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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - Niue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Niue Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue Data graphic Data Total Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue image Per Capita...

2

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have occurred...

3

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global, Regional, and National Annual Time Series (1751-2010) Latest Published Global Estimates (1751-2010) Preliminary 2011 Global & National Estimates...

4

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

5

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - American Samoa  

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Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania American Samoa Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from American Samoa Data graphic Data Total Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from...

6

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - Marshall Islands  

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Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Marshall Islands Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from the Marshall Islands Data graphic Data Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from...

7

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

8

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

9

Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania » Japan Oceania » Japan Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The history of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from Japan is remarkable for the abrupt change that occurred in 1973. With postwar growth at 9.8% per year from 1950 to 1973, total emissions were virtually constant from 1974-1987. From 1987-96, emissions grew 25.3% reaching 329 million metric tons of carbon. Growth during this period was characterized by a return to mid-1970s consumption levels for liquid petroleum products and increased contributions from coal and natural gas use. Since 1996, Japan's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have vacilated and now total 329 million metric tons of carbon in 2008. Based on United Nations energy trade data for 2008, Japan is the world's largest importer of coal (184 million metric tons) and

10

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Africa Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data What countries constitute Africa? Map of Africa Trends Africa's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions are...

11

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited) Trends Since 1751 approximately 337 billion metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The 2007 global fossil-fuel carbon emission estimate, 8365 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 1.7% increase from 2006. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.3% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement production in 2007. Combustion of gas fuels (e.g., natural gas) accounted for 18.5% (1551 million metric tons of carbon) of the total emissions from fossil fuels in 2007 and reflects a gradually increasing global utilization of natural gas. Emissions from

12

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Oceania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Oceania Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data What countries constitute Oceania? Oceania map Trends Oceania consists of approximately...

13

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from North America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North America Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from North America Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data What countries constitute North America? North America map Trends North America,...

14

People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asia Asia » People's Republic of China People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends According to reported energy statistics, coal production and use in China has increased ten-fold since the 1960s. As a result, Chinese fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have more than doubled 2000 alone. At 1.92 billion metric tons of carbon in 2008, the People's Republic of China is the world's largest emitter of CO2 due to fossil-fuel use and cement production. Even with the reported decline in Chinese emissions from 1997 to 1999, China's industrial emissions of CO2 have grown phenomenally since 1950, when China stood tenth among nations based on annual fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. From 1970 to 1997, China's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions grew at an annual rate of

15

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interannual variations in fossil fuel emissions. J. Geophys.Treat CO 2 from fossil fuel burning: global distribution ofdioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement

Gurney, Kevin R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East » North Korea Far East » North Korea North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions for North Korea, or the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, averaged 11.2% growth from 1950-93, reaching 71 million metric tons of carbon. Since 1993 according to published UN energy statistics, fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have declined 70% to 21.4 million metric tons of carbon. As the world's 14th largest producer of coal, it is no surprise North Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions record is dominated by emissions from coal burning. Coal consumption accounted for 93% of the 2008 CO2 emission total. With no natural gas usage, another 3.4% currently comes from liquid petroleum consumption, and the remainder is from cement

17

South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East » South Korea Far East » South Korea South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends South Korea, or the Republic of Korea, is the world's tenth largest emitter of CO2 based on 2008 fossil-fuel consumption and cement production with 139 million metric tons of carbon. From 1946-1997 South Korea experienced phenomenal growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions with a growth rate that averaged 11.5%. Initial growth in emissions was due to coal consumption, which still accounts for 46.9% of South Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. Since the late 1960s oil consumption has been a major source of emissions. South Korea is the world's fifth largest importer of crude oil. Natural gas became a significant source of CO2 for the first time in 1987, as South

18

Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.007_V2012 world map Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals Year Annex B Countries Non Annex B Countries Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) 1990 3894 90 2111 46 1991 3801 94 2299 38 1992 3750 109 2263 44 1993 3685 107 2339 48 1994 3656 107 2469 54 1995 3681 110 2570 59 1996 3704 111 2657 72 1997 3727 114 2737 74 1998 3746 118 2698 82 1999 3678 124 2718 90 2000 3725 130 2821 90 2001 3781 120 2936 92 2002 3764 128 3013 94 2003 3853 123 3347 98 2004 3888 135 3683 107 2005 3933 142 3926 106

19

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions by Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions by Region Map of the World Africa (1884-2008) Developing America (Central America, South America, and the Caribbean) (1884-2008) Centrally...

20

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Russia Federation Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Centrally Planned Europe » Russian Federation Russia Federation Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Since 1992 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from the Russian Federation have dropped 23% to 466 million metric tons of carbon, still the fourth largest emitting country in the world and the largest emitter of the republics comprising the former USSR. Emissions from gas consumption still represent the largest fraction (49.1%) of Russia's emissions and only recently have returned to the 1992 level. Emissions from coal consumption have dropped 25.5% since 1992 and presently account for 26.6% of Russia's emissions. Russia has the largest population of any Eastern European country with a population of 141 million people. From a per capita standpoint, Russia's

22

Reducing CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Emissions From Fossil Fuel Power Plants Scott M. Klara - National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA's 3 rd Annual Power Generation Conference October 16-17, 2002 Hershey, Pennsylvania EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned/operated * Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY 02 budget of $750 million National Energy Technology Laboratory EPGA - SMK - 10/17/02 * Diverse research portfolio - 60 external projects - Onsite focus area * Strong industry support - 40% cost share * Portfolio funding $100M 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2003 2003 Budget (Million $) Fiscal Year Senate House Administration Request Carbon Sequestration: A Dynamic Program Separation & Capture From Power Plants Plays Key Role

23

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions over...

24

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Western Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now contributes 28.1% of total CO2 emissions. All countries in the region with discrete energy statistics reported, except Montenegro, have per capita emission rates exceeding...

25

Spatial Relationships of Sector-Specific Fossil-fuel CO2 Emissions in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantification of the spatial distribution of sector-specific fossil fuel CO2 emissions provides strategic information to public and private decision-makers on climate change mitigation options and can provide critical constraints to carbon budget studies being performed at the national to urban scales. This study analyzes the spatial distribution and spatial drivers of total and sectoral fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the state and county levels in the United States. The spatial patterns of absolute versus per capita fossil fuel CO2 emissions differ substantially and these differences are sector-specific. Area-based sources such as those in the residential and commercial sectors are driven by a combination of population and surface temperature with per capita emissions largest in the northern latitudes and continental interior. Emission sources associated with large individual manufacturing or electricity producing facilities are heterogeneously distributed in both absolute and per capita metrics. The relationship between surface temperature and sectoral emissions suggests that the increased electricity consumption due to space cooling requirements under a warmer climate may outweigh the savings generated by lessened space heating. Spatial cluster analysis of fossil fuel CO2 emissions confirms that counties with high (low) CO2 emissions tend to be clustered close to other counties with high (low) CO2 emissions and some of the spatial clustering extends to multi-state spatial domains. This is particularly true for the residential and transportation sectors, suggesting that emissions mitigation policy might best be approached from the regional or multi-state perspective. Our findings underscore the potential for geographically focused, sector-specific emissions mitigation strategies and the importance of accurate spatial distribution of emitting sources when combined with atmospheric monitoring via aircraft, satellite and in situ measurements. Keywords: Fossil-fuel; Carbon dioxide emissions; Sectoral; Spatial cluster; Emissions mitigation policy

Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

27

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited)...

28

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from the Far East  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

level. The emissions growth since 1948 reflects not only the growth in India, South Korea and Indonesia, but also in Thailand, Taiwan, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines,...

29

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2012 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2009. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

30

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2013 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2010. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

31

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2011 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of del 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2008. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric del 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

32

Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building/street scale for a large US city  

SciTech Connect

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system and contribute to quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. Called the Hestia Project, this research effort is the first to use bottom-up methods to quantify all fossil fuel CO2 emissions down to the scale of individual buildings, road segments, and industrial/electricity production facilities on an hourly basis for an entire urban landscape. a large city (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Here, we describe the methods used to quantify the on-site fossil fuel CO2 emissions across the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. This effort combines a series of datasets and simulation tools such as a building energy simulation model, traffic data, power production reporting and local air pollution reporting. The system is general enough to be applied to any large U.S. city and holds tremendous potential as a key component of a carbon monitoring system in addition to enabling efficient greenhouse gas mitigation and planning. We compare our estimate of fossil fuel emissions from natural gas to consumption data provided by the local gas utility. At the zip code level, we achieve a bias adjusted pearson r correlation value of 0.92 (p<0.001).

Gurney, Kevin R.; Razlivanov, I.; Song, Yang; Zhou, Yuyu; Benes, Bedrich; Abdul- Massih, Michel

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Historical Global Estimates Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860-1982 (NDP-006) DOI: 10.3334CDIACffe.ndp006 image Data image...

36

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can the envisaged reductions of fossil fuel CO2 emissions beGoulden. 2008. Where do Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissionsof season-averaged fossil fuel CO 2 emissions (Riley et

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Device for separating CO2 from fossil-fueled power plant emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation device includes an inner conduit, and a concentric outer conduit. An electrically conductive filter media, preferably a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve, is provided in the annular space between the inner conduit and the outer conduit. Gas flows through the inner conduit and the annular space between the inner conduit and the outer conduit, so as to contact the filter media. The filter media preferentially adsorbs at least one constituent of the gas stream. The filter media is regenerated by causing an electric current to flow through the filter media. The inner conduit and outer conduit are preferably electrically conductive whereby the regeneration of the filter media can be electrically stimulated. The invention is particularly useful for the removal of CO.sub.2 from the exhaust gases of fossil-fueled power plants.

Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge, TN; Judkins, Roddie R [Knoxville, TN; Wilson, Kirk A [Knoxville, TN

2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

38

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions, has resulted in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel, combined with the expanded demand for biofuels, will result in higher food prices, since less land by using biofuels (vegetable oils). But the use of biofuels may not reduce CO2 emissions, even when

39

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

40

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

42

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

43

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html Country: United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand

44

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles and Aruba  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles and Aruba Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Netherland...

45

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait Oil Fires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Middle East Kuwait Oil Fires Graphics CO2 Emissions from the 1991 Kuwait Oil Fires Data graphic Data...

46

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nations CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement2010a). Coal is the main fossil fuel used in Chinas cementdioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO Multi-Pollutant Framework for Evaluating CO 2 Control Options for Fossil Fuel Power Plants Edward S. Rubin (rubin@cmu.edu; 412-268-5897) Anand B. Rao (abr@andrew.cmu.edu; 412-268-5605) Michael B. Berkenpas (mikeb@cmu.edu; 412-268-1088) Carnegie Mellon University EPP Department, Baker Hall 128A Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract As part of DOE/NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program, we are developing an integrated, multi-pollutant modeling framework to evaluate the costs and performance of alternative carbon capture and sequestration technologies for fossil-fueled power plants. The model calculates emissions, costs, and efficiency on a systematic basis at the level of an individual plant or facility. Both new and existing facilities can be modeled, including coal-based or natural gas-based combustion or gasification systems using air or oxygen.

49

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

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Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

50

Electricity Without CO2 Emissions: Assessing the Costs of Carbon...  

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Johnson and Keith: Electricity without CO 2 ... 1 ELECTRICITY FROM FOSSIL FUELS WITHOUT CO 2 EMISSIONS: ASSESSING THE COSTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION IN US...

51

North American CO2 exchange: Inter comparison of modeled estimates with results from a fine scale atmospheric inversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009), High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO 2 high-?resolution global fossil fuel CO 2 emission land cover, point source fossil fuel emissions, and

Gourdji, Sharon M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fossil Fuel Emission Verification Modeling at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

We have an established project at LLNL to develop the tools needed to constrain fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions using measurements of the carbon-14 isotope in atmospheric samples. In Figure 1 we show the fossil fuel plumes from Los Angeles and San Francisco for two different weather patterns. Obviously, a measurement made at any given location is going to depend on the weather leading up to the measurement. Thus, in order to determine the GHG emissions from some region using in situ measurements of those GHGs, we use state-of-the-art global and regional atmospheric chemistry-transport codes to simulate the plumes: the LLNL-IMPACT model (Rotman et al., 2004) and the WRFCHEM community code (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php). Both codes can use observed (aka assimilated) meteorology in order to recreate the actual transport that occurred. The measured concentration of each tracer at a particular spatio-temporal location is a linear combination of the plumes from each region at that location (for non-reactive species). The challenge is to calculate the emission strengths for each region that fit the observed concentrations. In general this is difficult because there are errors in the measurements and modeling of the plumes. We solve this inversion problem using the strategy illustrated in Figure 2. The Bayesian Inference step combines the a priori estimates of the emissions, and their uncertainty, for each region with the results of the observations, and their uncertainty, and an ensemble of model predicted plumes for each region, and their uncertainty. The result is the mathematical best estimate of the emissions and their errors. In the case of non-linearities, or if we are using a statistical sampling technique such as a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, then the process is iterated until it converges (ie reaches stationarity). For the Bayesian inference we can use both a direct inversion capability, which is fast but requires assumptions of linearity and Gaussianity of errors, or one of several statistical sampling techniques, which are computationally slower but do not require either linearity or Gaussianity (Chow, et al., 2008; Delle Monache, et al., 2008). The emission regions we are using are based on the air-basins defined by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), see Figure 3. The only difference is that we have joined some of the smaller air basins together. The results of a test using 4 days of simulated observations using our ensemble retrieval system are shown in Figure 3 (right). The main source of the variation between the different model configurations arises from the uncertainty in the atmospheric boundary layer parameterization in the WRF model. We are currently developing a capability to constrain the boundary layer height in our carbon-14 work either by weighting the ensemble member results by the accuracy of their boundary layer height (using commercial aircraft observations), or as part of the retrieval process using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) capability.

Cameron-Smith, P; Kosovic, B; Guilderson, T; Monache, L D; Bergmann, D

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO2 Removal  

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Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO 2 Removal Technical Report EPRI Project Manager N. A. H. Holt EPRI * 3412 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 * PO Box 10412, Palo Alto, California 94303 * USA 800.313.3774 * 650.855.2121 * askepri@epri.com * www.epri.com Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO 2 Removal 1000316 Interim Report, December 2000 Cosponsors U. S. Department of Energy - Office of Fossil Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874 U.S. Department of Energy/NETL 626 Cochrans Mill Road PO Box 10940 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236-0940 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH

54

The Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Use in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refinements in the spatial and temporal resolution of North American fossil-fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions provide additional information about anthropogenic aspects of the carbon cycle. In North America, the seasonal and spatial patterns ...

J. S. Gregg; L. M. Losey; R. J. Andres; T. J. Blasing; G. Marland

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evaluation of Innovative Fossil Fuel Power Plants with CO2 Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents initial results of an ongoing study of the potential cost of electricity (COE) produced in both conventional and innovative fossil fueled power plants that incorporate carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for subsequent sequestration or use. The baseline cases are natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and ultra-supercritical pulverized coal (PC) plants, with and without post combustion CO2 removal, and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants, with and without pre-combustion ...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Germany Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

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now 22.3% of the total. The year 1991 marked the first year the United Nations published energy statistics for unified Germany. Through 1990 statistics were still published for...

57

Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 US DoE-NETL Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO 2 Peter G. Brewer (brpe@mbari.org; 831-626-6618) Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 7700 Sandholdt Road Moss Landing CA 95039 Introduction. My laboratory has now been engaged in carrying out small scale controlled field experiments on the ocean sequestration of fossil fuel CO 2 for about five years, and the field has changed enormously in that time. We have gone from theoretical assessments to experimental results, and from cartoon sketches of imagined outcomes to high-resolution video images of experiments on the ocean floor shared around the world. It seems appropriate therefore to give a brief review, albeit one very much from a

58

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radiocarbon and fossil fuel-derived CO2 in surface air2004), Estimates of annual fossil-fuel CO 2 emitted for eachindependent budgeting of fossil fuel CO2 over Europe by (

Riley, W.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Estimates of Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emitted for Each State in the U.S.A.  

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State-Level Emission Estimates State-Level Emission Estimates Estimates of Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emitted for Each State in the U.S.A. and the District of Columbia for Each Year from 1960 through 2001 graphics Graphics data Data (ASCII comma-delimited) Investigators T.J. Blasing and Gregg Marland Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6335, U.S.A. Christine Broniak Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-3601 DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/00003 Period of Record 1960-2001 Methods Consumption data for coal, petroleum, and natural gas are multiplied by their respective thermal conversion factors, which are in units of heat energy per unit of fuel consumed (i.e., per cubic foot, barrel, or ton), to

60

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

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Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

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Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

62

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

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Far East Macau CO2 Emissions from Macau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macau...

63

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

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Guadeloupe Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guadeloupe...

64

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

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Africa Ghana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Ghana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ghana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ghana...

65

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

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Ireland CO2 Emissions from Ireland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ireland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ireland...

66

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

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Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

67

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

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Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

68

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

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Africa Mali Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mali Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mali image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mali...

69

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

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Western Europe Portugal CO2 Emissions from Portugal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Portugal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Portugal...

70

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

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Paraguay Graphics CO2 Emissions from Paraguay Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Paraguay image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Paraguay...

71

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

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Western Europe Macedonia CO2 Emissions from Macedonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macedonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macedonia...

72

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

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Malawi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Malawi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malawi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malawi...

73

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

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Africa Gabon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gabon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gabon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gabon...

74

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

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Grenada Graphics CO2 Emissions from Grenada Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Grenada image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Grenada...

75

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

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Oceania Kiribati Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kiribati Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kiribati image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kiribati...

76

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

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Israel Graphics CO2 Emissions from Israel Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Israel image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Israel...

77

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

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Far East Phillippines CO2 Emissions from Phillippines Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Phillippines image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Phillippines...

78

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

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Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

79

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

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Africa Mauritius Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritius Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritius image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritius...

80

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

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Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malaysia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malaysia...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

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Reunion Graphics CO2 Emissions from Reunion Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Reunion image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Reunion...

82

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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Guatemala Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guatemala Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guatemala image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guatemala...

83

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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Iceland CO2 Emissions from Iceland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iceland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iceland...

84

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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Asia Mongolia CO2 Emissions from Mongolia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mongolia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mongolia...

85

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

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Centrally Planned Europe Romania CO2 Emissions from Romania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Romania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Romania...

86

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

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Panama Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Panama...

87

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

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Madagascar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Madagascar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Madagascar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Madagascar...

88

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

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Netherlands CO2 Emissions from Netherlands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherlands image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Netherlands...

89

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

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Greenland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Greenland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greenland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greenland...

