National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for four-cycle diesel-engine buses

  1. Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Computational Fluid Dynamics ...

  2. Diesel Engines: Environmental Impact and Control | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact and Control Diesel Engines: Environmental Impact and Control 2002 ... More Documents & Publications Cleaning Up Diesel Engines DIesel Emission Control ...

  3. Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Use of Low Cetane Fuel to Enable Low Temperature ...

  4. Cleaning Up Diesel Engines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engines Cleaning Up Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_witherspoon.pdf (333.11 KB) More Documents & Publications ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin

  5. Next Generation Diesel Engine Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  6. New 11 liter Komatsu diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizusawa, M.; Tanosaki, T.; Kawase, M.; Oguchi, T.

    1984-01-01

    New 6 cylinder direct injection 11 liter diesel engines which have naturally aspirated, turbocharged, and turbocharged-aftercooled versions have been developed and moved in production at the end of 1983. The highest output of the turbocharged-aftercooled version is 276 kW (375 ps) at 2200 RPM. Based on Komatsu new technologies 125 mm bore diesel has been designed to meet the users' demands, such as compact in size, light in weight, extremely high performance, high reliability and durability. The turbocharged and turbocharged-aftercooled engines are characterized by the adoption of the ductile cast iron piston which is the first application into the high speed, four cycle diesels in production in the world, and which was enabled by Komatsu design and precision casting technologies. This paper also covers the other design aspects and performance characteristics.

  7. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions ...

  8. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications ...

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  10. Advanced Modeling of Direct-Injection Diesel Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling of Direct-Injection Diesel Engines Advanced Modeling of Direct-Injection Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters ...

  11. Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  12. North American Market Challenges for Diesel Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    North American Market Challenges for Diesel Engines North American Market Challenges for Diesel Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Gale ...

  13. Nanocatalysts for Diesel Engine Emissions Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broad temperature operating windows to treat diesel engine emissions, thus enabling diesel engine equipment and vehicles to meet regulatory requirements.

  14. BPM Diesel Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Zip: WR12 7NL Product: Converts diesel engines to operate on Dual Fuel using a digital generic system. References: BPM Diesel Engineering1 This article is a stub. You can...

  15. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound ...

  16. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound ...

  17. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound ...

  18. Advanced Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development for Tier 2 Emissions 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Detroit Diesel Corporation PDF icon 2003deerbolton1.pdf ...

  19. Diesel Engine Alternatives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternatives Diesel Engine Alternatives 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Southwest Research Institute PDF icon 2003deerryan.pdf More Documents & Publications Combustion Targets ...

  20. Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  1. Diesel Engine Light Truck Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-12-31

    The Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program consists of two major contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). The first one under DE-FC05-97-OR22606, starting from 1997, was completed in 2001, and consequently, a final report was submitted to DOE in 2003. The second part of the contract was under DE-FC05-02OR22909, covering the program progress from 2002 to 2007. This report is the final report of the second part of the program under contract DE-FC05-02OR22909. During the course of this contract, the program work scope and objectives were significantly changed. From 2002 to 2004, the DELTA program continued working on light-duty engine development with the 4.0L V6 DELTA engine, following the accomplishments made from the first part of the program under DE-FC05-97-OR22606. The program work scope in 2005-2007 was changed to the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment. This final report will cover two major technical tasks. (1) Continuation of the DELTA engine development to demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies and to demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages, covering progress made from 2002 to 2004. (2) DPF soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment from 2005-2007.

  2. Advances in Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles Advances in Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Volkswagen AG ...

  3. Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology 2005 Diesel ...

  4. Adaptive Control to Improve Low Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control to Improve Low Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion Adaptive Control to Improve Low Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, ...

  5. Diesel Engine Oil Technology Insights and Opportunities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil Technology Insights and Opportunities Diesel Engine Oil Technology Insights and Opportunities Perrformance of API CJ-4 diesel engine lubricating oil and emerging lubricant ...

  6. Design Challenges of Locomotive Diesel Engines | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerprimus.pdf (145.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Future Diesel Engine Thermal ...

  7. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions ...

  8. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime ...

  9. Update on Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment Implementation - Master Plan, Status and Critical Needs Update on Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment ...

  10. Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency Diesel Engines (CRADA with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engines (CRADA with Caterpillar) Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency Diesel Engines (CRADA ... More Documents & Publications Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency Diesel Engines ...

  11. Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel This study presents full quantification of ...

  12. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Caterpillar/U.S. Department of Energy

  13. Multicylinder Diesel Engine Design for HCCI Operation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  14. Staged direct injection diesel engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Quentin A.

    1985-01-01

    A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

  15. Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Poster presentaiton at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_clark.pdf (100.8 KB) More Documents & Publications Evaluating Exhaust

  16. Fuels and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Fuels and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_baranescu.pdf (87.57 KB) More Documents & Publications New Diesel Feedstocks and Future Fuels Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and Emissions-Friendly New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuel Diesel Engine Challenges

  17. Attaining Tier 2 Emissions Through Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine and Aftertreatment Integration - Strategy and Experimental Results Attaining Tier 2 Emissions Through Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Integration - Strategy and ...

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions | Department of Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_reitz.pdf (682.47 KB) More Documents & Publications Experiments and Modeling of Two-Stage Combustion in Low-Emissions Diesel Engines Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression

  19. An Innovative Pressure Sensor Glow Plug Offers Improved Diesel Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Closed-loop Control | Department of Energy Innovative Pressure Sensor Glow Plug Offers Improved Diesel Engine Closed-loop Control An Innovative Pressure Sensor Glow Plug Offers Improved Diesel Engine Closed-loop Control Describes glow plug with integrated pressure sensor for closed-loop control of diesel engine combustion p-20_ramond.pdf (459.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Diesel Combustion Control with

  20. 2002 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations 2002 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations August 25-29, 2002 San Diego, California The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Session 1: Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction Strategies Session 7: Emissions-Related Technologies and Regulations Session 2: Applied Thermoelectric Generator R&D Session 8: Emerging Diesel Engine Technology

  1. Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Technology Development for Light Duty High Efficient Diesel Engines Improve the efficiency of diesel engines for light duty applications through technical advances in system optimization. deer09_stanton.pdf (1.7 MB) More Documents & Publications Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC Effects of Biomass Fuels on Engine & System Out Emissions for Short Term Endurance

  2. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology | Department of Energy Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2003_deer_algrain.pdf (5.77 MB) More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

  3. Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, J. M.

    2000-07-06

    A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

  4. Utiization of alternate fuels in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lestz, S.S.

    1980-09-01

    Accomplishments during three years entitled The Utilization of Alternate Fuels in Diesel Engines are summarized. Experiments were designed and test equipment set-up for the purpose of evaluating the use of methanol as a fumigant for light-duty Diesel engine service. The major experimental results were obtained from a multicylinder automotive Diesel engine. However, fundamental studies employing a GC/micro-reactor and a constant volume combustion bomb were also started. The purpose of this work was to measure some of the chemical and physical properties of methanol and methanol-air mixtures. The laminar flame velocity for various mixtures has been measured in the combustion bomb and thermal degradation studies have begun in the GC/micro-reactor. An Oldsmobile 5.7 liter V/8 Diesel engine was fumigated with methanol in amounts up to 40% of the fuel energy. The primary objectives of the study were to determine the effect of methanol fumigation on fuel efficiency, smoke, nitric oxide emission, and the occurrence of severe knock. An assessment of the biological activity for samples of the raw exhaust particulate and its soluble organic extract was also made using boh the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test and the B. subtilis Comptest. Generally, methanol fumigation was found to decrease NO emission for all conditions, to have a slight effect on smoke opacity, and to have a beneficial effect on fuel efficiency at higher loads. Also at higher loads, the methanol was found to induce what was defined as knock limited operation. The biological activity of the raw particulate matter was fond to be less than that of its soluble organic extract. However, for both the fumigation of methanol did enhance the biological activity.

  5. Update on Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation - Master Plan, Status and Critical Needs | Department of Energy Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment Implementation - Master Plan, Status and Critical Needs Update on Modeling for Effective Diesel Engine Aftertreatment Implementation - Master Plan, Status and Critical Needs An integrated diesel engine-aftertreatment-vehicle system is extremely complex with numerous interacting variables and an unlimited number of control options. An experimental approach to

  6. Fuel Processor Enabled NOx Adsorber Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions Control | Department of Energy Processor Enabled NOx Adsorber Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine Emissions Control Fuel Processor Enabled NOx Adsorber Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine Emissions Control 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Catalytica Energy Systems 2004_deer_catalytica.pdf (331 KB) More Documents & Publications Transient Dynamometer Testing of a Single-Leg NOX Adsorber Combined with a Fuel Processor for Enhanced NOx

  7. Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology | Department of Energy Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_puetz.pdf (742.3 KB) More Documents & Publications Integrated Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Roadmap for EPA 2010 Heavy-duty Emissions Regulations Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization

  8. Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: The Pennsylvania State University 2002_deer_perez.pdf (315.66 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on Wear Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable,

  9. Attaining Tier 2 Emissions Through Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration - Strategy and Experimental Results | Department of Energy Attaining Tier 2 Emissions Through Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Integration - Strategy and Experimental Results Attaining Tier 2 Emissions Through Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Integration - Strategy and Experimental Results The feasibility of diesel engines to meet the stringent emissions regulations of 2007 and beyond is an important consideration for light trucks and other personal transportation vehicles.

  10. How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency How Exhaust Emissions Drive Diesel Engine Fuel Efficiency 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Pacific Northwest Laboratory 2004_deer_muntean.pdf (922.09 KB) More Documents & Publications The State of the Science in Diesel Particulate Control APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update Measurement and Characterization of Lean NOx Adsorber

  11. 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations August 29-September 2, 2004 Coronado, California The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Plenary Session: Diesel Efficiency and Emissions Policy Session 7: Combustion and Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Regimes Session 1: Emerging Diesel Technologies Session 8A: Diesel Engine

  12. 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations | Department of Energy 6 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations August 20-24, 2006 Detroit, Michigan The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Plenary Session 1: A View from the Bridge Concurrent Technical Session 3: Diesel Engine Development Technical Session 1: Advanced Combustion Technologies, Part 1

  13. Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines and a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathway to 50% Thermal Efficiency | Department of Energy High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines and a Pathway to 50% Thermal Efficiency Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines and a Pathway to 50% Thermal Efficiency Cost reduction is a key area of emphasis for the Cummins 2nd Generation ORC WHR System. deer09_stanton.pdf (455.27 KB) More Documents & Publications High Efficient Clean Combustion for SuperTruck Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC

  14. Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Substantial increases in brake power and considerably lower peak pressure can result from oxygen-enriched diesel combustion deer09_yelvington.pdf (196.85 KB) More Documents & Publications Development Methodology for Power-Dense Military Diesel Engine Oxygen-Enriched Combustion Emission Control Strategy for Downsized Light-Duty Diese

  15. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Presentation: North East States for Coordinated Air Use Management 2004_deer_block.pdf (36.26 KB) More Documents & Publications Dumping Dirty Diesels: The View From the Bridge EPA Diesel Update Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel

  16. Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Cummins 2002_deer_stang.pdf (2.47 MB) More Documents & Publications Cummins/DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines

  17. 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Combustion Technologies, Diesel Engine Development, ... Powered Thermoelectric Generator John C. Bass Hi-Z ... (PDF 2.1 MB) Improved Lifetime Pressure-Drop Management ...

  18. THE DIESEL ENGINE'S CHALLENGE IN THE NEW MILLENIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbanks, John W.

    2000-08-20

    Diesel engines are the dominant propulsion engine of choice for most of the commercial surface transportation applications in the world. Consider agricultural uses: Diesel engine power is used to prepare the soil, transport the bulk seed or seedlings, pump irrigation water, and spray fertilizers, mechanically harvest some crops and distribute the produce to market. Diesel engines power virtually all of the off-highway construction equipment. Deep water commercial freighters or containerships are almost all diesel engine powered. The passenger ships are primarily either diesel or a combination of diesel and gas turbine, referred to as CODAG or CODOG.

