X-ray cluster-AGN cross-correlation function in redshift space using the data of the ROSAT-NEP survey. The survey covers 9x9 deg^2 around the North Ecliptic Pole where 442 X-ray sources were detected and almost completely spectroscopically identified. We detected a > 3 sigma significant clustering signal on scales s<50 h_70^-1 Mpc. We performed a classical maximum-likelihood power-law fi...

  10. The 3D soft X-ray cluster-AGN cross-correlation function in the ROSAT NEP survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappelluti, N; Schücker, P; Pierpaoli, E; Mullis, C R; Gioia, I M; Henry, J P

    2007-01-01

    X-ray surveys facilitate investigations of the environment of AGNs. Deep Chandra observations revealed that the AGNs source surface density rises near clusters of galaxies. The natural extension of these works is the measurement of spatial clustering of AGNs around clusters and the investigation of relative biasing between active galactic nuclei and galaxies near clusters.The major aims of this work are to obtain a measurement of the correlation length of AGNs around clusters and a measure of the averaged clustering properties of a complete sample of AGNs in dense environments. We present the first measurement of the soft X-ray cluster-AGN cross-correlation function in redshift space using the data of the ROSAT-NEP survey. The survey covers 9x9 deg^2 around the North Ecliptic Pole where 442 X-ray sources were detected and almost completely spectroscopically identified. We detected a >3sigma significant clustering signal on scales s<50 h70^-1 Mpc. We performed a classical maximum-likelihood power-law fit to...

  11. A Measurement of Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters Using Data from the South Pole Telescope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baxter, E. J.; Keisler, R.; Dodelson, S.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Ashby, M. L.N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; et al

    2015-06-22

    Clusters of galaxies are expected to gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby generate a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurements of this effect can be used to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters with CMB data alone. Here we present a measurement of lensing of the CMB by galaxy clusters using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We also develop a maximum likelihood approach to extract the CMB cluster lensing signal and validate the method on mock data. We quantify the effects on our analysis of several potential sources of systematic error andmore »find that they generally act to reduce the best-fit cluster mass. It is estimated that this bias to lower cluster mass is roughly 0.85? in units of the statistical error bar, although this estimate should be viewed as an upper limit. Furthermore, we apply our maximum likelihood technique to 513 clusters selected via their Sunyaev–Zeldovich (SZ) signatures in SPT data, and rule out the null hypothesis of no lensing at 3.1?. The lensing-derived mass estimate for the full cluster sample is consistent with that inferred from the SZ flux: (68% C.L., statistical error only).« less

  12. The WARPS Survey: VI. Galaxy Cluster and Source Identifications from Phase I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Perlman; D. J. Horner; L. R. Jones; C. A. Scharf; H. Ebeling; G. Wegner; M. Malkan

    2002-09-25

    We present in catalog form the optical identifications for objects from the first phase of the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS). WARPS is a serendipitous survey of relatively deep, pointed ROSAT observations for clusters of galaxies. The X-ray source detection algorithm used by WARPS is Voronoi Tessellation and Percolation (VTP), a technique which is equally sensitive to point sources and extended sources of low surface brightness. WARPS-I is based on the central regions of 86 ROSAT PSPC fields, covering an area of 16.2 square degrees. We describe here the X-ray source screening and optical identification process for WARPS-I, which yielded 34 clusters at 0.06clusters form a complete, statistically well defined sample drawn from 75 of these 86 fields, covering an area of 14.1 square degrees, with a flux limit of $F (0.5-2.0 keV) = 6.5 \\times 10^{-14} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}}$. This sample can be used to study the properties and evolution of the gas, galaxy and dark matter content of clusters, and to constrain cosmological parameters. We compare in detail the identification process and findings of WARPS to those from other recently published X-ray surveys for clusters, including RDCS, SHARC-Bright, SHARC-south and the CfA 160 deg$^2$ survey.

  13. Black holes in young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Kiel, Paul; Rasio, Frederic A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present theoretical models for stellar black hole (BH) properties in young, massive star clusters. Using a Monte Carlo code for stellar dynamics, we model realistic star clusters with N ? 5 × 10{sup 5} stars and significant binary fractions (up to 50%) with self-consistent treatments of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. We compute the formation rates and characteristic properties of single and binary BHs for various representative ages, cluster parameters, and metallicities. Because of dynamical interactions and supernova (SN) kicks, more single BHs end up retained in clusters compared to BHs in binaries. We also find that the ejection of BHs from a cluster is a strong function of initial density. In low-density clusters (where dynamical effects are negligible), it is mainly SN kicks that eject BHs from the cluster, whereas in high-density clusters (initial central density ? {sub c}(0) ? 10{sup 5} M {sub ?} pc{sup –3} in our models) the BH ejection rate is enhanced significantly by dynamics. Dynamical interactions of binary systems in dense clusters also modify the orbital period and eccentricity distributions while increasing the probability of a BH having a more massive companion.

  14. Optimization of synchronization in gradient clustered networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingang Wang; Liang Huang; Ying-Cheng Lai; Choy Heng Lai

    2007-11-23

    We consider complex clustered networks with a gradient structure, where sizes of the clusters are distributed unevenly. Such networks describe more closely actual networks in biophysical systems and in technological applications than previous models. Theoretical analysis predicts that the network synchronizability can be optimized by the strength of the gradient field but only when the gradient field points from large to small clusters. A remarkable finding is that, if the gradient field is sufficiently strong, synchronizability of the network is mainly determined by the properties of the subnetworks in the two largest clusters. These results are verified by numerical eigenvalue analysis and by direct simulation of synchronization dynamics on coupled-oscillator networks.

  15. Wide field imaging of distant clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Treu

    2004-08-05

    Wide field imaging is key to understanding the build-up of distant clusters and their galaxy population. By focusing on the so far unexplored outskirts of clusters, where infalling galaxies first hit the cluster potential and the hot intracluster medium, we can help separate cosmological field galaxy evolution from that driven by environment. I present a selection of recent advancements in this area, with particular emphasis on Hubble Space Telescope wide field imaging, for its superior capability to deliver galaxy morphologies and precise shear maps of distant clusters.

  16. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  17. Globular Cluster Formation in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Lipscy; P. Plavchan

    2003-11-12

    We present high resolution mid-infrared (mid-IR; 11.7 and 17.65 micron) maps of the central 400 pc region of the starburst galaxy M82. Seven star forming clusters are identified which together provide ~ 15% of the total mid-IR luminosity of the galaxy. Combining the mid-IR data with thermal radio measurements and near- and mid-IR line emission, we find that these young stellar clusters have inferred masses and sizes comparable to globular clusters. At least 20% of the star formation in M82 is found to occur in super-star clusters.

  18. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Chen; Xiang Yang; Mingcheng Yang; Hepeng Zhang

    2015-09-22

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we show Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counter-clockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. Measurements indicate that long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions have strong influences on cluster properties. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  19. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Mingcheng; Zhang, Hepeng

    2015-01-01

    A bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arsing from interactions between individual cells. Here we show that Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counter-clockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. The observed cluster dynamics is qualitatively reproduced by a numerical model of self-propelled particles that interact via pair-wise forces extracted from hydrodynamic calculations. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  20. Performance Comparisons of PSO based Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satapathy, Suresh Chandra; Pattnaik, Sabyasachi; Murthy, J V R; Reddy, P V G D Prasad

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the performance of PSO Particle Swarm Optimization based clustering on few real world data sets and one artificial data set. The performances are measured by two metric namely quantization error and inter-cluster distance. The K means clustering algorithm is first implemented for all data sets, the results of which form the basis of comparison of PSO based approaches. We have explored different variants of PSO such as gbest, lbest ring, lbest vonneumann and Hybrid PSO for comparison purposes. The results reveal that PSO based clustering algorithms perform better compared to K means in all data sets.

  1. The Early-type Dwarf-to-Giant Ratio and Substructure in the Coma Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff Secker; William E. Harris

    1996-05-15

    We have obtained new CCD photometry for a sample of $\\simeq 800$ early-type galaxies (dwarf and giant ellipticals) in the central 700 arcmin$^2$ of the Coma cluster, complete in color and in magnitude to $R = 22.5$ mag ($M_R \\simeq -12$ mag for $H_0 = 86$ km/sec/Mpc). The composite luminosity function for all galaxies in the cluster core (excluding NGC 4874 and NGC 4889) is modeled as the sum of a Gaussian distribution for the giant galaxies and a Schechter function for the dwarf elliptical galaxies. We determine that the early-type dwarf-to-giant ratio (EDGR) for Coma is identical to that measured for the less rich Virgo cluster; i.e., the EDGR does not increase as predicted by the EDGR-richness correlation. We postulate that the presence of substructure is an important factor in determining the cluster's EDGR; that is, the EDGR for Coma is consistent with the Coma cluster being built up from the merger of multiple less-rich galaxy clusters.

  2. New Evidence Supporting Cluster Membership for the Keystone Calibrator Delta Cephei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majaess, Daniel J; Gieren, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    New and existing UBVJHKs, spectroscopic, NOMAD, HST, and revised HIP observations are employed to determine properties for delta Cep and its host star cluster. The multi-faceted approach ensured that uncertainties were mitigated (~2%). The following fundamental parameters were inferred for delta Cep: E(B-V)=0.073+-0.018, log(t)=7.9+-0.1, and d=272+-3(se)+-5(sd) pc. The cluster exhibits a turnoff near B6 (M*/Ms~5), and the brightest host cluster members are the supergiants zeta Cep (K1.5Ib) and delta Cep. To within the uncertainties, the two stars share common astrometric parameters (pi, mu_ra, mu_dec, RV\\sim-17 km/s) and are tied to bluer members via the evolutionary track implied by the cluster's UBVJHKs color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. The cluster's existence is bolstered by the absence of an early-type sequence in color-magnitude diagrams for comparison fields. NOMAD data provided a means to identify potential cluster members (n~30) and double the existing sample. That number could increase with f...

  3. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 Fuel Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, M; Bayliss, M; Allen, S W; Applegate, D E; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chiu, I; Desai, S; Gonzalez, A H; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Holzapfel, W L; Marrone, D P; Miller, E D; Reichardt, C L; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Schrabback, T; Stanford, S A; Stark, A A; Vieira, J D; Zenteno, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster, based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O II] emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available, finding 7 systems with SFR > 100 Msun/yr. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 Msun/yr in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 1, this fraction increases to 92(+6)(-31)%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific star formation rate in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z > 0.6, the correlation between cluster central entropy and BCG star formation - which is well established at z ~ 0 - i...

  4. The prospects for constraining dark energy with future X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Rapetti; Steven W. Allen; Adam Mantz

    2008-06-25

    We examine the ability of a future X-ray observatory to constrain dark energy via measurements of the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, fgas. We find that fgas measurements for a sample of ~500 hot, X-ray bright, dynamically relaxed clusters, to a precision of ~5 per cent, can be used to constrain dark energy with a Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) figure of merit of 15-40, with the possibility of boosting these values by 40 per cent or more by optimizing the redshift distribution of target clusters. Such constraints are comparable to those predicted by the DETF for other leading, planned dark energy experiments. A future fgas experiment will be preceded by a large X-ray or SZ survey that will find hot, X-ray luminous clusters out to high redshifts. Short `snapshot' observations with the new X-ray observatory should then be able to identify a sample of ~500 suitably relaxed systems. The redshift, temperature and X-ray luminosity range of interest has already been partially probed by existing X-ray cluster surveys which allow reasonable estimates of the fraction of clusters that will be suitably relaxed for fgas work. Our analysis uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which fully captures the relevant degeneracies between parameters and facilitates the incorporation of priors and systematic uncertainties in the analysis. We explore the effects of such uncertainties for scenarios ranging from optimistic to pessimistic. We conclude that the fgas experiment will provide tight constraints on the mean matter and dark energy densities, with a peak sensitivity for dark energy work at redshifts midway between those of supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillation/weak lensing/cluster number counts experiments. In combination, these experiments should enable a precise measurement of the evolution of dark energy. (Abridged)

  5. Detecting Climate Change in Multivariate Time Series Data by Novel Clustering and Cluster Tracing Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detecting Climate Change in Multivariate Time Series Data by Novel Clustering and Cluster Tracing Aachen University, Germany {kremer, guennemann, seidl}@cs.rwth-aachen.de Abstract--Climate change can series, and trace the clusters over time. A climate pattern is categorized as a changing pattern

  6. Papyrus: A System for Data Mining over Local and Wide Area Clusters and Super-Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Papyrus: A System for Data Mining over Local and Wide Area Clusters and Super-Clusters S. Bailey, R Grossman , H. Sivakumar, and A. Turinsky National Center for Data Mining University of Illinois at Chicago and H. Sivakumar, A. Turinsky, Papyrus: A System for Data Mining over Local and Wide Area Clusters

  7. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11

    THE TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Urban and Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form See sampling procedures and mailing instructions on the back of this form. (PLEASE DO NOT SEND CASH) SU07 E-444... (7-07) Results will be mailed to this address ONLY Address City Phone County where sampled Name Laboratory # (For Lab Use Only) State Zip Payment (DO NOT SEND CASH). Amount Paid $ SUBMITTED BY: Check Money Order Make Checks Payable to: Soil...

  8. A faint galaxy redshift survey behind massive clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, Brenda

    1999-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the gravitational lensing effect by massive galaxy clusters. We have explored a new technique for measuring galaxy masses and for detecting high-z galaxies by their optical colors. A redshift survey has been obtained at the Keck for a magnitude limited sample of objects (I<23) behind three clusters, A1689, A2390, and A2218 within a radius of 0.5M pc. For each cluster we see both a clear trend of increasing flux and redshift towards the center. This behavior is the result of image magnifications, such that at fixed redshift one sees further down the luminosity function. The gradient of this magnification is, unlike measurements of image distortion, sensitive to the mass profile, and found to depart strongly from a pure isothermal halo. We have found that V RI color selection can be used effectively as a discriminant for finding high-z galaxies behind clusters and present five 4.1 < z < 5.1 spectra which are of very high quality due to their high mean magnification of {approximately}20, showing strong, visibly-saturated interstellar metal lines in some cases. We have also investigated the radio ring lens PKS 1830-211, locating the source and multiple images and detected molecular absorption at mm wavelengths. Broad molecular absorption of width 1/40kms is found toward the southwest component only, where surprisingly it does not reach the base of the continuum, which implies incomplete coverage of the SW component by molecular gas, despite the small projected size of the source, less than 1/8h pc at the absorption redshift.

  9. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  10. Rhenium Complexes and Clusters Supported on c-Al2O3: Effects of Rhenium Oxidation State and Rhenium Cluster Size on Catalytic Activity for n-butane Hydrogenolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobo Lapidus, R.; Gates, B

    2009-01-01

    Supported metals prepared from H{sub 3}Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were treated under conditions that led to various rhenium structures on the support and were tested as catalysts for n-butane conversion in the presence of H{sub 2} in a flow reactor at 533 K and 1 atm. After use, two samples were characterized by X-ray absorption edge positions of approximately 5.6 eV (relative to rhenium metal), indicating that the rhenium was cationic and essentially in the same average oxidation state in each. But the Re-Re coordination numbers found by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (2.2 and 5.1) show that the clusters in the two samples were significantly different in average nuclearity despite their indistinguishable rhenium oxidation states. Spectra of a third sample after catalysis indicate approximately Re{sub 3} clusters, on average, and an edge position of 4.5 eV. Thus, two samples contained clusters approximated as Re{sub 3} (on the basis of the Re-Re coordination number), on average, with different average rhenium oxidation states. The data allow resolution of the effects of rhenium oxidation state and cluster size, both of which affect the catalytic activity; larger clusters and a greater degree of reduction lead to increased activity.

  11. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  12. Adaptive Sampling for Environmental Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Rahimi; Richard Pon; Deborah Estrin; William J. Kaiser; Mani Srivastava; Gaurav S. Sukhatme

    2003-01-01

    186, 2003. S. Thrun, “Robotics Mapping: A survey”, Exploringtechnique to environmental robotics applications includingSampling for Environmental Robotics Mohammad Rahimi †,‡‡ ,

  13. TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: M62 (NGC 6266), THE MOST RR LYRAE-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, R.; Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.; Kuehn, C. A.; Pritzl, B. J.; Borissova, J.

    2010-12-15

    We present new time-series CCD photometry, in the B and V bands, for the moderately metal-rich ([Fe/H] {approx_equal} -1.3) Galactic globular cluster M62 (NGC 6266). The present data set is the largest obtained so far for this cluster and consists of 168 images per filter, obtained with the Warsaw 1.3 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory and the 1.3 m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, in two separate runs over the time span of 3 months. The procedure adopted to detect the variable stars was the optimal image subtraction method (ISIS v2.2), as implemented by Alard. The photometry was performed using both ISIS and Stetson's DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. We have identified 245 variable stars in the cluster fields that have been analyzed so far, of which 179 are new discoveries. Of these variables, 133 are fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab), 76 are first overtone (RRc) pulsators, 4 are type II Cepheids, 25 are long-period variables (LPVs), 1 is an eclipsing binary, and 6 are not yet well classified. Such a large number of RR Lyrae stars places M62 among the top two most RR Lyrae-rich (in the sense of total number of RR Lyrae stars present) globular clusters known in the Galaxy, second only to M3 (NGC 5272) with a total of 230 known RR Lyrae stars. Since this study covers most but not all of the cluster area, it is not unlikely that M62 is in fact the most RR Lyrae-rich globular cluster in the Galaxy. In like vein, thanks to the time coverage of our data sets, we were also able to detect the largest sample of LPVs known so far in a Galactic globular cluster. We analyze a variety of Oosterhoff type indicators for the cluster, including mean periods, period distribution, Bailey diagrams, and Fourier decomposition parameters (as well as the physical parameters derived therefrom). All of these indicators clearly show that M62 is an Oosterhoff type I system. This is in good agreement with the moderately high metallicity of the cluster, in spite of its predominantly blue horizontal branch morphology-which is more typical of Oosterhoff type II systems. We thus conclude that metallicity plays a key role in defining Oosterhoff type. Finally, based on an application of the 'A-method', we conclude that the cluster RR Lyrae stars have a similar He abundance as M3, although more work on the temperatures of the M62 RR Lyrae is needed before this result can be conclusively established.

  14. Velocity structure of the dwarf galaxy population in the Centaurus cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Stein; H. Jerjen; M. Federspiel

    1997-07-17

    Based on the photometric survey of the inner region of the Centaurus cluster (Jerjen & Dressler 1997a) we measured redshifts for a deep, surface brightness limited sample of galaxies using the MEFOS multifibre spectrograph at the ESO 3.6m telescope. With the new data set radial velocities for 120 centrally located cluster members become available which is equivalent to 78% of all known cluster galaxies in the region brighter than B_T=18.5. The relevant aspect of this investigation is that new redshifts for 32 dwarf galaxies have been measured, rising the total number to 48. We investigate the prominent bimodal velocity distribution of Centaurus in more detail, discussing the very different characteristics of the velocity distributions for the main Hubble types E&S0, spirals, Im&BCD, and dE&dS0. The nucleated, bright dwarf ellipticals are the only galaxies with a Gaussian-like distribution centred at 3148+/-98 km/s. The remarkable coincidence of this velocity with the mean velocity of Cen30 and the redshift of NGC 4696 in particular strongly suggests a connection of the dE&dS0s to the gravitational centre of the Centaurus cluster and/or to the cluster dominant E galaxy. The application of statistical tests reveals the existence of a population dwarf galaxies bound to NGC 4696. The dynamical parameters for the two velocity components suggest that Cen30 is the real Centaurus cluster whereas Cen45 can only be a loosely bound group of galaxies. This conclusion is followed up with a type-mixture analysis. All results are fully consistent with the cluster-group scenario. Whether Cen45 is merging with the cluster or is located in the close background remains unclear. We show that the poorness of Cen45 represents an intrinsic problem which makes it difficult to approach this question.

  15. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V.; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Balcells, Marc; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Peng, Eric W. E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low-density environments for two reasons. First, S0s in rich clusters are less prone to bar instabilities as they are dynamically heated by harassment and are gas poor as a result of ram pressure stripping and accelerated star formation. Second, high-speed encounters in rich clusters may be less effective than slow, strong encounters in inducing bars. (3) We also take advantage of the high resolution of the ACS ({approx}50 pc) to analyze a sample of 333 faint (M{sub V} > -18) dwarf galaxies in the Coma core. Using visual inspection of unsharp-masked images, we find only 13 galaxies with bar and/or spiral structure. An additional eight galaxies show evidence for an inclined disk. The paucity of disk structures in Coma dwarfs suggests that either disks are not common in these galaxies or that any disks present are too hot to develop instabilities.

  16. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  17. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program.

  18. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey Luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norberg, P; Hawkins, E; Maddox, S; Peacock, J A; Cole, S; Frenk, C S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bridges, T J; Cannon, R; Colless, M; Collins, C; Couch, W J; Dalton, G B; Driver, S P; Efstathiou, G P; Ellis, Richard S; Glazebrook, K; Jackson, C; Lahav, O; Lewis, I; Lumsden, S; Peterson, B A; Sutherland, W; Taylor, K

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the strength of galaxy clustering on intrinsic luminosity using the Anglo-Australian two degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). The 2dFGRS is over an order of magnitude larger than previous redshift surveys used to address this issue. We measure the projected two-point correlation function of galaxies in a series of volume-limited samples. The projected correlation function is free from any distortion of the clustering pattern arising from peculiar motions and is well described by a power law in pair separation over the range 0.1 Benoist et al. However, we find a we...

  19. NO HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-20

    Although there have been recent claims that there is a large dispersion in the abundances of the heavy neutron capture elements in the old Galactic globular cluster M92, we show that the measured dispersion for the absolute abundances of four of the rare earth elements within a sample of 12 luminous red giants in M92 ({<=}0.07 dex) does not exceed the relevant sources of uncertainty. As expected from previous studies, the heavy elements show the signature of the r-process. Their abundance ratios are essentially identical to those of M30, another nearby globular cluster of similar metallicity.