90

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

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Norway CO2 Emissions from Norway Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Norway image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Norway...

91

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

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Guyana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guyana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guyana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guyana...

92

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

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Africa Mauritania Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritania...

93

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Lithuania CO2 Emissions from Lithuania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lithuania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lithuania...

94

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

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Africa Kenya Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kenya Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kenya image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kenya...

95

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Latvia CO2 Emissions from Latvia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Latvia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Latvia...

96

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Georgia CO2 Emissions from Georgia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Georgia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Georgia...

97

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

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Gambia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gambia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gambia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gambia...

98

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

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Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

99

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

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Middle East Oman Graphics CO2 Emissions from Oman Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Oman image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Oman...

100

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

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Middle East Kuwait Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kuwait Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kuwait image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kuwait...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

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Middle East Lebanon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Lebanon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lebanon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lebanon...

102

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

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Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

103

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

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Far East Maldives CO2 Emissions from Maldives Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Maldives image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Maldives...

104

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

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Morocco Graphics CO2 Emissions from Morocco Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Morocco image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Morocco...

105

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

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Far East Pakistan CO2 Emissions from Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Pakistan...

106

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

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Oceania Palau CO2 Emissions from Palau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Palau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Palau...

107

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

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Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

108

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

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Oceania Guam Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guam image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guam...

109

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

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Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

110

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

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Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

111

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

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Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

112

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

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Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

113

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

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Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

114

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

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Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

115

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

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Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

116

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

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Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

117

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

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Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

118

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

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Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

119

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

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Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

120

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

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Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

independent budgeting of fossil fuel CO 2 over Europe by (COcontributions from fossil fuels, oceans, the stratosphere,15 of 16 G04002 RILEY ET AL. : FOSSIL FUEL CO 2 TRANSPORT IN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Update on CO2 emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

Friedingstein, P. [University of Exeter, Devon, England; Houghton, R.A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hackler, J. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Raupach, Mike [GCP, Canberra, Australia; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Le Quere, Corrine [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

124

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

125

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

126

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

127

Strategic Approaches for CO2 Reduction Rate from Fossil Fuel Use ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... generation are currently being aimed at minimization of CO2 emissions. ... and financial burden through adoption of policies and regulations including the...

128

Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions Data and Data Plots from Project Vulcan  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Explore the Vulcan website for the Vulcan gridded data, methodological details, publications, plots and analysis.[Taken from "About Project Vulcan" at http://www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/index.php]Also, see the peer-reviewed paper that provides a "core" description for this project: Gurney, K.R., D. Mendoza, Y. Zhou, M Fischer, S. de la Rue du Can, S. Geethakumar, C. Miller (2009) The Vulcan Project: High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emissions fluxes for the United States, Environ. Sci. Technol., 43, doi:10.1021/es900,806c.

Gurney, Kevin [PI and spokesperson for the Vulcan Collaboration

129

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

Novel Electrochemical CO2 Removal Technology For Combustion of Fossil-Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical gas separation concepts are often neglected when discussing options to manage CO2 emissions. Electrochemical approaches are selective and do not require periodic regeneration. This paper will review prior work on electrochemical CO2 separation and compare the parasitic energy penalties of this approach to more conventional approaches of capturing CO2 from flue gas streams. A new concept to reduce the electrochemical parasitic energy penalties will be introduced and a preliminary analysis of the concept will be discussed. Relative to a conventional monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent approach, electrochemical CO2 capture does require less energy on a per-mole-of-CO2 basis. However, there are trade-offs since an electrochemical pumping approach requires electrical energy, instead of lower grade thermal energy. Although there are several issues with electrochemical CO2 capture, efforts to reduce parasitic losses of CO2 separation may need to consider such novel alternatives.

Douglas L. Straub; Maria Salazar-Villalpando

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

132

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

133

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

134

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Emission Factors Handbook: Guidelines for Estimating Trace Substance Emissions from Fossil Fuel Steam Electric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Emission Factors Handbook" provides a tool for estimating trace substances emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants. The suggested emission factors are based on EPRI and Department of Energy (DOE) field measurements conducted at over 50 power plants using generally consistent sampling and analytical protocols. This information will help utility personnel estimate air toxic emissions for permitting purposes.

2002-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

SciTech Connect

This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores 5 our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e. maps); how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions 10 from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% 15 confidence interval). Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. The information discussed in this manuscript synthesizes global, regional and national fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions, their distributions, their transport, and the associated uncertainties.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Breon, F.-M. [CEA/DSM/LSCE, Gif sur Yvette, France; Ciais, P. [LSCE/CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Davis, S. [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Erickson, D [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gregg, J. S. [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Marland, Gregg [Appalachian State University; Miller, J. [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Oda, T [NOAA ESRL/Boulder, CO/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State Univ.; Oliver, J. G. J. [PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Bilthoven, The Netherlands; Raupach, Michael [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Rayner, P [University of Melbourne, Australia; Treanton, K. [Energy Statistics Division, International Energy Agency, Paris, France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

138

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

An Intergrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, the project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests have been performed. Field tests of char/fertilizer have been conducted.

Z. Wang; K. B. Bota

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests are in operation phase. The experimental installations are discussed in this paper.

Z. Wang; K. B. Bota

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

142

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

143

An Integrated Hydrogen Producton-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO2 emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests have been performed. Field tests of char/fertilizer have been conducted. The experimental results are discussed in this paper.

Z. Wang; K.B. Bota; D. Day

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel use, CO 2 emissions, and CO 2 emission factors of ten largest California electricity generatingFuel use, CO 2 emissions, and CO 2 emission factors of ten largest California electricity generating

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

146

Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication...

147

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now 22.3% of the total. The year 1991 marked the first year the United Nations published energy statistics for unified Germany. Through 1990 statistics were still published for...

148

Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication...

149

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Centrally Planned Asia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Asia map Trends Centrally Planned Asia (CPA) includes Vietnam, North Korea (officially Democratic People's Republic of Korea), and Mongolia, but regional...

150

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions by Nation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Czech Republic (1992-2010) Czechoslovakia (1860-1991) D Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) (1945-2010) Democratic Republic of the Congo (Former Zaire) (1920-2010)...

151

Historic Patterns of CO{sub 2} Emissions from Fossil Fuels: Implications for Stabilization of Emissions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R. J.; Marland, G.

1994-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

152

Historic patterns of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuels: Implications for stabilization of emissions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the historical record of greenhouse gas emissions since 1950, reviews the prospects for emissions into the future, and projects what would be the short-term outcome if the stated targets of the FCCC were in fact achieved. The examination focuses on the most important of the greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2}. The extensive record of historic CO{sub 2} emissions is explored to ascertain if it is an adequate basis for useful extrapolation into the near future. Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption have been documented. Emissions grew at 4.3% per year from 1950 until the time of the 1973 oil crisis. Another disruption in growth followed the oil price increases of 1979. Global total emissions have been increasing steadily since the 1982-1983 minimum and have grown by more than 20% since then. At present, emission Of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning is dominated by a few countries: the U.S., the former Soviet Union, China, the developed countries of Europe and Japan. Only 20 countries emit 84% of emissions from all countries. However, rates of growth in many of the developed countries are now very low. In contrast, energy use has grown rapidly over the last 20 years in some of the large, developing economies. Emissions from fossil fuel consumption are now nearly 4 times those from land use change and are the primary cause of measured increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}. The increasing concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2} has led to rising concern about the possibility of impending changes in the global climate system. In an effort to limit or mitigate potential negative effects of global climate change, 154 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in Rio de Janeiro in June, 1992. The FCCC asks all countries to conduct an inventory of their current greenhouse gas emissions setting non-binding targets.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are rapidly changing as fossil-fuel costs soar and changesgas emissions from current fossil-fuel combustion practices.dioxide (CO 2 ) from fossil-fuel combustion (Raupach et

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO{sub 2} emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of about 100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Kevin R. Gurney; Daniel L. Mendoza; Yuyu Zhou; Marc L. Fischer; Chris C. Miller; Sarath Geethakumar; Stephane de la Rue du Can [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences/Department of Agronomy

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Research on CO2 Emission Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Clean Energy Utilization of Clean Energy Utilization Zhejing University 29 th May, 2008 Status of CCS in China 2 nd U.S.-China Symposium on CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology, Hangzhou China 28 th -30 th , May, 2008 Prof. Zhongyang Luo Global CO 2 Emissions Country CO 2 Emissions (Million Tons Carbon) 1990 1997 2001 2010 USA 1345 1480 1559 1800 China 620 822 832 1109 Former USSR 1034 646 654 825 Japan 274 297 316 334 World 5836 6175 6522 8512 Source: Energy Information Administration/International Energy Outlook 2001 Global CO 2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Use in 2006 11.72 3,330 EU-15 5.75 1,620 Russia 4.3 1,210 Japan 20.17 5,680 China 20.42 5,750 USA 100 28,160 Total Percentage (%) CO 2 Emissions (1 million metric tons CO 2 ) Country BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2007 (http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=6914&contentI

156

CO2 Emissions - New Zealand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania New Zealand Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Zealand Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Zealand image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Zealand...

157

CO2 Emissions - Hong Kong  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Hong Kong CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hong Kong...

158

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles Graphics CO2 Emissions from Netherland Antilles Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherland...

159

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

160

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SPATIAL AND SEASONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL-FUEL COMBUSTION; GLOBAL, REGIONAL, AND NATIONAL POTENTIAL FOR SUSTAINABLE BIOENERGY FROM RESIDUE BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combustion of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere, and has led to an increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2. CO2 is (more)

Gregg, Jay Sterling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

AN INTEGRATED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION-CO2 CAPTURE PROCESS FROM FOSSIL FUEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major project objective is to determine the feasibility of using the char from coal and/or biomass pyrolysis, ammonia and CO{sub 2} emissions at smokestacks to produce clean hydrogen and a sequestered carbon fertilizer. During this work period, literature review has been completed. The project plan, design and test schedules were made on the basis of discussion with partner in experimental issues. Installation of pilot scale units was finished and major units tests were fully performed. Modification of the pyrolyzer, reformer and gas absorption tank have been done. Integration testing is performing recently. Lab scale tests are in operation phase. The experimental installations are discussed in this paper.

Z. Wang; K.B. Bota; D. Day

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Field Demonstration of CO2 Capture from Coal-Derived Syngas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change. A significant portion of these CO 2 emissions are caused by the combustion of fossil fuels. One approach to controlling CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel power plants is...

164

An Integrated Hydrogen Production-CO2 Capture Process from Fossil Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The new technology concept integrates two significant complementary hydrogen production and CO{sub 2}-sequestration approaches that have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Clark Atlanta University. The process can convert biomass into hydrogen and char. Hydrogen can be efficiently used for stationary power and mobile applications, or it can be synthesized into Ammonia which can be used for CO{sub 2}-sequestration, while char can be used for making time-release fertilizers (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) by absorption of CO{sub 2} and other acid gases from exhaust flows. Fertilizers are then used for the growth of biomass back to fields. This project includes bench scale experiments and pilot scale tests. The Combustion and Emission Lab at Clark Atlanta University has conducted the bench scale experiments. The facility used for pilot scale tests was built in Athens, GA. The overall yield from this process is 7 wt% hydrogen and 32 wt% charcoal/activated carbon of feedstock (peanut shell). The value of co-product activated carbon is about $1.1/GJ and this coproduct reduced the selling price of hydrogen. And the selling price of hydrogen is estimated to be $6.95/GJ. The green house experimental results show that the samples added carbon-fertilizers have effectively growth increase of three different types of plants and improvement ability of keeping fertilizer in soil to avoid the fertilizer leaching with water.

Zhicheng Wang

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Emission Factors Handbook Addendum 2: Guidelines for Estimating Trace Substance Emissions from Fossil Fuel Steam Electric Power Plan ts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook provides a tool for estimating trace substances emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants. The suggested emission factors are based on EPRI and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) field measurements conducted at 51 power plants using generally consistent sampling and analytical protocols. This information will help utility personnel estimate air toxic emissions for permitting purposes.

2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains a minimum of 92 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from fossil fuels. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of nitrogen compounds from fossil fuels and their post-combustion emissions. Removal methods include biological denitrification, fluidized bed combustion, and flue gas denitrification. Applications to utilities, petroleum refineries, and other industries are presented. The design of nitrogen control systems and process optimization are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

CO2 Emissions - Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Puerto Rico Graphics CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico image Per capita...

170

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

171

Toward a Common Method of Cost Estimation for CO2 Capture and Storage at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are significant differences in the methods employed by various organizations to estimate the cost of carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems for fossil fuel power plants. Such differences often are not readily apparent in publicly reported CCS cost estimates. As a consequence, there is a significant degree of misunderstanding, confusion, and mis-representation of CCS cost information, especially among audiences not familiar with the details of CCS costing. Given the international importance ...

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

CO2 Emissions - Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Graphics CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah image Per capita CO2 Emission...

173

Linear regression analysis of emissions factors when firing fossil fuels and biofuels in a commercial water-tube boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the emissions factors for a suite of liquid biofuels (three animal fats, waste restaurant grease, pressed soybean oil, and a biodiesel produced from soybean oil) and four fossil fuels (i.e., natural gas, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, and pulverized coal) in Penn State's commercial water-tube boiler to assess their viability as fuels for green heat applications. The data were broken into two subsets, i.e., fossil fuels and biofuels. The regression model for the liquid biofuels (as a subset) did not perform well for all of the gases. In addition, the coefficient in the models showed the EPA method underestimating CO and NOx emissions. No relation could be studied for SO{sub 2} for the liquid biofuels as they contain no sulfur; however, the model showed a good relationship between the two methods for SO{sub 2} in the fossil fuels. AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels were also compared to the mass balance emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Overall, the AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels did not compare well with the mass balance emissions factors or the EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Regression analysis of the AP-42, EPA, and mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels showed a significant relationship only for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. However, the regression models underestimate the SO{sub 2} emissions by 33%. These tests illustrate the importance in performing material balances around boilers to obtain the most accurate emissions levels, especially when dealing with biofuels. The EPA emissions factors were very good at predicting the mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels and to a lesser degree the biofuels. While the AP-42 emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors are easier to perform, especially in large, full-scale systems, this study illustrated the shortcomings of estimation techniques. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Experience curves for power plant emission controlassessments of fossil fuel power plants with CO 2 capturethe future cost of power plants with CO 2 capture Edward S.

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Challenges and opportunities in accounting for non-energy use CO2 emissions: an editorial comment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M (2009) Non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting carbonThe combustion of fossil fuels for energy purposes is by farGHG) emissions. However, fossil fuels also contribute to GHG

Masanet, Eric; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Electrochemical CO2 Capture and Instant Conversion into Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, burning fossil fuels produces CO2, emission of which to atmosphere causes global warming and climate change. A near-term realistic solution to...

177

Composition and Method for Rapid and Equimolar CO2 Capture ...  

The emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from burning of fossil fuels has received worldwide attention because of its implication in climate change, which threatens ...

178

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Emissions Control - Program Goals and Targets The Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) is currently pursuing the demonstration of 1st-Generation Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)...

179

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels: A procedure for estimation and results for 1950-1982. Tellus 36B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (C02) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: 1) updating the 1950 to present time series of C02 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 2) extending this time series back to 1751, 3) gridding the data at 1 ' by 1 ' resolution, and 4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of C02 from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5 % over 1990 levels to 6188 x lo6 metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement wit % two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distriiution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of C02 emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population

Robert J. Andres; Gregg Marl; Tom Boden; Steve Bischof

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Transition Paths CO2 Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aantal van hen hier niet onvermeld laten. Het proefschrift heeft zijn oorsprong in het MATTER-project (Materials Technologies for CO2-reduction). Het project werd gecoördineerd vanuit het ECN door Dolf Gielen en costs 72 4.4.2 System emissions 72 4.4.3 Parameters 73 4.5 Costs and emissions, technical and economic

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CO2 Emissions - the Republic of Moldova  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe the Republic of Moldova CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

182

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda-Urundi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rwanda-Urundi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda-Urundi...

183

CO2 Emissions - Republic of Cameroon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Republic of Cameroon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

184

CO2 Emissions - East and West Pakistan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East East and West Pakistan CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

185

CO2 Emissions - Rhodesia-Nyasaland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhodesia-Nyasaland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

186

CO2 Emissions - Papua New Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Papua New Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Papua New...

187

Geothermal Electrical Production CO2 Emissions Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emission of ?greenhouse gases? into the environment has become an increasing concern. Deregulation of the electrical market will allow consumers to select power suppliers that utilize ?green power.? Geothermal power is classed as ?green power? and has lower emissions of carbon dioxide per kilowatt-hour of electricity than even the cleanest of fossil fuels, natural gas. However, previously published estimates of carbon dioxide emissions are relatively old and need revision. This study estimates that the average carbon dioxide emissions from geothermal and fossil fuel power plants are: geothermal 0.18 , coal 2.13, petroleum 1.56 , and natural gas 1.03 pounds of carbon dioxide per kilowatt-hour respectively.

K. K. Bloomfield (INEEL); J. N. Moore (Energy and Geoscience Institute)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

CO2 Emissions - Lao People's Democratic Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Lao People's Democratic Republic CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic image Per...

189

CO2 Emissions - Republic of South Vietnam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Republic of South Vietnam CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam...

190

CO2 Emissions - Panama Canal Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Canal Zone Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone...

191

CO2 Emissions - Occupied Palestinian Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Occupied Palestinian Territory CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory image...

192

CO2 emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data applicationvnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2...

193

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for significant reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. We examine the break-even value for CCS adoptions, that ... Keywords: accounting, cost--benefit analysis, energy, energy policies, environment, government, natural resources, pollution

zge ??legen; Stefan Reichelstein

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

CO2 Emissions - Pacific Islands (Palau)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Pacific Islands (Palau) Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) image Per capita CO2...

195

Fossil Fuels News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Fossil Fuels News. Fossil Fuels News. (showing 1 - 5 of 5). In Natural Gas Pipelines, NIST Goes with the Flow ...

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Updated Cost and Performance Estimates for Clean Coal Technologies Including CO2 Capture - 2003: Updated Economics of Fossil Fuel Power Technologies Including an Assessment of CO2 Capture - 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are considerable uncertainties about the emissions regulations that will be applicable to both existing and new coal-based power plants. However, most observers anticipate a progressive tightening of emissions regulation with regard to SOx, NOx, particulate, and mercury emissions. Since coal-fired power plants produce 31% of the U.S. CO2 emissions and they are the largest point sources, there is also the possibility of legislation requiring the reduction of CO2 emissions. The optimum choice of tech...