  19. Development Methodology for Power-Dense Military Diesel Engine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Laboratory data and modeling results are presented on a military auxiliary power unit ... More Documents & Publications Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine ...

  20. Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (196.85 KB) More Documents & Publications Development Methodology for Power-Dense Military Diesel Engine Oxygen-Enriched Combustion Emission Control Strategy for Downsized ...

  1. Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on diesel engine oil during standard test with an API Cummins M-11 engine. ... Fuel Economy and Engine Wear AVTA: Oil Bypass Filter Specifications and Test Procedures

  2. Multicylinder Diesel Engine for Low Temperature Combustion Operation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Low Temperature Combustion Operation Multicylinder Diesel Engine for Low Temperature Combustion Operation Fuel injection strategies to extend low temperature combustion ...

  3. Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (455.27 KB) More Documents & Publications High Efficient Clean Combustion for SuperTruck Advanced Diesel Engine Technology Development for HECC Enabling High Efficiency ...

  4. Clean and Efficient Diesel Engines- Designing for the Customer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A look at the key role that clean and efficient diesel engines will play in achieving climate and energy goals, and further improvements needed to perform this role.

  5. Estimation and Control of Diesel Engine Processes Utilizing Variable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimation and Control of Diesel Engine Processes Utilizing Variable Intake Valve Actuation Air handling system model for multi-cylinder variable geometry turbocharged diesel ...

  6. Diesel Engine Strategy & North American Market Challenges, Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategy & North American Market Challenges, Technology and Growth Diesel Engine Strategy & North American Market Challenges, Technology and Growth Presentation given at the 2007 ...

  7. Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

  8. In Vitro Genotoxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Vehicle Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Materials In Vitro Genotoxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Vehicle Exhaust Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Materials 2002 ...

  9. Fuels and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Diesel Feedstocks and Future Fuels Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and Emissions-Friendly New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuel Diesel Engine ...

  10. Understanding diesel engine lubrication at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.F. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on oil pumpability in passenger car gasoline engines that was well-characterized by an ASTM program and by individual researchers in the 1970's and early 1980's. oil pumpability in diesel engines however, was not investigated to any significant extent until the mid-1980's. This study was initiated to define the performance of several commercial viscosity modifiers in different formulations containing 3 detergent-inhibitor (DI) additive packages and 4 basestock types. The test oils were run at {minus}18{degrees} C (0{degrees} F) in a Cummins NTC-400 diesel engine. The results, when statistically analyzed, indicated that a new, second generation olefin copolymer (OCP) viscosity modifier has better performance that a first generation OCP and, furthermore, had performance equal to a polymethacrylate (PMA) viscosity modifier. The analysis also showed that one DI/base stock combination had a significant effect on performance. The apparent shear rate of the oil in the pump inlet tube was calculated from the oil pump flow rate measured at idle speed at low temperature and the pump inlet tube diameter. The shear rate and oil viscosity were used to estimate the shear stress in the pump inlet tube. The shear stress level of the engine is 56% higher than the Mini-Rotary Viscometer (MRV). Hence, the current MRV procedure is rheologically unsuitable to predict pumpability in a large diesel engine. A new device was developed for measuring the oil film thickness in the turbocharge bearing and noting the time when a full oil film is formed. Results indicate that a full oil film occurs almost immediately, well before any oil pressure is observed at the turbocharge inlet. Residual oil remaining in the bearing after shutdown may account of this observation. The oil film maintained its thickness both before, and after the first indication of oil pressure. More work is needed to study this effect.

  11. Integrated diesel engine NOx reduction technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoelzer, J.; Zhu, J.; Savonen, C.L.; Kharas, K.C.C.; Bailey, O.H.; Miller, M.; Vuichard, J.

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of catalyst performance is a function of the inlet exhaust gas temperature, gas flow rate, concentration of NO{sub x} and oxygen, and reductant quantity and species. Given this interrelationship, it becomes immediately clear that an integrated development approach is necessary. Such an approach is taken in this project. As such, the system development path is directed by an engine-catalyst engineering team. Of the tools at the engine engineer`s disposal the real-time aspects of computer assisted subsystem modeling is valuable. It will continue to be the case as ever more subtle improvements are needed to meet competitive performance, durability, and emission challenges. A review of recent prototype engines has shown that considerable improvements to base diesel engine technology are being made. For example, HSDI NO{sub x} has been reduced by a factor of two within the past ten years. However, additional substantial NO{sub x}/PM reduction is still required for the future. A viable lean NO{sub x} catalyst would be an attractive solution to this end. The results of recent high and low temperature catalyst developments were presented. High temperature base metal catalysts have been formulated to produce very good conversion efficiency and good thermal stability, albeit at temperatures near the upper range of diesel engine operation. Low temperature noble metal catalysts have been developed to provide performance of promising 4-way control but need increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency.

  12. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology | Department of Energy 2 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2002_deer_hopmann.pdf (828.29 KB) More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology An Engine System Approach to Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery

  13. Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace020_reitz_2011_o.pdf (786.77 KB) More Documents & Publications Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Use of Low Cetane Fuel to Enable Low Temperature Combustion

  14. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program 2005_deer_may.pdf (547.13 KB) More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and Demonstration Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction Unique Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust

  15. Lean-NOx Catalyst Development for Diesel Engine Applications | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Lean-NOx Catalyst Development for Diesel Engine Applications Lean-NOx Catalyst Development for Diesel Engine Applications 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2002_deer_park.pdf (302.37 KB) More Documents & Publications Lean NOx Catalysis Research and Development Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control

  16. Integration of Diesel Engine Technology to Meet US EPA 2010 Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 ... Multicylinder Diesel Engine for Low Temperature Combustion Operation Development of ...

  17. Dynamic behaviour of a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backhouse, R.; Winterbone, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    The transient behaviour of torque and smoke produced by a turbocharged diesel engine has been measured by frequency response methods, with a sinusoidal peturbation applied to the fuel. A dynamic torque parameter (dmep) has been introduced and the response of this to changes in speed and load can be separated. The dmep also enables the delay associated with torque production to be obtained: this is compared to the widely accepted values. The results have also been analysed to show the relationship between air-fuel ratio and smoke produced during a transient. The conclusion is that the production of smoke under dynamic condition behaves similarly to that under steady running but that it is more dependent on the initial load (air-fuel ratio) level.

  18. Adapting ethanol fuels to diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    During the 2nd International Alcohol Symposium 1977, Daimler-Benz reported on the advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of using ethanol in originally diesel-operated commercial vehicles, and especially about the first results in the field of adapting the ethanol fuel to the requirements of conventional diesel engines. Investigations to this effect were continued by Daimler-Benz AG, Stuttgart, and Mercedes-Benz of Brasil in coordination with competent Brazilian government departments. The development effort is primarily adapted to Brazilian conditions, since ethanol fuel is intended as a long-term project in this country. This report is presented under headings - auto-ignition; durability tests; remedial measures; the injection systems; ethanol quality.

  19. Diesel Engines: What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained World?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation; California Air Resources Board

  20. Future Breathing System Requirements for Clean Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  1. Diesel Engine Strategy & North American Market Challenges, Technology and Growth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  2. Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration Energy Technologies Program | Department of Energy Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Maritime Administration 2003_deer_gore.pdf (759.73 KB) More Documents & Publications The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2 Reduction of Emissions

  3. Advanced Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development for Tier 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions | Department of Energy Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development for Tier 2 Emissions Advanced Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Technology Development for Tier 2 Emissions 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Detroit Diesel Corporation 2003_deer_bolton1.pdf (935.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Attaining Tier 2 Emissions Through Diesel Engine and Aftertreatment Integration - Strategy and Experimental Results Analytical Tool Development for Aftertreatment Sub-Systems

  4. Advances in Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles Advances in Diesel Engine Technologies for European Passenger Vehicles 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Volkswagen AG 2002_deer_schindler.pdf (1.73 MB) More Documents & Publications Accelerating Light-Duty Diesel Sales in the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America Meeting the CO2 Challenge DEER 2002

  5. Dual fuel combustion in a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Few, P.C.; Newlyn, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    The modification of a turbocharged diesel engine to a dual-fuel engine using methane as the supplementary fuel has been carried out. The effect of the gaseous fuel in a turbo-charged diesel engine has been investigated by means of a heat release study and a computer program already developed at Leicester Polytechnic. It is used in order to examine the rate of heat released under any operational condition.

  6. Multicylinder Diesel Engine for Low Temperature Combustion Operation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for Low Temperature Combustion Operation Multicylinder Diesel Engine for Low Temperature Combustion Operation Fuel injection strategies to extend low temperature combustion temperatures to yield low NOx at higher loads and better efficiency over the speed-load range deer08_deojeda.pdf (1.22 MB) More Documents & Publications Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion Multicylinder Diesel Engine Design for HCCI Operation Impact of

  7. In Vitro Genotoxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Vehicle Exhaust

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Materials | Department of Energy Gasoline and Diesel Engine Vehicle Exhaust Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Materials In Vitro Genotoxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Vehicle Exhaust Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Materials 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 2002_deer_wallace.pdf (114.23 KB) More Documents

  8. 2003 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations 2003 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations August 24-28, 2003 Newport, Rhode Island The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Plenary Session: A View from the Bridge Session 6: Environmentally Concerned Public Sector Organization Panel Session 1: Emerging Diesel Technologies Session 7: Combustion and HCCI Regimes Session 2: Fuels and

  9. 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations August 21-25, 2005 Chicago, Illinois The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Plenary Session: A View from the Bridge Technical Session 4: Emission Control Technologies, Part 1 Technical Session 1: Advanced Combustion Technologies Part 1 Poster Session 2: Light-Duty Diesels and Emission

  10. 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations | Department of Energy 7 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations August 13-16, 2007 Detroit, Michigan The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Plenary Session: A View from the Bridge Tuesday Dinner Monday Lunch Concurrent Technical Session 4 : Emission Control Technologies, Part 2 Technical Session 1: Advanced

  11. 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentations | Department of Energy Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations August 4-7, 2008 Dearborn, Michigan The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Plenary Session: A View from the Bridge Concurrent Technical Session 4: Emission Control Technologies, Part 2 Lunch: Sponsored by Caterpillar, Inc. Concurrent Technical

  12. Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Discusses engine technology enablers that help achieve overall system integration effectively deer12_suresh.pdf (986.08 KB) More Documents & Publications Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine

  13. Modeling pollution formation in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N.

    1997-12-31

    Modeling combustion under conditions that prevail in Diesel engine presents a great challenge. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has invested Laboratory Directed Research and Development Funds to accelerate progress in this area. Research has been concerned with building a chemical mechanism to interface with a high fidelity fluid code to describe aspects of Diesel combustion. The complexity of these models requires implementation on massively parallel machines. The author will describe his efforts concerned with building such a complex mechanism. He begins with C and CO{sub 2} chemistry and adds sequentially higher hydrocarbon chemistry, aromatic production chemistry, soot chemistry, and chemistry describing NO{sub x} production. The metrics against which this chemistry is evaluated are flame velocities, induction times, ignition delay times, flammability limits, flame structure measurements, and light scattering. He assembles a set of elementary reactions, kinetic rate coefficients, and thermochemistry. He modifies existing Sandia codes to be able to investigate the behavior of the mechanism in well-stirred reactors, plug flow reactors, and one-dimensional flames. The modified combustion code with a chemical mechanism at the appropriate level of complexity is then interfaced with the high fidelity fluids code. The fluids code is distinguished by its ability to solve the requisite partial differential equations with adaptively refined grids necessary to describe the strong variation in spatial scales in combustion.