  20. THE APM CLUSTER SURVEY: CLUSTER DETECTION AND LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Dalton

    1995-05-17

    The APM Cluster Survey was based on a modification of Abell's original classification scheme for galaxy clusters. Here we discuss the results of an investigation of the stability of the statistical properties of the cluster catalogue to changes in the selection parameters. For a poor choice of selection parameters we find clear indications of line-of-sight clusters, but there is a wide range of input parameters for which the statistical properties of the catalogue are stable. We conclude that clusters selected in this way are indeed useful as tracers of large-scale structure.

  1. When Network Coding improves the Performances of Clustered Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    When Network Coding improves the Performances of Clustered Wireless Networks that significantly increases the performances of clustering algorithms in wireless multi-hop networks-XOR coding; wireless multi-hop networks; clustering I. INTRODUCTION Partitioning nodes

  2. Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao

    1 Hazard Sampling Dialog General Layout The dialog's purpose is to display information about the hazardous material being sampled by the UGV so either the system or the UV specialist can identify the risk level of the hazard. The dialog is associated with the hazmat reading icons (Table 1). Components

  3. Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riera, Jesús Bisbal

    Database Sampling with Functional Dependencies Jes´us Bisbal, Jane Grimson Department of Computer there is a need to prototype the database which the applications will use when in operation. A prototype database can be built by sampling data from an existing database. Including relevant semantic information when

  4. 200 area TEDF sample schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.

    1995-03-22

    This document summarizes the sampling criteria associated with the 200 Area Treatment Effluent Facility (TEDF) that are needed to comply with the requirements of the Washington State Discharge Permit No. WA ST 4502 and good engineering practices at the generator streams that feed into TEDF. In addition, this document Identifies the responsible parties for both sampling and data transference.

  5. Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster Concepts Nora Broy1,2,3 , Benedikt Zierer instrument cluster. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal more pronounced as auto-stereoscopic displays become available for the car. For instance, H¨akkil¨a et

  6. Stormy Weather and Cluster Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. O. Burns; C. Loken; K. Roettiger; E. Rizza; G. Bryan; M. L. Norman; P. Gomez; F. N. Owen

    1999-08-31

    New adaptive mesh refinement N-body + hydrodynamics numerical simulations are used to illustrate the complex and changing cluster environments in which many radio galaxies live and evolve. Groups and clusters of galaxies form at the intersections of filaments where they continue to accrete gas and dark matter to the present day. The accretion process produces shocks, turbulence, and transonic bulk flows forming a kind of stormy weather within the intracluster medium (ICM). Radio sources embedded within the stormy ICM form distorted, complex morphologies as observed in recent VLA cluster surveys. We show that the bending of wide-angle tailed radio sources can be understood as the result of recent cluster-subcluster mergers. We use new MHD simulations to illustrate how cluster radio halos can be formed by the shocks and turbulence produced during cluster mergers. Finally, we discuss new observations of distant Abell clusters that reveal a class of weak radio sources, probably starbursts, likely produced during the formation of the clusters as they accrete material from the supercluster environment.

  7. Clustering Web Search Results Using Fuzzy Ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Clustering Web Search Results Using Fuzzy Ants Steven Schockaert,* Martine De Cock, Chris Cornelis and Uncertainty Modelling Research Unit, Krijgslaan 281 (S9), B-9000 Gent, Belgium Algorithms for clustering Web existing approaches and illustrates how our algorithm can be applied to the problem of Web search results

  8. Sample push-out fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biernat, John L. (Scotia, NY)

    2002-11-05

    This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

  9. Identifying Geographic Clusters: A Network Analytic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catini, Roberto; Penner, Orion; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the role of networks and clusters in the global economy. Despite being a popular research topic in economics, sociology and urban studies, geographical clustering of human activity has often studied been by means of predetermined geographical units such as administrative divisions and metropolitan areas. This approach is intrinsically time invariant and it does not allow one to differentiate between different activities. Our goal in this paper is to present a new methodology for identifying clusters, that can be applied to different empirical settings. We use a graph approach based on k-shell decomposition to analyze world biomedical research clusters based on PubMed scientific publications. We identify research institutions and locate their activities in geographical clusters. Leading areas of scientific production and their top performing research institutions are consistently identified at different geographic scales.

  10. Clustering attributed graphs: models, measures and methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bothorel, Cecile; Magnani, Matteo; Micenkova, Barbora

    2015-01-01

    Clustering a graph, i.e., assigning its nodes to groups, is an important operation whose best known application is the discovery of communities in social networks. Graph clustering and community detection have traditionally focused on graphs without attributes, with the notable exception of edge weights. However, these models only provide a partial representation of real social systems, that are thus often described using node attributes, representing features of the actors, and edge attributes, representing different kinds of relationships among them. We refer to these models as attributed graphs. Consequently, existing graph clustering methods have been recently extended to deal with node and edge attributes. This article is a literature survey on this topic, organizing and presenting recent research results in a uniform way, characterizing the main existing clustering methods and highlighting their conceptual differences. We also cover the important topic of clustering evaluation and identify current open ...

  11. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  12. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  13. Sampling Report for August 15, 2014 WIPP Samples

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and pulley system was constructed to move a camera for documentation and close-up pictures. The sampling device is located at the end of the boom. (Note, this picture is from...

  14. High performance computing: Clusters, constellations, MPPs, and future directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack; Sterling, Thomas; Simon, Horst; Strohmaier, Erich

    2003-01-01

    and Jim Gray, “High Performance Computing: Crays, Clusters,The Marketplace of High-Performance Computing”, ParallelHigh Performance Computing Clusters, Constellations, MPPs,

  15. Toward Understanding the Microscopic Origin of Nuclear Clustering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward Understanding the Microscopic Origin of Nuclear Clustering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward Understanding the Microscopic Origin of Nuclear Clustering Open...

  16. Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene Title: Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene Authors:...

  17. Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geeothermal Reservoirs Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs...

  18. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Because of the important role that students and postdocs play in the future of this field, we also anticipate to select several posters from young investigators for oral presentations.

  19. An orbital-free self-consistent field approach for molecular clusters and liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean W. Derrickson; Eric R. Bittner

    2005-10-31

    We present an ``orbital'' free density functional theory for computing the quantum ground state of atomic clusters and liquids. Our approach combines the Bohm hydrodynamical description of quantum mechanics with an information theoretical approach to determine an optimal quantum density function in terms of density approximates to a statistical sample. The ideas of Bayesian statistical analysis and an expectation-maximization procedure are combined to develop approximations to the quantum density and thus find the approximate quantum force. The quantum force is then combined with a Lennard-Jones force to simulate clusters of Argon atoms and to obtain the ground state configurations and energies. As demonstration of the utility and flexibility of the approach, we compute the lowest energy structures for small rare-glass clusters. Extensions to many atom systems is straightforward.

  20. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, M. J.; Zoerb, M. C.; Campbell, N. R.; Zimmermann, K. J.; Blomquist, B. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-10-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e. DMS, ?-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, ?-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt?1) to DMS, isoprene, and ?-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion-molecule reactions likely proceed through amore »combination of ligand-switching and direct charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (R2=0.80) over a wide range of sampling conditions.« less

  1. The Luminosity Function of the Globular Cluster NGC 6397 Near the Limit of Hydrogen Burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, I R; Cool, A M; Piotto, G; King, Ivan R.; Anderson, Jay; Cool, Adrienne M.; Piotto, Giampaolo

    1997-01-01

    Second-epoch HST observations of NGC 6397 have led to the measurement of proper motions accurate enough to separate the faintest cluster stars from the field, thus extending the luminosity function of this globular cluster far enough to approach the limit of hydrogen burning on the main sequence. We isolate a sample of 1385 main-sequence stars, from just below the turnoff down to I=24.5 (M_I~12.5), which corresponds to a mass of less than 0.1 solar masses for the metallicity of this cluster. Below I=22 (M_I~10), the main-sequence luminosity function drops rapidly, in a manner similar to that predicted by theoretical models of low-mass stars near the hydrogen-burning limit.

  2. The Luminosity Function of the Globular Cluster NGC 6397 Near the Limit of Hydrogen Burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan R. King; Jay Anderson; Adrienne M. Cool; Giampaolo Piotto

    1997-11-03

    Second-epoch HST observations of NGC 6397 have led to the measurement of proper motions accurate enough to separate the faintest cluster stars from the field, thus extending the luminosity function of this globular cluster far enough to approach the limit of hydrogen burning on the main sequence. We isolate a sample of 1385 main-sequence stars, from just below the turnoff down to I=24.5 (M_I~12.5), which corresponds to a mass of less than 0.1 solar masses for the metallicity of this cluster. Below I=22 (M_I~10), the main-sequence luminosity function drops rapidly, in a manner similar to that predicted by theoretical models of low-mass stars near the hydrogen-burning limit.

  3. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Columbia, MD); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

    1998-07-07

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  4. Effects of $?$-cluster breaking on 3$?$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadahiro Suhara; Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

    2015-02-17

    To clarify the effects of $\\alpha$-cluster breaking on 3$\\alpha$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C, we investigate $^{12}$C using a hybrid model that combines the Brink-Bloch cluster model with the $p_{3/2}$ subshell closure wave function. We have found that $\\alpha$-cluster breaking caused by spin-orbit force significantly changes cluster structures of excited $0^{+}$ states through orthogonality to lower states. Spatially developed cluster components of the $0^{+}_{2}$ state are reduced. The $0^{+}_{3}$ state changes from a vibration mode in the bending motion of three $\\alpha$ clusters to a chain-like 3$\\alpha$ structure having an open triangle configuration. As a result of these structure changes of $0^{+}$ states, the band assignment for the $2^{+}_{2}$ state is changed by the $\\alpha$-cluster breaking effect. Namely, in model calculations without the $\\alpha$-cluster breaking effect, the $0^{+}_{2}$ state is assigned to be the band-head of the $2^{+}_{2}$ state. However, when we incorporate $\\alpha$-cluster breaking caused by the spin-orbit force, the $0^{+}_{3}$ state is regarded as the band-head of the $2^{+}_{2}$ state.

  5. A Multi-Wavelength Study of Low Redshift Cluster of Galaxies II. Environmental Impact on Galaxy Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlee, David W

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters provide powerful laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, particularly the origin of correlations of morphology and star formation rate (SFR) with density. We construct visible to MIR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of cluster galaxies and use them to measure stellar masses and SFRs in eight low redshift clusters, which we examine as a function of environment. A partial correlation analysis indicates that SFR depends strongly on R/R200 (>99.9% confidence) and is independent of projected local density at fixed radius. SFR also shows no residual dependence on stellar mass. We therefore conclude that interactions with the intra-cluster medium drive the evolution of SFRs in cluster galaxies. A merged sample of galaxies from the five most complete clusters shows \\propto(R/R200)^(1.3+/-0.7) for galaxies with R/R200<0.4. A decline in the fraction of SFGs toward the cluster center contributes most of this effect, but it is accompanied by a reduction in SFRs among star-forming galaxies (...

  6. Two formation paths for cluster dwarf galaxies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca M. Poggianti; Nobunari Kashikawa; Terry Bridges; Bahram Mobasher; Yutaka Komiyama; Dave Carter; Sadanori Okamura; Masafumi Yagi

    2003-10-15

    A surprising result of our recent spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the Coma cluster has been the discovery of a possible bimodal distribution in the metallicities of faint galaxies at $M_B>-17$. We identified a group of dwarfs with luminosity-weighted metallicities around solar and a group with [M/H] around -1.5. A metallicity bimodality among galaxies of similar luminosities is unexpected and suggests that faint cluster galaxies could be an heterogeneous population that formed through more than one evolutionary path, possibly as a consequence of the cluster environment.

  7. X-ray Selected Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella M. Gioia

    1996-01-21

    This paper given at the meeting on "Mapping, Measuring and Modelling the Universe" presents three topics: 1) the study of the clusters and groups of galaxies found serendipitously in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) region of the ROSAT all-sky survey; 2) the highest redshift clusters found in the EMSS (up to z=0.82) and the cosmological implications of their very existence; 3) the gravitational lensing in the EMSS X-ray selected clusters of galaxies observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  8. Clustering and Correlations in Neutron Haloes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Orr

    2002-01-25

    In the present paper clustering and correlations within halo systems is explored. In particular, the application of neutron-neutron interferometry and Dalitz-plot type analyses is presented through the example provided by the dissociation of 14Be. A novel approach for producing and detecting bound neutron clusters is also described. The observation of some 6 events with characteristics consistent with the liberation of a multineutron cluster in the breakup of 14Be -- possibly in the channel 10Be+4n -- is discussed.

  9. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  10. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim O. Lavrentovich; John H. Koschwanez; David R. Nelson

    2013-06-13

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness $\\ell$ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter $\

  11. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 ?m luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that ? = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ? 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ? 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  12. First results from SAPAC: towards a 3D-picture of the Fornax cluster core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura P. Dunn; Helmut Jerjen

    2006-06-07

    A sophisticated SBF analysis package has been developed, designed to measure distances of early-type galaxies by means of surface brightness fluctuations of unresolved stars. This suite of programs called SAPAC is made readily available to the astronomical community for extensive testing with the long-term goal to provide the necessary tools for systematic distance surveys of early-type galaxies using modern optical/NIR telescopes equipped with wide-field cameras. We discuss the technical and scientific concepts of SAPAC and demonstrate its capabilities by analysing deep B and R-band CCD images of 10 dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy candidates in the Fornax cluster obtained with FORS1 at the VLT. All candidates are confirmed as cluster members. We then turn our attention to the innermost region of the Fornax cluster. A total of 29 early-type galaxies closer than three cluster core radii (2 degrees) from the central galaxy NGC1399 have radial velocities and SBF distances. Their Hubble diagram exhibits a pronounced S-shaped infall pattern suggesting a picture that Fornax is still in the process of formation during the present epoch through a general collapse and possible accretion of distinct groups of galaxies. The associated collapse time is 2.9(+1.6, -0.9)Gyr. After cleansing our galaxy sample from a few kinematical outliers the true distance of the Fornax cluster core is determined at 20.13+-0.40 Mpc [(m-M)_0=31.51+-0.04mag]. Applying a bootstrap resampling technique on the distance distribution with individual distance errors taken into account further reveals a small intrinsic cluster depth of sigma_int=0.74(+0.52,-0.74)Mpc in best agreement with the cluster's linear extension in the sky: sigma_R.A=sigma_DEC~=0.5Mpc. (Abridged)

  13. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Norberg; C. M. Baugh; E. Hawkins; S. Maddox; J. A. Peacock; S. Cole; C. S. Frenk; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor; the 2dFGRS Team

    2001-10-19

    We investigate the dependence of the strength of galaxy clustering on intrinsic luminosity using the Anglo-Australian two degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). The 2dFGRS is over an order of magnitude larger than previous redshift surveys used to address this issue. We measure the projected two-point correlation function of galaxies in a series of volume-limited samples. The projected correlation function is free from any distortion of the clustering pattern induced by peculiar motions and is well described by a power-law in pair separation over the range 0.1 Benoist et al. However, we find a weaker dependence of clustering strength on luminosity at the highest luminosities. The correlation function amplitude increases by a factor of 4.0 between $M_{b_{J}} -5\\log_{10}h = -18$ and -22.5, and the most luminous galaxies are 3.0 times more strongly clustered than L* galaxies. The power-law slope of the correlation function shows remarkably little variation for samples spanning a factor of 20 in luminosity. Our measurements are in very good agreement with the predictions of the hierarchical galaxy formation models of Benson et al.

  14. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6388

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Origlia, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani, 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Valenti, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Cirasuolo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh and STFC, UK Astronomy Technology Center Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, EH9 3HJ, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 ± 1.5 km s{sup –1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ?9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  15. 86 IEEE Concurrency Because high-performance cluster comput-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    many topics makes High Performance Cluster Computing: Architectures and Systems unique, and the bibli

  16. Interest Rate Clustering in UK Financial Services Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    clustering in retail markets, through an examination of how interest rates cluster in two UK financial services markets. It is proposed that price or interest rate clustering forms in retail markets as firms1 Interest Rate Clustering in UK Financial Services Markets by John K. Ashton Norwich Business

  17. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  18. Do open clusters have distinguishable chemical signatures?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S; Heiter, U

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have already shown that stars in open clusters are chemically homogeneous (e.g. De Silva et al. 2006, 2007 and 2009). These results support the idea that stars born from the same giant molecular cloud should have the same chemical composition. In this context, the chemical tagging technique was proposed by Freeman et al. 2002. The principle is to recover disrupted stellar clusters by looking only to the stellar chemical composition. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this approach, it is necessary to test if we can distinguish between stars born from different molecular clouds. For this purpose, we studied the chemical composition of stars in 32 old and intermediate-age open clusters, and we applied machine learning algorithms to recover the original cluster by only considering the chemical signatures.

  19. Clustering of Galaxies in Brane World Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Hameeda; Mir Faizal; Ahmed Farag Ali

    2015-06-14

    In this paper, we analyze the clustering of galaxies using a modified Newtonian potential. This modification of the Newtonian potential occurs due to the existence of extra dimensions in brane world models. We will analyze a system of galaxies interacting with each other through this modified Newtonian potential. The partition function for this system of galaxies will be calculated, and this partition function will be used to calculate the free energy of this system of galaxies. The entropy and the chemical potential for this system will also be calculated. We will derive an explicit expression for the clustering parameter for this system. This parameter will determine the behavior of this system, and we will be able to express various thermodynamic quantities using this clustering parameter. Thus, we will be able to explicitly analyze the effect that modifying the Newtonian potential can have on the clustering of galaxies.

  20. Gravitational clustering in Static and Expanding Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    2003-08-28

    A brief summary of several topics in the study of gravitational many body problem is given. The discussion covers both static backgrounds (applicable to astrophysical systems) as well as clustering in an expanding background (relevant for cosmology)

  1. Cool Core Clusters from Cosmological Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasia, E; Murante, G; Planelles, S; Beck, A M; Biffi, V; Ragone-Figueroa, C; Granato, G L; Steinborn, L K; Dolag, K

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters, aimed at comparing predictions with observational data on the diversity between cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our simulations include the effects of stellar and AGN feedback and are based on an improved version of the Smoothed-Particle-Hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, which ameliorates gas mixing and better captures gas-dynamical instabilities by including a suitable artificial thermal diffusion. In this Letter, we focus our analysis on the entropy profiles, our primary diagnostic to classify the degree of cool-coreness of clusters, and on the iron profiles. In keeping with observations, our simulated clusters display a variety of behaviors in entropy profiles: they range from steadily decreasing profiles at small radii, characteristic of cool-core systems, to nearly flat core isentropic profiles, characteristic of non cool-core systems. Using observational criteria to distinguish between the two classes of...

  2. X-ray Clusters at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Gioia

    1997-11-30

    As the largest gravitationally bound structures known, clusters provide clear constraints on the formation of structure and on the composition of the universe. Despite their extreme importance for cosmology the number of clusters at high redshift (z > 0.75) is rather small. There are only a few X-ray emitting examples reported and a handful of optically-selected ones. These clusters can provide stringent constrains on theories of large scale structure formation, if they are massive enough. I will review the status of these distant X-ray selected clusters. These objects are of special importance because their X-ray emission implies that they are massive, comparable to low redshift examples, and their existence is problematic for some theories of structure formation.

  3. Online Spectral Clustering on Network Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Yi

    2012-12-31

    Graph is an extremely useful representation of a wide variety of practical systems in data analysis. Recently, with the fast accumulation of stream data from various type of networks, significant research interests have arisen on spectral clustering...

  4. Photometric study of five open star clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lata, Sneh; Sharma, Saurabh; Bonatto, Charles; Yadav, Ram Kesh

    2013-01-01

    $UBVRI$ photometry of the five open clusters Czernik 4, Berkeley 7, NGC 2236, NGC 7226 and King 12 has been carried out using ARIES 104 cm telescope, Nainital. Fundamental cluster parameters such as foreground reddening $E(B-V)$, distance, and age have been derived by means of the observed two colour and colour-magnitude diagrams, coupled to comparisons with theoretical models. $E(B-V)$ values range from 0.55 to 0.74 mag, while ages derived for these clusters range from $\\sim$10 to $\\sim$500 Myr. We have also studied the spatial structure, mass function and mass segregation effects. The present study shows that evaporation of low mass stars from the halo of the clusters increases as they evolve.

  5. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  6. Constrained simulation of the Bullet Cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lage, Craig; Farrar, Glennys, E-mail: csl336@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we report on a detailed simulation of the Bullet Cluster (1E0657-56) merger, including magnetohydrodynamics, plasma cooling, and adaptive mesh refinement. We constrain the simulation with data from gravitational lensing reconstructions and the 0.5-2 keV Chandra X-ray flux map, then compare the resulting model to higher energy X-ray fluxes, the extracted plasma temperature map, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect measurements, and cluster halo radio emission. We constrain the initial conditions by minimizing the chi-squared figure of merit between the full two-dimensional (2D) observational data sets and the simulation, rather than comparing only a few features such as the location of subcluster centroids, as in previous studies. A simple initial configuration of two triaxial clusters with Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter profiles and physically reasonable plasma profiles gives a good fit to the current observational morphology and X-ray emissions of the merging clusters. There is no need for unconventional physics or extreme infall velocities. The study gives insight into the astrophysical processes at play during a galaxy cluster merger, and constrains the strength and coherence length of the magnetic fields. The techniques developed here to create realistic, stable, triaxial clusters, and to utilize the totality of the 2D image data, will be applicable to future simulation studies of other merging clusters. This approach of constrained simulation, when applied to well-measured systems, should be a powerful complement to present tools for understanding X-ray clusters and their magnetic fields, and the processes governing their formation.

  7. Contribution of White Dwarfs to Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted von Hippel

    1998-02-14

    I present a literature search through 31 July 1997 of white dwarfs (WDs) in open and globular clusters. There are 36 single WDs and 5 WDs in binaries known among 13 open clusters, and 340 single WDs and 11 WDs in binaries known among 11 globular clusters. From these data I have calculated WD mass fractions for four open clusters (the Pleiades, NGC 2168, NGC 3532, and the Hyades) and one globular cluster (NGC 6121). I develop a simple model of cluster evolution that incorporates stellar evolution but not dynamical evolution to interpret the WD mass fractions. I augment the results of my simple model with N-body simulations incorporating stellar evolution (Terlevich 1987; de la Feunte Marcos 1996; Vesperini & Heggie 1997). I find that even though these clusters undergo moderate to strong kinematical evolution the WD mass fraction is relatively insensitive to kinematical evolution. By comparing the cluster mass functions to that of the Galactic disk, and incorporating plausibility arguments for the mass function of the Galactic halo, I estimate the WD mass fraction in these two populations. I assume the Galactic disk is ~10 Gyrs old (Winget et al. 1987; Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996) and that the Galactic halo is ~12 Gyrs old (Reid 1997b; Gratton et al. 1997; Chaboyer et al. 1998), although the WD mass fraction is insensitive to age in this range. I find that the Galactic halo should contain 8 to 9% (alpha = -2.35) or perhaps as much as 15 to 17% (alpha = -2.0) of its stellar mass in the form of WDs. The Galactic disk WD mass fraction should be 6 to 7% (alpha = -2.35), consistent with the empirical estimates of 3 to 7% (Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996). (abridged)

  8. The 3D soft X-ray cluster-AGN cross-correlation function in the ROSAT NEP survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Cappelluti; H. Boehringer; P. Schuecker; E. Pierpaoli; C. R. Mullis; I. M. Gioia; J. P. Henry

    2007-04-18

    X-ray surveys facilitate investigations of the environment of AGNs. Deep Chandra observations revealed that the AGNs source surface density rises near clusters of galaxies. The natural extension of these works is the measurement of spatial clustering of AGNs around clusters and the investigation of relative biasing between active galactic nuclei and galaxies near clusters.The major aims of this work are to obtain a measurement of the correlation length of AGNs around clusters and a measure of the averaged clustering properties of a complete sample of AGNs in dense environments. We present the first measurement of the soft X-ray cluster-AGN cross-correlation function in redshift space using the data of the ROSAT-NEP survey. The survey covers 9x9 deg^2 around the North Ecliptic Pole where 442 X-ray sources were detected and almost completely spectroscopically identified. We detected a >3sigma significant clustering signal on scales s<50 h70^-1 Mpc. We performed a classical maximum-likelihood power-law fit to the data and obtained a correlation length s_0=8.7+1.2-0.3 h_70-1 Mpc and a slope gamma=1.7$^+0.2_-0.7 (1sigma errors). This is a strong evidence that AGNs are good tracers of the large scale structure of the Universe. Our data were compared to the results obtained by cross-correlating X-ray clusters and galaxies. We observe, with a large uncertainty, that the bias factor of AGN is similar to that of galaxies.

  9. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  10. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  11. Communication Engineering Systems Sampling Theorem &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovintavewat, Piya

    x nT nx continuous sample quantized sample binary stream x t x t 2 D 7 D 8 D ( ) 7L MIDRISE s T 3 DPCM (1-bit quantizer) 1 (unit delay) 17 1n n nv x x , 0 sgn , 0 n n n n v v v v 1n n nx v x 2 DM #12;.. DM 18 1n n nx x v nx 1 1 sgn sgn n n n i ii i x v v #12;.. 19 1 b s b R mf T #12

  12. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  13. The Average Mass Profile of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson; S. L. Morris; R. Abraham; P. Gravel; C. J. Pritchet; T. Smecker-Hane; F. D. A. Hartwick; J. E. Hesser; J. B. Hutchings; J. B. Oke

    1997-05-23

    The average mass density profile measured in the CNOC cluster survey is well described with the analytic form rho(r)=A/[r(r+a_rho)^2], as advocated on the basis on n-body simulations by Navarro, Frenk & White. The predicted core radii are a_rho=0.20 (in units of the radius where the mean interior density is 200 times the critical density) for an Omega=0.2 open CDM model, or a_rho=0.26 for a flat Omega=0.2 model, with little dependence on other cosmological parameters for simulations normalized to the observed cluster abundance. The dynamically derived local mass-to-light ratio, which has little radial variation, converts the observed light profile to a mass profile. We find that the scale radius of the mass distribution, 0.20<= a_rho <= 0.30 (depending on modeling details, with a 95% confidence range of 0.12-0.50), is completely consistent with the predicted values. Moreover, the profiles and total masses of the clusters as individuals can be acceptably predicted from the cluster RMS line-of-sight velocity dispersion alone. This is strong support of the hierarchical clustering theory for the formation of galaxy clusters in a cool, collisionless, dark matter dominated universe.

  14. Sputtering of neutral and ionic indium clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Z.; Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Von Nagy-Felsobuki, E.I.

    1993-10-01

    Secondary neutral and secondary ion cluster yields were measured during the sputtering of a polycrystalline indium surface by normally incident {approximately}4 keV Ar{sup +} ions. In the secondary neutral mass spectra, indium clusters as large as In{sub 32} were observed. In the secondary ion mass spectra, indium clusters up to In{sub 18}{sup +} were recorded. Cluster yields obtained from both the neutral and ion channel exhibited a power law dependence on the number of constituent atoms, n, in the cluster, with the exponents measured to be {minus}5.6 and {minus}4. 1, respectively. An abundance drop was observed at n=8, 15, and 16 in both the neutral and ion yield distributions suggesting that the stability of the ion (either secondary ion or photoion) plays a significant role in the observed distributions. In addition, our experiments suggest that unimolecular decomposition of the neutral cluster may also plays an important role in the measured yield distributions.

  15. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, M.; Harnes, J.; Børve, K. J.; Myrseth, V.

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (?), allowing N and ? to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit ?{sup 2}(N, ?) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100–600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4?±?1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth.

  16. Disentangling Clustering Effects in Jet Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall Kelley; Jonathan R. Walsh; Saba Zuberi

    2012-04-04

    Clustering algorithms build jets though the iterative application of single particle and pairwise metrics. This leads to phase space constraints that are extremely complicated beyond the lowest orders in perturbation theory, and in practice they must be implemented numerically. This complication presents a significant barrier to gaining an analytic understanding of the perturbative structure of jet cross sections. We present a novel framework to express the jet algorithm's phase space constraints as a function of clustered groups of particles, which are the possible outcomes of the algorithm. This approach highlights the analytic properties of jet observables, rather than the explicit constraints on individual final state momenta, which can be unwieldy at higher orders. We derive the form of the n-particle phase space constraints for a jet algorithm with any measurement. We provide an expression for the measurement that makes clustering effects manifest and relates them to constraints from clustering at lower orders. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by using it to understand clustering effects for a large class of jet shape observables in the soft/collinear limit. We apply this framework to isolate divergences and analyze the logarithmic structure of the Abelian terms in the soft function, providing the all-orders form of these terms and showing that corrections from clustering start at next-to-leading logarithmic order in the exponent of the cross section.

  17. Free floating planets in stellar clusters?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kester W. Smith; Ian A. Bonnell

    2001-01-05

    We have simulated encounters between planetary systems and single stars in various clustered environments. This allows us to estimate the fraction of systems liberated, the velocity distribution of the liberated planets, and the separation and eccentricity distributions of the surviving bound systems. Our results indicate that, for an initial distribution of orbits that is flat in log space and extends out to 50AU, 50% of the available planets can be liberated in a globular cluster, 25% in an open cluster, and less than 10% in a young cluster. These fractions are reduced to 25%, 12% and 2% if the initial population extends only to 20AU. Furthermore, these free-floating planets can be retained for longer than a crossing time only in a massive globular cluster. It is therefore difficult to see how planets, which by definition form in a disc around a young star, could be subsequently liberated to form a significant population of free floating substellar objects in a cluster.

  18. CP2 stars in clusters: deep Delta a-photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Maitzen; M. Rode; E. Paunzen

    1998-05-05

    The search for chemically peculiar (CP) stars in open clusters using photoelectric photometry sampling the presence of the characteristic flux depression feature at 5200A via the Delta a-system (Maitzen 1976) has so far delivered data for objects usually no more distant than 1000 pc from the Sun. If one intends to study the presence of CP stars at larger distances from the Sun, classical photometry has to be replaced by CCD photometry. For the first time, our investigation presents the results of CCD-photometry in the Delta a-system for a rich open cluster which is at a distance clearly beyond hitherto studied objects, Melotte 105 (2 kpc, log age = 8.5). Comparison with published uvby-photometry yields the calibration of the colour index g_1-y of our system, which is necessary for deriving the peculiarity index Delta a. For this we achieve an average accuracy of 0.007 mag. Six objects with only marginally peculiar Delta a-values were found, but spectroscopic and additional photometric evidence is needed to substantiate their peculiarity.

  19. Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Well Cluster ER-20-6 drilling and completion project was conducted during February, March, and April of 1996 in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This project is part of the DOE`s Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject at the NTS. The primary UGTA tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, and hydrological data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality as well as pathways and rates of groundwater migration at the NTS. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented as part of the UGTA subproject to obtain site-specific data on the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides produced by an underground nuclear explosion. The ER-20-6 near-field drilling project was originally planned to be very similar to that recently conducted at Well Cluster ER-20-5, which was designed to obtain data on the existing hydrologic regime near the site of an underground nuclear explosion (IT, 1995; IT, 1996a). However, after further consideration of the goals of the near-field drilling program and the characteristics of the BULLION site, the TWG recommended that the ER-20-6 project be redesigned to accommodate a forced-gradient experiment. This proposed experiment is expected to yield more realistic estimates of transport parameters than can be deduced from sampling and testing natural groundwater flow systems.

  20. The dearth of nuclear star clusters in bright galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arca-Sedda, Manuel; Spera, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of a massive globular cluster (GC) with a super massive black hole (SMBH), located at the centre of its host galaxy, by means of direct $N$-body simulations. The results show that tidal distortions induced by the stellar background and the SMBH act on a time shorter than that of dynamical friction decay for a $10^6$ M$_\\odot$ GC whenever the SMBH mass exceeds $\\sim 10^8$ M$_\\odot$. This implies an almost complete dissolution of the infalling GC before it reaches the inner region ($\\lesssim 5$ pc) of the parent galaxy. The generalization of this result to a larger sample of infalling GCs shows that such destructive process may prevent the formation and growth of a bright galactic nucleus. Another interesting, serendipitous, result we obtained is that the close interaction between the SMBH and the GC produces a ``wave'' of stars that escape from the cluster and, in a fraction, even from the whole galaxy.

  1. AFRICAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY Sample Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    AFRICAN AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY PSYC 503 Sample Syllabus Course Description and Overview: This course examines the psychology of the African American experience. We begin the course with an overview of Black/African American psychology as an evolving field of study and consider the Black/African American Psychology

  2. Design of bioaerosol sampling inlets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nene, Rohit Ravindra

    2007-09-17

    An experimental investigation involving the design, fabrication, and testing of an ambient sampling inlet and two additional Stokes-scaled inlets is presented here. Testing of each inlet was conducted at wind speeds of 2, 8, and 24 km/h (0.55, 2...

  3. Polar Chemoreceptor Clustering by Coupled Trimers of Dimers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert G. Endres

    2009-06-11

    Receptors of bacterial chemotaxis form clusters at the cell poles, where clusters act as "antennas" to amplify small changes in ligand concentration. Interestingly, chemoreceptors cluster at multiple length scales. At the smallest scale, receptors form dimers, which assemble into stable timers of dimers. At a large scale, trimers form large polar clusters composed of thousands of receptors. Although much is known about the signaling properties emerging from receptor clusters, it is unknown how receptors localize at the cell poles and what the cluster-size determining factors are. Here, we present a model of polar receptor clustering based on coupled trimers of dimers, where cluster size is determined as a minimum of the cluster-membrane free energy. This energy has contributions from the cluster-membrane elastic energy, penalizing large clusters due to their high intrinsic curvature, and receptor-receptor coupling favoring large clusters. We find that the reduced cluster-membrane curvature mismatch at the curved cell poles leads to large and robust polar clusters in line with experimental observation, while lateral clusters are efficiently suppressed.

  4. Link-Prediction Enhanced Consensus Clustering for Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Matthew; Cafarella, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many real networks that are inferred or collected from data are incomplete due to missing edges. Missing edges can be inherent to the dataset (Facebook friend links will never be complete) or the result of sampling (one may only have access to a portion of the data). The consequence is that downstream analyses that consume the network will often yield less accurate results than if the edges were complete. Community detection algorithms, in particular, often suffer when critical intra-community edges are missing. We propose a novel consensus clustering algorithm to enhance community detection on incomplete networks. Our framework utilizes existing community detection algorithms that process networks imputed by our link prediction based algorithm. The framework then merges their multiple outputs into a final consensus output. On average our method boosts performance of existing algorithms by 7% on artificial data and 17% on ego networks collected from Facebook.

  5. Radio morphology and spectral analysis of cD galaxies in rich and poor galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Giacintucci; T. Venturi; M. Murgia; D. Dallacasa; R. Athreya; S. Bardelli; P. Mazzotta; D. J. Saikia

    2007-08-31

    We present a radio morphological study and spectral analysis for a sample of 13 cD galaxies in rich and poor clusters of galaxies.} Our study is based on new high sensitivity Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 1.28 GHz, 610 MHz and 235 MHz, and on archival data. From a statistical sample of cluster cD galaxies we selected those sources with little information available in the literature and promising for the detection of aged radio emission. Beyond the high sensitivity images for all 13 radio galaxies, we present also a detailed spectral analysis for 7 of them. We found a variety of morphologies and linear sizes, as typical for radio galaxies in the radio power range sampled here (low to intermediate power radio galaxies). The spectral analysis shows that 10/13 radio galaxies have steep radio spectrum, with spectral index $\\alpha \\ge 1$. In general, the radiative ages and growth velocities are consistent with previous findings that the evolution of radio galaxies at the cluster centres is affected by the dense external medium (i.e. low growth velocities and old ages. We suggest that the dominant galaxies in A 2622 and MKW 03s are dying radio sources, which at present are not fed by nuclear activity. On the other hand, the spectacular source at the centre of A 2372 might be a very interesting example of restarted radio galaxy. For this source we estimated a life cycle of the order of 10$^6$ yr.

  6. Consistent use of type Ia supernovae highly magnified by galaxy clusters to constrain the cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Redlich, Matthias [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    We discuss how Type Ia supernovae (SNe) strongly magnified by foreground galaxy clusters should be self-consistently treated when used in samples fitted for the cosmological parameters. While the cluster lens magnification of a SN can be well constrained from sets of multiple images of various background galaxies with measured redshifts, its value is typically dependent on the fiducial set of cosmological parameters used to construct the mass model. In such cases, one should not naively demagnify the observed SN luminosity by the model magnification into the expected Hubble diagram, which would create a bias, but instead take into account the cosmological parameters a priori chosen to construct the mass model. We quantify the effect and find that a systematic error of typically a few percent, up to a few dozen percent per magnified SN may be propagated onto a cosmological parameter fit unless the cosmology assumed for the mass model is taken into account (the bias can be even larger if the SN is lying very near the critical curves). We also simulate how such a bias propagates onto the cosmological parameter fit using the Union2.1 sample supplemented with strongly magnified SNe. The resulting bias on the deduced cosmological parameters is generally at the few percent level, if only few biased SNe are included, and increases with the number of lensed SNe and their redshift. Samples containing magnified Type Ia SNe, e.g., from ongoing cluster surveys, should readily account for this possible bias.

  7. A populous intermediate-age open cluster and evidence of an embedded cluster among the FSR globular cluster candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bica, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    We study the nature of the globular cluster (GC) candidates FSR 1603 and FSR 1755 selected from the catalogue of \\citet{FSRcat}. Their properties are investigated with 2MASS field-star decontaminated photometry, which is used to build colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). FSR 1603 has the open cluster (OC) Ruprecht 101 as optical counterpart, and we show it to be a massive intermediate age cluster (IAC). Relevant parameters of FSR 1603 are the age $\\approx1$ Gyr, distance from the Sun $\\ds\\approx2.7$ kpc, Galactocentric distance $\\dgc\\approx6.4$ kpc, core radius $\\rc\\approx1.1$ pc, mass function slope $\\chi\\approx1.8$, observed stellar mass (for stars with mass in the range $\\rm 1.27 \\ms\\leq m\\leq2.03 \\ms$) $\\mObs\\approx500 \\ms$, and a total (extrapolated to $\\rm m=0.08 \\ms$) stellar mass $\\mTot\\approx2300 \\ms$. FSR 1755, on the other hand, is not a populous cluster. It may be a sparse young cluster embedded in the H II region Sh2-3, subject to an absorption $\\aV\\approx...

  8. NetCluster: A clustering-based framework to analyze internet passive measurements data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NetCluster: A clustering-based framework to analyze internet passive measurements data Elena, Sophia Antipolis, France a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 October 2012 Received algorithms Data analytics Internet measurements and characterization a b s t r a c t Internet measured data

  9. Globular clusters in the outer Galactic halo: new HST/ACS imaging of 6 globular clusters and the Galactic globular cluster age-metallicity relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dotter, Aaron; Anderson, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) derived from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F606W,F814W photometry of 6 globular clusters (GCs) are presented. The six GCs form two loose groupings in Galactocentric distance (Rgc): IC 4499, NGC 6426, and Ruprecht 106 at ~15-20 kpc and NGC 7006, Palomar 15, and Pyxis at ~40 kpc. The CMDs allow the ages to be estimated from the main sequence turnoff in every case. In addition, the age of Palomar 5 (Rgc ~ 18 kpc) is estimated using archival HST Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 V,I photometry. The age analysis reveals the following: IC 4499, Ruprecht 106, and Pyxis are 1-2 Gyr younger than inner halo GCs with similar metallicities; NGC 7006 and Palomar 5 are marginally younger than their inner halo counterparts; NGC 6426 and Palomar 15, the two most metal-poor GCs in the sample, are coeval with all the other metal-poor GCs within the uncertainties. Combined with our previous efforts, the current sample provides strong evidence that the Galactic GC age-metall...

  10. 6 Model Evaluation III -Radiosonde and radar wind profiler cluster This section describes some of the cluster by cluster comparisons between the WRFb simulations and the radiosonde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    excess moisture transport from the Gulf of Mexico. For wind speed, the most striking feature6 Model Evaluation III - Radiosonde and radar wind profiler cluster analysis This section describes wind profiler clusters. The clusters and the method used to obtain them are described in detail in de

  11. Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources JumpMtSampling Jump to:

  12. THE DETAILED CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF M31 STAR CLUSTERS. I. Fe, ALPHA AND LIGHT ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-12-20

    We present ages, [Fe/H] and abundances of the ? elements Ca I, Si I, Ti I, Ti II, and light elements Mg I, Na I, and Al I for 31 globular clusters (GCs) in M31, which were obtained from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio >60 echelle spectra of their integrated light (IL). All abundances and ages are obtained using our original technique for high-resolution IL abundance analysis of GCs. This sample provides a never before seen picture of the chemical history of M31. The GCs are dispersed throughout the inner and outer halo, from 2.5 kpc < R {sub M31} < 117 kpc. We find a range of [Fe/H] within 20 kpc of the center of M31, and a constant [Fe/H] ? – 1.6 for the outer halo clusters. We find evidence for at least one massive GC in M31 with an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The ?-element ratios are generally similar to the Milky Way GC and field star ratios. We also find chemical evidence for a late-time accretion origin for at least one cluster, which has a different abundance pattern than other clusters at similar metallicity. We find evidence for star-to-star abundance variations in Mg, Na, and Al in the GCs in our sample, and find correlations of Ca, Mg, Na, and possibly Al abundance ratios with cluster luminosity and velocity dispersion, which can potentially be used to constrain GC self-enrichment scenarios. Data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope.

  13. GLOBULAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS: FIRST RESULTS FROM S{sup 4}G EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Aravena, Manuel; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comerón, Sébastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Hinz, Joannah L.; Ho, Luis C.; Holwerda, Benne; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-02-01

    Using 3.6 ?m images of 97 early-type galaxies, we develop and verify methodology to measure globular cluster populations from the S{sup 4}G survey images. We find that (1) the ratio, T {sub N}, of the number of clusters, N {sub CL}, to parent galaxy stellar mass, M {sub *}, rises weakly with M {sub *} for early-type galaxies with M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} when we calculate galaxy masses using a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF) but that the dependence of T {sub N} on M {sub *} is removed entirely once we correct for the recently uncovered systematic variation of IMF with M {sub *}; and (2) for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}, there is no trend between N {sub CL} and M {sub *}, the scatter in T {sub N} is significantly larger (approaching two orders of magnitude), and there is evidence to support a previous, independent suggestion of two families of galaxies. The behavior of N {sub CL} in the lower-mass systems is more difficult to measure because these systems are inherently cluster-poor, but our results may add to previous evidence that large variations in cluster formation and destruction efficiencies are to be found among low-mass galaxies. The average fraction of stellar mass in clusters is ?0.0014 for M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} and can be as large as ?0.02 for less massive galaxies. These are the first results from the S{sup 4}G sample of galaxies and will be enhanced by the sample of early-type galaxies now being added to S{sup 4}G and complemented by the study of later-type galaxies within S{sup 4}G.

  14. Metal Abundance Properties of M81 Globular Cluster System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Ma; David Burstein; Zhou Fan; Xu Zhou; Jiansheng Chen; Zhaoji Jiang; Zhenyu Wu; Jianghua Wu

    2007-08-30

    This paper is the third in the series of papers on M81 globular clusters. In this paper, we present spatial and metal abundance properties of 95 M81 globular clusters, which comprise nearly half of all the M81 globular cluster system. These globular clusters are divided into two M81 metallicity groups by a KMM test. Our results show that, the metal-rich clusters did not demonstrate a centrally concentrated spatial distribution as ones in M31, and metal-poor clusters tend to be less spatially concentrated. In other words, the distribution of the metal-rich clusters in M81 is not very similar to that of M31. Most of the metal-rich clusters distribute at projected radii of 4-8 kpc. It is also noted that the metal-rich clusters distribute within the inner 20 kpc, and the metal-poor ones do out to radii of ~40 kpc. Like our Galaxy and M31, the metallicity distribution of globular clusters in M81 along galactocentric radius suggests that some dissipation occurred during the formation of the globular cluster system, i.e. smooth, pressure-supported collapse models of galaxies are unlikely to produce such radial distribution of metallicity presented in this paper. There is not evident correlation between globular cluster luminosity and metallicity in M81 globular clusters. The overwhelming conclusion of this paper seems to be that a more complete and thorough cluster search is needed in M81.

  15. The Fundamental Plane of Early Type Galaxies in Nearby Clusters from the WINGS Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D'Onofrio; G. Fasano; J. Varela; D. Bettoni; M. Moles; P. Kjaergaard; E. Pignatelli; B. Poggianti; D. Dressler; A. Cava; J. Fritz; W. J. Couch; A. Omizzolo

    2008-06-27

    By exploting the data of three large surveys (WINGS, NFPS and SDSS), we present here a comparative analysis of the Fundamental Plane (FP hereafter) of the early-type galaxies (ETGs) belonging to 59 galaxy clusters in the redshift range $0.04kinematic variables, the coefficients of the FP are strongly influenced by a number of things, mainly related to the distribution of photometric/kinematic properties of galaxies in the particular sample under analysis. For instance, the $a$ coefficient derived for the whole sample of ETGs, turns out to decrease when faint galaxies are progressively removed from the sample, suggesting that bright and faint ETGs have systematically different FPs, likely because of different mechanisms of galaxy formation. In general, by comparing mock cluster samples with the real one, we conclude that the observed variances of the FP coefficients cannot be attributed just to statistical uncertainties. We speculate that the FP is actually a bent surface, which is approximated by different planes when different selection criteria, either chosen or induced by observations, are acting to define galaxies samples. We also find ...

  16. Clusters and halos in light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Neff

    2012-10-15

    The fermionic molecular dynamics approach uses Gaussian wave packets as single-particle basis states. Many-body basis states are Slater determinants projected on parity, angular momentum and total linear momentum. The wave-packet basis is very flexible - FMD contains harmonic oscillator shell model and Brink-type cluster states as special cases. The parameters of the wave packets are obtained by variation. A realistic effective interaction derived from the Argonne V18 interaction by means of the unitary correlation operator method is employed. We discuss the fully microscopic calculation of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be capture reaction within the FMD approach. The model space contains frozen cluster configurations at large distances and polarized configurations in the interaction region. The polarized configurations are essential for a successful description of the 7Be bound state properties and for the S- and D-wave scattering states. The calculated cross section agrees well with recent measurements regarding both the absolute normalization and the energy dependence. We also discuss the structure of the cluster states, including the famous Hoyle state, in 12C. From the two-body densities we conclude that the Hoyle state has a spatially extended triangular alpha-cluster structure, whereas the third 0+ state features a chain-like obtuse triangle structure. We also calculate the N hbar Omega decomposition of our wave functions to illuminate the challenges of no-core shell model calculations for these cluster states.

  17. NGC 7789: An open cluster case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbeek, Jamie C.; Friel, Eileen D.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Mészáros, Szabolcs [Indiana University Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Jacobson, Heather R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, Christian I., E-mail: joverbee@indiana.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectra of 32 giants in the open cluster NGC 7789 using the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO Hydra spectrograph. We explore differences in atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances caused by the use of the linelist developed for the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES) compared to one based on Arcturus used in our previous work. [Fe/H] values decrease when using the GES linelist instead of the Arcturus-based linelist; these differences are probably driven by systematically lower (??0.1 dex) GES surface gravities. Using the GES linelist we determine abundances for 10 elements—Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Na, Ni, Zr, Ba, and La. We find the cluster's average metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.03 ± 0.07 dex, in good agreement with literature values, and a lower [Mg/Fe] abundance than has been reported before for this cluster (0.11 ± 0.05 dex). We also find the neutron-capture element barium to be highly enhanced—[Ba/Fe] = +0.48 ± 0.08—and disparate from cluster measurements of neutron-capture elements La and Zr (?0.08 ± 0.05 and 0.08 ± 0.08, respectively). This is in accordance with recent discoveries of supersolar Ba enhancement in young clusters along with more modest enhancement of other neutron-capture elements formed in similar environments.

  18. Angular clustering in the SUMSS radio survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Tom Mauch; Elaine M. Sadler

    2003-10-05

    We measure the angular correlation function of radio galaxies selected by the 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS). We find that the characteristic imprint of large-scale structure is clearly detectable, and that the survey is very uniform. Through comparison with similar analyses for other wide-area radio surveys - the 1400 MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the 325 MHz Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) - we are able to derive consistent angular clustering parameters, including a steep slope for the clustering function, $w(\\theta) \\propto \\theta^{-1.1}$. We revise upwards previous estimates of the NVSS clustering amplitude, and find no evidence for dependence of clustering properties on radio frequency. It is important to incorporate the full covariance matrix when fitting parameters to the measured correlation function. Once the redshift distribution for mJy radio galaxies has been determined, these projected clustering measurements will permit a robust description of large-scale structure at $z \\sim 0.8$, the median redshift of the sources.

  19. Solution Path Clustering with Minimax Concave Penalty and Its Applications to Noisy Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Yuliya

    2014-01-01

    Path Clustering of Noisy Big Data . . . . . . . . . . . .Y. Wah, and T. Herawan. “Big Data Clustering: A Review. ” InPath Clustering of Noisy Big Data Introduction In this

  20. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but...

  1. The next generation Virgo cluster survey. VIII. The spatial distribution of globular clusters in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durrell, Patrick R.; Accetta, Katharine [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; McConnachie, Alan; Gwyn, Stephen [Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hongxin [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Puzia, Thomas H.; Jordán, Andrés [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Av. Vicu'a Mackenna 4860, Macul 7820436, Santiago (Chile); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Courteau, Stéphane [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Duc, Pierre-Alain [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu, Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Emsellem, Eric [Université de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 av. Charles André, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, ENS de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large-scale study of the distribution of globular clusters (GCs) throughout the Virgo cluster, based on photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a large imaging survey covering Virgo's primary subclusters (Virgo A = M87 and Virgo B = M49) out to their virial radii. Using the g{sub o}{sup ?}, (g' – i') {sub o} color-magnitude diagram of unresolved and marginally resolved sources within the NGVS, we have constructed two-dimensional maps of the (irregular) GC distribution over 100 deg{sup 2} to a depth of g{sub o}{sup ?} = 24. We present the clearest evidence to date showing the difference in concentration between red and blue GCs over the full extent of the cluster, where the red (more metal-rich) GCs are largely located around the massive early-type galaxies in Virgo, while the blue (metal-poor) GCs have a much more extended spatial distribution with significant populations still present beyond 83' (?215 kpc) along the major axes of both M49 and M87. A comparison of our GC maps to the diffuse light in the outermost regions of M49 and M87 show remarkable agreement in the shape, ellipticity, and boxiness of both luminous systems. We also find evidence for spatial enhancements of GCs surrounding M87 that may be indicative of recent interactions or an ongoing merger history. We compare the GC map to that of the locations of Virgo galaxies and the X-ray intracluster gas, and find generally good agreement between these various baryonic structures. We calculate the Virgo cluster contains a total population of N {sub GC} = 67, 300 ± 14, 400, of which 35% are located in M87 and M49 alone. For the first time, we compute a cluster-wide specific frequency S {sub N,} {sub CL} = 2.8 ± 0.7, after correcting for Virgo's diffuse light. We also find a GC-to-baryonic mass fraction ? {sub b} = 5.7 ± 1.1 × 10{sup –4} and a GC-to-total cluster mass formation efficiency ? {sub t} = 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10{sup –5}, the latter values slightly lower than but consistent with those derived for individual galactic halos. Taken as a whole, our results show that the production of the complex structures in the unrelaxed Virgo cluster core (including the production of the diffuse intracluster light) is an ongoing and continuing process.

  2. Nonlinear Gravitational Clustering in Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1996-07-19

    The gravitational clustering of collisionless particles in an expanding universe is modelled using some simple physical ideas. I show that it is possible to understand the nonlinear clustering in terms of three well defined regimes: (1) linear regime; (2) quasilinear regime which is dominated by scale-invariant radial infall and (3) nonlinear regime dominated by nonradial motions and mergers. Modelling each of these regimes separately I show how the nonlinear two point correlation function can be related to the linear correlation function in hierarchical models. This analysis leads to results which are in good agreement with numerical simulations thereby providing an explanation for numerical results. Using this model and some simple extensions, it is possible to understand the transfer of power from large to small scales and the behaviour of higher order correlation functions. The ideas presented here will also serve as a powerful analytical tool to investigate nonlinear clustering in different models.

  3. Alpha Cluster Model of Atomic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosin, Zbigniew; Kallunkathariyil, Jinesh; ?ukasik, Jerzy; Paw?owski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The description of the nuclear system in its ground state and at low excitations based on the equation of state (EoS) around the saturation density is presented. In the expansion of the EoS around the saturation point additional spin polarization terms are taken into account. In addition for atomic nuclei a correction of the average nucleonic energy for the surface energy is introduced. The ground state configurations for the N=Z even-even nuclei, obtained with the proposed EoS, exhibit a clear cluster structure. At the nuclear surface these clusters can be identified as alpha particles. Taking into account an additional interaction between clusters the binding energy and sizes of the considered nuclei are very accurately described. From properties of the {\\alpha} particle, 3He and t limits of the EoS parameters are established.

  4. Theoretical stellar models for old galactic clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Castellani; S. Degl'Innocenti; M. Marconi

    1998-12-05

    We present new evolutionary stellar models suitable for old Population I clusters, discussing both the consequences of the most recent improvements in the input physics and the effect of element diffusion within the stellar structures. Theoretical cluster isochrones are presented, covering the range of ages from 1 to 9 Gyr for the four selected choices on the metallicity Z= 0.007, 0.010, 0.015 and 0.020. Theoretical uncertainties on the efficiency of superadiabatic convection are discussed in some details. Isochrone fitting to the CM diagrams of the two well observed galactic clusters NGC2420 and M67 indicates that a mixing length parameter alpha = 1.9 appears adequate for reproducing the observed color of cool giant stars. The problems in matching theoretical preditions to the observed slope of MS stars are discussed.

  5. Information Propagation in Clustered Multilayer Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In today's world, individuals interact with each other in more complicated patterns than ever. Some individuals engage through online social networks (e.g., Facebook, Twitter), while some communicate only through conventional ways (e.g., face-to-face). Therefore, understanding the dynamics of information propagation among humans calls for a multi-layer network model where an online social network is conjoined with a physical network. In this work, we initiate a study of information diffusion in a clustered multi-layer network model, where all constituent layers are random networks with high clustering. We assume that information propagates according to the SIR model and with different information transmissibility across the networks. We give results for the conditions, probability, and size of information epidemics, i.e., cases where information starts from a single individual and reaches a positive fraction of the population. We show that increasing the level of clustering in either one of the layers increas...

  6. Breaking Cosmological Degeneracies in Galaxy Cluster Surveys with a Physical Model of Cluster Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua D. Younger; Zoltan Haiman; Greg L. Bryan; Sheng Wang

    2006-12-22

    Forthcoming large galaxy cluster surveys will yield tight constraints on cosmological models. It has been shown that in an idealized survey, containing > 10,000 clusters, statistical errors on dark energy and other cosmological parameters will be at the percent level. It has also been shown that through "self-calibration", parameters describing the mass-observable relation and cosmology can be simultaneously determined, though at a loss in accuracy by about an order of magnitude. Here we examine the utility of an alternative approach of self-calibration, in which a parametrized ab-initio physical model is used to compute cluster structure and the resulting mass-observable relations. As an example, we use a modified-entropy ("pre-heating") model of the intracluster medium, with the history and magnitude of entropy injection as unknown input parameters. Using a Fisher matrix approach, we evaluate the expected simultaneous statistical errors on cosmological and cluster model parameters. We study two types of surveys, in which a comparable number of clusters are identified either through their X-ray emission or through their integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We find that compared to a phenomenological parametrization of the mass-observable relation, using our physical model yields significantly tighter constraints in both surveys, and offers substantially improved synergy when the two surveys are combined. These results suggest that parametrized physical models of cluster structure will be useful when extracting cosmological constraints from SZ and X-ray cluster surveys. (abridged)

  7. Stacking weak lensing signals of SZ clusters to constrain cluster physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolyn Sealfon; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2006-01-12

    We show how to place constraints on cluster physics by stacking the weak lensing signals from multiple clusters found through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For a survey that covers about 200 sq. deg. both in SZ and weak lensing observations, the slope and amplitude of the mass vs. SZ luminosity relation can be measured with few percent error for clusters at z~0.5. This can be used to constrain cluster physics, such as the nature of feedback. For example, we can distinguish a pre-heated model from a model with a decreased accretion rate at more than 5sigma. The power to discriminate among different non-gravitational processes in the ICM becomes even stronger if we use the central Compton parameter y_0, which could allow one to distinguish between models with pre-heating, SN feedback and AGN feedback, for example, at more than 5sigma. Measurement of these scaling relations as a function of redshift makes it possible to directly observe e.g., the evolution of the hot gas in clusters. With this approach the mass-L_SZ relation can be calibrated and its uncertainties can be quantified, leading to a more robust determination of cosmological parameters from clusters surveys. The mass-L_SZ relation calibrated in this way from a small area of the sky can be used to determine masses of SZ clusters from very large SZ-only surveys and is nicely complementary to other techniques proposed in the literature.

  8. Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXA Corp. (Delaware)GalvestonWindSampling Details

  9. Gasoline Vehicle Exhuast Particle Sampling Study | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Exhuast Particle Sampling Study Gasoline Vehicle Exhuast Particle Sampling Study 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: University of Minnesota 2003deerkittelson.pdf More...

  10. Non-thermal phenomena in galaxies clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Brunetti

    2004-04-26

    The discovery of diffuse synchrotron radio emission and, more recently, of the hard X-ray (HXR) tails have triggered a growing interest about non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters. After a brief review of the most important evidences for non-thermal emission, I will focus on the origin of the emitting particles and of the hadronic component. In particular I will describe the particle-injection and -acceleration mechanisms at work in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and, at the same time, discuss the possibility to test current modellings of these phenomena with future radio, HXR, and gamma rays observatories.

  11. Algorithms for Gene Clustering Analysis on Genomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Gang Man

    2012-07-16

    CLUSTERING ANALYSIS ON GENOMES A Dissertation by GANG MAN YI Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2011 Major Subject: Computer Science... ALGORITHMS FOR GENE CLUSTERING ANALYSIS ON GENOMES A Dissertation by GANG MAN YI Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair...

  12. Stability of adhesion clusters under constant force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Erdmann; U. S. Schwarz

    2004-01-27

    We solve the stochastic equations for a cluster of parallel bonds with shared constant loading, rebinding and the completely dissociated state as an absorbing boundary. In the small force regime, cluster lifetime grows only logarithmically with bond number for weak rebinding, but exponentially for strong rebinding. Therefore rebinding is essential to ensure physiological lifetimes. The number of bonds decays exponentially with time for most cases, but in the intermediate force regime, a small increase in loading can lead to much faster decay. This effect might be used by cell-matrix adhesions to induce signaling events through cytoskeletal loading.

  13. Mass Distributions of Clusters Using Gravitational Magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-05-03

    Lensing in the context of rich clusters is normally quantified from small image distortions, yielding a relative mass distribution in the limit of weak lensing. Here we show the magnification effect of lensing can also be mapped over a cluster, resulting in absolute mass determinations for the weak limit. Furthermore, given both magnification and distortion measurements, the mass distribution may be constrained in the strong regime. Methods for obtaining the magnification using spectroscopic and/or photometric information are discussed, for object detection within a fixed isophote or to a given flux limit. A map of the magnification around A1689 is constructed from the observed depletion of background red galaxy counts.

  14. An explanation for long flares from extragalactic globular cluster X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2005-09-21

    Repeatedly flaring X-ray binaries have recently been discovered in NGC 4697 by Sivakoff and collaborators. We show that these flares can be explained as the result of eccentric binaries in globular clusters which accrete more rapidly at periastron than during the rest of the binary orbit. We show that theoretical timescales for producing eccentricities and circularising the binaries are consistent with what is needed to produce the observed population of flaring sources, although the circularisation timescales are highly uncertain on both observational and theoretical grounds. This model makes two clear theoretical predictions (1) the flares should be seen to be strictly periodic if adequate sampling is provided, and that periodicity should be of approximately 15 hours (2) this class of flaring behaviour should be seen only in globular cluster sources, and predominantly in the densest globular clusters. We also test the model for producing eccentricities through fly-by's of a third star near the binary in a globular cluster against a much larger database of millisecond pulsar observations than has been used in past work, and find that the theoretical cross sections for producing eccentricity in binaries are in reasonable agreement with most of the data, provided that the pulsar ages are about $4\\times10^9$ years.

  15. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Scottsdale, AZ); Wolf, Abraham (Sun City West, AZ)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample prior to introduction of a molding medium in the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  16. Beltrami Equation and Cluster Lensing: Characteristic Equations and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schramm; T

    1995-07-24

    Arclets in clusters of galaxies can be used to determine the lens mapping and not only to constrain the mass density of the cluster. Multiply imaged arclets are therefore easily identified without further modelling.

  17. Dynamics of Solvated Electrons in Clusters Ryan M. Young,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    in Water-Based Cluster Anions 5561 3.3. Dynamics in Halide-Water Clusters 5563 4. Methanol 5564 5. Ammonia 5567 6. Acetonitrile and Primary Amides 5568 7. Benzene, Toluene, and Other Aromatic Solvents 5571 8

  18. Spatial clustering of pixels of a multispectral image

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-08-19

    A method and system for clustering the pixels of a multispectral image is provided. A clustering system computes a maximum spectral similarity score for each pixel that indicates the similarity between that pixel and the most similar neighboring. To determine the maximum similarity score for a pixel, the clustering system generates a similarity score between that pixel and each of its neighboring pixels and then selects the similarity score that represents the highest similarity as the maximum similarity score. The clustering system may apply a filtering criterion based on the maximum similarity score so that pixels with similarity scores below a minimum threshold are not clustered. The clustering system changes the current pixel values of the pixels in a cluster based on an averaging of the original pixel values of the pixels in the cluster.

  19. Refactoring the nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Klebsiella oxytoca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Dehua

    Bacterial genes associated with a single trait are often grouped in a contiguous unit of the genome known as a gene cluster. It is difficult to genetically manipulate many gene clusters because of complex, redundant, and ...

  20. A first site of galaxy cluster formation: complete spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A first site of galaxy cluster formation: complete spectroscopy of a protocluster at z 6.01 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A first site of galaxy cluster formation:...

  1. Galaxy Clustering in the CNOC2 Redshift Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; S. L. Morris; H. Lin; P. Hall; D. Patton; M. Sawicki; C. W. Shepherd

    1999-10-06

    The correlation evolution of a high luminosity subsample of the CNOC2 redshift survey is examined. The sample is restricted to galaxies for which the k corrected and evolution corrected R luminosity is M_R <=-20 mag, where M_* ~= -20.3 mag. This subsample contains about 2300 galaxies. In consort with 13000 galaxies in a similarly defined low redshift sample from the Las Campanas Redshift survey we find that the comoving correlation can be described as xi(r|z) = (r_00/r)^gamma (1+z)^{-(3+e)} with r_00=5.08 +/- 0.08/h Mpc, e=0.02 +/- 0.23 and gamma=1.81 +/- 0.03 over the z=0.03 to 0.65 redshift range in a cosmology with Omega_M=0.2, Lambda=0. The measured clustering amplitude, and its evolution, are dependent on the adopted cosmology. The evolution rates for Omega_M=1 and flat low density models are e=0.9 +/- 0.3 and e=-0.5 +/- 0.2, respectively, with r_00 ~= 5/h Mpc in all cases.

  2. Energy Proportionality and Performance in Data Parallel Computing Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jinoh

    2011-01-01

    8] presented a hybrid datacenter model with two-class nodesbe ideally zero. Thus, a datacenter cluster still needs to

  3. Cluster-based architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CLUSTER MODEL; CORRECTIONS; ERRORS; NOISE; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUBITS; RESOURCES; VERIFICATION COMPUTERS; INFORMATION;...

  4. Computer System, Cluster and Networking Summer Institute (CSCNSI...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in setting up, configuring, administering, testing, monitoring, and scheduling computer systems, supercomputer clusters, and computer networks through a variety of...

  5. Core sampling system spare parts assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-04-04

    Soon, there will be 4 independent core sampling systems obtaining samples from the underground tanks. It is desirable that these systems be available for sampling during the next 2 years. This assessment was prepared to evaluate the adequacy of the spare parts identified for the core sampling system and to provide recommendations that may remediate overages or inadequacies of spare parts.

  6. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  7. Cluster Flies Family, Home & Garden Education Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , or "attic," flies often invade New Hampshire homes in the fall to become annoying wintertime pests containers safely, according to NH regulations. If you suspect pesticide poisoning, call the New Hampshire frames and electrical fixtures. Cluster flies are usually sluggish and make little attempt to escape, so

  8. Evolution of star clusters on eccentric orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Maxwell Xu; Heggie, Douglas C; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of star clusters on circular and eccentric orbits using direct $N$-body simulations. We model clusters with initially $N=8{\\rm k}$ and $N=16{\\rm k}$ single stars of the same mass, orbiting around a point-mass galaxy. For each orbital eccentricity that we consider, we find the apogalactic radius at which the cluster has the same lifetime as the cluster with the same $N$ on a circular orbit. We show that then, the evolution of bound particle number and half-mass radius is approximately independent of eccentricity. Secondly, when we scale our results to orbits with the same semi-major axis, we find that the lifetimes are, to first order, independent of eccentricity. When the results of Baumgardt and Makino for a singular isothermal halo are scaled in the same way, the lifetime is again independent of eccentricity to first order, suggesting that this result is independent of the Galactic mass profile. From both sets of simulations we empirically derive the higher order dependence of the lif...

  9. College of Engineering High Performance Computing Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    College of Engineering High Performance Computing Cluster Policy and Procedures COE-HPC-01 and registered as requiring high performance computing; the course identification/registrations process the College High Performance Computing system will need register for system access by visiting http

  10. Requirements for Clustering Data Streams Daniel Barbard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honavar, Vasant

    in astronomy, telecommunication operations, banking and stock- market applications, e-commerce and other fields and discovering new interesting facts. The challenge is to design algorithms that can track changes. Finding changes in clusters as new data is collected can prove fruitful in scenarios like the following

  11. Knowledge Engineering Technique for Cluster Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Knowledge Engineering Technique for Cluster Development Pradorn Sureephong1 , Nopasit Chakpitak1 management by using knowledge engineering which is one of the most important method for managing knowledge. This work analyzed three well known knowledge engineering methods, i.e. MOKA, SPEDE and Common

  12. Bridges in the random-cluster model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elçi, Eren Metin; Fytas, Nikolaos G

    2015-01-01

    The random-cluster model, a correlated bond percolation model, unifies a range of important models of statistical mechanics in one description, including independent bond percolation, the Potts model and uniform spanning trees. By introducing a classification of edges based on their relevance to the connectivity we study the stability of clusters in this model. We derive several exact relations for general graphs that allow us to derive unambiguously the finite-size scaling behavior of the density of bridges and non-bridges. For percolation, we are also able to characterize the point for which clusters become maximally fragile and show that it is connected to the concept of the bridge load. Combining our exact treatment with further results from conformal field theory, we uncover a surprising behavior of the variance of the number of (non-)bridges, showing that these diverge in two dimensions below the value $4\\cos^2{(\\pi/\\sqrt{3})}=0.2315891\\cdots$ of the cluster coupling $q$. Finally, it is shown that a par...

  13. Detecting the Gravitational Redshift of Cluster Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst; Evan Scannapieco

    2000-03-08

    We examine the gravitational redshift of radiation emitted from within the potential of a cluster. Spectral lines from the intracluster medium (ICM) are redshifted in proportion to the emission-weighted mean potential along the line of sight, amounting to approximately 50 km/s at a radius of 100 kpc/h, for a cluster dispersion of 1200 km/s. We show that the relative redshifts of different ionization states of metals in the ICM provide a unique probe of the three-dimensional matter distribution. An examination of the reported peculiar velocities of cD galaxies in well studied Abell clusters reveals they are typically redshifted by an average of $\\sim +200$ km/s. This can be achieved by gravity with the addition of a steep central potential associated with the cD galaxy. Note that in general gravitational redshifts cause a small overestimate of the recessional velocities of clusters by an average of $\\sim$ 20 km/s.

  14. Tasseography , Scrying , & Cluster Status As cluster supercomputers have grown from a few nodes to giant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Henry G. "Hank"

    cluster status is about as intuitive and effective as reading tea leaves or gazing into a crystal ball by nodescape as a real-time status display. Nodes are tinted from blue-to-green-to-red based on attribute

  15. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golan, Amir

    2013-01-01

    VUV) Photoionization of Small Water Clusters. J. Phys. Chem.Energy Transfer between Water Molecules. Nat. Phys. 2010, 6,of Low-Energy Electrons in Water. Nat. Phys. 2010, 6, 78-81.

  16. THE CLUSTERING AND HALO MASSES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z < 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolley, Tim; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Palamara, David P.; Beare, Richard; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Kochanek, C. S.; Dey, Arjun; Atlee, David W.

    2014-12-20

    We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star-forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we construct a sample of 22,553 24 ?m sources selected from 8.42 deg{sup 2} of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Boötes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors that are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}) and is composed entirely of LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r {sub 0} ? 3-6 h {sup –1} Mpc for almost all of our star-forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L {sub TIR} at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L {sub TIR} (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M {sub halo} ? 10{sup 12.9} h {sup –1} M {sub ?}. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star-forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star-forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L ? 2.5 L {sub *} blue galaxies in the local universe, but star-forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L {sub TIR} ? 10{sup 11.7} L {sub ?}) at 0.6 < z < 1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.

  17. CONVECTIVE STABILITY OF GALAXY-CLUSTER PLASMAS Benjamin D. Chandran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandran, Ben

    criterion by causing heat to diffuse primarily along magnetic field lines. We extend earlier analyses a cluster's age. In the cooling flow model, plasma heating is neglected, and the rate at which plasma cools nuclei and cosmic rays drive convection in galaxy-cluster plasmas and that convection heats cluster cores

  18. Topological Structures of Cluster Spins for Ising Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You-gang Feng

    2010-03-19

    We discussed hierarchies and rescaling rule of the self similar transformations in Ising models, and define a fractal dimension of an ordered cluster, which minimum corresponds to a fixed point of the transformations. By the fractal structures we divide the clusters into two types: irreducible and reducible. A relationship of cluster spin with its coordination number and fractal dimension is obtained.

  19. COWES: Clustering Web Users Based on Historical Web Sessions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    COWES: Clustering Web Users Based on Historical Web Sessions Ling Chen1,2 , Sourav S. Bhowmick1 Institute for Infocomm Research, Singapore, 119613 Abstract. Clustering web users is one of the most important research topics in web usage mining. Existing approaches cluster web users based on the snapshots

  20. Time-synchronized Clustering of Gene Expression Trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Hans-Georg

    Time-synchronized Clustering of Gene Expression Trajectories RONG TANG Division of Biostatistics, USA ABSTRACT Current clustering methods are routinely applied to gene expression time course data at different rates, successful clustering in this context requires dealing with varying time and shape patterns

  1. Aalborg Universitet Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters Lin, Hengwei; Liu, Chengxi., Vasquez, J. C., & Dragicevic, T. (2014). Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters ­ Invited

  2. Aalborg Universitet Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC Microgrids Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC Microgrids Clusters Shafiee, Qobad). Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC Microgrids Clusters. I E E E Transactions on Energy Conversion, 29(4), 922. Dragicevic, J. C. Vasquez, and J. M. Guerrero, "Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC-Microgrids Clusters

  3. TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters Ajit Chavan, Xunfei Jiang, Mohemmad I/O performance. I. INTRODUCTION Thermal management for power-dense storage clusters can address cooling problems. The following three factors make thermal-aware file assign- ment desirabe and practical for storage clusters

  4. Scene Modeling Using Co-Clustering Computer Vision Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    concept corresponds to a cluster of visterms in the Bag of Vis- terms (BOV) paradigm for scene to cluster image patches based on their appearances in BOV, MMI co-clustering can group the visterms which interest-points and their descriptors have attracted lots of attention. Bag of Visterms (BOV) approaches

  5. Memory Hierarchy Considerations for Cost-Effective Cluster Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhichun

    quantitative recommendations for building cost-effective clusters for different workloads. Index TermsMemory Hierarchy Considerations for Cost-Effective Cluster Computing Xing Du, Member, IEEE Computer workstations and PCs to build a cluster for parallel computing has become a common practice. The cost

  6. Towards Energy-Efficient Database Cluster Design Willis Lang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Jignesh

    Towards Energy-Efficient Database Cluster Design Willis Lang University of Wisconsin wlang efficiency of DBMSs, none of these studies have looked at the architectural design space of energy-efficient parallel DBMS clusters. There are many challenges to increasing the energy efficiency of a DBMS cluster

  7. Quick cluster analysis of Thomas Weber's Christian Hennig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Christian

    ;Discriminant coordinates of original groups (plot that shows group means optimally separated) Christian Hennig;Discriminant coordinates of mclust clustering: Christian Hennig Quick cluster analysis of Thomas Weber's data set #12;Original groups vs. clusters table(groups,smpoprc$classification) groups 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 5 7 0

  8. Distributed Energy-Efficient Hierarchical Clustering for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, JoAnne

    Distributed Energy-Efficient Hierarchical Clustering for Wireless Sensor Networks Ping Ding, Jo important. In this paper, we propose a distributed weight-based energy-efficient hierarchical clustering of the network topology. Younis and Fahmy [4] propose a Hybrid Energy-Efficient Distributed clustering (HEED

  9. Systematics of Pure and Doped He-4 Clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Siu A.; KROTSCHECK, E.

    1995-01-01

    Optimized variational calculations have been carried out for pure and doped clusters of He-4 atoms up to a cluster size of N=1000 particles. For small cluster sizes with less than or equal to 112 particles, where comparisons with existing diffusion...

  10. Multi-Grain Clustering Topic Model (MGCTM)Motivation Evaluation of Document Clustering Integrating Document Clustering and Topic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Eric P.

    proportion ·Sample Bernoulli parameter ·For each word (l) (l) ( )Dir (g) (g) ( )Dir ( )Beta w Sample kuwait larson shuttle energy usr motif xterm henrik armenians jews mission dc apr Local topics of 3

  11. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1998-01-01

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  12. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.; Wolf, A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  13. The Sustainability FYE Cluster The Sustainability FYE Cluster will make sustainable urban living a core experience for First

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Sustainability FYE Cluster The Sustainability FYE Cluster will make sustainable urban living University. The Sustainability community infuses the learning-living community with practical and theoretical approaches to sustainable living, merging students' living community with unique academic and field

  14. THE BURST CLUSTER: DARK MATTER IN A CLUSTER MERGER ASSOCIATED WITH THE SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST, GRB 050509B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahle, Hakon

    We have identified a merging galaxy cluster with evidence of two distinct subclusters. The X-ray and optical data suggest that the subclusters are presently moving away from each other after closest approach. This cluster ...

  15. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C. E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 × 10{sup ?5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  16. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OUTSKIRTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Walker, S. A.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2013-09-20

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot ({approx}8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to {approx}2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r{sub 500} reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r{sub 500}, the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters.

  17. Galaxy Cluster Virial Masses and Omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlberg; Yee; Ellingson; Abraham; Gravel; Morris; Pritchet

    1995-09-06

    To re-examine the rich cluster $\\Omega$ value the CNOC Cluster Survey has observed 16 high X-ray luminosity clusters in the redshift range 0.17 to 0.55, obtaining approximately 2600 velocities in their fields. Directly adding all the K and evolution corrected $r$ band light to $M_r(0)=-18.5$, about $0.2L_\\ast$, and correcting for the light below the limit, the average mass-to-light ratio of the clusters is $283\\pm27h\\msun/\\lsun$ and the average mass per galaxy is $3.5\\pm0.4\\times10^{12}h^{-1}\\msun$. The clusters are consistent with having a universal $M_v/L$ value (within the errors of about 20\\%) independent of their velocity dispersion, mean color of their galaxies, blue galaxy content, redshift, or mean interior density. Using field galaxies within the same data set, with the same corrections, we find that the closure mass-to-light, $\\rho_c/j$, is $1160\\pm130h\\msun/\\lsun$ and the closure mass per galaxy, $\\rho_c/\\phi(>0.2L_\\ast)$, is $13.2\\pm1.9\\times10^{12}h^{-1}\\msun$. Under the assumptions that the galaxies are distributed like the mass and that the galaxy luminosities and numbers are statistically conserved, which these data indirectly support, $\\Omega_0=0.20\\pm0.04\\pm0.09$ where the errors are, respectively, the $1\\sigma$ internal and an estimate of the $1\\sigma$ systematic error resulting from the luminosity normalization.

  18. MgO-Supported Cluster Catalysts with Pt-Ru Interactions Prepared from Pt3Ru6(CO)21(u3-H)(u-H)3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chotisuwan,S.; Wittapyakun, J.; Lobo-Lapidus, R.; Gates, B.

    2007-01-01

    Bimetallic MgO-supported catalysts were prepared by adsorption of Pt{sub 3}Ru{sub 6}(CO){sub 21}({mu}{sub 3}-H)({mu}-H){sub 3} on porous MgO. Characterization of the supported clusters by infrared (IR) spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed species were still in the form of metal carbonyls. The supported clusters were decarbonylated by treatment in flowing helium at 300 C, as shown by IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, and the resulting supported PtRu clusters were shown by EXAFS spectroscopy to have metal frames that retained Pt-Ru bonds but were slightly restructured relative to those of the precursor; the average cluster size was almost unchanged as a result of the decarbonylation. These are among the smallest reported bimetallic clusters of group-8 metals. The decarbonylated sample catalyzed ethylene hydrogenation with an activity similar to that reported previously for {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported clusters prepared in nearly the same way and having nearly the same structure. Both samples were also active for n-butane hydrogenolysis, with the MgO-supported catalyst being more active than the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalyst.

  19. Changing ionization conditions in SDSS galaxies with active galactic nuclei as a function of environment from pairs to clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Steinhardt, Charles L. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East-California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Silverman, John D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-Shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Mendel, J. Trevor [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Patton, David R., E-mail: ekhabibo@caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, Ontario, K9J 7B8 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] ?6548/H?, [O III] ?5007/H?) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  20. Obscured clusters.I. GLIMPSE30 - Young Milky Way Star Cluster Hosting Wolf-Rayet Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurtev, R; Georgiev, L; Ortolani, S; Ivanov, V D

    2007-01-01

    Young massive clusters are perfect astrophysical laboratories for study of massive stars. Clusters with Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are of special importance, since this enables us to study a coeval WR population at a uniform metallicity and known age. GLIMPSE30 (G30) is one of them. The cluster is situated near the Galactic plane (l=298.756deg, b=-0.408deg) and we aimed to determine its physical parameters and to investigate its high-mass stellar content and especially WR stars. Our analysis is based on SOFI/NTT JsHKs imaging and low resolution (R~2000) spectroscopy of the brightest cluster members in the K atmospheric window. For the age determination we applied isochrone fits for MS and Pre-MS stars. We derived stellar parameters of the WR stars candidates using a full nonLTE modeling of the observed spectra. Using a variety of techniques we found that G30 is very young cluster, with age t~4Myr. The cluster is located in Carina spiral arm, it is deeply embedded in dust and suffers reddening of Av~10.5+-1.1mag. T...

  1. Compact stellar systems in the Fornax cluster: a UV perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffen Mieske; Michael Hilker; Dominik J. Bomans; Soo-Chang Rey; Suk Kim; Suk-Jin Yoon; Chul Chung

    2008-08-01

    In recent years, increasing evidence for chemical complexity and multiple stellar populations in massive globular clusters (GCs) has emerged, including extreme horizontal branches (EHBs) and UV excess. Our goal is to improve our understanding of UV excess in the regime of both massive GCs and ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs). To this end, we use deep archival GALEX data of the central Fornax cluster to measure NUV and FUV magnitudes of UCDs and massive GCs. We obtain NUV photometry for a sample of 35 compact objects with -13.5

  2. Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters. M the emission yield of anionic clusters increases much faster with n than expected from simple proportionality. Accordingly, the most intense emission is observed for Au7 - : under Au9 + impact the Au7 - yield per incident

  3. Rotational fluctuation of molecules in quantum clusters. I. Path integral hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miura, Shinichi [Institute for Molecular Science, 38 Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2007-03-21

    In this paper, we present a path integral hybrid Monte Carlo (PIHMC) method for rotating molecules in quantum fluids. This is an extension of our PIHMC for correlated Bose fluids [S. Miura and J. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 2160 (2004)] to handle the molecular rotation quantum mechanically. A novel technique referred to be an effective potential of quantum rotation is introduced to incorporate the rotational degree of freedom in the path integral molecular dynamics or hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. For a permutation move to satisfy Bose statistics, we devise a multilevel Metropolis method combined with a configurational-bias technique for efficiently sampling the permutation and the associated atomic coordinates. Then, we have applied the PIHMC to a helium-4 cluster doped with a carbonyl sulfide molecule. The effects of the quantum rotation on the solvation structure and energetics were examined. Translational and rotational fluctuations of the dopant in the superfluid cluster were also analyzed.

  4. Distribution and Chemical State of Cu-rich Clusters in Silicon: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonassisi, T.; Marcus, M. A.; Istratov, A. A.; Heuer, M.; Ciszek, T. F.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Weber, E. R.

    2004-08-01

    the chemical state and distribution of Cu-rich clusters were determined in four different silicon-based materials with varying contamination pathways and degrees of oxygen concentration, including as-grown multicrystalline silicon. In all four samples, Cu3Si was the only chemical state observed. Cu3Si clusters were observed at structural defects within all four materials; XBIC measurements revealed that the presence of Cu3Si corresponds to increased recombination activity. Oxidized Cu compounds are not likely to form in silicon. The +1 eV edge shift in the -XAS absorption spectrum of Cu3Si relative to Cu metal is believed to be an indication of a degree of covalent bonding between Cu atoms and their silicon neighbors.

  5. Herschel observations of embedded protostellar clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennemann, M; Bontemps, S; Schneider, N; Csengeri, T; Balog, Z; Di Francesco, J; Zavagno, A; André, Ph; Men'shchikov, A; Abergel, A; Ali, B; Baluteau, J -P; Bernard, J -Ph; Cox, P; Didelon, P; di Giorgio, A -M; Griffin, M; Hargrave, P; Hill, T; Horeau, B; Huang, M; Kirk, J; Leeks, S; Li, J Z; Marston, A; Martin, P; Molinari, S; Luong, Q Nguyen; Olofsson, G; Persi, P; Pezzuto, S; Russeil, D; Saraceno, P; Sauvage, M; Sibthorpe, B; Spinoglio, L; Testi, L; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G; Wilson, C; Woodcraft, A

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel OB young stellar objects survey (HOBYS) has observed the Rosette molecular cloud, providing an unprecedented view of its star formation activity. These new far-infrared data reveal a population of compact young stellar objects whose physical properties we aim to characterise. We compiled a sample of protostars and their spectral energy distributions that covers the near-infrared to submillimetre wavelength range. These were used to constrain key properties in the protostellar evolution, bolometric luminosity, and envelope mass and to build an evolutionary diagram. Several clusters are distinguished including the cloud centre, the embedded clusters in the vicinity of luminous infrared sources, and the interaction region. The analysed protostellar population in Rosette ranges from 0.1 to about 15 Msun with luminosities between 1 and 150 Lsun, which extends the evolutionary diagram from low-mass protostars into the high-mass regime. Some sources lack counterparts at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths...

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES FROM DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rudnick, Lawrence [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Annihilation of dark matter can result in the production of stable Standard Model particles including electrons and positrons that, in the presence of magnetic fields, lose energy via synchrotron radiation, observable as radio emission. Galaxy clusters are excellent targets to search for or to constrain the rate of dark matter annihilation, as they are both massive and dark matter dominated. In this study, we place limits on dark matter annihilation in a sample of nearby clusters using upper limits on the diffuse radio emission, low levels of observed diffuse emission, or detections of radio mini-halos. We find that the strongest limits on the annihilation cross section are better than limits derived from the non-detection of clusters in the gamma-ray band by a factor of {approx}3 or more when the same annihilation channel and substructure model, but different best-case clusters, are compared. The limits on the cross section depend on the assumed amount of substructure, varying by as much as two orders of magnitude for increasingly optimistic substructure models as compared to a smooth Navarro-Frenk-White profile. In our most optimistic case, using the results of the Phoenix Project, we find that the derived limits reach below the thermal relic cross section of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for dark matter masses as large as 400 GeV, for the b b-bar annihilation channel. We discuss uncertainties due to the limited available data on the magnetic field structure of individual clusters. We also report the discovery of diffuse radio emission from the central 30-40 kpc regions of the groups M49 and NGC 4636.

  7. Gamma Rays from Clusters and Groups of Galaxies: Cosmic Rays versus Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesla E. Jeltema; John Kehayias; Stefano Profumo

    2009-05-22

    Clusters of galaxies have not yet been detected at gamma-ray frequencies; however, the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly known as GLAST, could provide the first detections in the near future. Clusters are expected to emit gamma rays as a result of (1) a population of high-energy primary and re-accelerated secondary cosmic rays (CR) fueled by structure formation and merger shocks, active galactic nuclei and supernovae, and (2) particle dark matter (DM) annihilation. In this paper, we ask the question of whether the Fermi telescope will be able to discriminate between the two emission processes. We present data-driven predictions for a large X-ray flux limited sample of galaxy clusters and groups. We point out that the gamma ray signals from CR and DM can be comparable. In particular, we find that poor clusters and groups are the systems predicted to have the highest DM to CR emission at gamma-ray energies. Based on detailed Fermi simulations, we study observational handles that might enable us to distinguish the two emission mechanisms, including the gamma-ray spectra, the spatial distribution of the signal and the associated multi-wavelength emissions. We also propose optimal hardness ratios, which will help to understand the nature of the gamma-ray emission. Our study indicates that gamma rays from DM annihilation with a high particle mass can be distinguished from a CR spectrum even for fairly faint sources. Discriminating a CR spectrum from a light DM particle will be instead much more difficult, and will require long observations and/or a bright source. While the gamma-ray emission from our simulated clusters is extended, determining the spatial distribution with Fermi will be a challenging task requiring an optimal control of the backgrounds.

  8. Noble Gas Clusters and Nanoplasmas in High Harmonic Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aladi, M; Rácz, P; Földes, I B

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of high harmonic generation from noble gas clusters of xenon atoms in a gas jet. Harmonic spectra were investigated as a function of backing pressure, showing spectral shifts due to the nanoplasma electrons in the clusters. At certain value of laser intensity this process may oppose the effect of the well-known ionization-induced blueshift. In addition, these cluster-induced harmonic redshifts may give the possibility to estimate cluster density and cluster size in the laser-gas jet interaction range.

  9. Characterizing cluster morphology using vector-valued Minkowski functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claus Beisbart; Thomas Buchert

    1997-11-04

    The morphology of galaxy clusters is quantified using Minkowski functionals, especially the vector-valued ones, which contain directional information and are related to curvature centroids. The asymmetry of clusters and the amount of their substructure can be characterized in a unique way using these measures. -- We briefly introduce vector-valued Minkowski functionals (also known as Querma\\ss vectors) and suggest their application to cluster data in terms of a morphological characterization of excursion sets. Furthermore, we develop robust structure functions which describe the dynamical state of a cluster and study the evolution of clusters using numerical simulations.

  10. Electrphoretic Sample Excitation Light Assembly.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Qingbo (State College, PA); Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA)

    2002-04-02

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  11. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, Daniel M. C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium.

  12. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-04-19

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

  13. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  14. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  15. ON THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN THEORETICAL AND X-RAY CONCENTRATION-MASS RELATIONS FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasia, E. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Borgani, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Trieste, Sezione di Astronomia, via Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Ettori, S.; Meneghetti, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Mazzotta, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133, Roma (Italy)

    2013-10-10

    In the past 15 years, the concentration-mass relation has been investigated diffusely in theoretical studies. On the other hand, only recently has this relation been derived from X-ray observations. When that happened, the results caused a certain level of concern: the X-ray normalizations and slopes were found significantly dissimilar from those predicted by theory. We analyzed 52 galaxy clusters and groups, simulated with different descriptions of the physical processes that affect the baryonic component, with the purpose of determining whether these discrepancies are real or induced by biases in the computation of the concentration parameter or in the determination of the selection function of the cluster sample for which the analysis is carried out. In particular, we investigate how the simulated concentration-mass relation depends (1) on the radial range used to derive the concentration; (2) on the presence of baryons in the simulations, and on the effect of star formation and feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Finally, we evaluate (3) how the results differ when adopting an X-ray approach for the analysis and (4) how the selection function based on X-ray luminosity can impact the results. All effects studied go in the direction of alleviating the discrepancy between observations and simulations, although with different significance: while the choice of the radial range to fit the profiles and the inclusion of the baryonic component play only a minor role, the X-ray approach to reconstruct the mass profiles and the selection of the cluster sample have a strong impact on the resulting concentration-mass relation. Extending the fit to the most central regions or reducing the fitting radius from the virial boundary to the typical X-ray external radius causes an increase of the normalization in radiative simulations by 5%-10%. In the second case, we measure a slope that is up to twice steeper than that derived by using the typical theoretical radial range. Radiative simulations including only supernova feedback produce 30% higher concentrations than the dark matter case. Such a difference is largely reduced when including the effect of AGN feedback. The concentration-mass relation derived from the X-ray synthetic catalog is significantly steeper due to the combination of several different effects, such as environment, dynamical state and dynamical history of the clusters, bias in mass and temperature measurements, and their dependence on the radius and on the mass of the system. Finally, selecting clusters according to their X-ray luminosity produces a net increase in both normalization and slope of the relation, since at fixed mass, the most luminous clusters are also the most concentrated.

  16. The Voronoi Tessellation Cluster Finder in 2 1 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soares-Santos, Marcelle; /Fermilab /Sao Paulo U.; de Carvalho, Reinaldo R.; /Sao Jose, INPE; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Gal, Roy R.; /Hawaii U.; La Barbera, Francesco; /Capodimonte Observ.; Lopes, Paulo A.A.; /Valongo Observ.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.; Gerke, Brian F.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-23

    We present a detailed description of the Voronoi Tessellation (VT) cluster finder algorithm in 2+1 dimensions, which improves on past implementations of this technique. The need for cluster finder algorithms able to produce reliable cluster catalogs up to redshift 1 or beyond and down to 10{sup 13.5} solar masses is paramount especially in light of upcoming surveys aiming at cosmological constraints from galaxy cluster number counts. We build the VT in photometric redshift shells and use the two-point correlation function of the galaxies in the field to both determine the density threshold for detection of cluster candidates and to establish their significance. This allows us to detect clusters in a self-consistent way without any assumptions about their astrophysical properties. We apply the VT to mock catalogs which extend to redshift 1.4 reproducing the ?CDM cosmology and the clustering properties observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. An objective estimate of the cluster selection function in terms of the completeness and purity as a function of mass and redshift is as important as having a reliable cluster finder. We measure these quantities by matching the VT cluster catalog with the mock truth table. We show that the VT can produce a cluster catalog with completeness and purity >80% for the redshift range up to {approx}1 and mass range down to {approx}10{sup 13.5} solar masses.

  17. The Properties of Young Clusters in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. J. Smith; J. S. Gallagher

    2000-01-31

    We present a detailed study of two luminous super star clusters in the starburst galaxy M82. Spectra, covering 3250-8790 A at a resolution of 1.6 A, were obtained at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) for cluster F and the highly reddened cluster L. We compare the strengths of the observed Balmer absorption lines and the Balmer jump in the blue spectrum of F with theoretical model cluster spectra using the PEGASE spectral synthesis code to derive an age of 60+/-20 Myr. For cluster L, we find that the similarities in the strength of the Ca II triplet and overall spectral appearance with cluster F suggest a similar age. The brightness and compactness of cluster F make it an ideal candidate for determining its dynamical mass by measuring the velocity dispersion. We present the results of such an investigation based on echelle spectra at a resolution of 8 km/s obtained at the WHT from 5760-9140 A. By cross-correlating various wavelength regions in the spectrum of cluster F with cool giant and supergiant template stars, we derive a velocity dispersion and, by application of the virial theorem, determine a dynamical mass of 2 million solar masses. We compare our derived mass with those determined for other young super star clusters and discuss whether our derived parameters are consistent with cluster F being able to survive to become a globular cluster.

  18. Substructure in the Globular Cluster System of the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Burkert; G. Smith

    1996-10-23

    The kinematical and spatial properties of the metal-rich globular clusters in the Galaxy ([Fe/H] > -0.8) indicates that these objects do not comprise a homogeneous population. Three subsystems are identified. The highest-mass clusters exhibit a very slow net rotation with a speed of v_rot = 24 km/s and v_rot/sigma = 0.3, indicative of a centrally condensed, spheroidal subsystem. Roughly half of the lower-mass clusters appear to be located in an elongated bar-like structure which passes through the Galactic Center, and has similar properties to the central stellar bar of the Milky Way. The remaining lower-mass clusters exhibit very rapid net rotation, with a rotation speed of v_rot = 164 km/s and v_rot/sigma = 6. These clusters are located in the Galactic plane, within a ring of 4 to 6 kpc radial distance from the Galactic Center. The highest-mass clusters may have formed during relatively advanced stages of the dissipative evolution of the inner Galactic halo. The lower-mass bar clusters may be associated with the formation of the Galactic stellar bar or bulge. The lower-mass ring clusters appear to be real disk objects. They may represent a stage in cluster formation that was intermediate between that of the halo globular clusters and the oldest extant open clusters.

  19. Change in magnetic and structural properties of FeRh thin films by gold cluster ion beam irradiation with the energy of 1.67?MeV/atom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koide, T.; Iwase, A. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Saitoh, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakamaki, M.; Amemiya, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Matsui, T., E-mail: t-matsui@21c.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Research Organization for the 21st Century, Osaka Prefecture University Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    The effect of energetic cluster ion beam irradiation on magnetic and structural properties of FeRh thin films have been investigated. The cluster ions used in the present studies consist of a few gold atoms with the energy of 1.67?MeV/gold atom. Saturation magnetization of the sample irradiated with Au3 cluster ion beam (280?emu/cc) is larger than that for the irradiated sample with Au1 ion beam (240?emu/cc) for the same irradiation ion fluence. These results can also be confirmed by the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurement; the XMCD signal for Au3 cluster ion irradiation is larger than that for Au1 ion irradiation. Since the ion beam irradiation induced magnetization of FeRh is significantly correlated with the amount of the lattice defects in the samples, cluster ion beam irradiation can be considered to effectively introduce the lattice defects in B2-type FeRh rather than the single ion beam. Consequently, cluster ion irradiation is better than single ion irradiation for the viewpoint of saturation magnetization, even if the same irradiation energy is deposited in the samples.

  20. 2MASS NIR photometry for 693 candidate globular clusters in M31 and the Revised Bologna Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Galleti; L. Federici; M. Bellazzini; F. Fusi Pecci; S. Macrina

    2003-12-17

    We have identified in the 2MASS database 693 known and candidate globular clusters in M31. The 2MASS J,H,K magnitudes of these objects have been transformed to the same homogeneous photometric system of existing near infrared photometry of M31 globulars, finally yielding J,H,K integrated photometry for 279 confirmed M31 clusters, 406 unconfirmed candidates and 8 objects with controversial classification. Of these objects 529 lacked any previous estimate of their near infrared magnitudes. The newly assembled near infrared dataset has been implemented into a revised version of the Bologna Catalogue of M31 globulars, with updated optical (UBVRI) photometry taken, when possible, from the most recent sources of CCD photometry available in the literature and transformed to a common photometric system. The final Revised Bologna Catalogue (available in electronic form) is the most comprehensive list presently available of confirmed and candidate M31 globular clusters, with a total of 1164 entries. In particular, it includes 337 confirmed GCs, 688 GC candidates, 10 objects with controversial classification, 70 confirmed galaxies, 55 confirmed stars, and 4 HII regions lying within ~3 deg. from the center of the M31 galaxy. Using the newly assembled database we show that the V-K color provides a powerful tool to discriminate between M31 clusters and background galaxies, and we identify a sample of 83 globular cluster candidates, which is not likely to be contaminated by misclassified galaxies.

  1. Rhapsody-G simulations I: the cool cores, hot gas and stellar content of massive galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Oliver; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August E; Teyssier, Romain; Wechsler, Risa H

    2015-01-01

    We present the Rhapsody-G suite of cosmological hydrodynamic AMR zoom simulations of ten massive galaxy clusters at the $M_{\\rm vir}\\sim10^{15}\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$ scale. These simulations include cooling and sub-resolution models for star formation and stellar and supermassive black hole feedback. The sample is selected to capture the whole gamut of assembly histories that produce clusters of similar final mass. We present an overview of the successes and shortcomings of such simulations in reproducing both the stellar properties of galaxies as well as properties of the hot plasma in clusters. In our simulations, a long-lived cool-core/non-cool core dichotomy arises naturally, and the emergence of non-cool cores is related to low angular momentum major mergers. Nevertheless, the cool-core clusters exhibit a low central entropy compared to observations, which cannot be alleviated by thermal AGN feedback. For cluster scaling relations we find that the simulations match well the $M_{500}-Y_{500}$ scaling of Planck ...

  2. Constraining the Dark Matter decay lifetime with very deep observations of the Perseus cluster with the MAGIC telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palacio, J; Acosta, M Vazquez; Colin, P; Maggio, C; Rico, J

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results on Dark Matter searches from observations of the Perseus galaxy cluster with the MAGIC Telescopes. MAGIC is a system of two Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes located in the Canary island of La Palma, Spain. Galaxy clusters are the largest known gravitationally bound structures in the Universe, with masses of ~10^15 Solar masses. There is strong evidence that galaxy clusters are Dark Matter dominated objects, and therefore promising targets for Dark Matter searches, particularly for decay signals. MAGIC has taken almost 300 hours of data on the Perseus Cluster between 2009 and 2015, the deepest observational campaign on any galaxy cluster performed so far in the very high energy range of the electromagnetic spectrum. We analyze here a small sample of this data and search for signs of dark matter in the mass range between 100 GeV and 20 TeV. We apply a likelihood analysis optimized for the spectral and morphological features expected in the dark matter decay signals. This i...

  3. IAU Commission 37 "Star Clusters and Associations" Legacy report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carraro, Giovanni; Elmegreen, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Geisler, Douglas; Goodwin, Simon; Stetson, Peter; Minniti, Dante

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that stars do not form in isolation but result from the fragmentation of molecular clouds, which in turn leads to star cluster formation. Over time, clusters dissolve or are destroyed by interactions with molecular clouds or tidal stripping, and their members become part of the general field population. Star clusters are thus among the basic building blocks of galaxies. In turn, star cluster populations, from young associations and open clusters to old globulars, are powerful tracers of the formation, assembly, and evolutionary history of their parent galaxies. Although their importance had been recognised for decades, major progress in this area has only become possible in recent years, both for Galactic and extragalactic cluster populations. Star clusters are the observational foundation for stellar astrophysics and evolution, provide essential tracers of galactic structure, and are unique stellar dynamical environments. Star formation, stellar structure, stellar evolution, and stellar...

  4. Laser induced neutron production by explosion of the deuterium clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holkundkar, Amol R., E-mail: amol.holkundkar@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani 333 031 (India); Mishra, Gaurav, E-mail: gauravm@barc.gov.in; Gupta, N. K., E-mail: nkgupta@barc.gov.in [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-01-15

    The high energy deuterium ions serve as compact source of neutrons when fused with either deuterium or tritium atoms. In view of this, the explosion of the deuterium clusters under the influence of the laser pulse with intensity ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 19}?W/cm{sup 2} is being studied along with the effect of the cluster radius and inter-cluster distance. The objective of this article is to study the efficiency of the deuterium cluster as a compact source of neutrons under various laser and cluster parameters. It is being observed that the cluster density (number of clusters per unit volume) is quite important to gain high neutron yield.

  5. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  6. WMAP OBSERVATIONS OF PLANCK ESZ CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Yinzhe; Hinshaw, Gary; Scott, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-07-10

    We examine the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in the seven year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data by cross-correlating it with the Planck Early-release Sunyaev-Zeldovich catalog. Our analysis proceeds in two parts. We first perform a stacking analysis in which the filtered WMAP data are averaged at the locations of the 175 Planck clusters. We then perform a regression analysis to compare the mean amplitude of the SZ signal, Y{sub 500}, in the WMAP data to the corresponding amplitude in the Planck data. The aggregate Planck clusters are detected in the seven year WMAP data with a signal-to-noise ratio of 16.3. In the regression analysis, we find that the SZ amplitude measurements agree to better than 25%: a = 1.23 {+-} 0.18 for the fit Y{sup wmap}{sub 500}= aY{sup planck}{sub 500}.

  7. Curve sampling and geometric conditional simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Ayres C. (Ayres Chee), 1978-

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is the development and exploitation of techniques to generate geometric samples for the purpose of image segmentation. A sampling-based approach provides a number of benefits over existing ...

  8. Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-10-18

    This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

  9. Adaptive Basis Sampling for Smoothing Splines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Nan

    2015-08-03

    . However, the high computational cost of smoothing splines for large data sets has hindered their wide application. We develop a new method, named adaptive basis sampling, for efficient computation of smoothing splines in super-large samples. Generally, a...

  10. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way III. 139 new open clusters at high Galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeja, S; Piskunov, A E; Röser, S; Schilbach, E; Froebrich, D; Scholz, R -D

    2014-01-01

    An earlier analysis of the Milky Way Star Cluster (MWSC) catalogue revealed an apparent lack of old (> 1 Gyr) open clusters in the solar neighbourhood ( 20{\\deg}. We were looking for stellar density enhancements using a star count algorithm on the 2MASS point source catalogue. To increase the contrast between potential clusters and the field, we applied filters in colour-magnitude space according to typical colour-magnitude diagrams of nearby old open clusters. The subsequent comparison with lists of known objects allowed us to select thus far unknown cluster candidates. For verification they were processed with the standard pipeline used within the MWSC survey for computing cluster membership probabilities and for determining structural, kinematic, and astrophysical parameters. In total we discovered 782 density enhancements, 522 of which were classified as real objects. Among them 139 are new open clusters with ages 8.3 < log (t [yr]) < 9.7, distances d < 3 kpc, and distances from the Galactic plan...

  11. Influence of cluster–support interactions on reactivity of size-selected NbxOy clusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nakayama, Miki; Xue, Meng; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; White, Michael G.

    2015-04-17

    Size-selected niobium oxide nanoclusters (Nb3O5, Nb3O7, Nb4O7, and Nb4O10) were deposited at room temperature onto a Cu(111) surface and a thin film of Cu2O on Cu(111), and their interfacial electronic interactions and reactivity toward water dissociation were examined. These clusters were specifically chosen to elucidate the effects of the oxidation state of the metal centers; Nb3O5 and Nb4O7 are the reduced counterparts of Nb3O7 and Nb4O10, respectively. From two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE) measurements, we found that the work function increases upon cluster adsorption in all cases, indicating a negative interfacial dipole moment with the positive end pointing into the surface.more »The amount of increase was greater for the clusters with more metal centers and higher oxidation state. Additional analysis with DFT calculations of the clusters on Cu(111) indicated that the reduced clusters donate electrons to the substrate, indicating that the intrinsic cluster dipole moment makes a larger contribution to the overall interfacial dipole moment than charge transfer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that the Nb atoms of Nb3O7 and Nb4O10 are primarily Nb5+ on Cu(111), while for the reduced Nb3O5 and Nb4O7 clusters, a mixture of oxidation states was observed on Cu(111). Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments with D2O showed that water dissociation occurred on all systems except for the oxidized Nb3O7 and Nb4O10 clusters on the Cu2O film. A comparison of our XPS and TPD results suggests that Nb5+ cations associated with Nb=O terminal groups act as Lewis acid sites which are key for water binding and subsequent dissociation. TPD measurements of 2-propanol dehydration also show that the clusters active toward water dissociation are indeed acidic. DFT calculations of water dissociation on Nb3O7 support our TPD results, but the use of bulk Cu2O(111) as a model for the Cu2O film merits future scrutiny in terms of interfacial charge transfer. The combination of our experimental and theoretical results suggests that both Lewis acidity and metal reducibility are important for water dissociation.« less

  12. Massive Stars in the Arches Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figer, D F; Gilmore, D; Morris, M; Kim, S S; Serabyn, E; McLean, I S; Gilbert, A M; Graham, J R; Larkin, J E; Levenson, N A; Teplitz, H I; Figer, Donald F.; Najarro, Francisco; Gilmore, Diane; Morris, Mark; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Serabyn, Eugene; Lean, Ian S. Mc; Gilbert, Andrea M.; Graham, James R.; Larkin, James E.; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2002-01-01

    We present and use new spectra and narrow-band images, along with previously published broad-band images, of stars in the Arches cluster to extract photometry, astrometry, equivalent width, and velocity information. The data are interpreted with a wind/atmosphere code to determine stellar temperatures, luminosities, mass-loss rates, and abundances. We have doubled the number of known emission-line stars, and we have also made the first spectroscopic identification of the main sequence for any population in the Galactic Center. We conclude that the most massive stars are bona-fide Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars and are some of the most massive stars known, having M_{initial} > 100 Msun, and prodigious winds, Mdot > 10^{-5} Msun yr^{-1}, that are enriched with helium and nitrogen; with these identifications, the Arches cluster contains about 5% of all known WR stars in the Galaxy. We find an upper limit to the velocity dispersion of 22 kms^{-1}, implying an upper limit to the cluster mass of 7(10^4) Msun within a radius...

  13. Oxygen abundance of open cluster dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. -X. Shen; X. -W. Liu; H. -W. Zhang; B. Jones; D. N. C. Lin

    2007-03-30

    We present oxygen abundances of dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665 deduced from the OI $\\lambda$7774 triplet lines and of dwarfs in the open cluster Pleiades derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line. Stellar parameters and oxygen abundances were derived using the spectroscopic synthesis tool SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy). We find a dramatic increase in the upper boundary of the OI triplet abundances with decreasing temperature in the dwarfs of IC 4665, consistent with the trend found by Schuler et al. in the open clusters Pleiades and M 34, and to a less extent in the cool dwarfs of Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006a) and UMa (King & Schuler 2005). By contrast, oxygen abundances derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line for stars in Pleiades and Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006b) are constant within the errors. Possible mechanisms that may lead a varying oxygen triplet line abundance are examined, including systematic errors in the stellar parameter determinations, the NLTE effects, surface activities and granulation. The age-related effects stellar surface activities (especially the chromospheric activities) are suggested by our analysis to blame for the large spreads of oxygen triplet line abundances.

  14. GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: A NEAR-UNIVERSAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, William E.; O'Halloran, Heather; Cockcroft, Robert E-mail: ohallohm@mcmaster.ca; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results from our Hubble Space Telescope brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) survey of seven central supergiant cluster galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems. We measure a total of 48,000 GCs in all seven galaxies, representing the largest single GC database. We find that a log-normal shape accurately matches the observed the luminosity function (LF) of the GCs down to the globular cluster luminosity function turnover point, which is near our photometric limit. In addition, the LF has a virtually identical shape in all seven galaxies. Our data underscore the similarity in the formation mechanism of massive star clusters in diverse galactic environments. At the highest luminosities (L ? 10{sup 7} L {sub ?}), we find small numbers of ''superluminous'' objects in five of the galaxies; their luminosity and color ranges are at least partly consistent with those of ultra-compact dwarfs. Last, we find preliminary evidence that in the outer halo (R ? 20 kpc), the LF turnover point shows a weak dependence on projected distance, scaling as L {sub 0} ? R {sup –0.2}, while the LF dispersion remains nearly constant.

  15. Development of Fluorescent Reporters for Monitoring Fe-S Cluster Transfer Reactions and Discerning the Role of Glutaredoxin Proteins in Fe-S Cluster Assembly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vranish, James Nicholas

    2015-04-27

    and persulfides to form clusters). The in vitro study of cluster transfer has been hampered by the lack of sufficient methods to investigate the kinetics of these processes. We have developed fluorescently labeled iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins...

  16. Fourier Sampling Coset States of Nonabelian Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Sean

    55 Chapter 6 Fourier Sampling Coset States of Nonabelian Groups In this chapter we analyze the HSP problem, to the HSP over the symmetric group S n . In particular, we will analyze Fourier sampling coset states when the group is nonabelian. We show that Fourier sampling a polynomial number of coset states

  17. Evidence for significant growth in the stellar mass of brightest cluster galaxies over the past 10 billion years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidman, C.; Suherli, J.; Muzzin, A.; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Demarco, Rafael Senos; Brough, S.; Rettura, A.; Cox, J.; DeGroot, A.; Yee, H. K. C.; Gilbank, D.; Hoekstra, H.; Balogh, M.; Ellingson, E.; Hicks, A.; Nantais, J.; Noble, A.; Lacy, M.; Surace, J.; Webb, T.

    2012-01-01

    .156 16:16:41.32 55:45:12.4 WIRCAM/CFHT 18 960 7000 SpARCS J163435+402151 1,3 1.177 16:34:38.21 40:20:58.4 WIRCAM/CFHT 11 640 6850 SpARCS J163852+403843 1,3 1.196 16:38:51.64 40:38:42.8 WIRCAM/CFHT 11 640 6000 SpARCS J003550?431224 1,4 1.335 00... et al. (2010), using a sample of 20 mostly X-ray selected clusters and a sample of nearby clusters from Stott et al. (2008), find that there is little growth between z ? 1.4 and now. At z ? 1.4, the semi-analytic model of De Lucia & Blaizot (2007...

  18. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

  19. Dynamical Friction on Star Clusters near the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sungsoo S. Kim; Mark Morris

    2003-07-14

    Numerical simulations of the dynamical friction suffered by a star cluster near the Galactic center have been performed with a parallelized tree code. Gerhard (2001) has suggested that dynamical friction, which causes a cluster to lose orbital energy and spiral in towards the galactic center, may explain the presence of a cluster of very young stars in the central parsec, where star formation might be prohibitively difficult owing to strong tidal forces. The clusters modeled in our simulations have an initial total mass of 10^5-10^6 Msun and initial galactocentric radii of 2.5-30 pc. We have identified a few simulations in which dynamical friction indeed brings a cluster to the central parsec, although this is only possible if the cluster is either very massive (~10^6 Msun), or is formed near the central parsec ( 10^6 Msun pc-3). The initial core collapse and segregation of massive stars into the cluster core, which typically happens on a much shorter time scale than that characterizing the dynamical inspiral of the cluster toward the Galactic center, can provide the requisite high density. Furthermore, because it is the cluster core which is most likely to survive the cluster disintegration during its journey inwards, this can help account for the observed distribution of presumably massive HeI stars in the central parsec.

  20. ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Tully, R. Brent; Marzke, R. O.; Phillipps, S.; Price, J.; Peng, Eric W.; Trentham, Neil; Carter, David; Hammer, Derek E-mail: tully@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: S.Phillipps@bristol.ac.uk E-mail: peng@pku.edu.cn E-mail: dxc@astro.livjm.ac.uk

    2011-08-20

    We have undertaken a spectroscopic search for ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) in the dense core of the dynamically evolved, massive Coma cluster as part of the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) Coma Cluster Treasury Survey. UCD candidates were initially chosen based on color, magnitude, degree of resolution within the ACS images, and the known properties of Fornax and Virgo UCDs. Follow-up spectroscopy with Keck/Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer confirmed 27 candidates as members of the Coma cluster, a success rate >60% for targeted objects brighter than M{sub R} = -12. Another 14 candidates may also prove to be Coma members, but low signal-to-noise spectra prevent definitive conclusions. An investigation of the properties and distribution of the Coma UCDs finds these objects to be very similar to UCDs discovered in other environments. The Coma UCDs tend to be clustered around giant galaxies in the cluster core and have colors/metallicity that correlate with the host galaxy. With properties and a distribution similar to that of the Coma cluster globular cluster population, we find strong support for a star cluster origin for the majority of the Coma UCDs. However, a few UCDs appear to have stellar population or structural properties which differentiate them from the old star cluster populations found in the Coma cluster, perhaps indicating that UCDs may form through multiple formation channels.

  1. MOCK OBSERVATIONS OF BLUE STRAGGLERS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: e.glebbeek@astro.ru.nl E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu

    2013-11-10

    We created artificial color-magnitude diagrams of Monte Carlo dynamical models of globular clusters and then used observational methods to determine the number of blue stragglers in those clusters. We compared these blue stragglers to various cluster properties, mimicking work that has been done for blue stragglers in Milky Way globular clusters to determine the dominant formation mechanism(s) of this unusual stellar population. We find that a mass-based prescription for selecting blue stragglers will select approximately twice as many blue stragglers than a selection criterion that was developed for observations of real clusters. However, the two numbers of blue stragglers are well-correlated, so either selection criterion can be used to characterize the blue straggler population of a cluster. We confirm previous results that the simplified prescription for the evolution of a collision or merger product in the BSE code overestimates their lifetimes. We show that our model blue stragglers follow similar trends with cluster properties (core mass, binary fraction, total mass, collision rate) as the true Milky Way blue stragglers as long as we restrict ourselves to model clusters with an initial binary fraction higher than 5%. We also show that, in contrast to earlier work, the number of blue stragglers in the cluster core does have a weak dependence on the collisional parameter ? in both our models and in Milky Way globular clusters.

  2. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  3. FNR 3410C Natural Resource Sampling FNR 3410C -NATURAL RESOURCE SAMPLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    of sampling. Design of cost-effective sample surveys. Sampling methodology applicable 0211 (Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering) Lab 1 Period 7-9 13:55-16:55 M BLK begins with a review of elementary statistics and continues with specific

  4. Modeling the formation of globular cluster systems in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y. E-mail: ognedin@umich.edu

    2014-11-20

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 10{sup 12} to 7 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ?} and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 10{sup 10} and 3 × 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}. To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  5. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : II. Atomic and Cluster Scale Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Takato, Yoichi

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the interaction of aerosol particle clusters/flocs with surfaces is an area of interest for a number of processes in chemical, pharmaceutical, and powder manufacturing as well as in steam-tube rupture in nuclear power plants. Developing predictive capabilities for these applications involves coupled phenomena on multiple length and timescales from the process macroscopic scale ({approx}1m) to the multi-cluster interaction scale (1mm-0.1m) to the single cluster scale ({approx}1000 - 10000 particles) to the particle scale (10nm-10{micro}m) interactions, and on down to the sub-particle, atomic scale interactions. The focus of this report is on the single cluster scale; although work directed toward developing better models of particle-particle interactions by considering sub-particle scale interactions and phenomena is also described. In particular, results of mesoscale (i.e., particle to single cluster scale) discrete element method (DEM) simulations for aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls are presented. The particle-particle interaction model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular package in the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Additionally, as mentioned, results from atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations are also described as a means of developing higher fidelity models of particle-particle interactions. Ultimately, the results from these and other studies at various scales must be collated to provide systems level models with accurate 'sub-grid' information for design, analysis and control of the underlying systems processes.

  6. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  7. Cosmological constraints from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts: An approach to account for missing redshifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonaldi, A.; Battye, R. A.; Brown, M. L., E-mail: anna.bonaldi@manchester.ac.uk [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-10

    The accumulation of redshifts provides a significant observational bottleneck when using galaxy cluster surveys to constrain cosmological parameters. We propose a simple method to allow the use of samples where there is a fraction of the redshifts that are not known. The simplest assumption is that the missing redshifts are randomly extracted from the catalog, but the method also allows one to take into account known selection effects in the accumulation of redshifts. We quantify the reduction in statistical precision of cosmological parameter constraints as a function of the fraction of missing redshifts for simulated surveys, and also investigate the impact of making an incorrect assumption for the distribution of missing redshifts.

  8. The Phoenix Deep Survey: the clustering and the environment of Extremely Red Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Georgakakis; J. Afonso; A. M. Hopkins; M. Sullivan; B. Mobasher; L. E. Cram

    2004-11-22

    In this paper we explore the clustering properties and the environment of the Extremely Red Objects (EROs; I-K>4mag) detected in a ~180arcmin^2 deep (Ks~20mag) Ks-band survey of a region within the Phoenix Deep Survey, an on-going multiwavelength program aiming to investigate the nature and the evolution of faint radio sources. Using our complete sample of 289 EROs brighter than Ks=20mag we estimate a statistically significant (~3.7sigma) angular correlation function signal with amplitude Aw=8.7^{+2.1}_{-1.7}x10^{-3} consistent with earlier work based on smaller samples. This amplitude suggests a clustering length in the range ro=12-17h^{-1}Mpc, implying that EROs trace regions of enhanced density. Using a novel method we further explore the association of EROs with galaxy overdensities by smoothing the K-band galaxy distribution using the matched filter algorithm of Postman et al. (1996) and then cross-correlating the resulting density maps with the ERO positions. Our analysis provides direct evidence that EROs are associated with overdensities at redshifts z>1. We also exploit the deep radio 1.4GHz data (limiting flux 60microJy) available to explore the association of EROs and faint radio sources and whether the two populations trace similar large scale structures. Cross-correlation of the two samples (after excluding 17EROs with radio counterparts) gives a 2sigma signal only for the sub-sample of high-z radio sources (z>0.6). Although the statistics are poor this suggests that it is the high-z radio sub-sample that traces similar structures with EROs.

  9. The relation between galactic properties and cluster structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca M. Poggianti; Terry J. Bridges; M. Yagi; Y. Komiyama; D. Carter; B. Mobasher; S. Okamura; N. Kashikawa

    2003-11-18

    A satisfactory understanding of the origin of the dependence of galaxy properties on their environment has remained, so far, out of reach. In the light of numerous observational results and substantial theoretical progress obtained for clusters of galaxies in the last years, a primary goal is to understand how the star formation activity depends on cluster substructure, i.e. on the merging/accretion history of a cluster. In this contribution we present a case in which it is possible to identify the cluster environment, and in particular the intracluster medium and the recent infall history of galaxies onto the cluster, as the cause for an abrupt change in the star formation histories of a subset of galaxies in the Coma cluster.

  10. Diffusion of tungsten clusters on tungsten (110) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Yang, Jianyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian; Gao, Fei

    2009-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation and modified analytic embedded-atom method, we have investigated the self-diffusion of clusters on a tungsten (110) surface. As compared to the linear-chain configuration, the close-packed islands for tungsten clusters containing more than nine adatoms have been predicted to be more stable with the relatively lower binding energies. The migration energies show an interesting and oscillating behavior with increasing cluster size. The tetramer, hexamer and octamer have obviously higher migration energies than the others. The different atomic configurations and diffusion mechanisms have been determined during the diffusion processes. It is clear that the dimer-shearing mechanism occurs inside the hexamer, while it occurs at the periphery of heptamer. The successive hopping mechanism of individual atom is of critical importance in the migration of the clusters containing five or fewer adatoms. In addition, the diffusion of a cluster with nine adatoms is achieved through the changes of the cluster shape.

  11. Galactic Globular and Open Cluster Fiducial Sequences in the Pan-STARRS1 Photometric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Edouard J; Schlafly, Edward F; Platais, Imants; Bell, Eric F; Martin, Nicolas F; Rix, Hans-Walter; Slater, Colin T; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth C; Draper, Peter W; Hodapp, Klaus W; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Magnier, Eugene A; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We present the fiducial sequences of a sample of Galactic star clusters in the five bands of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) photometric system (g_P1, r_P1, i_P1, z_P1, y_P1). These empirical sequences -- which include the red giant and sub-giant branches, the main sequence, and the horizontal branch -- were defined from deep colour-magnitude diagrams reaching below the oldest main-sequence turn-offs of 13 globular and 3 old open clusters covering a wide range of metallicities (-2.4 < [Fe/H] < +0.4). We find excellent agreement for the nine clusters in common with previous studies in similar photometric systems when transformed to the PS1 system. Because the photometric and spectroscopic properties of these stellar populations are accurately known, the fiducials provide a solid basis for the interpretation of observations in the PS1 system, as well as valuable constraints to improve the empirical colour--$T_{eff}$ relations.

  12. The 10830 Angstrom Helium Line Among Evolved Stars in the Globular Cluster M4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strader, Jay; Smith, Graeme H

    2015-01-01

    Helium is a pivotal element in understanding multiple main sequences and extended horizontal branches observed in some globular clusters. Here we present a spectroscopic study of helium in the nearby globular cluster M4. We have obtained spectra of the chromospheric He I 10830 A line in 16 red horizontal branch, red giant branch, and asymptotic giant branch stars. Clear He I absorption or emission is present in most of the stars. Effective temperature is the principal parameter that correlates with 10830 A line strength. Stars with T_eff < 4450 K do not exhibit the helium line. Red horizontal branch stars, which are the hottest stars in our sample, all have strong He I line absorption. A number of these stars show very broad 10830 A lines with shortward extensions indicating outflows as high as 80-100 km/s and the possibility of mass loss. We have also derived [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] abundances to see whether these standard tracers of "second generation" cluster stars are correlated with He I line strength. Un...

  13. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2013-10-10

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  14. Cluster computing software for GATE simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beenhouwer, Jan de; Staelens, Steven; Kruecker, Dirk; Ferrer, Ludovic; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Rannou, Fernando R.

    2007-06-15

    Geometry and tracking (GEANT4) is a Monte Carlo package designed for high energy physics experiments. It is used as the basis layer for Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear medicine acquisition systems in GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). GATE allows the user to realistically model experiments using accurate physics models and time synchronization for detector movement through a script language contained in a macro file. The downside of this high accuracy is long computation time. This paper describes a platform independent computing approach for running GATE simulations on a cluster of computers in order to reduce the overall simulation time. Our software automatically creates fully resolved, nonparametrized macros accompanied with an on-the-fly generated cluster specific submit file used to launch the simulations. The scalability of GATE simulations on a cluster is investigated for two imaging modalities, positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Due to a higher sensitivity, PET simulations are characterized by relatively high data output rates that create rather large output files. SPECT simulations, on the other hand, have lower data output rates but require a long collimator setup time. Both of these characteristics hamper scalability as a function of the number of CPUs. The scalability of PET simulations is improved here by the development of a fast output merger. The scalability of SPECT simulations is improved by greatly reducing the collimator setup time. Accordingly, these two new developments result in higher scalability for both PET and SPECT simulations and reduce the computation time to more practical values.

  15. Topological one-way quantum computation on verified logical cluster...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    computation on verified logical cluster states We present a scheme to improve the noise threshold for fault-tolerant topological one-way computation with constant overhead....

  16. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks Gu, Yi; Wu, Qishi; Rao, Nageswara S. V. Hindawi Publishing Corporation None...

  17. Jefferson Lab Awards Contract for Next Cluster Computer | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and gluons. For more information: Jefferson Lab's cluster computing efforts: http:datacenter.atouchoftech.com:9156newsreleasessupercomputing-sho... Thomas Jefferson National...

  18. Investigation of ${}^9$Be from nonlocalized clustering concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mengjiao Lyu; Zhongzhou Ren; Bo Zhou; Yasuro Funaki; Hisashi Horiuchi; Gerd Röpke; Peter Schuck; Akihiro Tohsaki; Chang Xu; Taiichi Yamada

    2014-12-31

    The nonlocalized aspect of clustering, which is a new concept for self-conjugate nuclei, is extended for the investigation of the N{\

  19. Supercomputing on a Shoestring: Cluster Computers at JLab | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which describe the distribution of electric charge and current inside the nucleon. Apple To calculate the solution to a science problem, a cluster computer slices space up...

  20. Old open clusters: UBGVRI photometry of NGC 2506

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Marconi; D. Hamilton; M. Tosi; A. Bragaglia

    1997-07-07

    UBGVRI photometry for the open cluster NGC 2506 is presented. From comparison of the observed colour-magnitude diagrams with simulations based on stellar evolutionary models we derive in a self consistent way reddening, distance, and age of the cluster: E(B-V)=0-0.07, (m-M)o = 12.6, age = 1.5-2.2 Gyr. The cluster shows a well definite secondary sequence, suggesting that binary systems constitute about 20 % of the cluster members visible in the colour-magnitude diagram.

  1. Reactive Molecular Simulations of Protonation of Water Clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactive Molecular Simulations of Protonation of Water Clusters and Depletion of Acidity in H-ZSM-5 Zeolite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reactive Molecular...

  2. Optimizing Cluster Heads for Energy Efficiency in Large-Scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    clustering is generally considered as an efficient and scalable way to facilitate the management and operation of such large-scale networks and minimize the total energy...

  3. in High Performance Computing Computer System, Cluster, and Networking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iSSH v. Auditd: Intrusion Detection in High Performance Computing Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute David Karns, New Mexico State University Katy Protin,...

  4. Cluster Analysis-Based Approaches for Geospatiotemporal Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cluster Analysis-Based Approaches for Geospatiotemporal Data Mining of Massive Data Sets for Identification of Forest Threats Mills, Richard T ORNL ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M...

  5. Ab Initio Coupled-Cluster Effective Interactions for the Shell...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Initio Coupled-Cluster Effective Interactions for the Shell Model: Application to Neutron-Rich Oxygen and Carbon Isotopes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio...

  6. Using Cluster Road Mapping to Determine Strategic Clean Energy Direction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the transcript for the Using Cluster Roadmapping to Determine Your Strategic Clean Energy Direction webinar held on May 16, 2013.

  7. The faint end of the luminosity function in clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Trentham

    1998-04-01

    I review recent measurements of the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in galaxy clusters. Evidence is presented that the luminosity function of galaxies in the central parts of clusters is remarkably constant between clusters and that this luminosity function is steep at bright and faint magnitudes and shallow in-between. The curvature is highly significant -- neither a power-law nor a Schechter function is consistent with the data. At no magnitude does alpha=-1 fit the data well. The faintest galaxies in all clusters that have been studied are dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  8. Privacy-Preserving Clustering to Uphold Business Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaiane, Osmar R.

    Reduction-Based Transformation Approach Stanley R. M. Oliveira Embrapa Informática Agropecuária, Brasil,marketmore effectively and understand customer behaviour. Data Clustering maximizes return on investment supporting

  9. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Atacama Cosmology...

  10. Star formation in the cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 and its large-scale environment: the infrared perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Joana S; Tanaka, Masayuki; Valtchanov, Ivan; Saintonge, Amelie; Dickinson, Mark; Foucaud, Sebastien; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rawle, Tim D; Tadaki, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    The galaxy cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 is one of the most distant galaxy clusters known, with a rich muti-wavelength data set that confirms a mature galaxy population already in place. Using very deep, wide area (20x20 Mpc) imaging by Spitzer/MIPS at 24um, in conjunction with Herschel 5-band imaging from 100-500um, we investigate the dust-obscured, star-formation properties in the cluster and its associated large scale environment. Our galaxy sample of 693 galaxies at z=1.62 detected at 24um (10 spectroscopic and 683 photo-z) includes both cluster galaxies (i.e. within r <1 Mpc projected clustercentric radius) and field galaxies, defined as the region beyond a radius of 3 Mpc. The star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from the measured infrared luminosity range from 18 to 2500 Ms/yr, with a median of 55 Ms/yr, over the entire radial range (10 Mpc). The cluster brightest FIR galaxy, taken as the centre of the galaxy system, is vigorously forming stars at a rate of 256$\\pm$70 Ms/yr, and the total cluster ...

  11. Reconstruction of Intensity From Covered Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Watkins, Thomas R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Burchell, Timothy D; Rosseel, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The safe handling of activated samples requires containment and covering the sample to eliminate any potential for contamination. Subsequent characterization of the surface with x-rays ideally necessitates a thin film. While many films appear visually transparent, they are not necessarily x-ray transparent. Each film material has a unique beam attenuation and sometimes have amorphous peaks that can superimpose with those of the sample. To reconstruct the intensity of the underlying activated sample, the x-ray attenuation and signal due to the film needs to be removed from that of the sample. This requires the calculation of unique deconvolution parameters for the film. The development of a reconstruction procedure for a contained/covered sample is described.

  12. 100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-08

    Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

  13. Visual Matrix Clustering of Social Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; May, Richard A.

    2013-07-01

    The prevailing choices to graphically represent a social network in today’s literature are a node-link graph layout and an adjacency matrix. Both visualization techniques have unique strengths and weaknesses when applied to different domain applications. In this article, we focus our discussion on adjacency matrix and how to turn the matrix-based visualization technique from merely showing pairwise associations among network actors (or graph nodes) to depicting clusters of a social network. We also use node-link layouts to supplement the discussion.

  14. Study of clustering structures through breakup reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Capel

    2014-12-16

    Models for the description of breakup reactions used to study the structure of exotic cluster structures like halos are reviewed. The sensitivity of these models to the projectile description is presented. Calculations are sensitive to the projectile ground state mostly through its asymptotic normalisation coefficient (ANC). They also probe the continuum of the projectile. This enables studying not only the bound states of the projectile but also its continuum, both resonant and non-resonant. This opens the possibility to study correlations between both halo neutrons in two-neutron halo nuclei.

  15. Course Clusters | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate CultureCounting small RNA inCourse

  16. Environmental Business Cluster EBC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop, IncsourceEnginuityBusiness Cluster EBC Jump to:

  17. Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

  18. Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maranas, Costas

    Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank Background Overview T The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply researchers with highly uniform, well-protected coal samples unexposed to oxygen. Researchers investigating coal structure, properties, and behavior can benefit greatly from these samples

  19. Clustering 16S rRNA for OTU prediction: a method of unsupervised Bayesian clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ting

    clusters based on the natural organization of data without setting a hard cut-off threshold (3, University of Southern California, University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA and 2MOE Key Laboratory Windows. Contact: tingchen@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available

  20. The galaxy cluster X-ray luminosity--gravitational mass relation in the light of the WMAP 3rd year data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Reiprich

    2006-05-22

    The 3rd year WMAP results mark a shift in best fit values of cosmological parameters compared to the 1st year data and the concordance cosmological model. We test the consistency of the new results with previous constraints on cosmological parameters from the HIFLUGCS galaxy cluster sample and the impact of this shift on the X-ray luminosity-gravitational mass relation. The measured X-ray luminosity function combined with the observed luminosity-mass relation are compared to mass functions predicted for given cosmological parameter values. The luminosity function and luminosity-mass relation derived previously from HIFLUGCS are in perfect agreement with mass functions predicted using the best fit parameter values from the 3rd year WMAP data (OmegaM=0.238, sigma8=0.74) and inconsistent with the concordance cosmological model (OmegaM=0.3, sigma8=0.9), assuming a flat Universe. Trying to force consistency with the concordance model requires artificially decreasing the normalization of the luminosity-mass relation by a factor of 2. The shift in best fit values for OmegaM and sigma8 has a significant impact on predictions of cluster abundances. The new WMAP results are now in perfect agreement with previous results on the OmegaM-sigma8 relation determined from the mass function of HIFLUGCS clusters and other X-ray cluster samples (the ``low cluster normalization''). We conclude that - unless the true values of OmegaM and sigma8 differ significantly from the 3rd year WMAP results - the luminosity-mass relation is well described by their previous determination from X-ray observations of clusters, with a conservative upper limit on the bias factor of 1.5. These conclusions are currently being tested in a complete follow-up program of all HIFLUGCS clusters with Chandra and XMM-Newton.

  1. CLUSTERING OF OBSCURED AND UNOBSCURED QUASARS IN THE BOOeTES FIELD: PLACING RAPIDLY GROWING BLACK HOLES IN THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Alexander, David M.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Myers, Adam D.; Brodwin, Mark; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Caldwell, Nelson; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cool, Richard J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Stern, Daniel; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2011-04-20

    We present the first measurement of the spatial clustering of mid-infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasars, using a sample in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 1.8 selected from the 9 deg{sup 2} Booetes multiwavelength survey. Recently, the Spitzer Space Telescope and X-ray observations have revealed large populations of obscured quasars that have been inferred from models of the X-ray background and supermassive black hole evolution. To date, little is known about obscured quasar clustering, which allows us to measure the masses of their host dark matter halos and explore their role in the cosmic evolution of black holes and galaxies. In this study, we use a sample of 806 mid-infrared-selected quasars and {approx}250,000 galaxies to calculate the projected quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function w{sub p} (R). The observed clustering yields characteristic dark matter halo masses of log(M{sub halo} [h {sup -1} M{sub sun}]) = 12.7{sup +0.4}{sub -0.6} and 13.3{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} for unobscured quasars (QSO-1s) and obscured quasars (Obs-QSOs), respectively. The results for QSO-1s are in excellent agreement with previous measurements for optically selected quasars, while we conclude that the Obs-QSOs are at least as strongly clustered as the QSO-1s. We test for the effects of photometric redshift errors on the optically faint Obs-QSOs, and find that our method yields a robust lower limit on the clustering; photo-z errors may cause us to underestimate the clustering amplitude of the Obs-QSOs by at most {approx}20%. We compare our results to previous studies, and speculate on physical implications of stronger clustering for obscured quasars.

  2. Hanford Sampling Quality Management Plan (HSQMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    HSQMP establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700. 6C and to 10 Code of Federal Regulations 830.120. HSQMP is designed to meet the needs of Richland Operations Office for controlling the quality of services provided by sampling operations. It is issued through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Programs Division. This document describes the Environmental Sampling and Analysis Program activities considered to represent the best management activities necessary to achieve a sampling program with adequate control.

  3. Sample Withdrawal Letter Ready Reference F-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Withdrawal Letter Ready Reference F-11 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  4. Sample Application Letter Ready Reference F-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Application Letter Ready Reference F-5 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  5. Sample Networking Letter Ready Reference F-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Networking Letter Ready Reference F-6 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  6. Sample Acceptance Letter Ready Reference F-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample Acceptance Letter Ready Reference F-10 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology Career Services Oklahoma State University College of College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology

  7. Hanford analytical sample projections 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1996-06-26

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal years 1996 to 2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Analytical Services, Site Monitoring, and Industrial Hygiene. This information will be used by Hanford Analytical Services to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs. Sample projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and Program. Analyses requirements are also presented.

  8. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples should be analyzed for colloid size and concentration shortly after they have been collected. A prolonged waiting period after sampling will affect the colloid size distribution as well as colloid concentration resulting from the changes of water chemical properties. The data also shows that sample containers, filter materials, and labware that are used for colloid analyses should be cleaned by specially treated low-colloid-containing water. Water used for sample dilution should be verified for total colloidal particle concentration. They then analyzed freshly collected groundwater from NTS wells ER-20-5{number_sign}1 and {number_sign}3. Results show that these groundwater samples have similar colloid concentrations and particle size distributions. For the particle size range between 50- and 200-nm, about ten trillion (1E10) colloidal particles per liter are present in these water samples. Most of these colloidal particles are less than 100 mm in size. For example, more than 98% of the colloids are smaller than 100 nm in size in the ER-20-5 {number_sign}1 sample. Furthermore, it was found that the smaller the sizes of colloid, the higher the colloid concentration present in the water. For another site at NTS, Cheshire, they had analyzed two zones of groundwater samples. For water samples collected from the lower water zone (near the underground detonation cavity about 3,700 feet of slanted depth from the surface), the colloid concentration was about 5E12 particles per liter. About 20 times less than the lower zone of total colloids was found in water samples collected from the upper aquifer (around 2,511 feet of slanted depth), although colloid size distributions from these two zones appear to be rather similar.

  9. THE BIZARRE CHEMICAL INVENTORY OF NGC 2419, AN EXTREME OUTER HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Kirby, Evan N. E-mail: enk@astro.caltech.edu

    2012-11-20

    We present new Keck/HIRES observations of six red giants in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419. Although the cluster is among the most distant and most luminous in the Milky Way, it was considered chemically ordinary until very recently. Our previous work showed that the near-infrared Ca II triplet line strength varied more than expected for a chemically homogeneous cluster, and that at least one star had unusual abundances of Mg and K. Here, we confirm that NGC 2419 harbors a population of stars, comprising about one-third of its mass, that is depleted in Mg by a factor of eight and enhanced in K by a factor of six with respect to the Mg-normal population. Although the majority, Mg-normal population appears to have a chemical abundance pattern indistinguishable from ordinary, inner-halo GCs, the Mg-poor population exhibits dispersions of several elements. The abundances of K and Sc are strongly anti-correlated with Mg, and some other elements (Si and Ca among others) are weakly anti-correlated with Mg. These abundance patterns suggest that the different populations of NGC 2419 sample the ejecta of diverse supernovae in addition to asymptotic giant branch ejecta. However, the abundances of Fe-peak elements except Sc show no star-to-star variation. We find no nucleosynthetic source that satisfactorily explains all of the abundance variations in this cluster. Because NGC 2419 appears like no other GC, we reiterate our previous suggestion that it is not a GC at all, but rather the core of an accreted dwarf galaxy.

  10. RUBIDIUM ABUNDANCES IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS NGC 6752, NGC 1904, AND NGC 104 (47 Tuc)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Orazi, Valentina [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Balaclava Road, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria; Campbell, Simon W. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Building 28, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Gratton, Raffaele G.; Lucatello, Sara [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); D'Antona, Francesca, E-mail: valentina.dorazi@mq.edu.au [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy)

    2013-10-10

    Large star-to-star variations of the abundances of proton-capture elements, such as Na and O, in globular clusters (GCs) are interpreted as the effect of internal pollution resulting from the presence of multiple stellar populations. To better constrain this scenario, we investigate the abundance distribution of the heavy element rubidium (Rb) in NGC 6752, NGC 1904, and NGC 104 (47 Tuc). Combining the results from our sample with those in the literature, we found that Rb exhibits no star-to-star variations, regardless of cluster metallicity, with the possible intriguing, although very uncertain, exception of the metal-rich bulge cluster NGC 6388. If no star-to-star variations can be confirmed for all GCs, this finding implies that the stellar source of the proton-capture element variations must not have produced significant amounts of Rb. This element is observed to be enhanced at extremely high levels in intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (IM-AGB) stars in the Magellanic Clouds (i.e., at a metallicity similar to 47 Tuc and NGC 6388). This fact may present a challenge to this popular candidate polluter, unless the mass range of the observed IM-AGB stars does not participate in the formation of the second-generation stars in GCs. A number of possible solutions are available to resolve this conundrum, including the fact that the Magellanic Cloud observations are very uncertain and may need to be revised. The fast rotating massive stars scenario would not face this potential problem as the slow mechanical winds of these stars during their main-sequence phase do not carry any Rb enhancements; however, these candidates face even bigger issues such as the production of Li and the close overlap with core-collapse supernova timescales. Observations of Sr, Rb, and Zr in metal-rich clusters such as NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 are sorely needed to clarify the situation.

  11. Low-mass binaries in the young cluster IC 348: implications for binary formation and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaspard Duchene; Jerome Bouvier; Theodore Simon

    1999-01-05

    We report on a near-infrared adaptive optics survey of a sample of 66 low-mass members of the pre-main sequence stellar cluster IC 348. We find 12 binary systems in the separation range 0.1-8.0 arcsec. An estimate of the number of faint undetected companions is derived, before we evaluate the binary frequency in this cluster. In the orbital period range log P=5.0-7.9 days, the binary fraction in IC 348 is 19+/-5 %.This is similar to the values correspondings to G- and M-dwarfs populations in the solar neigbourhood. Substellar companions are found to be rare, or even missing, as companions of low-mass stars in the separation range we surveyed. Also, the mass ratio distribution is not peaked at q=1. We do not find any evidence for an evolution of the binary frequency with age within the age spread of the cluster of about 10 Myr. We conclude that there is no temporal evolution of the binary fraction between a few Myrs after the formation process, the zero-age main sequence and the field population. We find instead a trend for the binary fraction to be inversely correlated with stellar density, with only loose associations exhibiting an excess of binaries. Either all star-forming regions initially host a large number of binaries, which is subsequently reduced only in dense clusters on a timescale of less than 1 Myr due to numerous gravitational encounters, or specific initial conditions in the parental molecular clouds impact on the fragmentation process leading to intrinsically different binary fractions.

  12. An SZ/X-ray galaxy cluster model and the X-ray follow-up of the Planck clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chamballu; J. G. Bartlett; J. -B. Melin; M. Arnaud

    2008-05-28

    Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster surveys will become an important cosmological tool over next few years, and it will be essential to relate these new surveys to cluster surveys in other wavebands. We present an empirical model of cluster SZ and X-ray observables constructed to address this question and to motivate, dimension and guide X-ray follow-up of SZ surveys. As an example application of the model, we discuss potential XMM-Newton follow-up of Planck clusters.

  13. Calibration of optical mass proxy for clusters of galaxies and update of the WHL12 cluster catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Z L

    2015-01-01

    Accurately determining the mass of galaxy clusters is fundamental for many studies on cosmology and galaxy evolution. We collect and rescale the cluster masses of 1191 clusters of 0.05measurements and use them to calibrate optical mass proxy. The total r-band luminosity (in units of L^{\\ast}) of these clusters are obtained by using spectroscopic and photometric data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the correlation between the cluster mass M_{500} and total r-band luminosity L_{500} significantly evolves with redshift. After correction of the evolution, we define a new cluster richness R_{L\\ast,500}=L_{500}E(z)^{1.40} as the optical mass proxy. By using this newly defined richness and the recently released SDSS DR12 spectroscopic data, we update the WHL12 cluster catalog and complementally identify 25,419 new rich clusters at high redshift. In the SDSS spectroscopic survey region, about 89% of galaxy clusters have spectroscopic redshifts...

  14. A comparison of the galaxy populations in the Coma and distant clusters: the evolution of k+a galaxies and the role of the intracluster medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Poggianti; T. J. Bridges; Y. Komiyama; M. Yagi; D. Carter; B. Mobasher; S. Okamura; N. Kashikawa

    2003-09-16

    The spectroscopic properties of galaxies in the Coma cluster are compared with those of galaxies in rich clusters at $z \\sim 0.5$, to investigate the evolution of the star formation history in clusters. Luminous galaxies with $M_V \\leq -20$ and post-starburst/post-starforming (k+a) spectra which constitute a significant fraction of galaxies in distant cluster samples are absent in Coma, where spectacular cases of k+a spectra are found instead at $M_V>-18.5$ and represent a significant proportion of the cluster dwarf galaxy population. A simple inspection of their positions on the sky indicates that this type of galaxy does not show a preferential location within the cluster, but the bluest and strongest-lined group of k+a's lies in projection towards the central 1.4 Mpc of Coma and have radial velocities significantly higher than the cluster mean. We find a striking correlation between the positions of these young and strong post-starburst galaxies and substructure in the hot intracluster medium (ICM) identified from {\\it XMM-Newton} data, with these galaxies lying close to the edges of two infalling substructures. This result strongly suggests that the interaction with the dense ICM could be responsible for the quenching of the star formation (thus creating the k+a spectrum), and possibly, for any previous starburst. The evolution with redshift of the luminosity distribution of k+a galaxies can be explained by a ``downsizing effect'', with the maximum luminosity/mass of actively star-forming galaxies infalling onto clusters decreasing at lower redshift. We discuss the possible physical origin of this downsizing effect and the implications of our results for current scenarios of environmental effects on the star formation in galaxies.

  15. Oxidation of Al doped Au clusters: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajesh, Chinagandham [RMC, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2009-06-21

    Using first principles method we report the oxidation of Al doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of Al doped Au{sub n-1} clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O{sub 2} with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by Al results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au{sub 3}Al and Au{sub 5}Al clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of Al doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O{sub 2} with Al, Au, AuAl, Au{sub 3}Al, and Au{sub 20}Al clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au{sub n-1}Al clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from Al to Au. Moreover, the O{sub 2} molecule prefers to attach at the Al site rather than at the Au site.

  16. Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischhauer, H.L.

    1985-10-01

    Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

  17. Cluster Cores, Gravitational Lensing, and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo A. Flores; Joel R. Primack

    1995-12-11

    Many multiply--imaged quasars have been found over the years, but none so far with image separation in excess of $8\\arcsec$. The absence of such large splittings has been used as a test of cosmological models: the standard Cold Dark Matter model has been excluded on the basis that it predicts far too many large--separation double images. These studies assume that the lensing structure has the mass profile of a singular isothermal sphere. However, such large splittings would be produced by very massive systems such as clusters of galaxies, for which other gravitational lensing data suggest less singular mass profiles. Here we analyze two cases of mass profiles for lenses: an isothermal sphere with a finite core radius (density $\\rho \\propto (r^2+r_{core}^2)^{-1})$, and a Hernquist profile ($\\rho \\propto r^{-1}(r+a)^{-3}$). We find that small core radii $r_{core} \\sim 30 h^{-1}$ kpc, as suggested by the cluster data, or large $a \\gsim 300 h^{-1}$ kpc, as needed for compatibility with gravitational distortion data, would reduce the number of large--angle splittings by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, it appears that these tests are sensitive both to the cosmological model (number density of lenses) and to the inner lens structure, which is unlikely to depend sensitively on the cosmology, making it difficult to test the cosmological models by large--separation quasar lensing until we reliably know the structure of the lenses themselves.

  18. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci; Brad K. Gibson

    1995-03-14

    We study the origin of iron and alpha-elements (O, Mg, Si) in clusters of galaxies. In particular, we discuss the [O/Fe] ratio and the iron mass-to-luminosity ratio in the intracluster medium (ICM) and their link to the chemical and dynamical evolution of elliptical and lenticular galaxies. We adopt a detailed model of galactic evolution incorporating the development of supernovae- driven galactic winds which pollute the ICM with enriched ejecta. We demonstrate \\it quantitatively \\rm the crucial dependence upon the assumed stellar initial mass function in determining the evolution of the mass and abundances ratios of heavy elements in typical model ICMs. We show that completely opposite behaviours of [alpha/Fe] ratios (\\ie positive versus negative ratios) can be obtained by varying the initial mass function without altering the classic assumptions regarding type Ia supernovae progenitors or their nucleosynthesis. Our results indicate that models incorporating somewhat flatter-than-Salpeter initial mass functions (ie x approx 1, as opposed to x=1.35) are preferred, provided the intracluster medium iron mass-to-luminosity ratio, preliminary [alpha/Fe]>0 ASCA results, and present-day type Ia supernovae rates, are to be matched. A simple Virgo cluster simulation which adheres to these constraints shows that approx 70% of the measured ICM iron mass has its origin in type II supernovae, with the remainder being synthesized in type Ia systems.

  19. Tracing gas motions in the Centaurus Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Graham; A. C. Fabian; J. S. Sanders; R. G. Morris

    2006-02-21

    We apply the stochastic model of iron transport developed by Rebusco et. al. (2005) to the Centaurus cluster. Using this model, we find that an effective diffusion coefficient D in the range 2x10^28 - 4x10^28 cm^2 s^-1 can approximately reproduce the observed abundance distribution. Reproducing the flat central profile and sharp drop around 30-70 kpc, however, requires a diffusion coefficient that drops rapidly with radius so that D > 4x10^28 cm^2 s^-1 only inside about 25 kpc. Assuming that all transport is due to fully-developed turbulence, which is also responsible for offsetting cooling in the cluster core, we calculate the length and velocity scales of energy injection. These length scales are found to be up to a factor of ~ 10 larger than expected if the turbulence is due to the inflation and rising of a bubble. We also calculate the turbulent thermal conductivity and find it is unlikely to be significant in preventing cooling.

  20. Sample dependence of giant magnetocaloric effect in a cluster-glass system Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoizumi, Saori Tamaki, Akira; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Mamiya, Hiroaki; Terada, Noriki; Tamura, Ryo; Dönni, Andreas; Kawamura, Yukihiko; Morita, Kengo

    2015-05-07

    In order to investigate the effect of vacancy on the magnetocaloric effect in Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}, we have carried out X-ray diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements in the rare-earth intermetallic compound Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2}(?0.4???x???0.4). The maximum magnetic entropy change ??S{sub m}{sup max}, the maximum adiabatic temperature change ?T{sub ad}{sup max}, and the relative cooling power of Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2} take large values at x?=?0?0.4 for the field change of 5?T. The paramagnetic Curie temperature ?{sub p} increases with an increase of x. This fact suggests that the enhancement of ferromagnetic coupling among the correlated spins leads to the increase of magnetocaloric effect.

  1. Cluster Analysis of the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS): Symptom Dimensions and Clinical Correlates in an Outpatient Youth Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kircanski, Katharina; Woods, Douglas W.; Chang, Susanna W.; Ricketts, Emily J.; Piacentini, John C.

    2010-01-01

    correlated with the severity of tic synptoms. The Australianet al. (1989). The Yale Global Tic Severity Scale: initialof a clinician-rated scale of tic severity. Journal of the

  2. GraFix: sample preparation for single-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    (cryo-EM). GraFix uses a glycerol gradient centrifugation step in which the complexes are centrifuged a structurally and compositionally homogeneous sample; this in turn requires advanced tools for sample handling are dissolved during centrifugation because of the pressure acting on the molecules. Chemical fixation reagents

  3. Stochastic Sampling for Internet Traffic Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rejaie, Reza

    is to sample or aggregate information. For example, to estimate link utilization, the size of all packets Gong Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA data from different sources with independent clocks and sampling rates. We present results that show

  4. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  5. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  6. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1984-08-16

    This is a patent for a disc-type, four-port sampling valve for service with erosive high temperature process streams. Inserts and liners of ..cap alpha..-silicon carbide respectively, in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities, limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation. 1 fig.

  7. Accurate Direct Illumination Using Iterative Adaptive Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bala, Kavita

    Accurate Direct Illumination Using Iterative Adaptive Sampling Michael Donikian, Bruce Walter with many lights and complex occlusion. Images are first divided into 8 Â 8 pixel blocks and for each point to be shaded within a block, a probability density function (PDF) is constructed over the lights and sampled

  8. Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars institute;Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars Institute,markov}@cs.uu.nl. Abstract The probabilistic roadmap approach is a commonly used motion planning technique. A crucial

  9. Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars institute; Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars Institute,markov}@cs.uu.nl. Abstract The probabilistic roadmap approach is a commonly used motion planning technique. A crucial

  10. SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    MATH SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way to navigate equivalent patterns are possible. Fall ­ Semester 1 Spring ­ Semester 2 MATH 198: Analytic Geometry with Calculus I MATH 263: Analytic Geometry with Calculus II MATH 101: Freshman Seminar CS 170: Intro

  11. Improved Sampling Algorithms in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambhir, Arjun Singh

    2015-01-01

    Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) is an algorithm that incorporates stochastic modification of the action as part of the process that updates the fields in a Monte Carlo simulation. Such update moves have the potential of lowering or eliminating potential barriers that may cause inefficiencies in exploring the field configuration space. The highly successful Cluster algorithms for spin systems can be derived from the RMC framework. In this work we apply RMC ideas to pure gauge theory, aiming to alleviate the critical slowing down observed in the topological charge evolution as well as other long distance observables. We present various formulations of the basic idea and report on our numerical experiments with these algorithms.

  12. Improved Sampling Algorithms in Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Singh Gambhir; Kostas Orginos

    2015-06-19

    Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) is an algorithm that incorporates stochastic modification of the action as part of the process that updates the fields in a Monte Carlo simulation. Such update moves have the potential of lowering or eliminating potential barriers that may cause inefficiencies in exploring the field configuration space. The highly successful Cluster algorithms for spin systems can be derived from the RMC framework. In this work we apply RMC ideas to pure gauge theory, aiming to alleviate the critical slowing down observed in the topological charge evolution as well as other long distance observables. We present various formulations of the basic idea and report on our numerical experiments with these algorithms.

  13. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  14. Microfluidic Tools for Biological Sample Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visuri, S R; Ness, K; Dzenitis, J; Benett, B; Bettencourt, K; Hamilton, J; Fisher, K; Krulevitch, P

    2002-04-10

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. To support detection instruments, we are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. We are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Sample preparation functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure, dielectrophoresis, and solid phase extraction. We are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow and investigating small-scale detection methods.

  15. Explaining Text Clustering Results using Semantic Andreas Hotho, Steffen Staab, Gerd Stumme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staab, Steffen

    of the explanation of why a cluster has been formed (e.g., just state `this cluster is about Volkswagen' instead of stating `this cluster is about Volkswagen and about VW'); (B2) to exploit semantic hierarchies of words

  16. Forming Peer Advisory Groups in Agriculture: An Alternative Application of Cluster Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doerr, Kayla Marie

    2012-07-16

    be approached from several different angles, one possible approach involves the practice of cluster analysis?a wide set of procedures intended to break down a set of objects into "clusters" of individuals with similar attributes. Cluster analysis comes...

  17. APOGEE chemical tagging constraint on the maximum star cluster mass in the $\\alpha$-enhanced Galactic disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2015-01-01

    Stars born from the same molecular cloud should be nearly homogeneous in their element abundances. The concept of chemical tagging is to identify members of disrupted clusters by their clustering in element abundance space. Chemical tagging requires large samples of stars with precise abundances for many individual elements. With uncertainties of $\\sigma_{[X/{\\rm Fe}]}$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm [Fe/H]} \\simeq 0.05$ for 10 elements measured for $> 10^4$ stars, the APOGEE DR12 spectra may be the first well-suited data set to put this idea into practice. We find that even APOGEE data offer only $\\sim 500$ independent volume elements in the 10-dimensional abundance space, when we focus on the $\\alpha$-enhanced Galactic disk. We develop and apply a new algorithm to search for chemically homogeneous sets of stars against a dominant background. By injecting star clusters into the APOGEE data set we show that chemically homogeneous clusters with masses $\\gtrsim 3 \\times 10^7 \\, {\\rm M}_\\odot$ would be easily detectable and y...

  18. The MUSIC of Galaxy Clusters III: Properties, evolution and Y-M scaling relation of protoclusters of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sembolini, Federico; Yepes, Gustavo; Foschi, Emma; Lamagna, Luca; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study the properties of protoclusters of galaxies by employing the MUSIC set of hydrodynamical simulations, featuring a mass-limited sample of 282 resimulated clusters with available merger trees up to high redshift, and we trace the cluster formation back to $z$ = 1.5, 2.3 and 4. We study the features and redshift evolution of the mass and the spatial distribution for all the cluster progenitors and for the protoclusters, which we define as the most massive progenitors of the clusters identified at $z$ = 0. A natural extension to redshifts larger than 1 is applied to the estimate of the baryon content also in terms of gas and stars budgets: no remarkable variations with redshift are discovered. Furthermore, motivated by the proven potential of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys to blindly search for faint distant objects, we focus on the scaling relation between total object mass and integrated Compton $y$-parameter, and we check for the possibility to extend the mass-observable paradigm to the proto...

  19. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ?} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ?1.6M {sub ?} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  20. COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01

    Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.