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

The coprocessing of fossil fuels and biomass for CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is underway to evaluate the Hydrocarb process for conversion of carbonaceous raw material to clean carbon and methanol products. These products are valuable in the market either as fuel or as chemical commodities. As fuel, methanol and carbon can be used economically, either independently or in slurry form, in efficient heat energies (turbines and internal combustion engines) for both mobile and stationary single and combined cycle power plants. When considering CO{sub 2} emission control in the utilization of fossil fuels, the copressing of those fossil fuels with biomass (which may include, wood, municipal solid waste and sewage sludge) is a viable mitigation approach. By coprocessing both types of feedstock to produce methanol and carbon while sequestering all or part of the carbon, a significant net CO{sub 2} reduction is achieved if the methanol is substituted for petroleum fuels in the transportation sector. The Hydrocarb process has the potential, if the R&D objectives are achieved, to produce alternative transportation fuel from indigenous resources at lower cost than any other biomass conversion process. These comparisons suggest the resulting fuel can significantly displace gasoline at a competitive price while mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions and reducing ozone and other toxics in urban atmospheres.

Steinberg, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dong, Yuanji [Hydrocarb Corp., New York, NY (United States); Borgwardt, R.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

What are the likely roles of fossil fuels in the next 15, 50, and 100 years, with or without active controls on greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

Since the industrial revolution, the production and utilization of fossil fuels have been an engine driving economic and industrial development in many countries worldwide. However, future reliance on fossil fuels has been questioned due to emerging concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and its potential contribution to global climate change (GCC). While substantial uncertainties exist regarding the ability to accurately predict climate change and the role of various greenhouse gases, some scientists and policymakers have called for immediate action. As a result, there have been many proposals and worldwide initiatives to address the perceived problem. In many of these proposals, the premise is that CO{sub 2} emissions constitute the principal problem, and, correspondingly, that fossil-fuel combustion must be curtailed to resolve this problem. This paper demonstrates that the worldwide fossil fuel resource base and infrastructure are extensive and thus, will continue to be relied on in developed and developing countries. Furthermore, in the electric generating sector (the focus of this paper), numerous clean coal technologies (CCTs) are currently being demonstrated (or are under development) that have higher conversion efficiencies, and thus lower CO{sub 2} emission rates than conventional coal-based technologies. As these technologies are deployed in new power plant or repowering applications to meet electrical load growth, CO{sub 2} (and other GHG) emission levels per unit of electricity generated will be lower than that produced by conventional fossil-fuel technologies. 37 refs., 14 figs., 11 tabs.

Kane, R.L. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (USA)); South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Analysis Systems Analysis DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Innovations for Existing Plants Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. This work includes technology, benefits, and current situation and trends analyses related to CO2 emissions control. Systems analyses and economic modeling of potential new processes are crucial to providing sound guidance to R&D efforts. Since the majority of new CO2 capture technologies are still at a bench scale level of development, a conceptual design is first generated with emphasis on mass and energy balances. Based on available data and/or engineering estimates, these systems are optimized, and "what-if" scenarios are evaluated to identify barriers to deployment and help the process developers establish system performance targets. Reports that have been generated describing systems analyses in support of carbon capture efforts are shown in the table below.

200

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-combustion CO2 control systems separate CO2 from the flue gas produced by conventional coal combustion in air. The flue gas is at atmospheric pressure and has a CO2 concentration of 10-15 volume percent. Read More! Capturing CO2 under these conditions is challenging because: (1) the low pressure and dilute concentration dictate a high total volume of gas to be treated; (2) trace impurities in the flue gas tend to reduce the effectiveness of the CO2 separation processes; and (3) compressing captured CO2 from atmospheric pressure to pipeline pressure (1,200 - 2,200 pounds per square inch) represents a large parasitic energy load. Plant Picture DOE/NETL's post-combustion CO2 control technology R&D program includes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

TY Generic T1 Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China s Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from the calcination process for clinker production direct emissions from fossil fuel combustion and indirect emissions from electricity consumption This paper examines in...

202

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Central America, South America...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Venezuela (46.2), Chile (19.9), Columbia (18.5), Trinidad and Tobago (13.6), and Peru (11.1). This is a region of great diversity. Liquid fuels account for 60.8% of the 2008...

203

Top 20 Emitting Countries by Total Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(7) Islamic Republic of Iran (1902-2008) (8) Canada (1785-2008) (9) Republic of Korea (South Korea) (1945-2008) (10) South Africa (1884-2008) (11) United Kingdom...

204

Energy Efficiency in CO2 Emissions Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update explores methods to account for carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reductions specifically associated with the implementation of energy efficiency programs into greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading or offset markets. It focuses on how to understand, account for, quantify, verify, and optimize how electricity savings may both reduce CO2 emissions and potentially be granted credits for CO2 savings that may be traded in cap-and-trade regimes.

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

205

Eliminating CO2 Emissions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TiO2 pigment is primarily produced by the high temperature chloride process, resulting in considerable CO2 emissions. A novel hydrometallurgical process for ...

206

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Critical analysis of GHG emissions generate by the fossil fuel power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors have compared the technology using the natural gas and coal in order to produce the electricity. The objective of this paper consists in evaluation of the life cycle assessment of the natural gas and coal in order to compare ... Keywords: CO2, LCA, combustion, energy, impact analysis

Cristian Dinca; Cosmin Marculescu; Adrian Badea; Cora Gheorghe

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution  

SciTech Connect

This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

CO2 Emissions Determined by HadGEM2-ES to be Compatible with the Representative Concentration Pathway Scenarios and Their Extensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the fossil fuelderived CO2 emissions simulated by the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model, version 2, Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) to be compatible with four representative concentration pathways (RCPs) from 2006 to 2100. ...

Spencer Liddicoat; Chris Jones; Eddy Robertson

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Estimating the marginal cost of reducing global fossil fuel CO[sub 2] emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper estimates the marginal, total, and average cost and effectiveness of carbon taxes applied either by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) members alone, or as part of a global cooperative strategy, to reduce potential future emissions and their direct implications for employment in the US coal industry. Two sets of cases are examined, one set in which OECD members acts alone, and another set in which the world acts in concert. In each case set taxes are examined which achieve four alternative levels of emissions reduction: halve the rate of emissions growth, no emissions growth, 20[percent] reduction from 1988 levels, and 50[percent] reduction from 1988 levels. For the global cooperation case, carbon tax rates of [dollar sign]32, [dollar sign]113, [dollar sign]161, and [dollar sign]517 per metric ton of carbon (mtC) were needed in the year 2025 to achieve the objectives. Total costs were respectively [dollar sign]40, [dollar sign]178, [dollar sign]253, and [dollar sign]848 billions of 1990 US dollars per year in the year 2025. Average costs were [dollar sign]32, [dollar sign]55, [dollar sign]59, and [dollar sign]135 per mtC. Costs were significantly higher in the cases in which the OECD members states acted alone. OECD member states, acting alone, could not reduce global emissions by 50[percent] or 20[percent] relative to 1988, given reference case assumptions regarding developing and recently planned nations economic growth.

Edmonds, J.; Barns, D.W.; McDonald, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Crop production without fossil fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With diminishing fossil fuel reserves and concerns about global warming, the agricultural sector needs to reduce its use of fossil fuels. The objective of this (more)

Ahlgren, Serina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microsoft Word - CO2 Supplement.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Understanding the Decline in Carbon Dioxide Understanding the Decline in Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2009 1 EIA projects carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels in 2009 to be 5.9 percent below the 2008 level in the Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2009 (STEO) (Table 1). Projected coal CO2 emissions fall by 10.1 percent in 2009, primarily because of lower consumption for electricity generation. Coal accounts for 63 percent of the total decline in CO2 emissions from fossil fuels this year. Forecast lower natural gas and petroleum emissions this year make up 7 percent and 30 percent of the projected total decline in CO2 emissions from fossil fuels, respectively. Table 1. Short-Term Energy Outlook CO

216

Capturing and Sequestering CO2 from a Coal-Fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing and Sequestering CO Capturing and Sequestering CO 2 from a Coal-fired Power Plant - Assessing the Net Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Pamela L. Spath (pamela_spath @nrel.gov; (303) 275-4460) Margaret K. Mann (margaret_mann @nrel.gov; (303) 275-2921) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 INTRODUCTION It is technically feasible to capture CO 2 from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant and various researchers are working to understand the fate of sequestered CO 2 and its long term environmental effects. Sequestering CO 2 significantly reduces the CO 2 emissions from the power plant itself, but this is not the total picture. CO 2 capture and sequestration consumes additional energy, thus lowering the plant's fuel to electricity efficiency. To compensate for this, more fossil fuel must be

217

Feasibility of Large-Scale CO2 Ocean Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gas emissions, due in large part to the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, has spawned debate over global climate change and...

218

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.iea.org/co2highlights/co2highlights.pdf CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Screenshot References: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion[1] Overview "This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2008 selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References ↑ "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion"

220

CO2 Emissions - the Former German Democratic Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany the Former German Democratic Republic Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Former German Democratic Republic Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Former German Democratic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission...

222

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of...

223

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CO2 Capture for PC-Boiler Using Flue-Gas Recirculation: Evaluation of CO2 CaptureUtilizationDisposal Options Project No.: FWP49539...

224

Modeling the Canadian Electric System to Analyze the CO2 Content of Electric Transportation Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Replacing fossil fuel with electricity for transportation can play an important role in reducing CO2 emissions provided the electricity can be used efficiently and can be produced without emitting significant amounts of CO2. Canada offers a particularly attractive opportunity to replace fossil fuels with electricity in the transportation sector because Canada has historically generated electricity with low emissions of CO2 and because the transportation sector is responsible for a larger percentage of na...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing flow patterns and mixing of fossil fuel-derived CO{sub 2} is important for effectively using atmospheric measurements to constrain emissions inventories. Here we used measurements and a model of atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) to investigate the distribution and fluxes of atmospheric fossil fuel CO{sub 2} across the state of California. We sampled {sup 14}C in annual C{sub 3} grasses at 128 sites and used these measurements to test a regional model that simulated anthropogenic and ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes, transport in the atmosphere, and the resulting {sup 14}C of annual grasses ({Delta}{sub g}). Average measured {Delta}{sub g} in Los Angeles, San Francisco, the Central Valley, and the North Coast were 27.7 {+-} 20.0, 44.0 {+-} 10.9, 48.7 {+-} 1.9, and 59.9 {+-} 2.5{per_thousand}, respectively, during the 2004-2005 growing season. Model predictions reproduced regional patterns reasonably well, with estimates of 27.6 {+-} 2.4, 39.4 {+-} 3.9, 46.8 {+-} 3.0, and 59.3 {+-} 0.2{per_thousand} for these same regions and corresponding to fossil fuel CO{sub 2} mixing ratios (Cf) of 13.7, 6.1, 4.8, and 0.3 ppm. {Delta}{sub g} spatial heterogeneity in Los Angeles and San Francisco was higher in the measurements than in the predictions, probably from insufficient spatial resolution in the fossil fuel inventories (e.g., freeways are not explicitly included) and transport (e.g., within valleys). We used the model to predict monthly and annual transport patterns of fossil fuel-derived CO{sub 2} within and out of California. Fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emitted in Los Angeles and San Francisco was predicted to move into the Central Valley, raising Cf above that expected from local emissions alone. Annually, about 21, 39, 35, and 5% of fossil fuel emissions leave the California airspace to the north, east, south, and west, respectively, with large seasonal variations in the proportions. Positive correlations between westward fluxes and Santa Ana wind conditions were observed. The southward fluxes over the Pacific Ocean were maintained in a relatively coherent flow within the marine boundary layer, while the eastward fluxes were more vertically dispersed. Our results indicate that state and continental scale atmospheric inversions need to consider areas where concentration measurements are sparse (e.g., over the ocean to the south and west of California), transport within and across the marine boundary layer, and terrestrial boundary layer dynamics. Measurements of {Delta}{sub g} can be very useful in constraining these estimates.

Riley, W.J.; Hsueh, D.Y.; Randerson, J.T.; Fischer, M.L.; Hatch, J.G.; Pataki, D.E.; Wang, W.; Goulden, M.L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Emissions of CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere due to U. S. A. fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and projection of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere are estimated based on the Brookhaven reference energy system. Some new results are given on carbon dioxide contribution to the atmosphere from US fossil fuel consumption by different sectors including residential, commercial, industrial and transportation. The total weight of carbon as carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere and the additional CO/sub 2/ concentration over background by different subsectors in the years 1977, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000 and 2020 are presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring 2010 Title Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring 2010 Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Newman, Sally, Seongeun Jeong, Marc L. Fischer, Xiaomei Xu, Christine L. Haman, Barry Lefer, Sergio Alvarez, Bernhard Rappenglueck, Eric A. Kort, Arlyn E. Andrews, Jeffrey Peischl, Kevin R. Gurney, Charles E. Miller, and Yuk L. Yung Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 13 Pagination 4359-4372 Abstract Attributing observed CO2 variations to human or natural cause is critical to deducing and tracking emissions from observations. We have used in situ CO2, CO, and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) measurements recorded during the CalNex-LA (CARB et al., 2008) ground campaign of 15 May-15 June 2010, in Pasadena, CA, to deduce the diurnally varying anthropogenic component of observed CO2 in the megacity of Los Angeles (LA). This affordable and simple technique, validated by carbon isotope observations and WRF-STILT (Weather Research and Forecasting model - Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model) predictions, is shown to robustly attribute observed CO2 variation to anthropogenic or biogenic origin over the entire diurnal cycle. During CalNex-LA, local fossil fuel combustion contributed up to ~50% of the observed CO2 enhancement overnight, and ~100% of the enhancement near midday. This suggests that sufficiently accurate total column CO2 observations recorded near midday, such as those from the GOSAT or OCO-2 satellites, can potentially be used to track anthropogenic emissions from the LA megacity.

228

The Power to Reduce CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007 EPRI released its first Prism analysis [EPRI 2007], providing a technically and economically feasible roadmap for the electricity sector as it seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Prism analysis provided a comprehensive assessment of potential CO2 reductions in key technology areas of the electricity sector. In 2009 EPRI, updated the analysis to reflect economic and technological changes that have the potential to affect projected emissions and the technologies to address them. The upda...

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 06, 2010 Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Six Projects Selected by DOE Will Further Important Technologies for Helping Reduce CO2...

230

Production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning by fuel type, 1860-1982  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide emission calculations resulting from fossil fuel useage for the years 1860-1982 are presented.

Rotty, R.M.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States). Institute for Energy Analysis

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monthly Isotopic (13C/12C) Estimates Monthly Isotopic (13C/12C) Estimates Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values from Fossil-Fuel Consumption in the U.S.A. DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.001 Web page graphic Graphics Web page graphic Data (ASCII Fixed Format) Web page graphic Data (ASCII Comma Delimited) Investigators T.J. Blasing and Gregg Marland Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290, U.S.A. Christine Broniak Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-3601 Period of Record 1981-2003 Methods The data from which these carbon-emissions estimates were derived are values of fuel consumed: in billions of cubic feet, for natural gas; in

232

Controlling Power Plant CO2 Emissions: A Long-Range View  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTROLLING POWER PLANT CO CONTROLLING POWER PLANT CO 2 EMISSIONS: A LONG RANGE VIEW John Marion (john.l.marion@power.alstom.com; 860-285-4539) Nsakala ya Nsakala (nsakala.y.nsakala@power.alstom.com; 860-285-2018) ALSTOM Power Plant Laboratories 2000 Day Hill Road Windsor, CT 06095, USA Timothy Griffin (timothy.griffin@power.alstom.com; +41 56/486 82 43) Alain Bill (alain.bill@power.alstom.com; +41 56/486 81 07) ALSTOM Power Technology Center 5405 Baden-Daettwil, Switzerland ABSTRACT ALSTOM Power (ALSTOM) is an international supplier of power generation with concern for the environment. We are aware of the present scientific concerns regarding greenhouse gas emissions and the role of fossil fuel use for power generation. Although the scientific and policy dialogue on global climate change is far from conclusive, ALSTOM continues to

233

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions cease, will atmospheric CO2 concentration continue to increase?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that overall ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

234

CO2 Emissions - the Former Federal Republic of Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany the Former Federal Republic of Germany CO2 Emissions from the Former Federal Republic of Germany Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Former Federal Republic of...

235

CO2 Emissions - U.S. Virgin Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations U.S. Virgin Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the U.S. Virgin Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the U.S....

236

PFC and CO2 Emissions from an Australian Aluminium Smelter ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The accurate measurement of perfluorocarbon and CO2 emissions from aluminium smelters is becoming increasingly important. CSIRO has...

237

Estimates of Global, Regional, and National Annual CO2 Emissions from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 (1995) 0 (1995) (click above to download the data!) Estimates of Global, Regional, and Naitonal Annual CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring: 1950-1992 NDP-030/R6 Cover T. A. Boden G. Marland Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee R. J. Andres Institute of Northern Engineering School of Engineering University of Alaska-Fairbanks Fairbanks, Alaska Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4473 Date Published: December 1995 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research Budget Activity Number KP 05 02 00 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

238

Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development Plan for Renewable Energy in China. Availablerenewable and non-fossil fuel generation prior to References China

Zhou, Nan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CANMET CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CANMET CO2 Consortium-O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion Project No.: IEA-CANMET-CO2 (International Agreement) Photograph of CANMET's Vertical Combustor Research Facility. Photograph of CANMET’s Vertical Combustor Research Facility. The CANMET carbon dioxide (CO2) consortium will conduct research to further the development of oxy-combustion for retrofit to coal-fired power plants. Research activities include: (1) modeling of an advanced, supercritical pressure oxy-coal plant, including an analysis of the impact of oxygen (O2) purity and O2 partial enrichment, overall process performance, and cost; (2) testing of pilot-scale CO2 capture and compression; (3) investigating CO2 phase change at liquid and supercritical states in gas mixtures

240

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodolog...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the need to understand the uncertainty of current estimates of cement emissions in China. This paper compares several methodologies for calculating CO2 emissions from cement...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

World Fossil Fuel Economics - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 1, 1971 ... World Fossil Fuel Economics ... in world energy demand, particularly in the U. S. and Europe; the consumption patterns and cost patterns of oil,...

242

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool [1] NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool This interactive tool enables the user to look at both total and power sector CO2 emissions from the use of coal, oil, or natural gas, over the period 1990 to 2030. One can use the tool to compare five of the larger CO2 emitters to each other or to overall world emissions. The data are from the

243

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004228 Akermin, Inc. is to conduct bench-scale testing...