  14. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Mullins, David R; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Wu, Zili

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging

  15. Prediction of transient exhaust soot for a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoping, B.; Shu, H.

    1995-12-31

    A generalized computer model for prediction of transient exhaust soot and response of turbocharged diesel engines is developed. It includes detailed thermodynamic and dynamic processes. This model utilizes a multi-zone combustion submodel that emphasizes simple and economical calculations for combustion behavior and zonal soot, so overall transient exhaust soot can be predicted. This model is applied to a turbocharged diesel engine. The steady state exhaust soot and performance are calculated and validated, and on the basis, the exhaust soot and response under three classes of transient operating conditions are predicted. The parametric study is carried out by using this model. The effects of valve overlap period, exhaust manifold volume, turbocharger inertia and ambient pressure are predicted. Applications of this model have proved that it is a convenient analytical tool in the study for turbocharged diesel engines. 18 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Light-duty diesel engine development status and engine needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This report reviews, assesses, and summarizes the research and development status of diesel engine technology applicable to light-duty vehicles. In addition, it identifies specific basic and applied research and development needs in light-duty diesel technology and related health areas where initial or increased participation by the US Government would be desirable. The material presented in this report updates information provided in the first diesel engine status report prepared by the Aerospace Corporation for the Department of Energy in September, 1978.

  17. The development of a prechamber diesel engine family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filtri, G.; Morello, L.; Stroppiana, B.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a new family of prechamber diesel engines, based on a technological commonalty with the gasoline engines is reported. The range of diesel engines, all of them four-cylinder-in line, consist of 3 displacements: 1365cc - 1697cc - 1930cc either naturally aspirated or turbocharged. Mention is also made of their most significant technical innovations about their architecture and combustion chambers, and the main components such as block cylinder, head, crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons, timing gear and injection pump control, intake and exhaust manifolds.

  18. An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. deer10_ciatti.pdf (1.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Use of Low Cetane Fuel to Enable Low Temperature Combustion High-Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Engine via Fuel Reactivity Control

  19. Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine Cummins Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel engine Discusses plan, baselining, and modeling, for new light ...

  20. Diesel Engines: What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained World? Diesel Engines: What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained World? 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) ...

  1. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) ...

  2. Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_troy.pdf (464.48 KB) More Documents & Publications An Innovative Pressure Sensor Glow Plug Offers Improved Diesel Engine Closed-loop Control Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

  3. Cummins/DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel Engine Progress Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Clean Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins/DOE Light Truck Clean Diesel Engine Progress Report 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Cummins Inc. 2003_deer_stang.pdf (168.78 KB) More Documents & Publications Cummins Light Truck Clean Diesel Cummins/DOE Light Truck Diesel Engine Progress Report Cummins Work Toward Successful Introduction of Light-Duty Clean Diesel Engines in US

  4. Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air | Department of Energy Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_bowser.pdf (615.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Membrane Technology Workshop Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) R&D - Presentation by Argonne National Laboratory, June 2011 Diesel Engine

  5. Comparative emissions from natural gas and diesel buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, N.N.; Gadapati, C.J.; Lyons, D.W.; Wang, W.; Gautam, M.; Bata, R.M.; Kelly, K.; White, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Data has been gathered using the West Virginia University Heavy Duty Transportable Emissions Laboratories from buses operating on diesel and a variety of alternate fuels in the field. Emissions data are acquired from buses using the Central Business District cycle reported in SAE Standard J1376; this cycle has 14 ramps with 20 mph (32.2 km/h) peaks, separated by idle periods. During the three years of testing, a significant fraction of emissions data was acquired from buses with Cummins L-10 engines designed to operate on either CNG or diesel. The CNG lean burn engines were spark ignited and throttled. Early CNG engines, which were pre-certification demonstration models, have provided the bulk of the data, but data from 9 buses with more advanced technology were also available. It has been found that carbon monoxide (CO) levels from early Cummins L-10 CNG powered buses varied greatly from bus to bus, with the higher values ascribed to either faulty catalytic converters or a rich idle situation, while the later model CNG L-10 engines offered CO levels considerably lower than those typical of diesel engines. The NO{sub x} emissions were on par with those from diesel L-10 buses. Those natural gas buses with engines adjusted correctly for air-fuel ratio, returned very low emissions data. CNG bus hydrocarbon emissions are not readily compared with diesel engine levels since only the non-methane organic gases (NMOG) are of interest. Data show that NMOG levels are low for the CNG buses. Significant reduction was observed in the particulate matter emitted by the CNG powered buses compared to the diesel buses, in most cases the quantity captured was vanishingly small. Major conclusions are that engine maintenance is crucial if emissions are to remain at design levels and that the later generation CNG engines show marked improvement over the earlier models. One may project for the long term that closed loop stoichiometry control is desirable even in lean burn applications.

  6. Dual fuel control of a high speed turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Few, P.C.; Sardari, P.

    1987-01-01

    The modification of a Ford 7600 turbocharged diesel engine to a dual fuel engine using methane as the supplementary fuel has been carried out. The paper describes the preliminary work of dual fuel control. Two systems are examined and their behaviour is presented.

  7. European Diesel Engine Technology: An Overview | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solution for Euro VI Emissions Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer

  8. Systems and methods for controlling diesel engine emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Cynthia Chaffin; Weber, Phillip Anthony; Khair, Magdi K.

    2004-06-01

    Systems and methods for controlling diesel engine emissions, including, for example, oxides of nitrogen emissions, particulate matter emissions, and the like. The emission control system according to this invention is provided in the exhaust passageway of a diesel engine and includes a catalyst-based particulate filter; and first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems coupled to the catalyst-based particulate filter. The first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems are arranged in a parallel flow configuration with each other. Each of the first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems include a carbon monoxide generating catalyst device, a sulfur trap device, a lean NO.sub.x device, a supplemental fuel injector device, and a plurality of flow diverter devices.

  9. Diesel engines vs. spark ignition gasoline engines -- Which is ``greener``?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbanks, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Criteria emissions, i.e., NO{sub x}, PM, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}, from recently manufactured automobiles, compared on the basis of what actually comes out of the engines, the diesel engine is greener than spark ignition gasoline engines and this advantage for the diesel engine increases with time. SI gasoline engines tend to get out of tune more than diesel engines and 3-way catalytic converters and oxygen sensors degrade with use. Highway measurements of NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO revealed that for each model year, 10% of the vehicles produce 50% of the emissions and older model years emit more than recent model year vehicles. Since 1974, cars with SI gasoline engines have uncontrolled emission until the 3-way catalytic converter reaches operating temperature, which occurs after roughly 7 miles of driving. Honda reports a system to be introduced in 1998 that will alleviate this cold start problem by storing the emissions then sending them through the catalytic converter after it reaches operating temperature. Acceleration enrichment, wherein considerable excess fuel is introduced to keep temperatures down of SI gasoline engine in-cylinder components and catalytic converters so these parts meet warranty, results in 2,500 times more CO and 40 times more H{sub 2} being emitted. One cannot kill oneself, accidentally or otherwise, with CO from a diesel engine vehicle in a confined space. There are 2,850 deaths per year attributable to CO from SI gasoline engine cars. Diesel fuel has advantages compared with gasoline. Refinery emissions are lower as catalytic cracking isn`t necessary. The low volatility of diesel fuel results in a much lower probability of fires. Emissions could be improved by further reducing sulfur and aromatics and/or fuel additives. Reformulated fuel has become the term covering reducing the fuels contribution to emissions. Further PM reduction should be anticipated with reformulated diesel and gasoline fuels.

  10. Nanocatalysts for Diesel Engine Emissions Remediation | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    venkatasubramanian1.pdf (1.13 MB) More Documents & Publications Nano-structures Thermoelectric Materals - Part 2 Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI Thermoelectric Developments for Vehicular Applications

    venkatasubramanian2.pdf (3.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Nano-structures Thermoelectric Materals - Part 1 Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible,

  11. Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitz, Rolf D.; Thiel, Matthew P.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

  12. Effect of EGR contamination of diesel engine oil on wear.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Aldajah, S.; Goldblatt, I. L.; Energy Systems; United Arab Emirates Univ.; BP-Global Lubricants Technology

    2007-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is one of the effective means to reduce the NO{sub X} emission from diesel engines. Returning exhaust product to the diesel engine combustion chamber accelerated the degradation of the lubricant engine oil, primarily by increasing the total acid number (TAN) as well as the soot content and, consequently, the viscosity. These oil degradation mechanisms were observed in engine oil exposed to EGR during a standard Cummins M-l 1 diesel engine test. Four-ball wear tests with M-50 balls showed that, although the used oils slightly decrease the friction coefficients, they increased the ball wear by two orders of magnitude when compared to tests with clean oil. Wear occurred primarily by an abrasive mechanism, but in oil with the highest soot loading of 12%, scuffing and soot particle embedment were also observed. Laboratory wear tests showed a linear correlation with the TAN, while the crosshead wear during the engine test was proportional to the soot content.

  13. Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badgley, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report, entitled Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,'' describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

  14. Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1999-05-03

    Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

  15. Regulation of Emissions from Stationary Diesel Engines (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    On July 11, 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued regulations covering emissions from stationary diesel engines New Source Performance Standards that limit emissions of NOx, particulate matter, SO2, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons to the same levels required for nonroad diesel engines. The regulation affects new, modified, and reconstructed diesel engines. Beginning with model year 2007, engine manufacturers must specify that new engines less than 3,000 horsepower meet the same emissions standard as nonroad diesel engines. For engines greater than 3,000 horsepower, the standard will be fully effective in 2011. Stationary diesel engine fuel will also be subject to the same standard as nonroad diesel engine fuel, which reduces the sulfur content of the fuel to 500 parts per million by mid-2007 and 15 parts per million by mid-2010.

  16. The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow The Diesel Engine Powering Light-Duty Vehicles: Today and Tomorrow 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Volkwagen AG, Wolfsburg, Germany 2004_deer_schindler.pdf (951.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Accelerating Light-Duty Diesel Sales in the U.S. Market Marketing Light-Duty Diesels to U.S. Consumers Clean Diesel: The Progress, The Message, The Opportunity

  17. The Potential of Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines The Potential of Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_millo.pdf (766.54 KB) More Documents & Publications Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications Downspeeding a Heavy-Duty Pickup Truck with a Combined Supercharger and Turbocharger Boosting System to Improve

  18. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions | Department of Energy Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August,

  19. SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_leprince.pdf (290.81 KB) More Documents & Publications Development of ADECS to Meet 2010 Emission Levels: Optimization of NOx, NH3 and Fuel Consumption Using High and Low Engine-Out NOx Calibrations Low Emissions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulation - A Progress Report The Development and

  20. Hydrogen as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines Hydrogen as a Supplemental Fuel in Diesel Engines Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_bika.pdf (177.65 KB) More Documents & Publications Fuels of the Future for Cars and Trucks Renewable Diesel Vehicle Technologies Office:

  1. Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America | Department of Energy Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America Technical Challenges and Opportunities Light-Duty Diesel Engines in North America 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_pinson.pdf (598.44 KB) More Documents & Publications Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America Diesel Technology - Challenges & Opportunities for North America Comparison of Conventional Diesel and

  2. The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just a Fantasy? |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just a Fantasy? The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just a Fantasy? 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_fairbanks2.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications DOE's Launch of High-Efficiency Thermiekectrics Projects Thermoelectric Developments for Vehicular Applications Solid-State Energy Conversion Overview

  3. Oil Bypass Filter and Diesel Engine Idling Wear-Rate Evaluations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bypass Filter and Diesel Engine Idling Wear-Rate Evaluations Oil Bypass Filter and Diesel Engine Idling Wear-Rate Evaluations 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_zirker.pdf (247.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles Development of Partial Filter Technology for HDD Retrofit Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating

  4. 2007-2009 USA Emission Solutions for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy -2009 USA Emission Solutions for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines 2007-2009 USA Emission Solutions for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Southwest Research Institute 2002_deer_leet.pdf (429.05 KB) More Documents & Publications Low Emisssions Potential of EGR-SCR-DPF and Advanced Fuel Formulations - A Progress Report State-of-the-Art and Emergin Truck Engine Technologies Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

  5. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    confidential, proprietary, or otherwise restricted information. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine This presentation does not contain any confidential, ...