244

Urban emissions of CO2 from Davos, Switzerland: the first real-time monitoring system using an atmospheric inversion technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions from urban areas represent 70% of the fossil fuel carbon emitted globally according to carbon emission inventories. We present here the first operational system able to monitor in near real-time daily emission estimates, ...

Thomas Lauvaux; Natasha L. Miles; Scott J. Richardson; Aijun Deng; Dave Stauffer; Kenneth J. Davis; Gloria Jacobson; Chris Rella; Gian-Paul Calonder; Philip L. DeCola

245

Research on CO2 Emission Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demonstration project of CO 2 separation from coal-fired flue gas was started at Beijing Thermal Power Plant which is affiliated with China Huaneng Group. The demonstration...

246

Rapid growth in CO2 emissions after the 2008-2009 global financial crisis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production grew 5.9% in 2010, surpassed 9 Pg of carbon (Pg C) for the first time, and more than offset the 1.4% decrease in 2009. The impact of the 2008 2009 global financial crisis (GFC) on emissions has been short-lived owing to strong emissions growth in emerging economies, a return to emissions growth in developed economies, and an increase in the fossil-fuel intensity of the world economy.

Peters, Glen P. [Center for International Climate and Energy Research (CICERO), Oslo, Norway; Marland, Gregg [Appalachian State University; Le Quere, Corinne [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Canadell, Josep [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Raupach, Michael [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NETL: News Release - Reining in CO2 Emissions....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reining in CO2 Emissions.... DOE Selects Eight Innovative Projects to Capture and Store Carbon Dioxide from Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - New ways to capture carbon dioxide from...

248

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Biomimetric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Papers and Publications: Development of Biomimetic Membranes for Near Zero PC Power Plant Emissions, PDF-4MB (March 2011) Final Report. Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture for...

249

High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Jump...

250

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India's Iron and Steel Industry Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry Publication Type Report...

251

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron and Steel Industry in China Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China Publication Type...

252

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Novel Strategy for CO2 Sequestration and Clean Air Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

protection. Introduction The current CO 2 problem from fossil fuel consumption. Fossil fuels-coal, oil, and natural gas-have long been a prime "engine" of our...

254

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands marginal CO2 intensities of energy eff...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

255

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands the marginal CO2 intensities of en...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an effort to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study establishes a proof-of-concept for quantifying marginal CO2 intensi...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Diffuse emissions of CO2 are known to be large around some volcanoes and hydrothermal areas. Accumulation-chamber measurements of CO2 flux are increasingly used to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude higher than normally encountered in soil respiration studies, a test system was

258

Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum ..7. CO 2 emissions from petroleum product combustion bycapita CO 2 emissions from petroleum product combustion by

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Control of CO2 Emissions of China under Kyoto Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the paper explores the major factors that affect CO2 emissions by the analysis for time-series of China since Chinese innovation and opening. The analysis concludes that there is no inverse-U curve between economic development and CO2 emissions. The ...

Zhao Yong

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development in China Xiliang Zhang, Tianyu Qi, and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 242 April 2013 China Energy & Climate Project TSINGHUA - MIT://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline Edited by Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Risø-R-1712(EN) September 2009 Proceedings Risø International Energy Conference 2009 #12;Editors: Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Title: Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak

262

Definition: Reduced Co2 Emissions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Co2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Co2 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in CO2 emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Co2_Emissions&oldid=502618

263

The Costs of Reducing Electricity Sector CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a high-level analysis of some of the critical challenges associated with cutting United States electricity-sector CO2 emissions and an order of magnitude feeling for what it will cost to meet emission-reduction targets now under consideration. Three basic strategies to limit emissions are illustrated to give readers a basic understanding of the tradeoff between CO2 reductions and additional cost inherent in several generation choices. Regional power market system simulations are then...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Uncertainty in future global energy use and fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions 1975 to 2075: Appendices A--B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appendix A contains the Monte Carlo Data Set. The data sheets give the distribution for input variables used in Monte Carlo analysis of the IEA/ORAU Global Energy, CO{sub 2} Model. The data sheets include a discussion of data sources, bibliographic sources, and other considerations used in developing the particular data format and values for distributions. As much detail as possible about how distributions are related to published estimates is given but in most cases it was necessary to make a significant leap from available data to the quantified distribution. The distributions are meant to be roughly accurate and to the degree that uncertainty exists about the form and value of distributions, the authors have tended to opt for wider bounds. Appendix B contains The IEA/ORAU Long-Term Global Energy-CO{sub 2} Model, Version A.84 -- Model Improvements. The model was originally developed in 1982 in support of work conducted for the US Department of Energy Carbon Dioxide Research Division in the area of future global fossil fuel related CO emissions research. The uncertainty analysis, documented in this report, made demands on the model that had not previously been made, and in the process of operating the model much was learned about areas in which simplification or elaboration was justified, or in which a different approach was warranted. As a consequence of these criticisms, demands, and learning numerous model modifications were undertaken. Since two versions of the model now exist, version specifications have been adopted. The 1984 version is designated A.84, while the version completed in 1982 is designated B.82. Model changes fall into three categories: those which affect the theoretical structure of the model, those which affect the computational processes of the model, and those which affect only the model by which model inputs are entered.

Edmonds, J.A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Energy Analysis; Reilly, J.M. [Pacific Northwest Labs., Washington, DC (United States); Gardner, R.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brenkert, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reduction of CO2 emissions and utilization of slag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Expectations from the industry partners (as pre- sented at the kick-off meeting): Applicability of the steel emissions is 314 #12;CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. Con- crete and steel manufacturers produce of industrial by-products and residues is the possibility to use CO2 in local flue gases for the carbonation

Zevenhoven, Ron

266

fossil fuels | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fossil fuels fossil fuels Dataset Summary Description Energy intensity data and documentation published by the U.S. DOE's office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Energy intensity is defined as: amount of energy used in producing a given level of output or activity; expressed as energy per unit of output. This is the energy intensity of the the electricity sector, which is an energy consuming sector that generates electricity. Data are organized to separate electricity-only generators from combined heat and power (CHP) generators. Data is available for the period 1949 - 2004. Source EERE Date Released May 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Energy Consumption energy intensity fossil fuels renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon electricity_indicators.xls (xls, 2.1 MiB)

267

Supported polyethylenimine adsorbents for CO2 capture from flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic CO2 emissions produced from fossil fuel combustion are believed to contribute to undesired consequences in global climate. Major contributors towards CO2 emissions are fossil fuel-fired power plants for electricity production. For this reason, CO2 capture from flue gas streams together with permanent sequestration in geologic formations is being considered a viable solution towards mitigation of the major greenhouse gas1. Technologies based on chemical absorption with alkanolamines have been assessed for first generation CO2 post-combustion capture primarily due to its advanced stage of development. However, limitations associated with these chemical solvents (i.e., low CO2 loadings, amine degradation by oxygen, equipment corrosion) manifest themselves in high capital and operating costs with reduced thermal efficiencies. Therefore, necessary design and development of alternative, lower cost approaches for CO2 capture from coal-fired combustion streams are warranted.

Fauth, D.J.; Gray, M.L.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reducing CO2 Emissions: Technology, Uncertainty, Decision Making...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing CO2 Emissions: Technology, Uncertainty, Decision Making and Consumer Behavior Speaker(s): Ins Magarida Lima de Azevedo Date: October 31, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122...

269

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Project No.: DE-FC26-08NT0000749 (active), DE-FC21-90MC25140...

270

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency Webcast Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his is a PDF of PowerPoint slides presented during the 17 February 2009 webcast, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency. The webcast was based on work conducted for the report, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency (product number 1016085). The webcast and the slides include the following information: Modeling approaches and assumptions Summary of results for two approaches How model output can be applied by utilities Planned refinements to the model in 2009 and beyond, includin...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

TRANSPORTATION SECTOR CO2 EMISSION REDUCTION STRATEGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance are both important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department inventories · Only need one week of work and fuel sales to get fuel based emissions inventories · RSD

Delaware, University of

272

1. The Challenge Concentrations of atmospheric CO2 have increased by more than 35% since industrialisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy can go some way to reducing CO2 emissions but the technology gap and time lag concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere traps more reflected heat, leading to enhanced climate changes. Energy is significant. Burning fossil fuels for energy is still the primary method of producing energy. It is therefore

273

Method for reducing CO2, CO, NOX, and SOx emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Industrial combustion facilities are integrated with greenhouse gas-solidifying fertilizer production reactions so that CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions can be converted prior to emission into carbonate-containing fertilizers, mainly NH.sub.4 HCO.sub.3 and/or (NH.sub.2).sub.2 CO, plus a small fraction of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3 and (NH.sub.4).sub.2 SO.sub.4. The invention enhances sequestration of CO.sub.2 into soil and the earth subsurface, reduces N0.sub.3.sup.- contamination of surface and groundwater, and stimulates photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere. The method for converting CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions into fertilizers includes the step of collecting these materials from the emissions of industrial combustion facilities such as fossil fuel-powered energy sources and transporting the emissions to a reactor. In the reactor, the CO.sub.2, CO, N.sub.2, SO.sub.x, and/or NO.sub.x are converted into carbonate-containing fertilizers using H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, or NH.sub.3. The carbonate-containing fertilizers are then applied to soil and green plants to (1) sequester inorganic carbon into soil and subsoil earth layers by enhanced carbonation of groundwater and the earth minerals, (2) reduce the environmental problem of NO.sub.3.sup.- runoff by substituting for ammonium nitrate fertilizer, and (3) stimulate photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere by the fertilization effect of the carbonate-containing fertilizers.

Lee, James Weifu (Oak Ridge, TN); Li, Rongfu (Zhejiang, CH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Calculating CO2 Emissions from Mobile Sources,GHG Protocol Agency/Company /Organization: Aether, Environmental Data Services, Aether, Environmental Data Services Sector: Energy Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development, Industry, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory, Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: cf.valleywater.org/Water/Where_Your_Water_Comes_From/Water%20Supply%20 Cost: Free References: http://cf.valleywater.org/Water/Where_Your_Water_Comes_From/Water%20Supply%20and%20Infrastructure%20Planning/Climate%20Change/Guidance_for_mobile_emissions_GHG_protocol.pdf Related Tools Tool and Calculator (Transit, Fuel)

275

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption:10. China's 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy: Sectoral16 Table 11. China's 2008 CO 2 Emissions from Energy:

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California Title Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California Publication Type Report Year of...

277

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar capacity. Non-fossil fuels (renewable plus hydro andthe CIS scenario fossil fuels have the highest capacityof total generation and non-fossil fuels account for 31%, as

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Project No.: DE-NT0005313 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International is researching fluorinated polymer membranes for carbon dioxide capture. RTI's research effort includes membrane materials development, module design, and process design. RTI is pursuing the development of two hollow-fiber membrane materials. First, RTI is working with Generon to develop a membrane material constructed of polycarbonate-based polymers. Lab-scale membrane modules are being studied with simulated flue-gas mixtures with and without flue gas emission contaminants. Two larger-scale polycarbonate membrane module prototypes are being tested with a slipstream of actual flue gas from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Multipollutant

279

The dilemma of fossil fuel use and global climate change  

SciTech Connect

The use of fossil fuels and relationship to climate change is discussed. As the use of fossil fuels has grown, the problems of protecting the environment and human health and safety have also grown, providing a continuing challenge to technological and managerial innovation. Today that challenge is to control atmospheric emissions from combustion, particularly those emissions that cause acidic deposition, urban pollution, and increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Technology for reducing acidic deposition is available and needs only to be adopted, and the remedies for urban pollution are being developed and tested. How effective or expensive these will be remains to be determined. The control of emissions of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}, seems possible only be reducing the total amounts of fossil fuels used worldwide, and by substituting efficient natural gas technologies for coal. Long before physical depletion forces the transition away from fossil fuels, it is at least plausible and even likely that the greenhouse effect will impose a show-stopping constraint. If such a transition were soon to be necessary, the costs would be very high because substitute energy sources are either limited or expensive or undesirable for other reasons. Furthermore, the costs would be unevenly felt and would be more oppressive for developing nations because they would be least able to pay and, on average, their use rates of fossil fuels are growing much faster than those of many industrialized countries. It is prudent, therefore, to try to manage the use of fossil fuels as if a greenhouse constraint is an important possibility.

Judkins, R.R.; Fulkerson, W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Sanghvi, M.K. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050  

SciTech Connect

As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic growth and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study focuses on a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. In the past years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced the China End-Use Energy Model based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not likely be the case because of saturation effects in appliances, residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that the 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David G.; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

CDIAC::Carbon Emission::Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Each year the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) generates estimates of carbon releases from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production. Emissions from fossil-fuel burning represent the largest anthropogenic source of carbon to the atmosphere and are an important contributor to elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. CDIAC produces annual fossil-fuel CO2 emission time series at global and national scales and these time series serve as building blocks for other data products including gridded (1 x 1) emission time series. Details regarding the methods used to produce these time series and data products may be found on the CDIAC website. This new interface allows users to query, visualize, and download the latest CDIAC fossil-fuel CO2 emission estimates. In the future, additional

282

Definition: Fossil fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Fossil fuels Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fossil fuels Fuels formed in the Earth's crust over millions of years from decomposed organic matter. Common fossil fuels include petroleum, coal, and natural gas.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Fossil fuels are fuels formed by natural processes such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms. The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes exceeds 650 million years. Fossil fuels contain high percentages of carbon and include coal, petroleum, and natural gas. They range from volatile materials with low carbon:hydrogen ratios like methane, to liquid petroleum

283

No Fossil Fuel - Kingston | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No Fossil Fuel - Kingston No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Jump to: navigation, search Name No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Facility No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner No Fossil Fuel LLC Developer No Fossil Fuel LLC Energy Purchaser Net-metered Location Kingston MA Coordinates 41.97388106°, -70.72577477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.97388106,"lon":-70.72577477,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

HS_FossilFuels_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels Fossil Energy Study Guide: Fossil Fuels C ontrary to what many people believe, fossil fuels are not the remains of dead dinosaurs. In fact, most of the fossil fuels found today were formed millions of years before the fi rst dinosaurs. Fossil fuels, however, were once alive. Th ey were formed from prehistoric plants and animals that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. Th ink about what the Earth must have looked like 300 million years or so ago. Th e land masses we live on today were just forming. Th ere were swamps and bogs everywhere. Th e climate was warmer. Trees and plants grew everywhere. Strange looking animals walked on the land, and just as weird looking fi sh swam in the rivers and seas. Tiny one-celled organisms called protoplankton fl

285

Modeling global atmospheric CO2 with improved emission inventories and CO2 production from the oxidation of other carbon species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of global three-dimensional (3-D) models with satellite observations of CO2 in inverse modeling studies is an area of growing importance for understanding Earth s carbon cycle. Here we use the GEOS-Chem model (version 8-02-01) CO2 mode with multiple modifications in order to assess their impact on CO2 forward simulations. Modifications include CO2 surface emissions from shipping (0.19 PgC yr 1), 3-D spatially-distributed emissions from aviation (0.16 PgC yr 1), and 3-D chemical production of CO2 (1.05 PgC yr 1). Although CO2 chemical production from the oxidation of CO, CH4 and other carbon gases is recognized as an important contribution to global CO2, it is typically accounted for by conversion from its precursors at the surface rather than in the free troposphere. We base our model 3-D spatial distribution of CO2 chemical production on monthly-averaged loss rates of CO (a key precursor and intermediate in the oxidation of organic carbon) and apply an associated surface correction for inventories that have counted emissions of CO2 precursors as CO2. We also explore the benefit of assimilating satellite observations of CO into GEOS-Chem to obtain an observation-based estimate of the CO2 chemical source. The CO assimilation corrects for an underestimate of atmospheric CO abundances in the model, resulting in increases of as much as 24% in the chemical source during May June 2006, and increasing the global annual estimate of CO2 chemical production from 1.05 to 1.18 Pg C. Comparisons of model CO2 with measurements are carried out in order to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions that result when these new sources are added. Inclusion of CO2 emissions from shipping and aviation are shown to increase the global CO2 latitudinal gradient by just over 0.10 ppm (3%), while the inclusion of CO2 chemical production (and the surface correction) is shown to decrease the latitudinal gradient by about 0.40 ppm (10%) with a complex spatial structure generally resulting in decreased CO2 over land and increased CO2 over the oceans. Since these CO2 emissions are omitted or misrepresented in most inverse modeling work to date, their implementation in forward simulations should lead to improved inverse modeling estimates of terrestrial biospheric fluxes.

Nassar, Ray [University of Toronto; Jones, DBA [University of Toronto; Suntharalingam, P [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Wecht, K. J. [Harvard University; Yantosca, R. M. [Harvard University; Kulawik, SS [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Bowman, K [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Worden, JR [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Machida, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption Reduction for New Construction and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings -- Docket No....

287

OpenEI Community - fossil fuels  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

communityblogfour-new-publications-help-advance-renewable-energy-developmentcomments energy scenarios fossil fuels OECD OpenEI policy Renewable Energy Tue, 16 Jul 2013...

288

Has US Shale Gas Reduced CO2 Emissions? Examining recent changes in emissions from the US power sector and traded fossil fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A research briefing commissioned by This report is non-peer-reviewed and all views contained within are attributable to the

Dr John Broderick; Prof Kevin Anderson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

Kharecha, P A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

FE annual Report Bioprocessing of Fossil Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FE annual Report July 2004 Bioprocessing of Fossil Fuels Abhijeet Borole, Life Sciences Division The overall objective of this research program is to develop novel technologies for processing fossil fuels energy-efficient. Processes based on oxidative as well as reductive reactions are being investigated

291

Towards Zero Emissions CO2-Reduction in Mediterranean Social Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the construction, use and deconstruction of a 60 apartment social housing complex to be built close to Barcelona revealed the importance of the application of life-cycle analysis, as the materials embodied energy showed to be responsible for half of the buildings life-cycle emissions. A 72% energy reduction compared to conventional housing projects is expected by implementation of centralised HVAC and DHW systems, based on ground source heat pumps and solar thermal energy, introducing an in Catalonia innovative facility management approach where energy and flow meters are installed in each flat for internet-based control of energy consumption, invoicing and supervision of the installation. A second study showed that up to 90% CO2 reduction considering the overall lifecycle is feasible at reasonable cost by giving priority to organic building materials like wood (CO2 storage effect), minimizing underground construction and increasing energy supply based on renewable energies.