  6. Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits Drastic reduction of engine-out emissions and complicated aftertreatment system comprising of oxidation catalyst, ...

  7. Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development of a new light truck, in-line 4-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine that will ... Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Cummins Next ...

  8. High-Load Partially Premixed Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy High-Load Partially Premixed Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine High-Load Partially Premixed Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_johansson.pdf (1.48 MB) More Documents & Publications Experiments and Modeling of Two-Stage Combustion in Low-Emissions Diesel Engines High-Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Engine via Fuel Reactivity Control Path

  9. Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil- Impact on Wear

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Results of completed study on the effect of four exhaust gas recirculation levels on diesel engine oil during standard test with an API Cummins M-11 engine.

  10. Influence of diesel engine combustion on the rupture strength of partially stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, C.R.; VonCook, K.; Foster, B.E.; Graves, R.L.; Kahl, W.K.; Liu, K.C.; Simpson, W.A. )

    1989-08-01

    This article is on a study conducted to determine whether long-term exposure of two types of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) to the combustion environment of diesel engines would generate a change in mechanical properties. The author explains why PSZ was chosen for the study and goes on to discuss some reservations about the use of PSZ in diesel engines.

  11. Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Comparative Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered Urban Buses Summary of Swedish Experiences on CNG and "Clean" Diesel Buses CNG and ...

  12. Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stand-alone urea SCR system was developed for marine diesel engines and showed a 50-percent reduction in NOx.

  13. A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Thomas E; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Curran, Scott; Nafziger, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

  14. Starting low compression ratio rotary Wankel diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamo, R.; Yamada, T.Y.; Hamada, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The single stage rotary Wankel engine is difficult to convert into a diesel version having an adequate compression ratio and a compatible combustion chamber configuration. Past efforts in designing a rotary-type Wankel diesel engine resorted to a two-stage design. Complexity, size, weight, cost and performance penalties were some of the drawbacks of the two-stage Wankel-type diesel designs. This paper presents an approach to a single stage low compression ratio Wankel-type rotary engine. Cold starting of a low compression ratio single stage diesel Wankel becomes the key problem. It was demonstrated that the low compression single stage diesel Wankel type rotary engine can satisfactorily be cold started with a properly designed combustion chamber in the rotor and a variable heat input combustion aid.

  15. Dual fueling of a Caterpillar 3406 diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.R.; Midkiff, K.C.; Doughty, G.; Brett, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    A Caterpillar 3406 turbocharged diesel engine was converted to operate in a dual-fuel mode and was evaluated for performance and emission characteristics for both diesel and natural gas operation. Full load power was achieved with dual fueling without knock. Similar fuel efficiencies were obtained with dual fueling a high loads, but efficiencies were lower for low loads. Bosch smoke numbers were reduced by over 50% with dual fueling for all cases investigated. NO{sub x} emissions were found to be lower at low loads and at high speeds under high load. CO emissions were significantly increased for dual fueling while CO{sub 2} concentrations in the exhaust were reduced for dual fueling.

  16. EXPLORING LOW EMISSION DIESEL ENGINE OILS WORKSHOP - A SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Joseph

    2000-08-20

    This paper discusses and summarizes some of the results of the title workshop. The workshop was held January 31-February 2, 2000 in Phoenix, Arizona. The purpose of the workshop was ''To craft a shared vision for Industry-Government (DOE) research and development collaboration in Diesel Engine Oils to minimize emissions while maintaining or enhancing engine performance''. The final report of the workshop (NREL/SR-570-28521) was issued in June 2000 by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393. There were some 95 participants at the workshop representing industry, government and academia, Figure 1. The format for the workshop is described in Figure 2. This format allowed for considerable discussion of the various issues prior to deliberations in breakout groups. This process resulted in recommendations to solve the issues related to the next generation of diesel engine oils. Keynote addresses by SAE President Rodica Baranescu (International Truck and Engine Corporation), James Eberhardt of DOE and Paul Machiele of EPA focused on diesel progress, workshop issues and regulatory fuel issues. A panel of experts further defined the issues of interest, presenting snapshots of the current status in their areas of expertise. A Q&A session was followed by a series of technical presentations discussing the various areas. Some two dozen presentations covered the technical issues, Figure 3. An open forum was held to allow any participant to present related studies or comment on any of the technical issues. The participants broke into work groups addressing the various areas found on Figure 2. A group leader was appointed and reported on their findings, recommendations, suggested participants for projects and on related items.

  17. Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines Variable Charge Motion for 2007-2010 Heavy Duty Diesel Engines 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: AVL Powertrain Engineering 2003_deer_maier.pdf (669.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine: New Development Rersults Can Future Emissions Limits be Met with a Hybrid EGR System Alone? Sources of CO and UHC Emissions in Low-Temperature

  18. Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a light-duty diesel engine, which require utilization of the waste energy found in the coolant, EGR, and exhaust streams, may be increased through the development of a Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system deer09_briggs.pdf (291.32 KB) More Documents & Publications Performance of an

  19. Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bin 5 Emission Limits | Department of Energy Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits Optimization of Engine-out Emissions from a Diesel Engine to Meet Tier 2 Bin 5 Emission Limits Drastic reduction of engine-out emissions and complicated aftertreatment system comprising of oxidation catalyst, particulate filter, and DeNOx catalyst are implemented to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 limits for U.S. market diesel engines. deer08_yoon.pdf (1.2 MB) More Documents &

  20. INL Hybrid Shuttle Buses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INL Hybrid Shuttle Buses Four 28 to 36 passenger hybrid-electric shuttle buses, operated at the Idaho National Laboratory, were equipped with data loggers. The shuttle buses were delivered in 2010 with MaxxForce DT engines configured for 620 ft-lb of torque, and Eaton City-Delivery hybrid-electric systems, each containing a lithium-ion battery pack, electric motor, and Fuller six-speed automated manual transmission. Road speed, engine speed, and fueling data were gathered from the diagnostic

  1. Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuen-Sen Lin

    2008-12-31

    Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data

  2. Cummins' Next Generation Tier 2, Bin 2 Light Truck Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of a new light truck, in-line 4-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine that will meet Tier 2, Bin 2 emissions and at least a 40% fuel economy benefit over the V-8 gasoline engine it could replace

  3. Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-08-01

    Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

  4. Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 1 Cleaning Up Diesel Engines Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel ...

  5. Estimation and Control of Diesel Engine Processes Utilizing Variable Intake Valve Actuation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Air handling system model for multi-cylinder variable geometry turbocharged diesel engine with cooled EGR and flexible intake valve actuation developed to capture dynamic effects of gas exchange actuators

  6. Adaptive Injection Strategies (AIS) for Ultra-low Emissions Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  7. Design and Implementation of Silicon Nitride Valves for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  8. Effect of Machining Procedures on the Strength of Ceramics for Advanced Diesel Engine Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  9. Can We Accurately Measure In-Use Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  10. Integration of Diesel Engine Technology to Meet US EPA 2010 Emissions with Improved Thermal Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  11. The Impact of Lubricant on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine The Impact of Lubricant on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Lab 2002_deer_whitacre.pdf (355.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies

  12. Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels | Department of Energy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with EGR using Oil Sands Derived Fuels 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 2003_deer_neill.pdf (860.57 KB) More Documents & Publications Development of Advanced Combustion Technologies for Increased Thermal Efficiency Biodiesel Research Update Effect of the Composition of Hydrocarbon Streams on HCCI

  13. Exhaust Heat Driven Rankine Cycle for a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Driven Rankine Cycle for a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Exhaust Heat Driven Rankine Cycle for a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Presents progress to date and plans to develop a viable Rankine engine to harness useful brake power from wasted heat energy in heavy duty truck engine exhaust deer11_singh.pdf (2.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems Roadmapping Engine Technology for Post-2020 Heavy Duty Vehicles

  14. Mixture Formation in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixture Formation in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Mixture Formation in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine Presents quantitative measurements of evolution of in-cylinder equivalence ratio distributions in a light-duty engine where wall interactions and strong swirl are significant deer12_miles.pdf (4.42 MB) More Documents & Publications Low-Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion Light-Duty Diesel Combustion Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Light-Duty Diesel Combuston

  15. System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine System-Response Issues Imposed by Biodiesel in a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine The objective of the current research is to assess differences in NOx emissions between biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuels, resulting from fundamental issues and system-response issues. deer09_jacobs.pdf (775.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Biodiesel's Enabling Characteristics in Attaining Low Temperature

  16. Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Emissions Milestones | Department of Energy DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones Progress on DOE Vehicle Technologies Light-Duty Diesel Engine Efficiency and Emissions Milestones The path to 45 percent peak BTE in FY 2010 includes modern base engine plus enabling technologies demonstrated in FY 2008 plus the recovery of thermal energy from the exhaust and EGR systems deer09_wagner.pdf (224.99 KB) More Documents & Publications Achieving

  17. An experimental investigation of low octane gasoline in diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciatti, S. A.; Subramanian, S.

    2011-09-01

    Conventional combustion techniques struggle to meet the current emissions norms. In particular, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) emissions have limited the utilization of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Advance combustion concepts have proved the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved emission performance. Low-temperature combustion (LTC) offers reduced NO{sub x} and PM emissions with comparable modern diesel engine efficiencies. The ability of premixed, low-temperature compression ignition to deliver low PM and NO{sub x} emissions is dependent on achieving optimal combustion phasing. Diesel operated LTC is limited by early knocking combustion, whereas conventional gasoline operated LTC is limited by misfiring. So the concept of using an unconventional fuel with the properties in between those two boundary fuels has been experimented in this paper. Low-octane (84 RON) gasoline has shown comparable diesel efficiencies with the lowest NO{sub x} emissions at reasonable high power densities (NO{sub x} emission was 1 g/kW h at 12 bar BMEP and 2750 rpm).

  18. Taguchi methods applied to oxygen-enriched diesel engine experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.W.; Sekar, R.R.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.; Longman, D.E.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a test series conducted on a six-cylinder diesel engine to study the impacts of controlled factors (i.e., oxygen content of the combustion air, water content of the fuel, fuel rate, and fuel-injection timing) on engine emissions using Taguchi methods. Three levels of each factor were used in the tests. Only the main effects of the factors were examined; no attempt was made to analyze the interactions among the factors. It was found that, as in the case of the single-cylinder engine tests, oxygen in the combustion air was very effective in reducing particulate and smoke emissions. Increases in NO{sub x} due to the oxygen enrichment observed in the single-cylinder tests also occurred in the present six-cylinder tests. Water in the emulsified fuel was found to be much less effective in decreasing NO{sub x} emissions for the six-cylinder engine than it was for the single-cylinder engine.

  19. Taguchi methods applied to oxygen-enriched diesel engine experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.W.; Sekar, R.R.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Longman, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a test series conducted on a six-cylinder diesel engine to study the impacts of controlled factors (i.e., oxygen content of the combustion air, water content of the fuel, fuel rate, and fuel-injection timing) on engine emissions using Taguchi methods. Three levels of each factor were used in the tests. Only the main effects of the factors were examined; no attempt was made to analyze the interactions among the factors. It was found that, as in the case of the single-cylinder engine tests, oxygen in the combustion air was very effective in reducing particulate and smoke emissions. Increases in NO[sub x] due to the oxygen enrichment observed in the single-cylinder tests also occurred in the present six-cylinder tests. Water in the emulsified fuel was found to be much less effective in decreasing NO[sub x] emissions for the six-cylinder engine than it was for the single-cylinder engine.

  20. On the concept of separate aftercooling for locomotive diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzkan, T.; Lenz, M.A.

    1999-04-01

    This paper describes a patented cooling system concept for a turbocharged diesel engine. In particular, it defines a cooling system having the capability of transferring some of the cooling capacity of transferring some of the cooling capacity of engine jacket and engine oil cooling to cool the cylinder inlet air when more than the cooling capacity built into the system through the size of the radiators and fans is needed. This increased aftercooling will improve the engine performance and reduce emission levels. The cooling capacity of a locomotive is essentially determined by the radiator and fan size, among other factors, and is designed to cool the engine within acceptable metal temperatures at a specified maximum ambient temperature and at the maximum engine power. On the other hand, at lower ambient temperatures or engine power levels, the cooling needs of the engine will be less than this maximum cooling capacity of the cooling system. There remains some excess capacity. This paper describes the concept called the ``Separate Aftercooling System`` that uses some of this excess cooling capacity to cool the engine inlet air at the aftercoolers. It shows the feasibility of such a system, describes the order of magnitude of benefits that can be expected from such a system, and outlines the implementation of this concept to EMD built locomotives.

  1. Mathematical model of marine diesel engine simulator for a new methodology of self propulsion tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izzuddin, Nur; Sunarsih,; Priyanto, Agoes

    2015-05-15

    As a vessel operates in the open seas, a marine diesel engine simulator whose engine rotation is controlled to transmit through propeller shaft is a new methodology for the self propulsion tests to track the fuel saving in a real time. Considering the circumstance, this paper presents the real time of marine diesel engine simulator system to track the real performance of a ship through a computer-simulated model. A mathematical model of marine diesel engine and the propeller are used in the simulation to estimate fuel rate, engine rotating speed, thrust and torque of the propeller thus achieve the target vessel’s speed. The input and output are a real time control system of fuel saving rate and propeller rotating speed representing the marine diesel engine characteristics. The self-propulsion tests in calm waters were conducted using a vessel model to validate the marine diesel engine simulator. The simulator then was used to evaluate the fuel saving by employing a new mathematical model of turbochargers for the marine diesel engine simulator. The control system developed will be beneficial for users as to analyze different condition of vessel’s speed to obtain better characteristics and hence optimize the fuel saving rate.

  2. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li-Ping Ding, Shun-Liang; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen; Litak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-15

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  3. Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... APPENDIX B - EMISSIONS TABLES APPENDIX C - DISCUSSION OF OUTLIER CNG TEST RESULTS APPENDIX ... Appendix A Figure 2 Emissions Test Cycles Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses 1 ...

  4. COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, D.; Parsley, W.; Bush,C; Zupo, D.

    2003-08-24

    Using previously published data on regulated and unregulated emissions, this paper will compare the environmental performance of current generation transit buses operated on compressed natural gas (CNG) to current generation transit buses operated on ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and incorporating diesel particulate filters (DPF). Unregulated emissions evaluated include toxic compounds associated with adverse health effects (carbonyl, PAH, NPAH, benzene) as well as PM particle count and size distribution. For all regulated and unregulated emissions, both technologies are shown to be comparable. DPF equipped diesel buses and CNG buses have virtually identical levels of PM mass emissions and particle number emissions. DPF-equipped diesel buses have lower HC and CO emissions and lower emissions of toxic substances such as benzene, carbonyls and PAHs than CNG buses. CNG buses have lower NOx emissions than DPF-equipped buses, though CNG bus NOx emissions are shown to be much more variable. In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and DPF-equipped buses. The cost comparison is primarily based on the experience of MTA New York City Transit in operating CNG buses since 1995 and DPF-equipped buses fueled with ULSD since 2001. Published data on the experience of other large transit agencies in operating CNG buses is used to validate the NYCT experience. The incremental cost (compared to ''baseline'' diesel) of operating a typical 200-bus depot is shown to be six times higher for CNG buses than for ''clean diesel'' buses. The contributors to this increased cost for CNG buses are almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and installation of fueling infrastructure, and increased operating costs for purchase of fuel, bus maintenance, and fuel station maintenance.

  5. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  6. The use of neural nets for matching compressors with diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.A. II; Filipi, Z.S.; Assanis, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    A technique which uses trained neural nets to model the compressor in the context of a turbocharged diesel engine simulation is introduced. This technique replaces the usual interpolation of compressor maps with the evaluation of a smooth mathematical function, thus providing engine simulations with greater robustness and flexibility. Following presentation of the methodology, the proposed neural net technique is validated against data from a truck type, 6-cylinder, 14 liter diesel engine. Furthermore, with the introduction of an additional parameter, the proposed neural net can be trained to simulate an entire family of compressors. As a demonstration, five compressors of different sizes are represented with the neural net model, and used for matching calculations with intercooled and non-intercooled engine configurations at different speeds. This novel approach readily allows for evaluation of various options prior to prototype production, and is thus a powerful design tool for selection of the best compressor for a given diesel engine system.

  7. Visualization of UHC Emissions for Low-Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Visualization of UHC Emissions for Low-Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion Visualization of UHC Emissions for Low-Temperature Diesel Engine Combustion Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_musculus.pdf (9.8 MB) More Documents & Publications In-Cylinder Processes of EGR-Diluted Low-Load, Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion A

  8. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements of the U.S. Market | Department of Energy EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Ricardo, Inc. 2004_deer_greaney.pdf (497.44 KB) More Documents & Publications Ricardo's ACTION Strategy: An Enabling Light Duty Diesel Technology for the US Market US

  9. Effects of fuel stability upon injection-nozzle deposit formation in road-tested diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortnagel, M.; Herrbrich, B.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of diesel fuels have changed distinctly, especially in the United States. Fuel-related problems-one of which is the injector-nozzle coking in passenger-car diesel engines-have arisen due to deteriorated fuel qualities. Extended investigations of road-tested diesel engines suggest a link between fuel stability and the coke-deposit mechanism. Stabilizing poor-quality fuels by a chemical-additive package resulted in troublefree operation over extended mileage. Thus fuel stability, which evidently has to be secured at the refinery, shows up as an important property for satisfactory engine operation.

  10. 12TH DIESEL ENGINE-EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS RESEARCH CONFERENCE (DEER 2006)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRESENTATIONS | Department of Energy 2TH DIESEL ENGINE-EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS RESEARCH CONFERENCE (DEER 2006) PRESENTATIONS 12TH DIESEL ENGINE-EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS RESEARCH CONFERENCE (DEER 2006) PRESENTATIONS Presented at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_aravelli.pdf (1.66 MB) More Documents & Publications Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some

  11. COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and ... almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and ...

  12. Cold starting capabilities of petroleum and syntehetic lubricants in heavy-duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margeson, M.A.; Belmesch, B.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the work described in this paper was to compare the cold weather starting ability of diesel engines lubricated with SAE 15W-40 petroleum and SAE 5W-30 synthetic motor oil. Laboratory bench tests were used to compare rhelogical features such as borderline pumping temperature and cold cranking simulator profiles. A cold box provided a well controlled environment in which cranking and starting studies were carried out on the two oils in a turbocharged diesel engine. The SAE 5W-30 synthetic exhibited higher cranking speeds, lower starter amperage draw and immediate oil pressure readings when compared to the SAE l5W-40 petroleum. The SAE 5W-30 synthetic oil was safely started at {minus} l0 {sup 0}F oil temperature without auxiliary heaters. The comparative cylinder turbocharged diesel engines representing conditions commonly found in the commercial and off-highway sectors, These studies indicate that combining high capacity cold cranking amperage batteries, high pressure ether aid injection, and SAE 5W-30 synthetic oil resulted in a system that safely starts diesel engines down to actual oil temperatures of at least {minus} 10 {sup 0}F.

  13. A flexible system for the simulation of turbocharged diesel engines and turbocharging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulaty, T.; Codan, E.; Skopil, M.

    1996-12-31

    A fully flexible simulation system enables substitution of the conventional tests performed on turbocharged diesel engines. The supercharging systems can be calculated either by filling and emptying or by the differential method for 1-D unsteady flow during steady-state or transient operation. During sophisticated simulations, some conservation problems were observed. Their theoretical explanation and a practical solution are presented.

  14. Potentiality of small DI diesel engines under consideration of emissions and noise control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugihara, K.; Matusi, Y.; Saegusa, S.

    1985-01-01

    The potentiality of direct injection (DI) diesel engines for passenger cars has been examined by comparing the characteristics of fuel consumption, exhaust emissions and noise levels between a turbocharged DI diesel engine and a turbocharged IDI diesel engine with the same displacement, 4 cylinders and 2 liters. It was observed that improved fuel consumption was obtained as the engine load increased, namely, 10 - 15% in the higher load range and 5 - 10% in the partial load range. In comparison to the IDI engine, the exhaust emissions of the DI engine tended to contain two or three times higher NOx and HC, and also about 30% higher particulates. Further, the noise levels of the DI engine were approximately 2 - 4 db (a) higher than those of the IDI engine. It was suggested from these results that in those countries which have stringent emission and noise regulations several years would be required to introduce small, high speed DI diesel engines for passenger cars to meet with these regulations.

  15. Sizes, graphitic structures and fractal geometry of light-duty diesel engine particulates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K. O.; Zhu, J.; Ciatti, S.; Choi, M. Y.; Energy Systems; Drexel Univ.

    2003-01-01

    The particulate matter of a light-duty diesel engine was characterized in its morphology, sizes, internal microstructures, and fractal geometry. A thermophoretic sampling system was employed to collect particulates directly from the exhaust manifold of a 1.7-liter turbocharged common-rail direct-injection diesel engine. The particulate samples collected at various engine-operating conditions were then analyzed by using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an image processing/data acquisition system. Results showed that mean primary particle diameters (dp), and radii of gyration (Rg), ranged from 19.4 nm to 32.5 nm and 77.4 nm to 134.1 nm, respectively, through the entire engine-operating conditions of 675 rpm (idling) to 4000 rpm and 0% to 100% loads. It was also revealed that the other important parameters sensitive to the particulate formation, such as exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rate, equivalence ratio, and temperature, affected particle sizes significantly. Bigger primary particles were measured at higher EGR rates, higher equivalence ratios (fuel-rich), and lower exhaust temperatures. Fractal dimensions (D{sup f}) were measured at a range of 1.5 - 1.7, which are smaller than those measured for heavy-duty direct-injection diesel engine particulates in our previous study. This finding implies that the light-duty diesel engine used in this study produces more stretched chain-like shape particles, while the heavy-duty diesel engine emits more spherical particles. The microstructures of diesel particulates were observed at high TEM magnifications and further analyzed by a Raman spectroscope. Raman spectra revealed an atomic structure of the particulates produced at high engine loads, which is similar to that of typical graphite.

  16. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2009-11-01

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats

  17. Alternative Fuel Transit Buses

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    35th St. Craig Ave. Alt Blvd. Colucci Pkwy. Final Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Vehicle Evaluation Program Final Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Vehicle Evaluation Program N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Produced for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a U.S. DOE national laboratory Transit Buses Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Final Results from the

  18. Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy (RN) and Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Flotillas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  19. A Comparison of Combustion and Emissions of Diesel Fuels and Oxygenated Fuels in a Modern DI Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A single-cylinder engine was used to study how selected oxygenated fuels affect combustion and emissions in a modern diesel engine during conventional combustion and low-temperature combustion (LTC).