Sabate, J.; Peters, C.; Cuchi, A.; Lopez, F.; Sagrera, A.; Wadel, G.; Vidal, J.; Cantos, S.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990  

SciTech Connect

Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture Reversible Ionic Liquids as Double-Action Solvents for Efficient CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005287 In this project, the Georgia Tech Research Corporation is using totally novel chemistryto engender the dramatic changes needed for widespread implementation of CO2 capture in a both environmentally benign and economical process. Current methods of CO2 post-combustion recovery from coal-fired power plants focus on such techniques as absorption in aqueous ethanolamine scrubbers - and this is now a mature technology unlikely to achieve a quantum change in either capacity or cost. The objective of this project is to develop a novel class of solvents for post-combustion recovery of CO2 from fossil fuel-fired power plants which will achieve a substantial increase in CO2 carrying capacity with a concomitant plummet in cost. The project team is a combination of chemical engineers and chemists with extensive experience in working with industrial partners to formulate novel solvents and to develop processes that are both environmentally benign and economically viable. Further, the team has already developed solvents called "reversible ionic liquids," essentially "smart" molecules which change properties abruptly in response to some stimulus, and these have quickly found a plethora of applications.

294

An Integrated Approach for Oxy-fuel Combustion with CO2 Capture and Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vent Stream Vent Stream (out) CO 2 Product Stream (out) Flue Gas Stream (in) CO 2 CCU Skid Government of Canada Gouvernement du Canada An Integrated Approach for Oxy An Integrated Approach for Oxy- -fuel Combustion with CO fuel Combustion with CO 2 2 Capture and Capture and Compression Compression Kourosh Zanganeh, Ahmed Shafeen, and Carlos Salvador Zero-Emission Technologies Group, Clean Electric Power Generation CANMET CO 2 R&D Consortium CANMET Energy Technology Centre - Ottawa The capture and storage or reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the combustion of fossil fuels as well as industrial off gases represents an opportunity to achieve a significant reduction in anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Fossil fuel combustion is expected to dominate the energy structure in at least the next few decades.

295

CO2 Intensity in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to the launch of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005, the electricity sector was widely proclaimed to have more low-cost emission abatement opportunities than other sectors. If this were true, effects of the EU ETS on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would likely be visible in the electricity sector. Our study looks at the effect of the price of emission allowances (EUA) on CO2 emissions from Swedish electricity generation, using an econometric time series analysis for the period 20042008. We control for effects of other input prices and hydropower reservoir levels. Our results do not indicate any link between the price of EUA and the CO2 emissions of Swedish electricity production. A number of reasons may explain this result and we conclude that other determinants of fossil fuel use in Swedish electricity generation probably diminished the effects of the EU ETS.

Anna Widerberg; Markus Wrke; Anna Widerberg; Markus Wrke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fossil Fuels Study Guide - High School | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuels Study Guide - High School Fossil Fuels Study Guide - High School Fossil Fuels Study Guide - High School More Documents & Publications Coal Study Guide for Elementary School...

297

Fossil Fuel and Biomass Burning Effect on ClimateHeating or Cooling?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission from burning of fossil fuels and biomass (associated with deforestation) generates a radiative forcing on the atmosphere and a possible climate chaw. Emitted trace gases heat the atmosphere through their greenhouse effect, while ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser; Robert L. Mahoney

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption: ReferenceChinas 2008 Total CO 2 Emissions from Energy Consumption byof estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Decomposition of Energy and CO2 Emission of China between 1980 and 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2005, Chinas energy consumption amounted to 2233 million tons coal equivalent (MtCE), and the CO2 emission was 5322.69 million tons, making China the worlds second largest consumer of energy products and source of CO2 emissions behind ... Keywords: China, Energy intensity, CO2 emissions, decarbon

Xiaoli Liu; Yongxiu He; Jun Dong

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

fossil fuels | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fossil fuels Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 16 July, 2013 - 14:37 Four new publications help advance renewable energy development energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chemical Characterization of Fossil Fuel Combustion Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion wastes differ considerably in total composition and in the key chemical characteristics of their extracts, making leachate composition difficult to predict. A new mechanistic approach, however, shows promise for more-accurate prediction.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a literature review of hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation is first given with an emphasis on system integration and evaluation. Hybrid systems are defined as those which use solar energy and fuel ...

Sheu, Elysia J. (Elysia Ja-Zeng)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date Published 052012 Conference Location New Orleans, USA Keywords cement, co2 emissions, concrete, emerging technologies, energy efficiency, Low Emissions & Efficient...

305

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operation Project No.: DE-FE0004278 American Air Liquide, Inc. will develop a system for CO2 capture based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The...

306

Study of Regenerable Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CO 2 ) is a greenhouse gas that is customarily released to the environment during the usage of fossil fuels, including electric power generation. With the projected increase in...

307

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is produced when different ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... (CO 2) is produced per kilowatt-hour when generating electricity with fossil fuels?

308

Strategies for Controlling Coal Permeability in CO2-Enhanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), caused primarily by combustion of fossil fuels for power generation and transportation, are considered to be leading...

309

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

310

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Post-Combustion CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0004274 3H Company will evaluate the feasibility of its "Self-Concentrating Absorbent CO2 Capture Process." The process is based on amines in a non-aqueous solvent which, upon reaction with CO2, separate into two distinct phases: a CO2-rich liquid phase and a dilute lean phase. The proposed process offers several potential advantages. Preliminary experimental data show that the process has the potential of reducing the total regeneration energy by as much as 70 percent. The solvent has high working capacity, thus required solvent volume would be lower than that required in a currently available amine system. This results in lower pumping requirements, lower auxiliary power demands, and reduced equipment size. In addition, since the solvent is non-aqueous, corrosion issues would be reduced. During the three-year project, an engineering design supported by laboratory data and economic justification will be developed to construct and operate a slipstream demonstration facility at an E-ON power plant in the United States as a next stage of commercialization development.

311

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture from Flue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption Project No.: FG26-05NT42488 Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Hampton University researched a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption concept, phase transitional absorption, that utilizes a two-part proprietary absorbent consisting of an activated agent dissolved in a solvent. Phase separation of the activated agent from the chemical solvent occurs during CO2 absorption and physical separation of the two phases exiting the absorber reduces the volume of process liquid requiring thermal regeneration. This unique aspect of phase transitional absorption also decreases the amount of energy (i.e., steam) required to liberate the CO2. If the proper liquid

312

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Novel Solvent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Novel Solvent System for Post Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0005799 ION Engineering Ionic Liquid ION Engineering Ionic...

313

Carbon capture technology: future fossil fuel use and mitigating climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon capture technology: future fossil fuel use and mitigating climate change DR N FloRiN aND DR P FeNNell executive summary What is carbon capture and storage? Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) refers to the set of technologies devel- oped to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from the exhausts

314

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co Co 2 SequeStration Potential of texaS low-rank CoalS Background Fossil fuel combustion is the primary source of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a major greenhouse gas. Sequestration of CO 2 by injecting it into geologic formations, such as coal seams, may offer a viable method for reducing atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Injection into coal seams has the potential added benefit of enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The potential for CO 2 sequestration in low-rank coals, while as yet undetermined, is believed to differ significantly from that for bituminous coals. To evaluate the feasibility and the environmental, technical, and economic impacts of CO 2 sequestration in Texas low-rank coal beds, the Texas Engineering Experimental Station is conducting a four-year study

315

Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date Published 062011 Institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords china, china energy, china energy group, co2, data, energy analysis and environmental...

316

Materials for CO2 Capture and Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scope, Our present dependence on fossil fuels means that, as our demand for energy inevitably increases, so do emissions of greenhouse gases, notably...

317

Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions November 16, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Geologic capacity exists to permanently store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in nine states stretching from Indiana to New Jersey, according to injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). MRCSP's just-released Phase II final report indicates the region has likely total storage of 245.5 billion metric tons of CO2, mostly in deep saline rock formations, a large capacity compared to present day emissions. While distributed sources such as agriculture, transportation, and home heating account for a significant amount of CO2 emissions in the MRCSP

318

Energy - environmental methods to reduce CO2emissions in Romanian iron and steel industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents some energy-environmental methods for reducing the CO2 emissions in Romanian iron and steel processes, both technological, as well as combustion processes, in case of integrated, technological and energetic approach, using ... Keywords: CO2 emissions, emissions reduction, energy-environmental methods, integrated system, mathematical model

Ion Melinte; Mihaela Balanescu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several perialpine and alpine investigated greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from reservoirs located across an altitude gradient in Switzerland. These are the first results of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs at high elevations

Wehrli, Bernhard

320

The Potential to Reduce CO2 Emissions by Expanding End-Use Applications of Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the sources of electricity production, the use of electricity can be a contributing factor to net CO2 emissions. What is less obvious is that using efficient end-use electric technologies has the potential save energy and decrease overall CO2 emissions substantially. The two main mechanisms for saving energy and reducing CO2 emissions with electric end-use technologies are (1) upgrading existing electric technologies, processes, and building energy systems; and (2) expanding end-use applica...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of the distribution of electricity CO 2 emissions20 shows the distribution of electricity generation by fuel21 shows the distribution of electricity use, including

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ation of slags from iron- and steel industry" pre- sented at the 4th Nordic Mini-symposium on CO2CO2 emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2 Nordic Plus) and Use of serpentinites in energy and metal industry (ECOSERP) Carl-Johan Fogelholm, Project leader, professor Sanni

Zevenhoven, Ron

323

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004787 Gas Technology Institute is partnering with PoroGen Corporation and Aker Process Systems in a three-year effort to develop a hybrid technology for CO2 capture from flue gases based on a combination of solvent absorption and hollow fiber membrane technologies. The technology could also apply to removal of numerous other gas pollutants such as NOx and SOx, separation of CO2 from hydrogen in refinery streams, and separation of CO2 from natural gas (natural gas sweetening). The technology increases interfacial gas/liquid area by a factor of ten over conventional packed or tray columns, thus increasing mass transfer. The selectivity is controlled by the chemical affinity of CO2 with a hindered amine. The process results in lower steam regeneration energy, and the CO2 is generated at pressure, reducing compression costs. The project includes bench-scale testing on a 25 kWe-equivalent slipstream at Midwest Generation's Joliet Power Station.

324

Thermal dissolution of solid fossil fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of oil shales and coals in the processes of thermal dissolution is considered. It is shown that thermal dissolution is a mode of liquefaction of solid fossil fuels and can be used both independently and in combination with liquefaction of coals and processing of heavy petroleum residues.

E.G. Gorlov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Slipstream...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of a Membrane CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Project No.: DE-FE0005795 MTRs high-permeance membranes MTRs high-permeance membranes Membrane...

326

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the use of concentrated piperazine (PZ) as a solvent for absorbing CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas, coupled with two-stage flash regeneration. This process offers...

327

NETL - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Evaluation of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents (CACHYS(tm)) Project No.: DE-FE0007603 The University of North Dakota (UND) is...

328

Forecasting US CO2 Emissions Using State-Level Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curve for air pollution emissions, Journal of EnvironmentalInformation Agency: 2004, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in1999, Controlling Carbon Emissions in China, Environment and

Steinhauser, Ralf; Auffhammer, Maximilian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A process developed by researchers at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) that improves the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants while reducing the cost has been selected to receive a 2011 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer. The Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process separates CO2 from the flue or stack gas of power plants, preventing its release into the air. The captured CO2 can then be permanently stored in a carbon sequestration

331

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 This...

332

Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels

333

Fossil Fuel Prices to Electric Utilities - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuel Prices to Electric Utilities. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, July 2000.

334

Energy consumption and CO2emissions of Beijing heating system: based on a system dynamics model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beijing is a typical North China city, and it uses about 15-18% of its total energy consumption for heating. The building construction industry is also a key source of CO2 emissions. This article, based on a system dynamics model, aims to simulate and ... Keywords: CO2 emissions, energy consumption, heating system, system dynamics

Hefeng Tong; Weishuang Qu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Study on Zero CO2 Emission SOFC Hybrid Power System with Steam Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a traditional SOFC hybrid power system, a zero CO2 emission SOFC hybrid power system with steam injection is proposed in this paper and its performance is analyzed. Oxy-fuel combustion can burn the fuel gas from anode thoroughly, and increases ... Keywords: solid oxide fuel cell, Aspen Plus, hybrid power system, zero CO2 emission, steam injection

Liqiang Duan; Xiaoyuan Zhang; Yongping Yang; Gang Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

NETL: IEP-In-House Post Combustion CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - In-House Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP - In-House Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CO2 Capture Chemical Sorbents Chemical Solvents Membranes Miscellaneous The objective of this National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development (ORD) multi-faceted project is to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) capture systems for coal-based power plants that lower the costs and energy penalty associated with those systems. Research and development in the capture area is aimed at developing systems that are low in capital cost, have low parasitic load, can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and can be integrated within the power generation system. A majority of the research will occur on laboratory- and bench-scale reactors. Further information on ORD's CO2 capture projects can be found by using the links found in the adjacent blue box.

337

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California Title Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in...

338

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

339

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

340

Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -matched with $156 million in private cost-share -today's selections demonstrate the potential opportunity to use CO2 as an inexpensive raw material that can help reduce carbon dioxide emissions while producing useful by-products that Americans

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductionconsumption and related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions.during Cumulative Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction (MtCO

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Feasibility Study on a Two-Stage Benefits CO2 Sequestration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and attracts international society to pay attention. The power generation plants firing fossil fuels, which is the biggest polluter in the world, emit huge amount CO2 into...

343

Failing Drop CO2 Deposition (Desublimation) Heat Exchanger for the Cryogenic Carbon Capture Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cryogenic carbon capture removes CO2 and other pollutants from flue and waste stream gases produced from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, natural (more)

James, David William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

CDIAC::Carbon Emission::Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) generates estimates of carbon releases from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production. Emissions from fossil-fuel burning represent the...

345

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxygen-Based PC Boiler Project No.: FC26-04NT42207 & FC26-03NT41736 Spatial Comparison of an Air-Fired Furnace versus an Oxygen-Fired Furnace. Spatial Comparison of an Air-Fired Furnace versus an Oxygen-Fired Furnace. Foster Wheeler North America Corporation will conduct to two projects to improve carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology by developing a conceptual pulverized coal-fired boiler system design using oxygen as the combustion medium. Using oxygen instead of air produces a flue gas with a high CO2 concentration, which will facilitate CO2 capture for subsequent sequestration. The first project will develop modeling simulations that will lead to a conceptual design that addresses costs, performance, and emissions, and

346

Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report allocates California's 2004 statewide carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fuel combustion to the 58 counties in the state. The total emissions are allocated to counties using several different methods, based on the availability of data for each sector. Data on natural gas use in all sectors are available by county. Fuel consumption by power and combined heat and power generation plants is available for individual plants. Bottom-up models were used to distribute statewide fuel sales-based CO2 emissions by county for on-road vehicles, aircraft, and watercraft. All other sources of CO2 emissions were allocated to counties based on surrogates for activity. CO2 emissions by sector were estimated for each county, as well as for the South Coast Air Basin. It is important to note that emissions from some sources, notably electricity generation, were allocated to counties based on where the emissions were generated, rather than where the electricity was actually consumed. In addition, several sources of CO2 emissions, such as electricity generated in and imported from other states and international marine bunker fuels, were not included in the analysis. California Air Resource Board (CARB) does not include CO2 emissions from interstate and international air travel, in the official California greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, so those emissions were allocated to counties for informational purposes only. Los Angeles County is responsible for by far the largest CO2 emissions from combustion in the state: 83 Million metric tonnes (Mt), or 24percent of total CO2 emissions in California, more than twice that of the next county (Kern, with 38 Mt, or 11percent of statewide emissions). The South Coast Air Basin accounts for 122 MtCO2, or 35percent of all emissions from fuel combustion in the state. The distribution of emissions by sector varies considerably by county, with on-road motor vehicles dominating most counties, but large stationary sources and rail travel dominating in other counties.The CO2 emissions data by county and source are available upon request.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Fischer, Marc

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Will Economic Restructuring in China Reduce Trade-Embodied CO2 Emissions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate CO2 emissions embodied in Chinas net exports using a multi-regional input-output database. We find that the majority of Chinas export-embodied CO2 is associated with production of machinery and equipment ...

Qi, Tianyu

348

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products July 6, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research to help find ways of converting into useful products CO2 captured from emissions of power plants and industrial facilities will be conducted by six projects announced today by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects are located in North Carolina, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia, and Quebec, Canada (through collaboration with a company based in Lexington, Ky.) and have a total value of approximately $5.9 million over two-to-three years, with $4.4 million of DOE funding and $1.5 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the

349

Dynamics of Implementation of Mitigating Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions from Commercial Aviation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing demand for air transportation and growing environmental concerns motivate the need to implement measures to reduce CO2 emissions from aviation. Case studies of historical changes in the aviation industry have ...

Kar, Rahul

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

U.S. energy-related CO 2 emissions in early 2012 lowest since 1992 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions resulting from energy use during the first quarter of 2012 were the lowest in two decades for any January-March period.

351

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Novel Dual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

amine modified membrane capable of economically and efficiently removing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The use of such an...

352

FOREST MANAGEMENT, BIOMASS FUELS, AND EMISSIONS OF CO2 TO THE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management, Biomass Fuels, and CO2 Emissions to the Atmosphere papers by Gregg Marland and Bernhard Schlamadinger Fax: +1 (865) 574-2232 E-mail: marlandgh@ornl.gov Email:...

353

U.S. energy-related CO 2 emissions in early 2012 lowest since ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions resulting from energy use during the first quarter of 2012 were the lowest in two decades for any January-March period.

354

Fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon. Phase I final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involves the simultaneous production of clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon and sulfur, along with value-added carbon nanofibers. This can be accomplished because the nanofiber production process removes carbon via a catalyzed pyrolysis reaction, which also has the effect of removing 99.9% of the sulfur, which is trapped in the nanofibers. The reaction is mildly endothermic, meaning that net energy production with real reductions in greenhouse emissions are possible. In Phase I research, the feasibility of generating clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon was demonstrated by the successful design, construction and operation of a facility capable of utilizing coal as well as natural gas as an inlet feedstock. In the case of coal, for example, reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions can be as much as 70% (normalized according to kilowatts produced), with the majority of carbon safely sequestered in the form of carbon nanofibers or coke. Both of these products are value-added commodities, indicating that low-emission coal fuel can be done at a profit rather than a loss as is the case with most clean-up schemes. The main results of this project were as follows: (1) It was shown that the nanofiber production process produces hydrogen as a byproduct. (2) The hydrogen, or hydrogen-rich hydrocarbon mixture can be consumed with net release of enthalpy. (3) The greenhouse gas emissions from both coal and natural gas are significantly reduced. Because coal consumption also creates coke, the carbon emission can be reduced by 75% per kilowatt-hour of power produced.