  20. Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  1. Isuzu's new 12. 0L micro-computer controlled turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakabayashi, M.; Sakata, S.; Hamanaka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Isuzu Motors Limited introduced in the Japanese market a new micro-computer controlled turbocharged 6RA1TC diesel engine which powers new Isuzu heavy-duty trucks in 1983. This engine has successfully achieved both fuel economy and vehicle performance. This was realized by the combination of the newly developed micro-computer controlled fuel injection system and turbocharged air-to-air intercooled four valve low friction diesel engine. The purpose of the computer control system is flexible and precise control of fuel flow rate and fuel injection timing. This provides maximum engine performance and driveability, best fuel economy combined with the gearing of the vehicle, and easy operation for drivers. Additionally, this engine offers the following features: Good cold startability; Constant speed Cruise Control; Automatic schedule idling speed during warm-up; Stable low speed idling; Light and quick throttle response; Monitoring display for best fuel economy operation; Monitor display for engine diagnosis.

  2. The effect of fumigation of different ethalnol proofs on a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T.K.; Savage, L.D.; White, R.A.; Sorenson, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Lower proof ethanol is shown to be a viable alternate fuel for diesel engines. This type of ethanol can be manufactured economically in small distillation plants from renewable grain supplies. The effect of fumigation of ethanol proofs with a multipoint injection system on a turbocharged direct injection diesel engine at 2,400 rpm and three loads was studied. The addition of the water in the lower proofs reduced the maximum rate of pressure rise and peak pressure from pure ethanol levels. Both of these values were significantly higher than those for diesel operation. HC and CO emissions increased several times over diesel levels at all loads and also with increased ethanol fumigation. NO emissions were reduced below diesel levels for lower proof ethanol at all loads. The tests at this rpm and load with a a multipoint ethanol injection system indicate that lower (100 or 125) proof provides optimum performance.

  3. The regenerable trap oxidizer-An emission control technique for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abthoff, J.; Schuster, H.D.; Langer, H.J.; Loose, G.

    1985-01-01

    Daimler-Benz made an early start with the development of systems for the aftertreatment of the exhaust gas emitted by diesel engines. The more important limiting conditions could best be met by the provision of a ceramic, selfcleaning trap oxidizer (TO). In such filters, self-regeneration is effected continuously while driving without any external control. Either partial or complete regeneration is effected, depending on the temperature, oxygen content and rate of flow of the exhaust gas, the amount of soot in the filter and the period for which a given operating condition is maintained. Such a trap oxidizer was developed for a 3.0 liter turbocharged diesel engine to the extent necessary for series production and has been fitted to type 300 SD and 300 D turbocharged diesel of model year 1985 in California.

  4. Fate of SO{sub 2} During Plasma Treatment of Diesel Engine Exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1999-10-25

    Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} to achieve efficient reduction of NO{sub x} and particulates in diesel engine exhaust. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO{sub 2} is also active in converting SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without oxidizing SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. It is shown that the presence of hydrocarbons in the plasma is essential for enhancing the selective partial oxidation of NO and suppressing the oxidation of SO{sub 2}.

  5. U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 2 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2 U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 2 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: NAVSEA 2002_deer_osborne2.pdf (1.14 MB) More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4 Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates and NOx MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 1

  6. U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 3 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 3 U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 3 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: NAVSEA 2002_deer_osborne3.pdf (1.1 MB) More Documents & Publications Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies High Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2

  7. Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1990-03-01

    Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

  8. Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1990-03-01

    Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Low-Temperature and Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Combustion Research | Department of Energy ace_07_oefelein.pdf (4.03 MB) More Documents & Publications Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Low-Temperature and Diesel Engine Combustion Research Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to LTC/Diesel/Hydrogen Engine Combustion Research Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Applied to Advanced Engine Combustion Research Combustion Research | Department of Energy

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program,

  10. Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions Laboratory Policy (LP) LP Home About Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Frequently Asked Questions Impact Legislative History Program Contacts Management & Operating (M&O) Contracts Technology Transfer Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) Contact Information Laboratory Policy U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:

  11. Conversion of a diesel engine to a spark ignition natural gas engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Requirements for alternatives to diesel-fueled vehicles are developing, particularly in urban centers not in compliance with mandated air quality standards. An operator of fleets of diesel- powered vehicles may be forced to either purchase new vehicles or equip some of the existing fleets with engines designed or modified to run on alternative fuels. In converting existing vehicles, the operator can either replace the existing engine or modify it to burn an alternative fuel. Work described in this report addresses the problem of modifying an existing diesel engine to operate on natural gas. Tecogen has developed a technique for converting turbocharged automotive diesel engines to operate as dedicated spark-ignition engines with natural gas fuel. The engine cycle is converted to a more-complete-expansion cycle in which the expansion ratio of the original engine is unchanged while the effective compression ratio is lowered, so that engine detonation is avoided. The converted natural gas engine, with an expansion ratio higher than in conventional spark- ignition natural gas engines, offers thermal efficiency at wide-open- throttle conditions comparable to its diesel counterpart. This allows field conversion of existing engines. Low exhaust emissions can be achieved when the engine is operated with precise control of the fuel air mixture at stoichiometry with a 3-way catalyst. A Navistar DTA- 466 diesel engine with an expansion ratio of 16.5 to 1 was converted in this way, modifying the cam profiles, increasing the turbocharger boost pressure, incorporating an aftercooler if not already present, and adding a spark-ignition system, natural gas fuel management system, throttle body for load control, and an electronic engine control system. The proof-of-concept engine achieved a power level comparable to that of the diesel engine without detonation. A conversion system was developed for the Navistar DT 466 engine. NOx emissions of 1.5 g/bhp-h have been obtained.

  12. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakwani, R. M.; Wilson, Jr., R. P.; Winsor, R. E.

    1991-12-01

    Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

  13. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2011-03-15

    Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

  14. Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

  15. Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

    1992-12-31

    The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

  16. Proof-of-principle test for thermoelectric generator for diesel engines; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-07-26

    In September of 1987, the principals of what is now Hi-Z TECHNOLOGY, INC. applied to the National Bureau of Standards (now National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) under the Energy Related Inventions Program. The invention was entitled ``Thermoelectric Generator for Diesel Engines.`` The National Institute of Standards and Technology evaluated the invention and on January 12, 1989 forwarded Recommendation Number 455 to the Department of Energy (DOE). This recommendation informed the DOE that the invention had been selected for recommendation by the NIST for possible funding by the DOE. Following the recommendation of the NIST, the DOE contacted Hi-Z to work out a development program for the generator. A contract for a grant to design, fabricate, and test a Proof-of-Principle exhaust powered thermoelectric generator for Diesel engines was signed October 19, 1989. Hi-Z provided the thermoelectric modules used in the generator as their contribution to the project. The purpose of this Grant Program was to design, build, and test a small-scale, Proof-of-Principle thermoelectric generator for a Diesel engine. 15 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badgley, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report, entitled ``Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,`` describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

  18. Control studies of an automotive turbocharged diesel engine with variable geometry turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterbone, D.E.; Jai In, S.

    1988-01-01

    Major advances are being made in engine hardware, control theories and microcomputer technology. The application of advanced control and monitoring techniques to engines should enable them to meet all the restrictions imposed upon them while they operate to their full potential. Variable geometry turbocharging of automotive diesel engines is a good example of a case where the control implications need to be considered carefully. This paper reports a technique for developing the dynamic characteristics of turbocharged diesel engines with variable geometry turbine and compares the results with measurements obtained on an engine. It is the first step in the design process for a true, dynamic, multivariable controller. Most current systems are simply scheduling devices with little understanding or consideration of possible interactions between various control loops. A non-linear simulation model for a turbocharged diesel engine was used to investigate the performance of the engine. Major features of the program, aspects of constructing a model for control purposes and identification procedures of the engine dynamic are discussed.

  19. Simulations of the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Hybrid Transit Buses over Planned Local Routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E; Franzese, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    We present simulated fuel economy and emissions city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but trends in the tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions involve more complex interactions that significantly depend on motor size and drive cycle details.

  20. Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

  1. Abrasive wear by coal-fueled diesel engine and related particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ives, L.K. )

    1992-09-01

    The development of commercially viable diesel engines that operate directly on pulverized coal-fuels will require solution to the problem of severe abrasive wear. The purpose of the work described in this report was to investigate the nature of the abrasive wear problem. Analytical studies were carried out to determine the characteristics of the coal-fuel and associated combustion particles responsible for abrasion. Laboratory pinon-disk wear tests were conducted on oil-particle mixtures to determine the relationship between wear rate and a number of different particle characteristics, contact parameters, specimen materials properties, and other relevant variables.

  2. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  3. Coal-fueled diesel technology development: Nozzle development for coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.N.; Lee, M.; White, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Direct injection of a micronized coal water mixture fuel into the combustion chambers of a diesel engine requires atomizing an abrasive slurry fuel with accurately sized orifices. Five injector orifice materials were evaluated: diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, thermally stabilized diamond, tungsten carbide with cobalt binder, and tungsten carbide with nickel binder with brazed and mechanically mounted orifice inserts. Nozzle bodies were fabricated of Armco 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel and Stellite 6B in order to withstand cyclic injection pressures and elevated temperatures. Based on a total of approximately 200 cylinder hours of engine operation with coal water mixture fuel diamond compacts were chosen for the orifice material.

  4. The effect of diesel injection timing on a turbocharged diesel engine fumigated with ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, A.R.; Savage, L.D.; White, R.A.; Sorenson, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    A study has been done to determine the effect of changes in diesel injection timing on engine performance using a multicylinder, turbocharged diesel engine fumigated with ethanol. Tests at half load with engine speeds of 2000 and 2400 rpm indicated that a 4% increase in thermal efficiency could be obtained by advancing the diesel injection timing from 18 to 29/sup 0/BTDC. The effect of changes in diesel timing was much more pronounced at 2400 rpm. Advancing the diesel timing decreased CO and unburned HC levels significantly. The increase in NO levels due to advances in diesel timing was offset by the decrease in NO due to ethanol addition.

  5. Development of the DDA 8. 2L diesel engine for 1988 emission standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winsor, R.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The emission development performed to meet 1988 Federal and California emission standards with a four-stroke direct-injection V-8 diesel engine of 8.2L displacement is described. On the naturally aspirated engine the major concern was meeting particulate and lug smoke standards at low NO/sub x/ levels. Acceleration smoke and particulate emission reduction was necessary on the turbocharged engine. The performance and emission goals were met by modifying the unit injectors and pistons of both naturally aspirated and turbocharged engines.

  6. An application of a combined charging system on a turbocharged diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.I.; Her, K.; Chang, N.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the low-speed torque characteristics and the fuel economy and to reduce the exhaust gaseous emissions from a 10-liter, turbocharged diesel engines, charge air cooling with a resonant intake system has been introduced. The use of an air-to-air inter-cooler mounted in front of the radiator results in increasing the charge air density and the resonant intake system offers a high volumetric charging efficiencies at low-speed region. Actual engine data show an increase in power of 14 percent, the improvement of specific fuel consumption by 3-7 percent and a decrease in NOx emissions by 33 percent.

  7. Hot isostatically pressed reaction bonded silicon nitride prechambers for the diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasthuber, H.H. ); Heinrich, J.G.; Huber, J.A.; Steiner, M. ); Bunk, W. )

    1989-12-01

    The aim of this work was to design a silicon nitride prechamber for a diesel engine in the 2- to 3-L range, to calculate temperature and stress distributions, and to test these ceramic prechambers in a fired engine under all working conditions. Another goal was the development of a processing technique for mass production of dense silicon nitride prechambers. For the production of components in narrow tolerances without postmachining, injection molding of silicon powder, dewaxing, nitriding, encapsulation, and postdensification by hot isostatic pressing was decided to be the most suitable procedure.

  8. Hot isostatically passed reaction-bonded silicon nitride prechambers for the diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasthurber, H.H. ); Heinrich, J.G.; Huber, J.A.; Steiner, M. ); Bunk, W. , Koeln )

    1989-12-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper, was to design a silicon nitride prechamber for a diesel engine in the 2- to 3-L range, to calculate temperature and stress distributions, and to test these ceramic prechambers in a fired engine under all working conditions. Another goal was the development of a processing technique for mass production of dense silicon nitride prechambers. For the production of components in narrow tolerances without postmachining, injection molding of silicon powder, dewaxing, nitriding, encapsulation, and postdensification by hot isostatic pressing was decided to be the most suitable procedure.

  9. Development of high temperature liquid lubricants for low-heat rejection heavy duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiczynski, T.A.; Marolewski, T.A.

    1993-03-01

    Objective was to develop a liquid lubricant that will allow advanced diesel engines to operate at top ring reversal temperatures approaching 500 C and lubricant sump temperatures approaching 250 C. Base stock screening showed that aromatic esters and diesters has the lowest deposit level, compared to polyol esters, poly-alpha-olefins, or refined mineral oil of comparable viscosity. Classical aryl and alkyl ZDP antiwear additives are ineffective in reducing wear with aromatic esters; the phosphate ester was a much better antiwear additive, and polyol esters are more amenable to ZDP treatment. Zeolites and clays were evaluated for filtration.

  10. Fuel Cell Buses | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Fuel Cell Buses" held on September 12, 2013. Fuel Cell Buses Webinar Slides (2.44 MB) More ...

  11. Synergies of PCCI-Type Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Kass, Michael D; Huff, Shean P

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that future NOx and PM emission targets for diesel engines cannot be met solely via advanced combustion over the full engine drive cycle. Therefore some combination of advanced combustion methodology with an aftertreatment technology will be required. In this study, NOx reduction, fuel efficiency, and regeneration performance of lean NOx trap (LNT) were evaluated for four operating conditions. The combustion approaches included baseline engine operation with and without EGR, two exhaust enrichment methods (post injection and delayed injection), and one advanced combustion mode to enable high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A 1.7 liter 4-cylinder diesel engine was operated under five conditions, which represent key interest points for light-duty diesel operation. At the low load setting the exhaust temperature was too low to enable LNT regeneration and oxidation; however, HECC (low NOx) was achievable. HECC was also reached under more moderate loads and the exhaust temperatures were high enough to enable even further NOx reductions by the LNT. At high loads HECC becomes difficult but the LNT performance improves and acceptable regeneration can be met with enrichment methodologies.

  12. Simulation studies of diesel engine performance with oxygen enriched air and water emulsified fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assanis, D.N.; Baker, D. ); Sekar, R.R.; Siambekos, C.T.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation code of a turbocharged, turbocompound diesel engine was modified to study the effects of using oxygen-enriched combustion air and water-emulsified diesel fuels. Oxygen levels of 21 percent to 40 percent by volume in the combustion air were studied. Water content in the fuel was varied from 0 percent to 50 percent mass. Simulation studies and a review and analysis of previous work in this area led to the following conclusions about expected engine performance and emissions: the power density of the engine is significantly increased by oxygen enrichment. Ignition delay and particulate emissions are reduced. Combustion temperatures and No{sub x} emissions are increased with oxygen enrichment but could be brought back to the base levels by introducing water in the fuel. The peak cylinder pressure which increases with the power output level might result in mechanical problems with engine components. Oxygen enrichment also provides an opportunity to use cheaper fuel such as No. 6 diesel fuel. Overall, the adverse effects of oxygen enrichment could be countered by the addition of water and it appears that an optimum combination of water content, oxygen level, and base diesel fuel quality may exist. This could yield improved performance and emissions characteristics compared to a state-of-the-art diesel engine. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and Additives for Diesel Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The lubricating properties of two ionic liquids with the same anion but different cations, one ammonium IL [C8H17]3NH.Tf2N and one imidazolium IL C10mim.Tf2N, were evaluated both in neat form and as oil additives. Experiments were conducted using a standardized reciprocating sliding test using a segment of a Cr-plated diesel engine piston ring against a grey cast iron flat specimen with simulated honing marks as on the engine cylinder liner. The selected ionic liquids were benchmarked against conventional hydrocarbon oils. Substantial friction and wear reductions, up to 55% and 34%, respectively, were achieved for the neat ionic liquids compared to a fully-formulated 15W40 engine oil. Adding 5 vol% ILs into mineral oil has demonstrated significant improvement in the lubricity. One blend even outperformed the 15W40 engine oil with 9% lower friction and 34% less wear. Lubrication regime modeling, worn surface morphology examination, and surface chemical analysis were conducted to help understand the lubricating mechanisms for ionic liquids. Results suggest great potential for using ionic liquids as base lubricants or lubricant additives for diesel engine applications.

  14. Production of Diesel Engine Turbocharger Turbine from Low Cost Titanium Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, T. R.; Mayer, R.

    2012-05-04

    Turbochargers in commercial turbo-diesel engines are multi-material systems where usually the compressor rotor is made of aluminum or titanium based material and the turbine rotor is made of either a nickel based superalloy or titanium, designed to operate under the harsh exhaust gas conditions. The use of cast titanium in the turbine section has been used by Cummins Turbo Technologies since 1997. Having the benefit of a lower mass than the superalloy based turbines; higher turbine speeds in a more compact design can be achieved with titanium. In an effort to improve the cost model, and develop an industrial supply of titanium componentry that is more stable than the traditional aerospace based supply chain, the Contractor has developed component manufacturing schemes that use economical Armstrong titanium and titanium alloy powders and MgR-HDH powders. Those manufacturing schemes can be applied to compressor and turbine rotor components for diesel engine applications with the potential of providing a reliable supply of titanium componentry with a cost and performance advantage over cast titanium.

  15. Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.; Assanis, D.N.; Cataldi, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the oxygen-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, the gross and net power output of an engine operating under different levels of oxygen enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in an increase in net engine power of approximately 13% when intake air with an oxygen content of 28% by volume is used and fuel injection timing is retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure can improve power by only 4%. If part of the significantly higher exhaust enthalpies available as a result of oxygen enrichment are recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met, resulting in substantial net power improvements. Oxygen enrichment with its attendant higher combustion temperatures, reduces emissions of particulates and visible smoke but increases NO emissions (by up to three times at 26% oxygen content). Therefore, exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required if the full potential of oxygen enrichment for improving the performance of locomotive diesel engines is to be realized.

  16. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  17. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  18. Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, M.; Veliz, M.

    2011-09-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a

  19. Investigation of methyl decanoate combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, A. S.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, an optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of methyl decanoate (MD) on combustion and emissions. A specific goal of the study was to determine if MD could enable soot-free leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC) – a mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with fuel-air equivalence ratios below approximately two. An ultra-low sulfur diesel certification fuel (CF) was used as the baseline fuel, and experiments were conducted at two fuel-injection pressures with three levels of charge-gas dilution. In addition to conventional pressure-based and engine-out emissions measurements, exhaust laser-induced incandescence, in-cylinder natural luminosity (NL), and in-cylinder chemiluminescence (CL) diagnostics were used to provide detailed insight into combustion processes.

  20. Investigation of methyl decanoate combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, A. S.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, an optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of methyl decanoate (MD) on combustion and emissions. A specific goal of the study was to determine if MD could enable soot-free leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC) – a mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with fuel-air equivalence ratios below approximately two. An ultra-low sulfur diesel certification fuel (CF) was used as the baseline fuel, and experiments were conducted at two fuel-injection pressures with three levels of charge-gas dilution. In addition to conventional pressure-based and engine-out emissions measurements, exhaust laser-induced incandescence, in-cylinder natural luminosity (NL), and in-cylindermore » chemiluminescence (CL) diagnostics were used to provide detailed insight into combustion processes.« less

  1. Silicon nitride swirl lower-chamber for high power turbocharged diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiya, S.; Murachi, M.; Kawamoto, H.; Kato, S.; Kawakami, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes application of sintered silicon nitride to the swirl lower-chamber in order to improve performance of turbocharged diesel engines. Various stress analyses by finite element method and stress measurements have been applied to determine the design specifications for the component, which compromise brittleness of ceramic materials. Material development was conducted to evaluate strength, fracture toughness, and thermal properties for the sintered bodies. Ceramic injection molding has been employed to fabricate components with large quantities. In the present work. Quality assurance for the components can be made by reliability evaluation methods as well as non-destructive and stress loading inspections. It is found that the engine performance with ceramic component has been increased in the power out put of 9ps as compared to that of conventional engines.

  2. Intercooling effects of methanol on turbocharged diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, T.; Daisho, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Kawase, N.

    1984-01-01

    From the viewpoint of utilizing methanol fuel in an automotive turbocharged direct-injection diesel engine, an intercooling system supplying liquid methanol has been devised and its effects on engine performance and exhaust gas emissions have been investigated. With an electronically controlled injector in this system, methanol as a supplementary fuel to diesel fuel can be injected into the intake pipe in order to intercool a hot air charge compressed by the turbocharger. It has been confirmed that especially at heavy load conditions, methanol-intercooling can yield a higher thermal efficiency, and lower nox and smoke emissions simultaneously, compared with three other cases without using methanol: natural aspiration and the cases with and without an ordinary intercooler. However, methanol fueling must be avoided at lower loads since sacrifices in efficiency and hydrocarbon emissions are involved.

  3. Addressing the Manufacturing Issues Associated with the use of Ceramic Materials for Diesel Engine Components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSpadden, SB

    2001-09-12

    This CRADA supports the objective of selecting appropriate ceramic materials for manufacturing several diesel engine components and addressing critical manufacturing issues associated with these components. Materials that were evaluated included several varieties of silicon nitride and stabilized zirconia. The critical manufacturing issues that were addressed included evaluation of the effect of grain size and the effect of the grinding process on mechanical properties, mechanical performance, reliability, and expected service life. The CRADA comprised four tasks: (1) Machining of Zirconia and Silicon Nitride Materials; (2) Mechanical Properties Characterization and Performance Testing; (3) Tribological Studies; and (4) Residual Stress Studies. Using instrumented equipment at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) Machining and Inspection Research User Center (MIRUC), zirconia and silicon nitride materials were ground into simulated component geometries. These components were subsequently evaluated for mechanical properties, wear, and residual stress characteristics in tasks two, three, and four.

  4. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  5. Application of oxygen-enriched combustion for locomotive diesel engines. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Assanis, D.N.

    1996-09-01

    A thermodynamic simulation is used to study the effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on the performance and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions of a locomotive diesel engine. The parasitic power of the air separation membrane required to supply the oxygen-enriched air is also estimated. For a given constraint on peak cylinder pressure, the gross and net power outputs of an engine operating under different levels of oxygen enrichment are compared with those obtained when a high-boost turbocharged engine is used. A 4% increase in peak cylinder pressure can result in an increase in net engine power of approximately 13% when intake air with an oxygen content of 28% by volume is used and fuel injection timing is retarded by 4 degrees. When the engine is turbocharged to a higher inlet boost, the same increase in peak cylinder pressure improves power by only 4%. If part of the significantly higher exhaust enthalpies available as a result of oxygen enrichment are recovered, the power requirements of the air separator membrane can be met, resulting in substantial net power improvements. Oxygen enrichment reduces particulate and visible smoke emissions but increases NO emissions. However, a combination of retarded fuel injection timing and post-treatment of exhaust gases may be adequate to meet the locomotive diesel engine NO{sub x} standards. Exhaust gas after-treatment and heat recovery would be required to realize the full potential of oxygen enrichment. Economic analysis shows that oxygen-enrichment technology is economically feasible and provides high returns on investment. The study also indicates the strong influence of membrane parasitic requirements and exhaust energy recovery on economic benefits. To obtain an economic advantage while using a membrane with higher parasitic power requirements, it is necessary to recover a part of the exhaust energy.