Kennel, E.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Cessna, T.J.

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

EU obiective of 120g CO2/km emission for new cars, a challenge for tribology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passenger cars produce about 12 % of overall EU greenhouse gas -GHG- emissions (CO2) and transport sector with about 20 % is the second biggest emitter of GHG among all sources. Since 1990, EU has reduced transport emissions by 5 % but the contribution ... Keywords: GHG emissions, friction modifiers, fuel efficiency, structured surfaces, surface treatment

Ivan Iliuc

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Metal Monolithic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Metal Monolithic Amine-Grafted Zeolites for CO2 Capture Project No.: FC26-07NT43086 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE CO2 capture unit with metal monolithic amine-grafted zeolites. The University of Akron is investigating a new sorbent for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture that involves the novel integration of metallic monolith structures coated with amine-grafted zeolites. This sorbent would eliminate the use of corrosive liquid amine and decrease the energy required for sorbent regeneration. The metal monoliths consist of straight channels: one row of channels coated with amine-grated zeolite and one used for heat transfer media for either cooling for adsorption or heating for regeneration. In combination with the innovative applications of metal monoliths as an

357

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Coal Direct Chemical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit for Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants with In-Situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005289 Ohio State chemical looping metal carrier. Ohio State chemical looping metal carrier. The Ohio State University Research Foundation will further develop coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) technology. CDCL uses a patented iron oxide-based composite oxygen carrier and can be retrofit to existing coal-fired power plants. The development of the CDCL system will be conducted through experimental testing under bench- and sub-pilot scales. Related Papers and Publications: Coal Direct Chemical Looping Retrofit to Pulverized Coal Power Plants for In-Situ CO2 Capture [PDF-2.43MB] (July 2013) Presented by Samuel Bayham of the Ohio State University Research Foundation at the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting.

358

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

359

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels are abundant, inexpensive to produce, and are easily converted to usable energy by combustion as demonstrated by mankind's dependence on fossil fuels for over 80% of its primary energy supply (13). This reliance on fossil fuels comes with the cost of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that exceed the rate at which CO{sub 2} can be absorbed by terrestrial and oceanic systems worldwide resulting in increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration as recorded by direct measurements over more than five decades (14). Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas linked to global warming and associated climate change, the impacts of which are currently being observed around the world, and projections of which include alarming consequences such as water and food shortages, sea level rise, and social disruptions associated with resource scarcity (15). The current situation of a world that derives the bulk of its energy from fossil fuel in a manner that directly causes climate change equates to an energy-climate crisis. Although governments around the world have only recently begun to consider policies to avoid the direst projections of climate change and its impacts, sustainable approaches to addressing the crisis are available. The common thread of feasible strategies to the energy climate crisis is the simultaneous use of multiple approaches based on available technologies (e.g., 16). Efficiency improvements (e.g., in building energy use), increased use of natural gas relative to coal, and increased development of renewables such as solar, wind, and geothermal, along with nuclear energy, are all available options that will reduce net CO{sub 2} emissions. While improvements in efficiency can be made rapidly and will pay for themselves, the slower pace of change and greater monetary costs associated with increased use of renewables and nuclear energy suggests an additional approach is needed to help bridge the time period between the present and a future when low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the associated environmental risks are acceptable or not to the public.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Translating Energy Efficiency into CO2 Emissions Reduction: A Modeling Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology that EPRI has developed to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though energy efficiency is intuitively recognized to reduce carbon emissions, one barrier to its broader application is the lack of precision in attributing emissions reductions to specific program activities. Coarse estimates based on utilities' average emissions factors, while straightforward to calculate, do not provide enough specificity on emissions reductions...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Options for Near-Term Phaseout of CO2 Emissions from Coal Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unconventional fossil fuels (e.g., oil shale and tar sands) are prohibited. This paper outlines technology

362

Chapter 4. Receipts and Cost of Fossil Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

74 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 4. Receipts and Cost of Fossil Fuels

363

Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 69 Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation

364

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet (2003) 208 Fluid...

365

Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-NETL...

366

Reference Materials and Standards for Fossil Fuels, Electric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the energy consumed by the US Along with ... from the specification of fossil fuel raw materials ... relevant reference materials to support the emerging ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Impacts of Wind and Solar on Fossil-Fueled Generators: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High penetrations of wind and solar power will impact the operations of the remaining generators on the power system. Regional integration studies have shown that wind and solar may cause fossil-fueled generators to cycle on and off and ramp down to part load more frequently and potentially more rapidly. Increased cycling, deeper load following, and rapid ramping may result in wear-and-tear impacts on fossil-fueled generators that lead to increased capital and maintenance costs, increased equivalent forced outage rates, and degraded performance over time. Heat rates and emissions from fossil-fueled generators may be higher during cycling and ramping than during steady-state operation. Many wind and solar integration studies have not taken these increased cost and emissions impacts into account because data have not been available. This analysis considers the cost and emissions impacts of cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generation to refine assessments of wind and solar impacts on the power system.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Agan, D.; Lefton, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Materials and Processes for CO2 Capture, Conversion, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scope, Our present dependence on fossil fuels means that, as our demand for energy inevitably increases, so do emissions of greenhouse gases, notably...

369

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Bench-Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004360 The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will evaluate the Hot Carbonate Absorption Process (Hot-CAP) process with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping. The Hot-CAP is an absorption-based, post-combustion CO2 technology that uses a carbonate salt (K2CO3 or Na2CO3) as a solvent. The process integrates a high temperature (70-80°C) CO2 absorption column, a slurry-based high pressure (up to 40atm) CO2 stripping column, a crystallization unit to separate bicarbonate and recover the carbonate solvent, and a reclaimer to recover CaSO4 as the byproduct of the SO2 removal.

370

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Development of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Development of Oxygen-Fired Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers for Greenhouse Gas Control Project No.: FC26-04NT42205 & FC26-01NT41146 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Alstom's Multi-Use Test Facility (MTF). Alstom Power Inc. will conduct two projects using a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor for economic evaluations of the recovery of carbon dioxide (CO2). The projects will involve preparation of the facility and test equipment, conducting the comprehensive pilot-scale testing and analysis, and application of test results in re-evaluation and refinement of commercial oxygen-fired CFB designs. The project goal is to determine if CO2 can be recovered at an avoided cost of no more than $10 per ton of carbon avoided, using a CFB combustor that burns coal with a mixture of

371

Fossil fuel decarbonization technology for mitigating global warming  

SciTech Connect

It has been understood that production of hydrogen from fossil and carbonaceous fuels with reduced CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere is key to the production of hydrogen-rich fuels for mitigating the CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas climate change problem. The conventional methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas and biomass) include steam reforming and water gas shift mainly of natural gas (SRM). In order to suppress CO{sub 2} emission from the steam reforming process, CO{sub 2} must be concentrated and sequestered either in or under the ocean or underground (in aquifers, or depleted oil or gas wells). Up to about 40% of the energy is lost in this process. An alternative process is the pyrolysis or the thermal decomposition of methane, natural gas (TDM) to hydrogen and carbon. The carbon can either be sequestered or sold on the market as a materials commodity or used as a fuel at a later date under less severe CO{sub 2} restraints. The energy sequestered in the carbon amounts to about 42% of the energy in the natural gas resource which is stored and not destroyed. A comparison is made between the well developed conventional SRM and the less developed TDM process including technological status, efficiency, carbon management and cost. The TDM process appears to have advantages over the well developed SRM process. It is much easier to sequester carbon as a stable solid than CO{sub 2} as a reactive gas or low temperature liquid. It is also possible to reduce cost by marketing the carbon as a filler or construction material. The potential benefits of the TDM process justifies its further efficient development. The hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel or converted to methanol by reaction with CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel fired power plant stack gases, thus allowing reuse of the carbon in conventional IC automobile engines or in advanced fuel cell vehicles.

Steinberg, M.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

SciTech Connect

After rapid growth in economic development and energy demand over the last three decades, China has undertaken energy efficiency improvement efforts to reduce its energy intensity under the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP). Since becoming the world's largest annual CO{sub 2} emitter in 2007, China has set reduction targets for energy and carbon intensities and committed to meeting 15% of its total 2020 energy demand with non-fossil fuel. Despite having achieved important savings in 11th FYP efficiency programs, rising per capita income and the continued economic importance of trade will drive demand for transport activity and fuel use. At the same time, an increasingly 'electrified' economy will drive rapid power demand growth. Greater analysis is therefore needed to understand the underlying drivers, possible trajectories and mitigation potential in the growing industrial, transport and power sectors. This study uses scenario analysis to understand the likely trajectory of China's energy and carbon emissions to 2030 in light of the current and planned portfolio of programs, policies and technology development and ongoing urbanization and demographic trends. It evaluates the potential impacts of alternative transportation and power sector development using two key scenarios, Continued Improvement Scenario (CIS) and Accelerated Improvement Scenario (AIS). CIS represents the most likely path of growth based on continuation of current policies and meeting announced targets and goals, including meeting planned appliance efficiency standard revisions, fuel economy standards, and industrial targets and moderate phase-out of subcritical coal-fired generation with additional non-fossil generation. AIS represents a more aggressive trajectory of accelerated improvement in energy intensity and decarbonized power and transport sectors. A range of sensitivity analysis and power technology scenarios are tested to evaluate the impact of additional actions such as carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and integrated mine-mouth generation. The CIS and AIS results are also contextualized and compared to model scenarios in other published studies. The results of this study show that China's energy and CO{sub 2} emissions will not likely peak before 2030, although growth is expected to slow after 2020. Moreover, China will be able to meet its 2020 carbon intensity reduction target of 40 to 45% under both CIS and AIS, but only meet its 15% non-fossil fuel target by 2020 under AIS. Under both scenarios, efficiency remains a key resource and has the same, if not greater, mitigation potential as new technologies in transport and power sectors. In the transport sector, electrification will be closely linked the degree of decarbonization in the power sector and EV deployment has little or no impact on China's crude oil import demand. Rather, power generation improvements have the largest sector potential for overall emission mitigation while mine-mouth power generation and CCS have limited mitigation potential compared to fuel switching and efficiency improvements. Comparisons of this study's results with other published studies reveal that CIS and AIS are within the range of other national energy projections but alternative studies rely much more heavily on CCS for carbon reduction. The McKinsey study, in particular, has more optimistic assumptions for reductions in crude oil imports and coal demand in its abatement scenario and has much higher gasoline reduction potential for the same level of EV deployment. Despite these differences, this study's scenario analysis of both transport and power sectors illustrate the necessity for continued efficiency improvements and aggressive power sector decarbonization in flattening China's CO{sub 2} emissions.

G. Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; T. Aden, Nathaniel

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Separation and Capture of CO2 from Large Stationary Sources and Sequestration in Geological Formations: A Summary of the 2003 Critical Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, and the resulting global warming effect, is a major air quality concern. CO2 is the most abundant greenhouse gas emitted by fossil-fuel combustion for power generation, transportation, and heating. Reducing worldwide emissions of CO2 will require many mitigation measures, including reductions in energy consumption, more efficient use of available energy, renewable energy sources, and carbon sequestration. The feasibility of capturing CO2 from large point sources and subsequent geological sequestration is the subject of this years Critical Review.

White, C.M.; Strazisar, B.R.; Granite, E.J.; Hoffman, J.S.; Pennline, H.W.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power generation cycles are: (1) increased efficiency by a factor of up to 2 over many conventional fossil fuel steam plants, (2) reduced power generation cost, especially for increasing fossil fuel cost, (3) reduced CO2 emission per kWh, and (4) direct sequestration or reuse (e.g., in enhanced oil or NG recovery) of the CO{sub 2} product.

Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Statistical Model to Assess Indirect CO2 Emissions of the UAE Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a regional bottom-up model for assessing space cooling energy and related greenhouse gas emissions. The model was developed with the aim of improving the quality and quantity of cooling energy and emission data, especially for the benefit of local decision making. Based on a benchmarking study, a representative archetype was developed, simulation software used and linear statistical model constructed. This model explores the way in which CO2 emission levels are affected by different energy efficiency measures to reduce cooling energy consumption in buildings. The analysis showed that improving building energy efficiency could generate considerable carbon emissions reduction credits with competitive benefit. The developed model was found to be capable in selecting cost-effective, environmentally-preferred building efficiency measures and evaluating the future trend of CO2 emissions in the residential building of Al-Ain city.

Radhi, H.; Fikry, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Sharing the burden of climate change stabilization: An energy sector perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional, and National Fossil Fuel CO 2 Emissions. Inentirely on emissions from fossil fuel consumption, that is,reducing emissions from fossil fuel consumption. Moreover,

Wagner, Fabian; Sathaye, Jayant

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Modeling the release of CO2 in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea of capturing and disposing of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants has recently received attention as a possible mitigation strategy to counteract potential global warming due ...

Liro, Christopher R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Microporous Metal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks Project No.: FC26-07NT43092 Examples of several MOFs under investigation Examples of several MOFs under investigation UOP LLC is conducting research for separating carbon dioxide (CO2) using novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs). In the first project, NT42121, UOP partnered with the University of Michigan and Northwestern University to evaluate MOFs in both pre-combustion and post-combustion applications. In the second project, NT43092, UOP is collaborating with Vanderbilt University and the University of Edinburgh, as well as the University of Michigan and Northwestern University, in a more focused effort on MOFs in post-combustion applications. MOFs are an extraordinary

380

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Low Cost Sorbent for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005497 TDA sorbent test equipment TDA sorbent test equipment. TDA Research Inc. will produce and evaluate a low-cost solid sorbent developed in prior laboratory testing. The process uses an alkalized alumina adsorbent to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) at intermediate temperature and near ambient pressure. The physical adsorbent is regenerated with low-pressure steam. Although the regeneration is primarily by concentration swing, the adsorption of steam on the sorbent during regeneration also provides approximately 8°C to 10°C of temperature swing, further enhancing the regeneration rate. The sorbent is transferred between two moving bed reactors. Cycling results in gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Model selection with considering the CO2 emission alone the global supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study formulates a model for analyzing eco-environmental impact on global supply chain network. The multi-criteria optimization model is applied to seek optimal solutions that not only can achieve predetermined objectives, but also can satisfy constraints ... Keywords: CO2 emission, Environmental management, Global supply chain, Integer linear programming, Multi-criteria optimization model, Supply chain management

Thi Phuong Le; Tzong-Ru Lee

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is produced per kilowatt-hour ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2) is produced per kilowatt-hour when generating electricity with fossil fuels? You can calculate the amount of CO2 produced per kWh for ...

383

Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

Greenbaum, E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Production of fossil fuel from federal and Indian lands fell ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales of fossil fuels from production on federal and Indian lands in fiscal year (FY) 2012 dropped 4% from FY 2011, according to data from the Department of the ...

385

Three essays on biofuel's and fossil fuel's stochastic prices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation consists of three essays on biofuel's and fossil fuel's stochastic prices focusing on the U.S. corn-based fuel-ethanol market. The research objectives include investigating (more)

Zhang, Zibin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Optimization of fossil fuel sources: An exergy approach  

SciTech Connect

We performed linear programming for optimization of fossil fuel supply in 2000 in Turkey. For this, an exergy analysis is made because the second law of thermodynamics takes into account the quality of energy as well as quantity of energy. Our analyses showed that the interfuel substitution between different fossil fuels will lead to a best energy mix of the country. The total retail price of fossil fuels can be lowered to 11.349 billion US$ from 13.012 billion US$ by increasing the domestic production of oil, lignite, and hard coal and by decreasing imports. The remaining demand can be met by natural gas imports. In conclusion, our analysis showed that a reduction of 1.663 billion US$ in fossil fuel cost can be made possible by giving more emphasis on domestic production, particularly of oil, lignite and hard coal.

Camdali, U. [Development Bank of Turkey, Ankara (Turkey)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Brazil-NETL Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships (Redirected from Brazil-NETL Cooperation) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Brazil-NETL Cooperation Name Brazil-NETL Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization National Energy Technology Laboratory Partner Brazil Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.netl.doe.gov/techno Program Start 2007 Program End 2012 Country Brazil South America References NETL Technologies Programs[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Fossil Fuels Partnerships with Brazil ORD International Research Agreements Brazilian Coal Gasification and CCS MOUs References ↑ NETL Technologies Programs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brazil-NETL_Advanced_Fossil_Fuels_Partnerships&oldid=375248"

388

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 1: Feasibility Study (1004931), published in 2004; Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization (1012207) published in 2007; and Boiler Water Deposition ...

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

What are the greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For combustion of fossil fuels: CO 2 for common fuels; CO 2 for fuels used for electricity generation ; For electricity as generated:

390

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion Technology Development for Industrial-Scale Boiler Applications Project No.: DE-NT0005290 Alstom oxy-combustion test facility Alstom oxy-combustion test facility. Alstom will develop an oxyfuel firing system design specifically for retrofit to tangential-fired (T-fired) boilers and provide information to address the technical gaps for commercial boiler design. Several oxyfuel system design concepts, such as internal flue gas recirculation and various oxygen injection schemes, will be evaluated for cost-effectiveness in satisfying furnace design conditions in a T-fired boiler. The evaluation will use an array of tools, including Alstom's proprietary models and design codes, along with 3-D computational fluid dynamics modeling. A

391

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Environmental Analysis--Electric Sector Modeling of CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute has initiated a comprehensive collaborative study to quantify the environmental impacts of electric transportation, specifically with respect to plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). This technical update describes the adaptation of the EPRI electric sector model for the analysis of CO2 emissions from the charging on PHEVs on the electrical grid. A "PHEV Base Case" was developed using baseline assumptions from the "EPRI Base Case," a nominal set of key assumptio...

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Tool for calculation of CO2 emissions from organisations Agency/Company /Organization: United Kingdom Department of Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/nationalindicators/ni185emissio Country: United Kingdom Northern Europe Coordinates: 55.378051°, -3.435973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.378051,"lon":-3.435973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Reducing Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Using Accelerated Limestone Weathering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following earlier descriptions, the use and impacts of accelerated weathering of limestone AWL; reaction: CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + CaCO{sub 3} {yields} Ca{sup 2+} + 2(HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) as a CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration method is further explored. Since ready access to the ocean is likely an essential requirement for AWL, it is shown that significant limestone resources are relatively close to a majority of CO{sub 2}-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Furthermore, waste fines, representing more than 20% of current US crushed limestone production (>10{sup 9} tonnes/yr), could be used in many instances as an inexpensive or free source of AWL carbonate. With limestone transportation to coastal sites then as the dominant cost variable, CO{sub 2} sequestration (plus capture) costs of $3-$4/tonne are achievable in certain locations. While there is vastly more limestone and water on earth than that required for AWL to capture and sequester all fossil fuel CO{sub 2} production, the transportation cost of bringing limestone, seawater, and waste CO{sub 2} into contact likely limits the method's applicability to perhaps 10-20% of US point-source emissions. Using a bench-scale laboratory reactor, it is shown that CO{sub 2} sequestration rates of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -5} moles/sec per m{sup 2} of limestone surface area are readily achievable using seawater. This translates into reaction densities as high as 2 x 10{sup -2} tonnes CO{sub 2} m{sup -3}day{sup -1}, highly dependent on limestone particle size, solution turbulence and flow, and CO{sub 2} concentration. Modeling of AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean shows significantly reduced effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct CO{sub 2} disposal into the atmosphere or ocean. In fact the increase in ocean Ca{sup 2+} and bicarbonate offered by AWL should significantly enhance the growth of corals and other marine calcifiers whose health is currently being threatened by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} invasion and pH reduction in the ocean.

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

Qualitative and Quantitative Comparison of Two Promising Oxy-Fuel Power Cycles for CO2 Capture Presentation at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worldwide ever rising emissions of greenhouse gases to atmosphere-> global warming and environmental change Kyoto Protocol demands the reduction of greenhouse gases, mainly CO2 In EU: strong pressure on utilities and companies to reduce CO2 emissions Carbon capture and storage (CCS) as short and mid term solution Background- II (CCS Technologies) Post-combustion: CO2-Capture from exhaust gas (chemical absorbtion, membranes, ) Pre-combustion: Decarbonization of fossil fuel to produce pure hydrogen for power cycle (e.g. steam reforming of methane, ) Oxy-fuel power generation: Internal combustion with pure oxygen and CO2/H2O as working fluid enabling CO2 separation by condensation Which technology has the best chances to dominate future power generation?

Thermal Turbomaschinery; Asme Turbo Expo; Wolfgang Sanz; Herbert Jericha; Bernhard Bauer; Emil Gttlich

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy-efficient air pollution controls for fossil-fueled plants: Technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require most fossil-fuel fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate emissions. While emission-control equipment is available to help most of New York State`s 91 utility units in 31 power plants comply with the new regulations, technologies currently available consume energy, increase carbon dioxide emissions, reduce operating efficiency, and may produce large amounts of solid and/or semisolid byproducts that use additional energy for processing and disposal. This report discribes several pollution-control technologies that are more energy efficient compared to traditional technologies for controlling sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and particulates, that may have application in New York State. These technologies are either in commercial use, under development, or in the demonstration phase; This report also presents operating characteristics for these technologies and discusses solutions to dispose of pollution-control system byproducts. Estimated energy consumption for emission-control systems relative to a plant`s gross generating capacity is 3 to 5 for reducing up to 90% sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants. 0.5 to 2.5% for reducing nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 80% from all fossil-fuel fired plants; and 0.5 to 1.5 % for controlling particulate emissions from oil- and coal-fired plants. While fuel switching and/or cofiring with natural gas are options to reduce emissions, these techniques are not considered in this report; the discussion is limited to fossil-fueled steam-generating plants.

Sayer, J.H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Complex Flow and Composition Path in CO2 Injection Schemes from Density Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for many years. The first large-scale, commercial CO2 IOR project began operation in 1972 at the SACROC concentration in the atmosphere because of the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation may be one of the main causes for acceleration in global warming. Because fossil fuels will be a critical component of the world

Firoozabadi, Abbas

397

Inverse modeling of CO2 sources and sinks using satellite observations of CO2 from TES and surface flask measurements  

SciTech Connect

We infer CO2 surface fluxes using satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and measurements of CO2 from surface flasks in a time-independent inversion analysis based on the GEOS-Chem model. Using TES CO2 observations over oceans, spanning 40 S 40 N, we find that the horizontal and vertical coverage of the TES and flask data are complementary. This complementarity is demonstrated by combining the datasets in a joint inversion, which provides better constraints than from either dataset alone, when a posteriori CO2 distributions are evaluated against independent ship and aircraft CO2 data. In particular, the joint inversion offers improved constraints in the tropics where surface measurements are sparse, such as the tropical forests of South America. Aggregating the annual surface-to-atmosphere fluxes from the joint inversion for the year 2006 yields 1.13 0.21 PgC for the global ocean, 2.77 0.20 PgC for the global land biosphere and 3.90 0.29 PgC for the total global natural flux (defined as the sum of all biospheric, oceanic, and biomass burning contributions but excluding CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion). These global ocean and global land fluxes are shown to be near the median of the broad range of values from other inversion results for 2006. To achieve these results, a bias in TES CO2 in the Southern Hemisphere was assessed and corrected using aircraft flask data, and we demonstrate that our results have low sensitivity to variations in the bias correction approach. Overall, this analysis suggests that future carbon data assimilation systems can benefit by integrating in situ and satellite observations of CO2 and that the vertical information provided by satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 combined with measurements of surface CO2, provides an important additional constraint for flux inversions.

Nassar, Ray [University of Toronto; Jones, DBA [University of Toronto; Kulawik, SS [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Worden, JR [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Bowman, K [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Suntharalingam, P [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Brenninkmeijer, CAM [Max Planck Institut fur Chemie, Mainz; Schuck, TJ [Max Planck Institut fur Chemie, Mainz; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Worthy, DE [Environment Canada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

CO2 EMISSION CALCULATIONS AND TRENDS Thomas A. Boden and Gregg Marland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMISSION CALCULATIONS AND TRENDS EMISSION CALCULATIONS AND TRENDS Thomas A. Boden and Gregg Marland Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-6335 Robert J. Andres Institute of Northern Engineering School of Engineering University of Alaska-Fairbanks Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5900 ABSTRACT FEB 05 ZS3 OSTI The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- ACO5-840R21400. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so. for U.S. Government purposes." This paper describes the compilation, calculation, and availability of the most comprehensive CO2 emissions database currently available. The database offers global, regional, and national annual

399

Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2 concentration resulted in incremental loss in IAS performance and revealed progressive degrees of staining upon testing. Adsorption of SO2 by the IAS necessitates upstream removal of SO2 prior to CO2 capture.

Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption Reduction for New Construction and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings -- Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0031; RIN 1904-AB96 Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption Reduction for New Construction and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings -- Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0031; RIN 1904-AB96 This memo provides an overview of communications made to DOE staff on the subject of the rulemaking referenced above. The communications occurred at a meeting held on February 13, 2013. DOE 433 ex parte memo.pdf More Documents & Publications Disclosure of Permitted Communication Concerning Regional Standards Enforcement Framework Document -- Docket No. EERE-2011-BT-CE-0077

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost and performance of fossil fuel power plants with CO2cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewablesector emissions. The fossil fuel-related carbon intensity (

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Documentarary Series from the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership and Prairie Public Broadcasting  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tManaging Carbon Emissions: The Geologic Solution: Natural CO2 tapped from underground geologic formations has been used for more than 30 years to help recover more oil from reservoirs in West Texas. Anthropogenic or human-derived CO2 from a coal gasification plant has been doing the same in southern Saskatchewan. Using this same technique called CO2 enhanced oil recovery, scientists and engineers are developing safe, practical ways of permanently storing CO2 from fossil fuel-fired power plants in natural sealed containers deep underground. This practice is called geologic sequestration. It is the storage component of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The concepts of CCS and geologic sequestration will be explained to show how these strategies can help manage carbon in our world.

403

Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the labs total carbon footprint.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Bench-scale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

parasitic energy loads and associated capital and operating costs for CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants compared to conventional aqueous amine CO2 scrubbing. Specific...

405

Treatment of Biomass Emissions the Same as Fossil Fuel Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This summary of research on life cycle carbon accounting with implications for bioenergy was prepared for the National Alliance of Forest Owners by researchers working with the Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials (CORRIM), an independent non-profit corporation of 17 research institutions. The conclusions in the summary are those of the authors only based on publications produced for and by CORRIM and do not necessarily reflect the views of CORRIM's other researchers, member institutions, donors or grantors. The full body of work described in this summary will be

Elaine Oneil; Elaine Oneil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

CO2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Objective R MOTC can play a signifi cant role in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage and enhanced oil recovery technology development and fi eld demonstra- tions. RMOTC completed a scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) CO 2 enhanced oil recovery potential. More recent character- ization studies indicate geologic carbon storage would also be an excellent use of NPR-3 resources beyond their economic life in conventional production. Geologic Storage Fossil fuels will remain the mainstay of energy production well into the 21st century. Availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is es- sential for the prosperity and security of the United States. However, increased atmospheric concentrations

407

Sensors and Controls Research Combustion of fossil fuels currently  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, aggressive environments and high temperatures. Sponsor: Department of Energy Fossil Energy Program. FeaturesSensors and Controls Research Combustion of fossil fuels currently generates most of the nation's energy, and 2008 forecasts by the Energy Information Agency predict this will continue to be the case

408

Beef production options and requirements for fossil fuel  

SciTech Connect

A large percentage of the feed resources used in beef production cannot be used by man or most other animals. These noncompetitive feeds could be used in different ways to increase beef production, but fossil fuel consumption by the beef industry would not be greatly reduced.

Ward, G.M.; Knox, P.L.; Hobson, B.W.

1977-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

409

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Near-Zero Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Project No.: DE-NT0005341 Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment. Praxair Inc. will develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing coal-fired power plants retrofit with oxy-combustion technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and mercury (Hg) will be reduced by at least 99 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions will be reduced by greater than 90 percent without the need for wet flue gas desulfurization and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Two separate processes are proposed depending on the sulfur content of the coal. For high-sulfur coal, SO2 and NOx will be recovered as product sulfuric acid and nitric acid, respectively, and Hg will be recovered as

410

Figure 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices Prices, 1949-2011 Fossil Fuel Composite Price, Change From Previous Year, 1950-2011 68 U.S. Energy Information ...

411

Implications of Limiting CO2 Concentrations for Land Use and Energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the first to simultaneously examine the implications of extending the concept of placing a value on carbon beyond fossil fuel and industrial emissions to all sources, including those associated with land use and land use change. The paper reports a variety of results that have bearing on recent discussions in the literature regarding the role of bioenergy and the indirect emission of carbon through land-use change as well as the burgeoning literature on interactions between bioenergy and crop prices. This paper goes beyond results currently in the literature by using an integrated assessment model to assess energy use and supply, atmospheric composition, land use, and terrestrial carbon in the context of limiting the concentration of atmospheric CO2. We find that when the concept of valuing carbon emissions is extended to all carbon emissions, regardless of origin, that in contrast to a mitigation scenario where only fossil fuel and industrial carbon emissions are valued, deforestation is replaced by afforestation and expanded unmanaged ecosystems; the cost of limiting CO2 concentrations falls; crop prices rise; and human diets are transformed as people shift away from consumption of beef and other carbon-intensive protein sources. The increase in crop prices flows directly from the consideration of land-use change emissions in a comprehensive emissions mitigation program and occurs even in the absence of the use of purpose-grown bioenergy. Finally, we find that the assumed rate of improvement in food and fiber crop productivity (e.g. wheat, rice, corn) has a strong influence on land-use change emissions, making the technology for growing crops potentially as important for limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations as energy technologies such as CO2 capture and storage.

Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Sands, Ronald D.; Smith, Steven J.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Edmonds, James A.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Comparative analysis of monetary estimates of external environmental costs associated with combustion of fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect

Public utility commissions in a number of states have begun to explicitly treat costs of environmental externalities in the resource planning and acquisition process (Cohen et al. 1990). This paper compares ten different estimates and regulatory determinations of external environmental costs associated with fossil fuel combustion, using consistent assumptions about combustion efficiency, emissions factors, and resource costs. This consistent comparison is useful because it makes explicit the effects of various assumptions. This paper uses the results of the comparison to illustrate pitfalls in calculation of external environmental costs, and to derive lessons for design of policies to incorporate these externalities into resource planning. 38 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Koomey, J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Commerce study looks at cost of pollution control for fossil-fuel power industry  

SciTech Connect

Environmental controls for fossil-fuel power plants consumed 1.3 percent of the national fuel used in 1974, with the largest demand going for sulfur dioxide emission control. Projections for power plant consumption to meet environmental standards range as high as eight percent in the 1980s. Less-energy-consuming systems include coal blending, tall stacks, and supplementary control systems; while high consumers are using coal washing operations in place of scrubbers, fuel transportation, conversion to acceptable fuels, waste heat disposal, and particulate controls. A summary table presents sulfur dioxide regulations in terms of their goals and their anticipated minimum and maximum fuel consumption. (DCK)

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

An Integrated Approach for Oxy-fuel Combustion with CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ottawa The capture and storage or reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the combustion of fossil fuels as well as industrial off gases represents an opportunity to achieve a...

415

Microsoft PowerPoint - ECUST Centered Cooperative research efforts to reduce CO2 emission.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research efforts research efforts d CO i i to reduce CO 2 emission Shan Shan- -Tung Tung Tu Tu East China University of Science and Technology East China University of Science and Technology sttu@ecust.edu.cn 30 30 th th of May, 2008 of May, 2008 P f Y Ji KTH d MdU (CCS) Prof. Yan Jinyue, KTH and MdU (CCS) Prof. Dahlquist Erik, MdU (BL Gasification) Prof Jin Hongguan CAS (Energy systems) Prof. Jin Hongguan, CAS (Energy systems) Prof. Liu Honglai, ECUST (Physic chemistry) Prof. Wang Fucheng, ECUST (Coal Gasification) g g, ( ) Prof. Ling Licheng, ECUST (Carbon materials) Profs. Yan Yongjie and Bao Jie, ECUST (Biomass) A/Prof. Yu Xinhai, ECUST (Biodiesel) China China- -Sweden Program Sweden Program Fundamental studies of thermophysical sciences

416

Technological prospects and CO2 emission trading analyses in the iron and steel industry: A global model Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents the Iron and Steel Industry Model (ISIM). This is a world simulation model able to analyze the evolution of the industry from 1997 to 2030, focusing on steel production, demand, trade, energy consumption, CO2 emissions, technology dynamics, and retrofitting options. In the context of the Kyoto Protocol on climate change, the potential impacts of a CO2 emission market (e.g. the gains in terms of compliance costs, the country trading position, the evolution of the technology and the energy mixes) are also addressed. In particular, three emission trading scenarios are considered: an EU15 market, an enlarged EU market, and an Annex B market.

Ignacio Hidalgo; Laszlo Szabo; Juan Carlos Ciscar; Antonio Soria

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

SciTech Connect

Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption behind sectoral emissions, responsible for 2533 Mt CO2 and 321 Mt CO{sub 2}, respec

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Analysis of Strategies for Multiple Emissions from Electric Power SO2, NOX, CO2, Mercury and RPS  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

At the request of the Subcommittee, EIA prepared an initial report that focused on the impacts of reducing power sector NOx, SO2, andCO2 emissions.2 The current report extends the earlier analysis to add the impacts of reducing power sector Hg emissions and introducing RPS requirements.

J. Alan Beamon

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrialized societies which continue to use fossil fuel energy sources are considering adoption of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology to meet carbon emission reduction targets. Deep geological storage of CO2 onshore faces opposition regarding potential health effects of CO2 leakage from storage sites. There is no experience of commercial scale CCS with which to verify predicted risks of engineered storage failure. Studying risk from natural CO2 seeps can guide assessment of potential health risks from leaking onshore CO2 stores. Italy and Sicily are regions of intense natural CO2 degassing from surface seeps. These seeps exhibit a variety of expressions, characteristics (e.g., temperature/ flux), and location environments. Here we quantify historical fatalities from CO2 poisoning using a database of 286 natural CO2 seeps in Italy and Sicily. We find that risk of human death is strongly influenced by seep surface expression, local conditions (e.g., topography and wind speed), CO2 flux, and human behavior. Risk of accidental human death from these CO2 seeps is calculated to be 10-8 year-1 to the exposed population. This value is significantly lower than that of many socially accepted risks. Seepage from future storage sites is modeled to be less than Italian natural flux rates. With appropriate hazard management, health risks from unplanned seepage at onshore storage sites can be adequately minimized.

Roberts, J.J.; Wood, R.A.; Haszeldine, R.S. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage, School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JW, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

US fossil fuel technologies for Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has been encouraging other countries to consider US coal and coal technologies in meeting their future energy needs. Thailand is one of three developing countries determined to be a potentially favorable market for such exports. This report briefly profiles Thailand with respect to population, employment, energy infrastructure and policies, as well as financial, economic, and trade issues. Thailand is shifting from a traditionally agrarian economy to one based more strongly on light manufacturing and will therefore require increased energy resources that are reliable and flexible in responding to anticipated growth. Thailand has extensive lignite deposits that could fuel a variety of coal-based technologies. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors could utilize this resource and still permit Thailand to meet emission standards for sulfur dioxide. This option also lends itself to small-scale applications suitable for private-sector power generation. Slagging combustors and coal-water mixtures also appear to have potential. Both new construction and refurbishment of existing plants are planned. 18 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Buehring, W.A.; Dials, G.E.; Gillette, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.; Traczyk, P.A.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Emission Cuts Realities Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Temperature Fossil Fuel Energy System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Adaptable Sensor Packaging for High Temperature Fossil Fuel Energy Systems Background The Advanced Research Sensors and Controls Program is leading the effort to develop sensing and control technologies and methods to achieve automated and optimized intelligent power systems. The program is led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and is implemented through research and development agreements with other

424

Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility and initial development of an integrated, deterministic model of the various processes governing deposition in fossil boilers was assessed in the following Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reports: 1004931, Boiler Water Deposition Model: Part 1: Feasibility Study, published in 2004; 1012207, Boiler Water Deposition Model for Fossil Fuel Plants, Part 2: Initial Deterministic Model Development and Deposit Characterization, published in 2007; 1014128, Boiler Water Deposition Model fo...

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

425

Justification of Simulators for Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cost benefit analysis of simulator use at fossil fuel power plants identifies benefits in four categories: availability savings, thermal performance savings, component life savings, and environmental compliance savings. The study shows that a 500 MW plant, over 15 years, can realize a total present value saving of over $24 million, easily justifying the purchase of a simulator that typically costs about $600,000.

1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Decommissioning Process for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a staged process for the decommissioning and possible demolition of fossil-fueled power generating facilities. Drawn from experience with power and major industrial facilities, the report provides the owner/operator of a plant that is approaching the end of its useful life with an overview of the key elements necessary to successfully implement decommissioning. The process is applicable to full decommissioning, demolition, and closure; to partial scenarios (that is, partial dismantl...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Review of Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO2 emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This paper is an initial effort to compile the available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO2 emissions. This paper consolidates available information on eighteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

Hasanbeigi, A.; Price, L.; Lin, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Twenty-First-Century Compatible CO2 Emissions and Airborne Fraction Simulated by CMIP5 Earth System Models under Four Representative Concentration Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carbon cycle is a crucial Earth system component affecting climate and atmospheric composition. The response of natural carbon uptake to CO2 and climate change will determine anthropogenic emissions compatible with a target CO2 pathway. For ...

Chris Jones; Eddy Robertson; Vivek Arora; Pierre Friedlingstein; Elena Shevliakova; Laurent Bopp; Victor Brovkin; Tomohiro Hajima; Etsushi Kato; Michio Kawamiya; Spencer Liddicoat; Keith Lindsay; Christian H. Reick; Caroline Roelandt; Joachim Segschneider; Jerry Tjiputra

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Novel High Capacity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost CO2 Capture Novel High Capacity Oligomers for Low Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005310 GE Global Research is using both computational and laboratory methods to identify and produce novel oligomeric solvents for the post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). An oligomer is a polymer with relatively few structural units. Molecular and system modeling, advanced synthetic methods, and laboratory testing will be used to identify oligomeric solvents that have the potential for high CO2 capture capacity with corresponding low regeneration energy requirements. GE Global Test Equipment GE Global Test Equipment Related Papers and Publications: Aminosilicone Solvents for Low Cost CO2 Capture [PDF-2.0MB] (Sept 2010) Presentation given at the 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting

431

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Carbon Dioxide Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission...

432

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

U.S. energy-related CO 2 emissions in 2013 expected to be ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. ... Once all data are in, energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) ...

434

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Flue Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SOx NOx Reactions During Compression of CO2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion Project No.: DE-NT0005309 Air Products and Chemicals Inc. will...

435

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

75 Figure 60 Planned HVDC Projects inmine-mouth generation with HVDC by 2062 Mtce 4393 Mt CO 2intermittency. Figure 60 Planned HVDC Projects in China

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Alstom?s...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alstoms Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO2 Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005286 Alstom chemical looping cold flow model....

437

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Development of Novel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO2 Capture Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-NT0005578 SRI International will develop a novel, high-capacity, carbon-based carbon dioxide (CO2) sorbent with moderate thermal requirements for regeneration. In the proposed process, CO2 is absorbed in a bed of carbon sorbent pellets and desorbed in a separate reactor that regenerates the sorbent and cycles it back to the absorber. The flue gas stream is cooled in a direct contact cooler (DCC) to decrease its temperature to near ambient conditions. The cooled flue gas from the DCC passes through the sorbent contained in a moving bed reactor, where CO2 is removed by adsorption. The CO2-laden sorbent is transported to a second moving bed reactor, where it is indirectly heated by steam coils to desorb the CO2. Project objectives are to validate the performance of the carbon-based sorbent concept on a bench-scale system, to perform parametric experiments to determine optimum operating conditions, and to evaluate the technical and economic viability of the technology.

438

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Evaluation of Solid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004343 ADA-ES Inc. is refining the conceptual design of a commercial solid sorbent-based, post-combustion CO2 capture technology through slipstream pilot testing and process modeling. A pilot unit (~1 MW) will be designed and constructed to demonstrate solid sorbent-based CO2 capture on actual flue gas. The pilot tests and process modeling will provide the information necessary to complete a techno-economic analysis of the technology. The design will be based on a 1 kW-scale transport reactor system built and demonstrated under an existing DOE/NETL CO2 capture project (Figure). There are several advantages solids offer over aqueous MEA. For example, solids have a working capacity over two times that of MEA, by weight, leading to lower regeneration energy attributable to less material to heat. The increased capacity, in conjunction with the lower heat capacity, results in a theoretical regeneration energy approximately half that of MEA, per kg of CO2. This indicates that solids can dramatically reduce the energy requirements for CO2 capture compared to aqueous systems. In addition, circulating less material in a solid-based system compared to aqueous MEA will likely lead to lower pressure drop, depending on the system configuration. Also, solids have the potential to be less corrosive than the solution used in aqueous MEA systems.

439

Synthetic fossil fuel technologies: health problems and intersociety cooperation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential health impacts of synthetic fossil fuel products are considered mainly in terms of complex and potentially carcinogenic mixtures of polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds. These components of oils and tars present an especially perplexing range of problems to those concerned with health protection. The nature of these problems, such as multifactorial exposure, are discussed within a framework of current and future standards to regulate human exposure. Some activities of government agencies, national laboratories, and professional societies are described. A case can be made for pooling the resources of these groups to achieve better solutions for assessing the acceptability of the various technologies and safeguarding human health.

Gammage, R B; Turner, J E

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

carbon dioxide emissions, total greenhouse gas emissions, sector-specific emissions, and emissions by fuel type. Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels, principally petroleum,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

442

Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nations energy security through more effective utilization of our countrys resources while simultaneously providing economic stability and growth (through predictable energy prices and high value jobs), in an environmentally sustainable and secure manner (through lower land and water use, and decreased byproduct emissions). The reduction in imported oil will also increase the retention of wealth within the U.S. economy while still supporting economic growth. Nuclear energy is the only non-fossil fuel that has been demonstrated to reliably supply energy for a growing industrial economy.

David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

carbon emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity carbon emissions energy demand Energy Generation fossil fuels GHG emissions UK Data applicationvnd.openxmlformats-office...

444

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionic Liquids Ionic Liquids Project No.: FC26-07NT43091 Model of CO2 absorption by an ionic liquid. Model of CO2 absorption by an IL. The model shows that the anions are controlling absorption in ILs. The green units represent anions and the grey units represent cations. The University of Notre Dame is conducting the Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture project (FC26-07NT43091), that builds on the work of its earlier project (FG26-04NT42122), to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the feasibility of using a novel class of compounds - ionic liquids (ILs) - for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Initial efforts focused on "proof-of-concept" exploration, followed by a laboratory-/bench-scale effort. ILs include a broad category

445

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Dry Regenerable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Regenerable Sorbents Dry Regenerable Sorbents Project No.: FC26-07NT43089 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Schematic of RTI’s Dry Carbonate Process Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International completed two projects, NT43089 and NT40923, to investigate the use of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3 or soda ash) as an inexpensive, dry, and regenerable sorbent for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in the Dry Carbonate Process. In this process, Na2CO3 reacts with CO2 and water to form sodium bicarbonate at the temperature of the flue gas exhaust; the sorbent is then regenerated at modest temperatures (~120°C) to yield a concentrated stream of CO2 for sequestration or other use. The regenerated sorbent is recycled to the absorption step for subsequent CO2 capture. See schematic of RTI's Dry Carbonate Process.

446

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. Three cement output projections are developed based onthese three production projections, energy savings and CO2have been a number of projections of Chinas future cement

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Membrane Process to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Project No.: DE-NT0005312 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE MTR membrane test skid. Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) Inc. is preparing commercial-scale membrane modules that meet low pressure-drop and high packing-density performance targets using carbon dioxide (CO2) capture membranes developed under FC26-07NT43085, a previous MTR project with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. These thin-film membranes utilize Pebax® polyether-polyamide copolymers. The new research will involve the construction of an approximately 1 ton of CO2 per day capacity membrane skid for use in a six-month pilot-scale field test using a slip-stream of flue gas from a coal-fired power plant.

448

The Future Trajectory of US CO2 Emissions: The Role of State vs. Aggregate Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998, World carbon dioxide emissions 1950 - 2050, Review ofof us greenhouse gas emissions and sinks:1990 - 2001, EPAper capita carbon dioxide emissions, Harvard Department of

Auffhammer, Maximilian; Steinhauser, Ralf

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Table 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual ... excluding freight or shipping and insurance costs. ... 4 Derived by multiplying the price per Btu of each fossil fuel by the ...

450

June 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US Dept...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fossil Fuels Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), reported by ACI Committee 229 Rajendran, N. (1997) 78 EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER...

451

Table 3.7 Value of Fossil Fuel Imports, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 3.7 Value of Fossil Fuel Imports, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars) Year: Coal: Coal Coke: Natural Gas: Crude Oil 1: Petroleum ... Office of Fossil Energy.

452

Japan is the second largest net importer of fossil fuels in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Japan ranked as the second largest net importer of fossil fuels in the world in 2012, trailing only China. This follows the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, after ...

453

Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011: Fiscal Year 7: Crude Oil and Lease Condensate

454

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)

455

Projection of world fossil fuel production with supply and demand interactions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research Doctorate - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Historically, fossil fuels have been vital for our global energy needs. However climate change is prompting renewed interest (more)

Mohr, Steve

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on simulations of CO2 concentrations, the model could be used for other atmospheric compounds with known estimated emissions.

Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Project No.: FC26-02NT41440 Pilot Plant at the University of Texas Pilot Plant at the University of Texas The University of Texas at Austin investigated an improved process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption that uses an alternative solvent, aqueous potassium carbonate (K2CO3) promoted by piperazine (PZ). If successful, this process would use less energy for CO2 capture than the conventional monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing process. An improved capture system would mean a relative improvement in overall power plant efficiency. The project developed models to predict the performance of absorption/stripping of CO2 using the improved solvent and perform a pilot plant study to validate the process models and define the range of feasible

458

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Slipstream Testing of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of a Membrane CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Testing of a Membrane CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Project No.: DE-FE0005795 MTRs high-permeance membranes MTRs high-permeance membranes Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) is scaling-up their high-permeance membrane and process design. MTR will design and construct a 1 MW equivalent capacity membrane skid. This proof-of-concept system will undergo a six-month slipstream field test at a coal-fired power plant. Field test data and membrane performance data obtained at the National Carbon Capture Center will allow a thorough techno-economic evaluation of the membrane capture process and will clarify the relative potential of the approach. The MTR capture process has two significant advantages over the previous application of membranes to CO2 removal from flue gas. First, the newly

459

Constraining the Ratio of Global Warming to Cumulative CO2 Emissions Using CMIP5 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenarios and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Constraining the ratio of global warming to cumulative CO2 emissions using CMIP5 simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenario, and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fossil-fuel co2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Evaluation of Solid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005649 ADA-ES Sorbent Test Equipment. ADA-ES Sorbent Test Equipment. ADA-ES Inc. is developing and scaling-up a sorbent-based, post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2 ) capture process. Investigators are evaluating the performance of sorbents from laboratory- to bench-scale. Various sorbents are being screened in a fixed-bed contactor in the laboratory on simulated flue gas, as well as in the field on actual flue gas. Bench-scale tests are being performed on slip-streams of simulated and actual flue gas with a moving-bed reactor large enough to treat flue gas containing nominally 1 tons of CO2 per day (~100 acfm). The criteria for optimal sorbents will

462

Does the CO2 emission trading directive threaten the competitiveness of European industry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, gas and water; non-metallic minerals; iron and steel; petroleum refining, coke and nuclear fuel industry refining, coke and nuclear fuels chemicals machinery and equipement, N.E.C. textile, textile sector, the loss in turnover is then the higher, the higher the four items below: 1. the cost of CO2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

463

SPECIAL REPORT 298: EFFECTS OF LAND DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS ON MOTORIZED TRAVEL, ENERGY, AND CO2 EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPECIAL REPORT 298: EFFECTS OF LAND DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS ON MOTORIZED TRAVEL, ENERGY, AND CO2 by significant fuel economy legislation, energy taxes, household-level carbon budgets, and cooperative behavior alternative to gasoline and diesel, achieving significant GHG and petroleum savings. However, biofuels

Kockelman, Kara M.

464

Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures Tailoring the Properties of Magnetic Nanostructures X-ray Holograms Expose Secret Magnetism How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Tracking the Origins of Fossil Fuels MAY 29, 2007 Bookmark and Share S-XANES absorbance and third derivative absorbance edge spectra of Duvernay (A) Type II kerogen and the results of curve fits using spectra from model compounds. Notice that sharp features appear in the thrid derivative spectrum that are easily associated with FeS2, aliphatic sulfur and

465

Formulating Energy Policies Related to Fossil Fuel Use:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONF-9 O O 255 --I CONF-9 O O 255 --I DE90 008741 Formulating Energy Policies Related to Fossil Fuel Use: i Critical Uncertainties in the Global Carbon Cycle. W. M. Post, V. H. Dale, D. L. DeAngelis, L. K. Mann, P. J. Mulholland, R. V. O'Neill, T. -H. Peng, M. P. Farrell Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Post Office Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 The global carbon cycle is the dynamic interaction among the earth's carbon sources and sinks. Understanding the global carbon cycle requires knowledge of the carbon exchanges between major carbon reservoirs by various chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes (Bolin et al., 1979; Rosenberg, 1981; and Solomon et al., 1985). Four reservoirs can be identified, including the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere (usually

466

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; R.D. Carneim; P.F. Becher; C-H. Hsueh; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Aromatic nitrogen compounds in fossil fuels: a potential hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve energy independence in the United States, converting coal to oil or extracting oil from shale will be required. Before commercial scale fossil fuel conversion facilities become a reality, chemical and biological studies of currently available synfuel samples derived from coal or shale are urgently needed in order to determine what the potential health problems, such as from occupational exposure, might be. Aromatic nitrogen compounds such as basic aza-arenes, neutral aza-arenes, and aromatic amines are considered environmentally important and several members of these classes of compounds possess biological activity. For example, dibenz(a,h)acridine, 7 H-dibenzo(c,g)carbazole, and 2-naphthylamine, are well known as carcinogens. The methods used to isolate the basic aromatic nitrogen compounds and neutral aza-arenes from one shale oil and one coal-derived oil are discussed. The mutagenic activities of these fractions, based on the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test, are compared.

Ho, C H; Clark, B R; Guerin, M R; Ma, C Y; Rao, T K

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fossil fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the capital and operating costs for fossil fuel-fired peak heating systems in geothermally (direct use) heated greenhouses. Issues covered include equipment capital costs, fuel requirements, maintenance and operating costs, system control and integration into conventional hot water greenhouse heating systems. Annual costs per square foot of greenhouse floor area are developed for three climates: Helena, MT; Klamath Falls, OR and San Bernardino, CA, for both boiler and individual unit heater peaking systems. In most applications, peaking systems sized for 60% of the peak load are able to satisfy over 95% of the annual heating requirements and cost less than $0.15 per square foot per year to operate. The propane-fired boiler system has the least cost of operation in all but Helena, MT climate.

Rafferty, K.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

471

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions. The model uses generation dispatch algorithms, efficiency levels, and capacity factors

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels biofuels, such as wood, manure, dung, and other solid biomass used for home heating and cooking in many

473

Hydrogen Separation Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eltron Research and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This project was motivated by the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. The proposed technology addresses the DOE Vision 21 initiative in two ways. First, this process offers a relatively inexpensive solution for pure hydrogen separation that can be easily incorporated into Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Second, this process could reduce the cost of hydrogen, which is a clean burning fuel under increasing demand as supporting technologies are developed for hydrogen utilization and storage. Additional motivation for this project arises from the potential of this technology for other applications. By appropriately changing the catalysts coupled with the membrane, essentially the same system can be used to facilitate alkane dehydrogenation and coupling, aromatics processing, and hydrogen sulfide decomposition.

Roark, Shane E.; Mackay, Richard; Sammells, Anthony F.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

474

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 This paper was prepared in response to recent requests that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) provide updated summary information regarding fossil fuel production on federal and Indian lands in the United States. It provides EIA's current best estimates of fossil fuels sales from production on federal and Indian lands for fiscal year 2003 through 2011. eia-federallandsales.pdf More Documents & Publications Testimony Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources Before the House Natural Resources Committee Before the Energy and Power Subcommittee - House Energy and Commerce

475

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Development and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Evaluation of a Novel Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process Development and Evaluation of a Novel Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process Project No.: DE-NT0005498 ISGS solvent cartoon. ISGS solvent cartoon. The Illinois State Geological Survey is developing an integrated vacuum carbonate absorption process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. This process employs potassium carbonate solution as a solvent that can be integrated with the power plant steam cycle by using low-quality steam. Researchers will confirm IVCAP process parameters through laboratory testing, identify an effective catalyst for accelerating CO2 absorption rates, and develop an additive for reducing regeneration energy. Related Papers and Publications: Development and Evaluation of a Novel Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process [PDF-1.5MB] (July 2012)

476

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Project No.: FG02-04ER83925 SBIR CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge [6" (D) X 17" (L)] Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. developed and tested a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal system for flue gas streams from large point sources that offers improved mass transfer rates compared to conventional technologies. The project fabricated perfluorinated membranes on hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane contactors, demonstrated CO2 removal from a simulated flue gas mixture via amine absorption using the fabricated membranes, examine chemical compatibility of the membrane with amines, and demonstrate enhanced stability of the perfluoro-coated membranes. In addition, an economic analysis was performed to demonstrate that the perfluoro-coated

477

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Project No.: FG02-04ER83885 SBIR Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. has completed a small business innovative research (SBIR) project that initiated development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion flue gas. The primary goal of this project wa s to develop a process using a supported amine for CO2 capture that exhibits better system efficiency, lower cost, and less corrosion than current aqueous amine-based processes. The project was to demonstrate performance of carbon-supported amine sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. Three tasks were undertaken:

478

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - OTM-Based Oxycombustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OTM-Based Oxycombustion for CO2 Recovery OTM-Based Oxycombustion for CO2 Recovery Project No.: FC26-01NT41147 & FC26-07NT43088 Praxair Advanced Boiler Praxair Advanced Boiler Praxair, Inc. will conduct two projects to develop and demonstrate the integration of a novel, ceramic oxygen transport membrane (OTM) with the combustion process to enhance boiler efficiency. The economics of oxy-combustion processes are currently limited by the parasitic power required for oxygen (O2) production using cryogenic air separation units (ASU). OTMs can be integrated such that there is minimal need for air compression and the parasitic power consumption required for O2 production is reduced by 70 to 80 percent as compared to a cryogenic ASU. Praxair will design, construct, and operate a bench-scale OTM at the

479

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions are allocated to that sector accordingly. Biogas.The majority of biogas consumed in China is from rural

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z