  6. Study of fuel consumption and cooling system in low heat rejection turbocharged diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taymaz, I.; Gur, M.; Cally, I.; Mimaroglu, A.

    1998-07-01

    In a conventional internal combustion engine, approximately one-third of total fuel input energy is converted to useful work. Since the working gas in a practical engine cycle is not exhausted at ambient temperature, a major part of the energy is lost with the exhaust gases. In addition another major part of energy input is rejected in the form of heat via the cooling system. If the energy normally rejected to the coolant could be recovered instead on the crankshaft as useful work, then a substantial improvement in fuel economy would result. At the same time, the cooling water, antifreeze, thermostat, radiator, water pump, cooling fan, and associated hoses and clamps could be eliminated. A new trend in the field of internal combustion engines is to insulate the heat transfer surfaces such as the combustion chamber, cylinder wall, cylinder head, piston and valves by ceramic insulating materials for the improvement of engine performance and elimination of cooling system. In this study, the effect of insulated heat transfer surfaces on direct injected and turbocharged diesel engine fuel consumption and cooling system were investigated. The research engine was a four-stroke, direct injected, six cylinder, turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine. This engine was tested at different speeds and loads conditions without coating. Then, combustion chamber surfaces, cylinder head, valves and piston crown faces was coated with ceramic materials. Ceramic layers were made of CaZrO{sub 3} and MgZrO{sub 3} and plasma coated onto base of the NiCrAl bond coat. The ceramic coated research engine was tested at the same operation conditions as the standard (without coating) engine. The results indicate a reduction in fuel consumption and heat losses to engine cooling system of the ceramic coated engine.

  7. Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naylor, M.G.S. )

    1992-06-01

    The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ring'' samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased soot sensitivity'' is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in

  9. Enterprise converting buses to biodiesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rental car customers may be able to breathe a little easier during their next trip to the airport. Alamo Rent A Car, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, and National Car Rental, all brands operated by the subsidiaries of Enterprise Holdings, are converting their airport shuttle buses to run on biodiesel fuel. The move is a good one for the environment, and will ultimately reduce the company’s carbon emissions. “We are saving 420,000 gallons of petroleum diesel,”  says Lee Broughton, director of corporate identity and sustainability for Enterprise Holdings.    

  10. Evaluation of NTE Windows and a Work-Based Method to Determine In-Use Emissions of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  11. The Chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx Process: A Review of the Technology's Possible Application to control of NOx from Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, Richard

    2001-08-05

    This paper presents a review of the Thermal DeNOx process with respect to its application to control of NOx emissions from diesel engines. The chemistry of the process is discussed first in empirical and then theoretical terms. Based on this discussion the possibilities of applying the process to controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines is considered. Two options are examined, modifying the requirements of the chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx process to suit the conditions provided by diesel engines and modifying the engines to provide the conditions required by the process chemistry. While the former examination did not reveal any promising opportunities, the latter did. Turbocharged diesel engine systems in which the turbocharger is a net producer of power seem capable of providing the conditions necessary for NOx reduction via the Thermal DeNOx reaction.

  12. Biodiesel Emissions Testing with a Modern Diesel Engine - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-399

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the emissions and performance impact of biodiesel in a modern diesel engine equipped with a diesel particulate filter. This testing is in support of the Non-Petroleum Based Fuels (NPBF) 2010 Annual Operating Plan (AOP).

  13. Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas...

  14. Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Agency...

  15. Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report...

  16. Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis ...

  17. New Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    School District's new hybrid diesel buses. | Photo courtesy of FWISD Students look underneath one of Fort Worth Independent School District's new hybrid diesel buses. | ...

  18. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ...

  19. DELTA-DIESEL ENGINE LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATION Contract DE-FC05-97OR22606 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakim, Nabil Balnaves, Mike

    2003-05-27

    DELTA Diesel Engine Light Truck Application End of Contract Report DE-FC05-97-OR22606 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report is the final technical report of the Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program under contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606. During the course of this contract, Detroit Diesel Corporation analyzed, designed, tooled, developed and applied the ''Proof of Concept'' (Generation 0) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine and designed the successor ''Production Technology Demonstration'' (Generation 1) 4.0L V-6 DELTA engine. The objectives of DELTA Program contract DE-FC05-97-OR22606 were to: Demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies, specifically intended for the North American LDT and SUV markets; Demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages. With a clean sheet design, DDC produced the DELTA engine concept promising the following attributes: 30-50% improved fuel economy; Low cost; Good durability and reliability; Acceptable noise, vibration and harshness (NVH); State-of-the-art features; Even firing, 4 valves per cylinder; High pressure common rail fuel system; Electronically controlled; Turbocharged, intercooled, cooled EGR; Extremely low emissions via CLEAN Combustion{copyright} technology. To demonstrate the engine technology in the SUV market, DDC repowered a 1999 Dodge Durango with the DELTA Generation 0 engine. Fuel economy improvements were approximately 50% better than the gasoline engine replaced in the vehicle.

  20. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide absorbents for lean-burn diesel engine emission control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2010-01-23

    It is known that sulfur oxides contribute significantly and deleteriously to the overall performance of lean-burn diesel engine aftertreatment systems, especially in the case of NOx traps. A Ag-based, fast regenerable SO2 absorbent has been developed and will be described. Over a temperature range of 300oC to 550oC, it absorbs almost all of the SO2 in the simulated exhaust gases during the lean cycles and can be fully regenerated by the short rich cycles at the same temperature. Its composition has been optimized as 1 wt% Pt-5wt%Ag-SiO2, and the preferred silica source for the supporting material has been identified as inert Cabosil fumed silica. The thermal instability of Ag2O under fuel-lean conditions at 230oC and above makes it possible to fast regenerate the sulfur-loaded absorbent during the following fuel-rich cycles. Pt catalyst helps reducing Ag2SO4 during rich cycles at low temperatures. And the chemically inert fumed SiO2 support gives the absorbent long term stability. This absorbent shows great potential to work under the same lean-rich cycling conditions as those imposed on the NOx traps, and thus, can protect the downstream particulate filter and the NOx trap from sulfur poisoning.

  1. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  2. Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors. Since the combustion event is a strong function of the fuel spray, full characterization of the spray is a necessity for successful engine design and for modeling of the combustion process. Two experimental facilities were used at TAMU to study the injection of coal slurry fuels. The first experimental facility incorporates General Electric locomotive engine components (injection pump, fuel line, and nozzle) and a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the moving parts of the pump. The second experimental facility is based on an accumulator injector from General Electric. Instrumentation includes instantaneous needle lift and fuel line pressure. A pressurized visualization chamber was used to provide a spray environment which simulated the engine gas density and permitted the use of spray diagnostic techniques. The study was divided into two phases: (1) overall characterization of the spray, and (2) detailed droplet size and size distribution characterization. In addition to this overall characterization of the spray, the second phase of this study characterized the details of the atomization quality.

  3. Diesel engine experiments with oxygen enrichment, water addition and lower-grade fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Schaus, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The concept of oxygen enriched air applied to reciprocating engines is getting renewed attention in the context of the progress made in the enrichment methods and the tougher emissions regulations imposed on diesel and gasoline engines. An experimental project was completed in which a direct injection diesel engine was tested with intake oxygen levels of 21% -- 35%. Since an earlier study indicated that it is necessary to use a cheaper fuel to make the concept economically attractive, a less refined fuel was included in the test series. Since a major objection to the use of oxygen enriched combustion air had been the increase in NO{sub x} emissions, a method must be found to reduce NO{sub x}. Introduction of water into the engine combustion process was included in the tests for this purpose. Fuel emulsification with water was the means used here even though other methods could also be used. The teat data indicated a large increase in engine power density, slight improvement in thermal efficiency, significant reductions in smoke and particulate emissions and NO{sub x} emissions controllable with the addition of water. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO Oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2011-04-20

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the Fe-zeolite SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data. Such inhibition models will improve the accuracy of model based control design for integrated DPF-SCR aftertreatment systems.

  5. Modeling Species Inhibition of NO oxidation in Urea-SCR Catalysts for Diesel Engine NOx Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2010-09-15

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are regarded as the leading NOx aftertreatment technology to meet the 2010 NOx emission standards for on-highway vehicles running on heavy-duty diesel engines. However, issues such as low NOx conversion at low temperature conditions still exist due to various factors, including incomplete urea thermolysis, inhibition of SCR reactions by hydrocarbons and H2O. We have observed a noticeable reduction in the standard SCR reaction efficiency at low temperature with increasing water content. We observed a similar effect when hydrocarbons are present in the stream. This effect is absent under fast SCR conditions where NO ~ NO2 in the feed gas. As a first step in understanding the effects of such inhibition on SCR reaction steps, kinetic models that predict the inhibition behavior of H2O and hydrocarbons on NO oxidation are presented in the paper. A one-dimensional SCR model was developed based on conservation of species equations and was coded as a C-language S-function and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. NO oxidation and NO2 dissociation kinetics were defined as a function of the respective adsorbate’s storage in the SCR catalyst. The corresponding kinetic models were then validated on temperature ramp tests that showed good match with the test data.

  6. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Task 7, Extended wear testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakenell, J.F.; Fritz, S.G.; Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-07-01

    Over the past several years, interest has arisen in the development of coal-fired diesel engines for the purpose of efficiently utilizing the extensive coal reserves in the United States, and therefore reducing dependence on foreign oil. One process, which is being considered for use in producing clean coal fuel products involves mild gasification. This process produces by-products which can be further refined and, when blended with neat diesel fuel, used as an engine fuel. The purpose of this task was to test a blend of this coal liquid and diesel fuel (referred to as coal-lite) in an engine, and determine if any detrimental results were observed. This was done by performing a back-to-back performance and emission test of neat diesel fuel and the coal-lite fuel, followed by a 500-hour test of the coal-lite fuel, and completed by a back-to-back performance and emission test of the coal-lite fuel and neat diesel fuel.

  7. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakenell, J.F.; Fritz, S.G.; Schwalb, J.A.

    1991-07-01

    Over the past several years, interest has arisen in the development of coal-fired diesel engines for the purpose of efficiently utilizing the extensive coal reserves in the United States, and therefore reducing dependence on foreign oil. One process, which is being considered for use in producing clean coal fuel products involves mild gasification. This process produces by-products which can be further refined and, when blended with neat diesel fuel, used as an engine fuel. The purpose of this task was to test a blend of this coal liquid and diesel fuel (referred to as coal-lite) in an engine, and determine if any detrimental results were observed. This was done by performing a back-to-back performance and emission test of neat diesel fuel and the coal-lite fuel, followed by a 500-hour test of the coal-lite fuel, and completed by a back-to-back performance and emission test of the coal-lite fuel and neat diesel fuel.

  8. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

  9. Simulation and control of a HD diesel engine equipped with new EGR technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekker, H.J.; Sturm, W.L.

    1996-09-01

    A dynamic model of a Heavy Duty (HD) turbocharged and aftercooled diesel engine was developed. The engine was equipped with high pressure diesel injection, a Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT) and an Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system. This engine was targeted at meeting EURO4 emission requirements. The final emission results were 2.4 g/k Wh NO{sub x} and 0.107 g/kWh particulates for the European 13 mode test. Better than 3.0 g/k Wh NO{sub x} and 0.10 g/k Wh particulates are expected to be characteristic EURO4 emission requirements (approximate year of implementation is 2004). In the design of the EGR system the model provided initial assessments of the properties of this system. Associated engine and turbocharger behavior as well as optimal control strategies were predicted. A transient engine control algorithm was developed using the dynamic engine model. The VGT is closed loop controlled and EGR is shut off during a short time after a load increase. The simulation results were confirmed by actual measurements, demonstrating acceptable transient behavior.

  10. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalifa, H.E.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an evaluation of Brayton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. It is also shown that, if installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or $170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that would hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified.