Sample records for fort mojave indian

  1. Renewable Energy Development on Fort Mojave Reservation Feasiblity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell Gum, ERCC analytics LLC

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ft. Mojave tribe, whose reservation is located along the Colorado River in the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada near the point where all three states meet, has a need for increased energy supplies. This need is a direct result of the aggressive and successful economic development projects undertaken by the tribe in the last decade. While it is possible to contract for additional energy supplies from fossil fuel sources it was the desire of the tribal power company, AHA MACAV Power Service (AMPS) to investigate the feasibility and desirability of producing power from renewable sources as an alternative to increased purchase of fossil fuel generated power and as a possible enterprise to export green power. Renewable energy generated on the reservation would serve to reduce the energy dependence of the tribal enterprises on off reservation sources of energy and if produced in excess of reservation needs, add a new enterprise to the current mix of economic activities on the reservation. Renewable energy development would also demonstrate the tribe’s support for improving environmental quality, sustainability, and energy independence both on the reservation and for the larger community.

  2. Geothermal Direct Use Feasibility Study on the Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Merrick

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation (FBIR) is rich in renewable energy resources. Development of its geothermal resources has the potential to profoundly affect the energy and economic future of the FBIC. Geothermal energy can contribute to making the reservation energy self-sufficient and, potentially, an energy exporter. The feasibility study assessed the feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating system to provide low-cost, efficient heating of existing and planned residences, community buildings and water, using an existing geothermal well, FB-3.

  3. MOJAVE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing |PrepareMOJAVE MOJAVE MOJAVE MOJAVE MOJAVE

  4. Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa...

  5. Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

    1980-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater aquifer. While beneficial uses may be found for these geothermal fluids, even higher temperatures (in excess of 260 F) may be found directly beneath the town of Poplar and the new residential development which is being planned in the area. This project is primarily concerned with the use of geothermal energy for space heating and domestic hot water for the town of Poplar (Figure 2 and Photograph 1) and a new residential development of 250 homes which is planned for an area approximately 4 miles east of Poplar along U.S. Route 2 (Figure 2 and Photograph 2). A number of alternative engineering design approaches have been evaluated, and the cost of these systems has been compared to existing and expected heating costs.

  6. EA-1798: Abengoa Solar's Mojave Solar Project near Barstow, CA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Abengoa Solar's Mojave Solar Project near Barstow, CA July 1, 2011 EA-1798: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Mojave Solar, LLC for the Abengoa Mojave Solar...

  7. World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave April 16, 2010 - 4:47pm Addthis A California company will harness the...

  8. Fort Carson Sustainability Journey

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORT CARSON - ENERGY RELIABILITY AND SECURITY SPIDERS PH2 Microgrid pilot site Power to critical facilities during grid outage Ties several facilities together ...

  9. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Fort Calhoun

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fort Calhoun" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  10. Dating The Pinto Occupation at Rogers Ridge: A Fossil Spring Site in the Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Dennis L

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tiefort Basin, Fort Irwin, California. Salinas, CA: CoyoteBasin, Fort Irwin, California, by Dennis L. Jenkins, Appendix F. Salinas,

  11. Water resource opportunity assessment: Fort Dix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Hostick, D.J.; Elliott, D.B.; Fitzpatrick, Q.K.; Dahowski, R.T.; Dison, D.R

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the water resource opportunity assessments performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Fort Dix facility located in Fort Dix, New Jersey.

  12. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  13. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  14. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

  15. FORT UNION DEEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

  16. Optical Spectroscopic ATLAS of the MOJAVE/2cm AGN Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrealba, Janet; Cruz-González, Irene; Arshakian, Tigran G; Bertone, Emanuele; Rosa-González, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an optical spectroscopic atlas at intermediate resolution (8 -15 A) for 124 core-dominated radio-loud active galactic nuclei with relativistic jets, drawn from the MOJAVE/2cm sample at 15GHz. It is the first time that spectroscopic and photometric parameters for a large sample of such type of AGN are presented. The atlas includes spectral parameters for the emission lines Hbeta, [O III] 5007, Mg II 2798 and/or C IV 1549 and corresponding data for the continuum, as well as the luminosities and equivalent widths of the Fe II UV/optical. It also contains the homogeneous photometric information in the B-band for 242 sources of the sample, with a distribution peak at BJ=18.0 and a magnitude interval of 11.1< BJ <23.7.

  17. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Fort Calhoun

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in DelawareTotal Consumption (MillionYeartotalFort

  18. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

  19. United States Army; Fort Gordon, Georgia, Range Control Operations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (DPTMS), Page 10 2.5 Chief-Training Division, DPTMS, Page 10 2.6 Fort Gordon Range Control Operations, Page 10 2.7 Fort Gordon Installation Range Manager, Page 10 2.8 Fort...

  20. EECBG Success Story: Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library EECBG Success Story: Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 9:53am Addthis Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing...

  1. Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing tremendous...

  2. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  3. Energy Department Recognizes Fort Worth for Leadership in Advancing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fort Worth for Leadership in Advancing Energy Efficiency Energy Department Recognizes Fort Worth for Leadership in Advancing Energy Efficiency April 14, 2015 - 10:04am Addthis NEWS...

  4. City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October 2011 The City of Fort Collins provided comments to the Department of Energy's notice of intent to...

  5. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  6. Fort Loudoun Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer ElectricFort BelknapFortFort

  7. Fort Valley Utility Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer ElectricFortFort PierceFort

  8. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  9. Fort Collins Utilities- Home Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fort Collins Utilities (FCU) provides rebates for customers living in existing single-family homes who pursue energy efficiency projects. Either the Efficiency Audit or Efficiency Audit Plus is a...

  10. fort hood range revegetation Located on the northern edge of the Texas Hill Country, Fort Hood Military

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Service (NRCS) and Fort Hood's Integrated Training Area Management (ITAM) and Directorate

  11. FORTE spacecraft vibration mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maly, J.R.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work that was performed by CSA Engineering, Inc., for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to reduce vibrations of the FORTE spacecraft by retrofitting damped structural components into the spacecraft structure. The technical objective of the work was reduction of response at the location of payload components when the structure is subjected to the dynamic loading associated with launch and proto-qualification testing. FORTE is a small satellite that will be placed in orbit in 1996. The structure weighs approximately 425 lb, and is roughly 80 inches high and 40 inches in diameter. It was developed and built by LANL in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque for the United States Department of Energy. The FORTE primary structure was fabricated primarily with graphite epoxy, using aluminum honeycomb core material for equipment decks and solar panel substrates. Equipment decks were bonded and bolted through aluminum mounting blocks to adjoining structure.

  12. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Brian K.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Sill, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Sill took place on June 10, 2010.

  13. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Polk, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Boyd, Brian K.; Horner, Jacob A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Orrell, Alice C.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Polk, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Polk took place on February 16, 2010.

  14. Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer ElectricFort BelknapFort

  15. Fort Pierce Utilities Auth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer ElectricFortFort Pierce

  16. Tools from the French and Indian War sloop Boscawen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, David Mitchell

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996 Major Subject: Anthropology TOOLS FROM THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR SLOOP 80SCA 8XW A Thesis by DAVID MITCHELL GRANT Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulgllment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS Approved.... . . . , Tools and Blacksmithing Equipment Sent to Crown Point . . . . 67 68 69 70 Tools Sent from Fort George to Crown Point. 72 British Axe Suppliers from the Mid-Eighteenth Century . . . . . 125 Tools Recovered &om the Boscawen. 139 CHAPTER I...

  17. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The project at Cove FortSulphurdale in Utah, T26S R67W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale...

  18. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The project at Cove FortSulphurdale in Utah, T26S R67W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale...

  19. Fort Pierce Utilities Authority- Solar Water Heating Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has completed its rebate program for 2015. Check the website for updates.

  20. Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

  1. 1490 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1490

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or coauthored over 100 articles for various journals and publications. In his spare time, Dr. Allen is an active he discusses the efforts being made to document the flora of Fort Polk, and by publishing articles concerning the flora of Fort Polk in academic journals each year. His work at Fort Polk has given

  2. Process Optimization Assessments at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and Fort Carson, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, M.; Vavrin, J.; Smith, W.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process Optimization Assessments at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and Fort Carson, Colorado Mike C.J. Lin U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research Development Center, Construction Engineering Research Laboratory Champaign, Illinois... a specific Level II scope of work, respective roles, and the most expeditious path forward. This begins with a formal review of this report, combined with a planning session to organize the Level II program. REFERENCES 1. Lin, Mike C.J., et...

  3. Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel,Moe Wind Farm JumpMojave

  4. Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel,Moe Wind Farm JumpMojaveII

  5. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  6. Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (Indian Council of Agricultural Research)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    #12;Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), Library Avenue, Pusa, New Delhi-110012 : July 2011 All Rights Reserved 2011, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), New Delhi

  7. Process Optimization Assessments at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and Fort Carson, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, M.; Vavrin, J.; Smith, W.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for process energy efficiency improvements and reductions of pollutant emissions at Fort Leonard Wood and Fort Carson, using the process energy and pollution reduction (PEPR) methodology and the process optimization guide, both of which are tools developed.../CERL Technical Report, TR- 03-8, April 2003. 3. Lin, Mike C.J., et al. "Process Energy and Pollution Reduction (PEPR) Level I Review at the Watervliet Arsenal, New York" USACERL Technical Report 99/92, November 1999. 4. Lin, Mike C.J., Walter Smith...

  8. Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  9. Contrasting Eruption Styles Of The 147 Kimberlite, Fort A La...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contrasting Eruption Styles Of The 147 Kimberlite, Fort A La Corne, Saskatchewan, Canada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  10. acid pit fort: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at DallasFort Worth International Airport Jerry R. Dennis, CEM, CEP Energy Manager October 9, 2013 Energy Management Practices at DFW Airport, October 9, 2013 Presentation...

  11. Fort Pierce Utilities Authority- Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Fort Pierce Utilities Authority has suspended the Solar Water Heating rebate program until 2013. Contact the utility for more information on these offerings.'''''

  12. Fort Totten Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,dataset nameFort BendLupton,Totten

  13. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohweller, D.J. [Astro Aerospace Corp., Carpinteria, CA (United States); Butler, T.Af. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  14. Fort Payne Improvement Auth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer ElectricFort

  15. Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAdd aNorthFort Bliss

  16. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  17. SPIDERS Phase 2 Fort Carson Technology Transition Consolidated Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final program public report for phase 2 summarizes the key outcomes generated during the second phase of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD), which was implemented at Fort Carson, Colorado, during 2013-2014. The public demonstration of the technology at Fort Carson was completed in April 2014.

  18. Large-magnitude miocene extension in the central Mojave Desert: Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary paleogeography and tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, J. Douglas; Bartley, John M.; Glazner, Allen F.

    1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ., and D. J. DePaolo, Proterozoic crustal history of the western United States as determined by neodymium isotopic mapping, Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 99, 674-685, 1987. Bowen, O. E., Geology and mineral deposits of the Barstow Quadrangle, San Bernardino... County, California, Bull. 165, 208 pp., Div. of Mines, Calif. Dep. of Nat. Resour., Sacramento, 1954. Burchfiel, B.C., and G. A. Davis, Mojave Desert and environs, in The Geotectonic Development of California, edited by W. G. Ernst, pp. 217...

  19. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY INVITATION Description of work Estimated cost (1) (2) (3) 1 Construction of Institutional/Residential buildings, external development, HVAC, Elevators etc. for Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, at the campus

  20. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.; Markel, T.; Simpson, M.; Leahey, J.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Lisell, L.; Burman, K.; Singer, M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army's Fort Carson installation was selected to serve as a prototype for net zero energy assessment and planning. NREL performed the comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of Fort Carson to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. This study is part of a larger cross-laboratory effort that also includes an assessment of renewable opportunities at seven other DoD Front Range installations, a microgrid design for Fort Carson critical loads and an assessment of regulatory and market-based barriers to a regional secure smart grid.

  1. U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NO. DACA45-1-07-6037 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY LEASE FORT CARSON MILITARY INSTALLATION EL PAS0 COUNTY, COLORADO THIS LEASE, made on behalf of the United States, between the SECRETARY...

  2. U.S. Army Fort Carson Environmental Document

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this Finding of Suitability to Lease (FOSL) is to document the environmental suitability of property at Fort Carson, Colorado, for leasing and...

  3. Fort Pierce Utilities Authority- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fort Pierce Utilities Authority offers a variety of incentives for their residential customers to save energy in their homes. Rebates are available for room A/C units, insulation upgrades, central...

  4. area fort calhoun: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the laundry operation and the DOL maintenance complex with specific focus on paintingmedia blasting... Lin, M.; Vavrin, J.; Smith, W. 2004-01-01 33 FOREST TECHNOLOGY 2 FORT...

  5. Paleoenvironment of Fort Union Formation, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrum, C.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocks of Paleocene age are represented in the Cave Hills of northwestern South Dakota by the Ludlow, Cannonball, and Tongue River members of the Fort Union Formation. The Cave Hills are situated within the southern margin of the Williston basin, 80 mi (130 km) north of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Numerous fine-grained, fining-upward sedimentary sequences comprise the Ludlow Member and are attributed to meandering streams occupying a low-gradient lower alluvial to upper deltaic plain. The Cannonball Member is 130 ft (40 m) thick in the North Cave Hills and is represented by two fine-grained, coarsening-upward sandstone mudstone sequences. A distinct vertical succession of sedimentary facies occur within each sequence representing offshore/lower shoreface through upper shoreface/foreshore depositional environment. A north to northeast depositional strike for the Cannonball shoreline is inferred from ripple crest and cross-bed orientations. The basal part of the Tongue River consists of approximately 40 to 50 ft (12 to 15 m) of lenticular sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, thin-bedded lignite, and kaolinite beds representing thin broad channels, point-bar, levee, overbank, and nearshore swamp depositional environments. Massive fluvial channel sandstones measuring several tens of ft in thickness overlie the fine-grained basal Tongue River lithologies. These channel sandstones represent the continued progradation of continental/fluvial/coastal plain depositional environments eastward over the marine sandstones of the Cannonball Member.

  6. Four years of operations and results with FORTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingner, P. L. (Phillip L.); Carlson, L. D. (Leslie D.); Dingler, R. D. (Robert D.); Esch-Mosher, D. M. (Diana M.); Jacobson, A. R.; Roussel-Dupre, D. (Diane)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

  7. INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY Science academies play a crucial role in promoting, recognizing and bring out proceedings and monographs. The academies promote public awareness and understanding the country. In this section the growth of the Indian National Science Academy and its functions

  8. them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figu

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage Presentation iManagemodule 4

  9. Central Energy System Modernization at Fort Jackson, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.; Dirks, James A.

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of technology options was conducted for the central energy systems at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. There were two objectives in conducting this study. From a broader viewpoint, the Army would like to develop a systematic approach to management of its central energy systems and selected Fort Jackson for this ''pilot'' study for a prospective Central Energy System Modernization Program. From a site-specific perspective, the objective was to identify the lowest life-cycle cost energy supply option(s) at Fort Jackson for buildings currently served by central boilers and chillers. This study was co-funded by the Army's Southeast Region and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program.

  10. Indian Water 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indian Water is a call to help plan a national water summit. This strategic session consist of a facilitated dialog with tribal leaders on important opportunities, challenges and tactics, which...

  11. Characterization of Damage in Sandstones along the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault: Implications for the Shallow Extent of Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    Characterization of Damage in Sandstones along the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault: Implications for the Shallow Extent of Damage Generation ORY DOR,1,5 JUDITH S. CHESTER,2 YEHUDA BEN-ZION,1 shallow generation of rock damage during an earthquake rupture, we measure the degree of fracture damage

  12. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

  13. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Drum, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Solana, Amy E.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Hand, James R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rowley, Steven; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Drum, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Drum took place on May 4 and 5, 2010.

  14. El Paso County Geothermal Project at Fort Bliss

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: Determine if, and where, economically viable low temperature geothermal resources might exist in the McGregor test area ?or if necessary at other lesser known sites that exist on the Fort Bliss Military Reservation ?and to determine at what location they can be best accessed without compromising the tactical and strategic missions of Fort Bliss. Determine if identified resources have adequate temperatures and flow rates/volumes to justify development at any scale, with an eye toward the 20 megawatt target identified. Over base need: 45 megawatts.

  15. Fort Inge and the Texas frontier, 1849-1869

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Thomas Tyree

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) May 1991 ABSTRACT Fort Inge and the Texas Frontier, 1849-1869. (May 1991) Thomas Tyree Smith B. S. in Ed. , Southwest Texas State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joseph G. Dawson III Now an obscure site near Uvalde, Fort Inge was once...'s Report on the Eighth Nilitary Department, " Cartographic Division, DR 148, RG 77, NA. 12 NOTES 1. Frederick Law Olmsted, A Journey Through Texas: Or A Saddle- Trip On the Southwestern Frontier (New York: Dix, Edwards 6 Co. , 1857; rpr. , Austin...

  16. Fort Worth, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer ElectricFortFort

  17. Conference shapes direction of Doctrine 2015 -Fort Leavenworth, KS -The Fort Leavenworth Lamp http://www.ftleavenworthlamp.com/news/around_the_force/x27456959/Conference-shapes-direction-of-Doctrine-2015[8/18/2011 12:32:27 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Conference shapes direction of Doctrine 2015 - Fort Leavenworth, KS - The Fort Leavenworth Lamp and more accessible. The conference was led by the Combined Arms Doctrine Directorate, a subordinate

  18. Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT in water and sediment of the Indian River Lagoon, Florida - 1977 to 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.C.; Johnson, R.S.; Bricker, J.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water and sediment samples collected during 1977 to 1978 from the Indian River lagoon between Vero Beach, Indian River County, and Fort Pierce, Saint Lucie County, Florida were analyzed for PCBs and DDT. Sample locations were chosen on the basis of proximity to major tributaries, sewage outfalls, or municipal area. Concentrations in water samples were below 0.01 ppB sigma DDT and 0.5 ppB PCBs. Small amounts of PCBs and DDT were found in most sediment samples, ranging from less than 1.0 ppB to 0.63 ppM Aroclor 1254 and from less than 0.1 ppB to 0.081 ppM sigma DDT. Samples from the Taylor Creek tributary and from the Fort Pierce power plant and municipal docking area contained higher PCB concentrations than did samples from other locations. DDT and PCB levels in most samples indicate little contamination by these compounds of the Indian River Waterway between Vero Beach and Fort Pierce.

  19. Better Buildings Challenge U.S. Department of Energy Fort Worth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roskelly,A.; LEED aP BD+C; GGP; GPCP USGBC Representative

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 The Fort Worth Better Buildings Challenge 3 ? Community Partner Agreement (2012) ? Focus: Energy and Water Reductions ? Structure: Local Partner & Ally Network ? Partners: Building Property... • ASHRAE Fort Worth • North Texas AEE • AIA Fort Worth • USGBC north Texas • Oncor Electric Delivery • Atmos Energy • FW Water Department ESL-KT-14-11-33 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 The Fort Worth Better...

  20. Efficiency of Surveying, Baiting, and Trapping Wild Pigs at Fort Benning, Georgia Brian Lee Williams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    Efficiency of Surveying, Baiting, and Trapping Wild Pigs at Fort Benning, Georgia by Brian Lee surveys, trapping efficiency, Fort Benning Copyright 2010 by Brian Lee Williams Approved by Stephen S This study, conducted at Fort Benning, Georgia, sought to develop more efficient ways of surveying

  1. School of Social Work Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    School of Social Work Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586 Phone (970) 491-6612 Fax (970) 491-7280 Colorado State University College of Health and Human Sciences School of Social Work http or disability. #12;ii Greetings! Welcome to the School of Social Work at Colorado State University! Central

  2. Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

  3. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Stewart, a US Army Forces Command facility located near Savannah, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. PNL, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has designed a model program applicable to the federal sector for this purpose. The model program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Stewart. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Stewart by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  4. Water Management Plan for Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Water Management Plan (WMP). The WRMP developed during this task is an amalgam of the templates and guidelines from the Federal Energy Management Program and Army regulations.

  5. Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte Dipartimento di Fisica ingredient in achieving all of these goals is the integration of parton distri- butions within Monte Carlo, and data collected in an experimental fiducial region. Whereas next-to-leading (NLO) order Monte Carlo

  6. EIS-0090: Fort Peck-Havre Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of its proposed action to construct and operate a 230kV transmission line from Fort Peck to Havre, Montana, with three intermediate interconnecting substations.

  7. Indian Gaming 2013 Tradeshow & Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Indian Gaming Association will host its annual tradeshow and convention on March 24-27 in Phoenix, Arizona. Be sure to visit the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth at the event.

  8. Full-Fledged Indian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Josh Benjamin

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee Stafford is in his seventh summer as a counselor at Camp Arrowdance. While Lee enjoys his status as one of the most popular staff members at camp, he begins to wonder if he's in danger of going "Full-Fledged Indian", ...

  9. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN By R.M. Flores,1 C.W. Keighin,1 A.M. Ochs,2 P.D. Warwick,1 L.R. Bader,1 and E.C. Murphy3 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 3 North

  10. Informal report on measurements of slant TEC by FORTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, R.S.

    1997-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Space and Atmospheric Sciences group is now operating the FORTE satellite, which has two sets of instruments: optical detectors and radio detectors. In this report the author describes work with one set of radio detectors that allow measurements of the total electron content (TEC) traversed by VHF radiation originating at an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) generator located at Los Alamos.

  11. Geothermal heat pumps at Fort Polk: Early results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At Fort Polk, LA an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) is being converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under a performance contract. At the same time other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow water outlets, and attic insulation are being installed. If these contracts and this technology are to be used widely in US Department of Defense (DoD) facilities and other public buildings, better data from actual projects is the key. Being the first GHP project of this type and size, Fort Polk proved to be very challenging for all concerned. To get from RFP to start of construction took several years. This hard work by others created a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to address many of the due diligence issues that delayed the Fort Polk project. So that future projects can move faster, an evaluation has been undertaken to address the following barriers: absence of a documented large-scale demonstration of GHP energy, demand, and maintenance savings (a barrier to acceptance by federal customers, performance contractors, and investors); newness of large-scale facility capital renewal procurements at federal facilities under energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) or traditional appropriations (lack of case studies); and variability in current GHP design tools (increases risks and costs for federal customers, performance contractors, investors and designers). This paper presents early energy and demand savings results based on data collection through January 1996.

  12. DOE Office of Indian Energy Announces New Indian Country Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Indian Community: Barney Enos, Jr., District 4 Community Council Ho-Chunk Nation: Susan Weber, Representative "The Working Group is honored to welcome these new members and would...

  13. Colonial Social Formations: The Indian Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Hamza

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to my view that Indian feudalism was dissolved under theis the widely held one that feudalism and imperialism haveto dissolve Indian 'feudalism' and imperialist domination.

  14. U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

  15. An evaluation of the Fort Polk energy savings performance contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army, in cooperation with an energy services company (ESCO), used private capital to retrofit 4,003 family housing units on the Fort Polk, Louisiana, military base with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The project was performed under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) that provides for the Army and the ESCO to share the cost savings realized through the energy retrofit over the 20-year life of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, the ESCO is responsible for maintaining the GHPs and provides ongoing measurement and verification (M and V) to assure cost and energy savings to the Army. An independent evaluation conducted by the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the GHP systems in combination with other energy retrofit measures have reduced annual whole-community electrical consumption by 33%, and natural gas consumption by 100%. These energy savings correspond to an estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions of 22,400 tons per year. Peak electrical demand has been reduced by 43%. The electrical energy and demand savings correspond to an improvement in the whole-community annual electric load factor from 0.52 to 0.62. As a result of the project, Fort Polk saves about $450,000 annually and benefits from complete renewal of the major energy consuming systems in family housing and maintenance of those systems for 20 years. Given the magnitude of the project, the cost and energy savings achieved, and the lessons learned during its design and implementation, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other housing-related energy savings performance contracts in both the public and private sectors.

  16. An Evaluation of the Fort Polk Energy Savings Performance Contract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Shonder, John A [ORNL

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army, in cooperation with an energy services company (ESCO), used private capital to retrofit 4003 family housing units on the Fort Polk, Louisiana, military base with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The project was performed under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) that provides for the army and the ESCO to share the cost savings realized through the energy retrofit over the 20-year life of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, the ESCO is responsible for maintaining the GHPs and provides ongoing measurement and verification (M&V) to assure cost and energy savings to the Army. An independent evaluation conducted by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the GHPS systems in combination with other energy retrofit measures have reduced annual whole-community electrical consumption by 33%, and natural gas consumption by 100%. These energy savings correspond to an estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions of 22,400 tons per year. Peak electrical demand has been reduced by 43%. The electrical energy and demand savings correspond to an improvement in the whole-community annual electric load factor from 0.52 to 0.62. As a result of the project, Fort Polk saves about $450,000 annually and benefits from complete renewal of the major energy consuming systems in family housing and maintenance of those systems for 20 years. Given the magnitude of the project, the cost and energy savings achieved, and the lessons learned during its design and implementation, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other housing-related energy savings performance contracts in both the public and private sectors.

  17. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

  18. Development of a composite satellite structure for FORTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grastataro, C.I.; Butler, T.A.; Smith, B.G.; Thompson, T.C.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has advanced the development of low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite mission. The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. This paper investigates the application of composite technology in the design of an all-composite spacecraft structure for small satellites. Engineering analysis and test results obtained from the development of the spacecraft engineering model are also presented.

  19. Wind Monitoring Report for Fort Wainwright's Donnelly Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the wind data collected at a location in Fort Wainwright’s Donnelly Training Area (DTA) near the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) test track, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the gross and net energy productions that proposed turbine models would have produced exposed to the wind resource measured at the meteorological tower (met tower) location during the year of measurement. Calculations are based on the proposed turbine models’ standard atmospheric conditions power curves, the annual average wind speeds, wind shear estimates, and standard industry assumptions.

  20. Fort Bend County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,dataset nameFort Bend County, Texas:

  1. Fort Defiance, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,dataset nameFort Bend County,

  2. Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,dataset nameFort Bend

  3. Fort Lupton, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,dataset nameFort BendLupton,

  4. Fort Wayne, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,dataset nameFort

  5. Fort Belknap Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer ElectricFort Belknap

  6. Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b <RGS Development BVRadiantRadioFort

  7. Boralex Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,BelcherBlundell 1Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Jump

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fort St Vrain - 011

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk River ReactorProjectFordhamFort

  9. Town of Fort Laramie, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station JumpOpenEITown ofTown of Fort Laramie,

  10. Town of Fort Supply, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station JumpOpenEITown ofTown of Fort Laramie,Town

  11. Fort Bliss, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAdd aNorthFort BlissBliss,

  12. Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAdd aNorthFort

  13. Fort Carson, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAdd aNorthFortCarson,

  14. 40th Indian Law Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Bar Association is hosting the 40th Annual Indian Law Conference. This two-day conference focuses on the significant changes that have occurred in the relationship between Tribal Nations and the United States in the last four decades. The conference will cover several topics, including climate change, Indian Law, tribal courts, and more.

  15. Air Quality and Road Emission Results for Fort Stewart, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Randy R.; Driver, Crystal J.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Barfuss, Brad C.

    2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Directorate of Public Works Environmental & Natural Resources Division (Fort Stewart /Hunter Army Airfield) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to monitor particulate matter (PM) concentrations on Fort Stewart, Georgia. The purpose of this investigation was to establish a PM sampling network using monitoring equipment typically used in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ''saturation sampling'', to determine air quality on the installation. In this initial study, the emphasis was on training-generated PM, not receptor PM loading. The majority of PM samples were 24-hr filter-based samples with sampling frequency ranging from every other day, to once every six days synchronized with the EPA 6th day national sampling schedule. Eight measurement sites were established and used to determine spatial variability in PM concentrations and evaluate whether fluctuations in PM appear to result from training activities and forest management practices on the installation. Data collected to date indicate the average installation PM2.5 concentration is lower than that of nearby urban Savannah, Georgia. At three sites near the installation perimeter, analyses to segregate PM concentrations by direction of air flow across the installation boundary indicate that air (below 80 ft) leaving the installation contains less PM2.5 than that entering the installation. This is reinforced by the observation that air near the ground is cleaner on average than the air at the top of the canopy.

  16. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  17. Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

  18. Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the site’s training mission. In addition, the site’s blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ˘/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

  19. Innovative use of DSP technology in space: FORTE event classifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briles, S.; Moore, K. Jones, R.; Klingner, P.; Neagley, D.; Caffrey, M.; Henneke, K.; Spurgen, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Blain, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) small satellite will field a digital signal processor (DSP) experiment for the purpose of classifying radio-frequency (rf) transient signals propagating through the earth`s ionosphere. Designated the Event Classifier experiment, this DSP experiment uses a single Texas Instruments` SMJ320C30 DSP to execute preprocessing, feature extraction, and classification algorithms on down-converted, digitized, and buffered rf transient signals in the frequency range of 30 to 300 MHz. A radiation-hardened microcontroller monitors DSP- abnormalities and supervises spacecraft command communications. On- orbit evaluation of multiple algorithms is supported by the Event Classifier architecture. Ground-based commands determine the subset and sequence of algorithms executed to classify a captured time series. Conventional neural network classification algorithms will be some of the classification techniques implemented on-board FORTE while in a low-earth orbit. Results of all experiments, after being stored in DSP flash memory, will be transmitted through the spacecraft to ground stations. The Event Classifier is a versatile and fault-tolerant experiment that is an important new space-based application of DSP technology.

  20. Dust Plume Modeling at Fort Bliss: Full Training Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for air quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating in the training ranges and on the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss is being investigated. The investigation uses the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN to simulate fugitive dust emission and dispersion from typical activities occurring on the installation. This report conveys the results of DUSTRAN simulations conducted using a “Full Training” scenario developed by Fort Bliss personnel. he Full Training scenario includes simultaneous off-road activities of two full Heavy Brigade Combat Teams (HCBTs) and one HCBT battalion on three training ranges. Simulations were conducted for the six-day period, April 25-30, 2005, using previously archived meteorological records. Simulation results are presented in the form of 24-hour average PM10 plots and peak 1-hour PM10 concentration plots, where the concentrations represent contributions resulting from the specified military vehicular activities, not total ambient PM10 concentrations. Results indicate that the highest PM10 contribution concentrations occurred on April 30 when winds were light and variable. Under such conditions, lofted particulates generated by vehicular movement stay in the area of generation and are not readily dispersed. The effect of training duration was investigated by comparing simulations with vehicular activity extending over a ten hour period (0700 to 1700 MST) with simulations where vehicular activity was compressed into a one hour period (0700 to 0800 MST). Compressing all vehicular activity into one hour led to higher peak one-hour and 24-hour average concentration contributions, often substantially higher.

  1. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  2. Indian Energy Blog Archive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment and Department ofIndian Energy

  3. Indian/Alaska.pmd

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approved on 24Independent OversightFederalAmerican Indian

  4. Arizona Indian Gaming Association (AIGA) Expo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This year’s EXPO will take place November 5-7, 2014 at the Radisson Fort McDowell Resort & Casino located in Scottsdale, Arizona.

  5. Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...

  6. ancient indian wisdom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Indian Ocean Zhang, Yi 180 FACT SHEET: INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: FACT SHEET: - INDIAN...

  7. Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

  8. Landscape influences on headwater streams on Fort Stewart, Georgia, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; al., et. [Various Institutes

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Military landscapes represent a mixture of undisturbed natural ecosystems, developed areas, and lands that support different types and intensities of military training. Research to understand water-quality influences of military landscapes usually involves intensive sampling in a few watersheds. In this study, we developed a survey design of accessible headwater watersheds intended to improve our ability to distinguish land water relationships in general, and training influences, in particular, on Fort Stewart, GA. We sampled and analyzed water from watershed outlets. We successfully developed correlative models for total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), organic carbon (OC), and organic nitrogen (ON), which dominated in this blackwater ecosystem. TSS tended to be greater in samples after rainfall and during the growing season, and models that included %Wetland suggested a build-and-flush relationship. We also detected a positive association between TSS and tank-training, which suggests a need to intercept sediment-laden runoff from training areas. Models for OC showed a negative association with %Grassland. TN and ON both showed negative associations with %Grassland, %Wetland, and %Forest. Unexpected positive associations were observed between OC and equipmenttraining activity and between ON and %Bare ground ? Roads. Future studies that combine our survey-based approach with more intensive monitoring of the timing and intensity of training would be needed to better understand the mechanisms for these empirical relationships involving military training. Looking beyond local effects on Fort Stewart streams, we explore questions about how exports of OC and nitrogen from coastal military installations ultimately influence estuaries downstream.

  9. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  10. 2015 National Indian Timber Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Intertribal Timber Council is hosting the Annual National Indian Timber Symposium to facilitate communication from the perspective of Tribes, the BIA, private industry, legislative bodies, and academia on issues and concerns of current forestry management practices.

  11. Uranium in prehistoric Indian pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filberth, Ernest William

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    URANIUM IN PREHISTORIC INDIAN POTTERY A Thesis by ERNEST WILLIAM FILBERTH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject...: Chemistry URANIUM IN PREHISTORIC INDIAN POTTERY A Thesis by ERNEST WILLIAM FILBERTH Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Membe (Member) (Member) December 1976 ABSTRACT Uranium in Prehistoric...

  12. Fort Smith, mother post of the southwest quartermaster supply and archeological patterning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bento, Sylvia Deborah

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the site of the second Fort Smith on a relatively level terrace reaching an elevation of 440 to 455 feet AMSL. This terrace extends east beyond the park boundary about three quarters of a mile until uplands are encountered. The majority of the park... of Fort Smith became a topic of concern to the War Department . On July 8, 1845, General Thomas Jesup 'I f irst Quartermaster General of the United States Army, was sent to examine "the site of Fort Smith in its relation to the line of defense...

  13. Renewable energy in Indian country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 25--27, 1995, at Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado, the Center for Resource Management (CRM), organized and sponsored a conference in conjunction with the Navajo Nation, EPA, and Bechtel Group, Inc., to deal with issues associated with developing renewable energy resources on Indian lands. Due to the remoteness of many reservation homes and the cost of traditional power line extensions, a large percentage of the Indian population is today without electricity or other energy services. In addition, while they continue to develop energy resources for export, seeing only minimal gain in their own economies, Indian people are also subject to the health and environmental consequences associated with proximity to traditional energy resource development. Renewable energy technologies, on the other hand, are often ideally suited to decentralized, low-density demand. These technologies--especially solar and wind power--have no adverse health impacts associated with generation, are relatively low cost, and can be used in applications as small as a single home, meeting power needs right at a site. Their minimal impact on the environment make them particularly compatible with American Indian philosophies and lifestyles. Unfortunately, the match between renewable energy and Indian tribes has been hampered by the lack of a comprehensive, coordinated effort to identify renewable energy resources located on Indian lands, to develop practical links between Indian people`s needs and energy producers, and to provide the necessary training for tribal leaders and members to plan, implement, and maintain renewable energy systems. Summaries of the presentations are presented.

  14. A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

  15. An ozone climatology of the Dallas-Fort Worth area and its relationship to meteorology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobis, Timothy Edward

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental protection agency has established a hics. National Ambient Air Quality Standard for surface ozone through the Clean Air Act and its amendments. The Dallas / Fort Worth area is in violation of these standards, and to date...

  16. City of Fort Collins- Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City Council of Fort Collins passed a resolution in September 2006, establishing green building goals for new city-owned buildings of 5,000 square feet or more. New buildings must be designed...

  17. Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prcin, Lisa J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted...

  18. Fort Collins Utilities- Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program (Colorado)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fort Collins offers its residential customers low-interest loans that may be used to finance a variety of projects including adding insulation, replacing a furnace, upgrading water and space...

  19. Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prcin, Lisa J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted...

  20. Reassembling the rolling bridge : an art gallery at Fort Point Channel, Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Winston E

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spanning the Fort Point Channel for nearly a century, Boston's Rolling Bridge is a familiar landmark to many railway commuters and residents of the city. Its robust steel assembly, characterized by three anthropomorphic ...

  1. State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This list was compiled by the federal government's Interagency Working Group on Indian Affairs (IWGIA) as an aid to federal agency consultation with federally recognized Indian tribes. It is not...

  2. 2015 State of Indian Nations Address

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The President of the National Congress of American Indians will deliver his annual State of the Indian Nations address to Member of Congress, government officials, tribal leaders and citizens, and...

  3. Urban tree maintenance scheduling: a case study using Fort Worth's METRIS geo data base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirenda, Joseph Salvatore

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    URBAN TREE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULING: A CASE STUDY USING FORT WORTH'S METRIS GEO DATA BASE A Thesis JOSEPH SALVATORE MIRENDA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1981 Major Subject: Forestry URBAN TREE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULING: A CASE STUDY USING FORT WORTH'S METRIS GEO DATA BASE A Thesis by JOSEPH SALVATORE MIRENDA Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Robert D. Baker...

  4. Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the findings of the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) assessment at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, by a team of PNNL engineers under contract to the Installation Management Agency (IMA) Southeast Region Office (SERO). Funding support was also provided by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The purpose of the assessment was to determine how energy is consumed at Fort Buchanan, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

  5. Identification and prehistoric exploitation of chert from Fort Hood, Bell and Coryell counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, William Alan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION AND PREHISTORIC EXPLOITATION OF CHERT FROM FORT HOOD, BELL AND CORYELL COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALAN DICKENS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1995 Major Subject: Anthropology IDENTIFICATION AND PREHISTORIC EXPLOITATION OF CHERT FROM FORT HOOD, BELL AND CORYELL COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALAN DICKENS Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  6. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  7. Market segmentation of visitors to Fort Wilkins State Park using a hierarchical clustering approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Thomas Mark

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MARKET SEGMENTATION OF VISITORS TO FORT WILKINS STATE PARK USING A HIERARCHICAL CLUSTERING APPROACH A Thesis by THOMAS MARK FISHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development MARKET SEGMENTATION OF VISITORS TO FORT WILKINS STATE PARK USING A HIERARCHICAL CLUSTERING APPROACH A Thesis by THOMAS MARK FISHER Approved as to style...

  8. Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnd, Natchee Blu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1986. Renegade Tribe: The Palouse Indians and the Invasionthe Spokane, Yakima, Palouse, and Coeur d’Alene peoples.

  9. Welcome Indian Gaming Phoenix 2013 Attendees!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for visiting the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth. Below are links to our booth materials and resources.

  10. Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnd, Natchee Blu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colorado: Westview Press. Bixler, Margaret T. 1995. Winds ofIndian code talkers, see Bixler (1995) ad Meadows (2003).

  11. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the US Army US Forces Command (FORSCOM) Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 2, Baseline Detail, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment.

  12. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE 560080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080 NOTICE INVITING TENDER SEALED ITEM RATE TENDERS are invited for the execution of the following work, 1. Proposed renovation for guest room at Indian Academy ­ 560042 Phone: 09916381210 5. Last date of receipt of tender 02.09.2011 before 3.00 pm at Indian Academy

  13. change in the indian mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    climate change awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and policy support in India. The results make very Change Communication in collaboration with GlobeScan Incorporated. Fieldwork in India was conducted by C and should inform stakeholders across India. Dr. Leiserowitz has asked the Indian public a series

  14. Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

  15. Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, & Venetie Biomass Boiler Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Koontz, ME William A. Wall, PhD

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of ten Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes settled in 10 remote villages and are linked by the Yukon River System. The CATG mission is to maintain the Yukon Flats region as Indian Country by asserting traditional rights and taking responsibility for developing tribal technical capacity to manage the land and resources. It is the intent of CATG to explore and develop all opportunities for a renewable and self-sufficient energy program for each of the villages. CATG envisions utilization of forest resources both for construction and energy as one of the best long-term strategies for integrating the economic goals for the region as well as supporting the cultural and social issues. The intent for this feasibility project is to focus specifically on biomass utilization for heat, first, and for future electrical generation within the region, second. An initial determination has already been made regarding the importance of wood energy as a primary source of renewable energy to displace diesel fuel in the Yukon Flats region. A desktop study of other potential renewable resources was conducted in 2006.

  16. Fort Smith, mother post of the southwest quartermaster supply and archeological patterning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bento, Sylvia Deborah

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the supplies and haul them to Fort Smith. This process was extremely time consuming and expensive. When steamers attempted to ride the low water they would often collide with floating debris and become stranded. The steamer New World was stuck 10 miles... below Pine Bluff ? Arkansas? for six months (NcClel land 18'55) . Unable to get the vessel out of the r iver & the For t Smith quartermaster, then Captain French& knew that a way had to be found to get the stores from the steamer to Fort Smith...

  17. Dust Plume Modeling at Fort Bliss: Move-Out Operations, Combat Training and Wind Erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for air-quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating in the training ranges and on the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss was investigated. This report details efforts by the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Fort Bliss Directorate of Environment in this investigation. Dust emission and dispersion from typical activities, including move outs and combat training, occurring on the installation were simulated using the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN. Major assumptions associated with designing specific modeling scenarios are summarized, and results from the simulations are presented.

  18. "Indian Rancherie on Dry Creek": An Early 1850s Indian Village on the Sacramento and San Joaquin County Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farris, Glenn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I "Indian Rancherie on Dry Creek": An Early 185Ds IndianIndian Rancherie on Dry Creek." Cahfomia Pictorial Letterimage of the rancheria on Dry Creek with a commentary relat-

  19. American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Communication & Engagement Tribal Programs American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive...

  20. Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27 Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27...

  1. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

  2. EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training...

  3. Society of American Indian Government Employees Annual National Training Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Event includes plenary session, American Indian law classes, Native American youth workshops, cultural presentations, and a veterans program. Sponsored by the Society of American Indian Government...

  4. DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country by Addressing Barriers to Renewable Energy Development DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country...

  5. american indian youth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been used for Indian script characters. Terminal In Partial; Jyotirmoy Saikia; To The 1999-01-01 279 Indian Railways Backbone of Information Transport in India Computer...

  6. EIS-0069: Solvent Refined Coal-II Demonstration Project, Fort Martin, Monongalia County, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental, economic and social impacts associated with the construction and short-term operation of a 6,000-tons-per-stream-day-capacity facility that will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the solvent refined coal process at Fort Martin, West Virginia.

  7. FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  8. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  9. BOCA RATON DANIA BEACH DAVIE FORT LAUDERDALE HARBOR BRANCH JUPITER PORT ST. LUCIE Educational Plant Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    BOCA RATON DANIA BEACH DAVIE FORT LAUDERDALE HARBOR BRANCH JUPITER PORT ST. LUCIE Educational Plant Survey 2011/2012 ­ 2016/2017 Approved by FAU BOT on June 15, 2011 #12;EDUCATIONAL PLANT SURVEY Florida ...................................................................................................................... ii Educational Plant Survey Team

  10. Jordan Cove Energy Project Fort Chicago Energy Partners L.P.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan Cove Energy Project Fort Chicago Energy Partners L.P. 1.0 Bcfd Coos Bay, Oregon Oregon LNG Funding Partners 1.0-1.5 Bcfd Astoria, Oregon Portwestward LNG Facility Portwestward LNG, LLC 0.7-1.25 Bcfd Clatskanie, Oregon Kitimat LNG Facility Apache Corp 0.64 -1.0 Bcfd Kitimat, British Columbia

  11. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores,1 A.M. Ochs,2 and L.R. Bader1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 1999

  12. WARNER COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES 1401 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-1401

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Protected Area· Management Natural Resources Management Rangeland Ecology Range and Forest ManagementWARNER COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES 1401 Campus Delivery · Fort Collins, CO 80523-1401 (970) 491 Science· Forest Management· Forestry Business· Geology Environmental Geology· Geology· Natural Resource

  13. Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama Angela Marie Jackson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    Survival Estimates of White-tailed Deer Fawns at Fort Rucker, Alabama by Angela Marie Jackson for the Degree of Master of Science Auburn, Alabama August 6, 2011 Keywords: White-tailed deer, fawn survival, coyote, predator-prey theory Copyright 2011 by Angela Marie Jackson Approved by Stephen S. Ditchkoff

  14. EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE (lead agency), Denali Commission (cooperating agency) and USDA Rural Utilities Services (cooperating agency) are proposing to provide funding to support the final design and construction of a biomass combined heat and power plant and associated district heating system to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments and the Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation. The proposed biomass district heating system would be located in Fort Yukon Alaska.

  15. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Sanjiva

    MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND BHEL REGARDING THE `THERMAL POWER PLANT ENGINEERING CHAIR' This Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) made on 25th day of august 1986 between Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (IITD) and M/s Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, 18

  16. Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation is hosting the Special Institute on Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country. This two-day conference will cover laws, policies, and practices regarding natural resources development in Indian Country and how they've evolved in the recent years.

  17. Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodrick, J.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort`s electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils {number_sign}2 and {number_sign}6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

  18. Erosion Potential of a Burn Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Interim Summary of One Year of Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Etyemezian, D. Shafer, J. Miller, I. Kavouras, S. Campbell, D. DuBois, J. King, G. Nikolich, and S. Zitzer

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in deserts in the Southwest U.S. is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. This increase in fires has implications for management of Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site office (NNSA/NSO) has responsibility. A series of studies has been initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn over to understand technical and perceived risk they might pose to site workers and public receptors in communities around the NTS, TTR, and NTTR; and to develop recommendations for stabilization and restoration after a fire. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob fire, a lightning-caused fire approximately 12 kilometers north of Hiko, Nevada, that burned approximately 200 ha between August 6-8, 2008, and is representative of a transition zone on the NTS between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, where the largest number of Soil Sub-Project CAUs/CASs are located.

  19. Indian Policy and Westward Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malin, James Claude

    1921-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the in vestigation of his activity on that committee led to a study of Indian policy in the Trans-Mississippi Valley and its relation to the westward movement. This latter problem, begun as a phase of Atchison's career in the Senate, de veloped into one... policy and its relation to westward expansion now furnish a frame-work upon which the history of the Trans-Mississippi Valley before the Civil War may be written. The period is given a unity otherwise impossible and a foundation is laid upon which...

  20. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3/29/10. Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community ProfileHarbor Fishing Community Profile Henning. 1966. FeasibilityVaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and North

  1. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Home: Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

  2. Nondestructive examination of 51 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain Core Segment 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty-one fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 1 of the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) were inspected dimensionally and visually in the Hot Service Facility at Fort St. Vrain in July 1979. Time- and volume-averaged graphite temperatures for the examined fuel elements ranged from approx. 400/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C. Fast neutron fluences varied from approx. 0.3 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ to 1.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Nearly all of the examined elements shrank in both axial and radial dimensions. The measured data were compared with strain and bow predictions obtained from SURVEY/STRESS, a computer code that employs viscoelastic beam theory to calculate stresses and deformations in HTGR fuel elements.

  3. "American Indian Freedom Controversy:" Political and Social Activism by Southern California Mission Indians, 1934-1958

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Heather Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indian Congress—Vyola Olinger, President, Max Mazzetti,representatives Viola Olinger, Virgil Lawson, Jane Penn (First Vice President- Viola Olinger; Second Vice President-

  4. A pillar in our Indian work: Daniel Gookin, the praying Indians, and King Philip's War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, Steven Kirk

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Submitted to the Off1ce of Graduate Stud1es of Texas ASM University 1n partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1989 Major Subject: H1story "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Approved as to style and content by: John Canup (Chair...

  5. Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodrick, J.R. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort's electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils [number sign]2 and [number sign]6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

  6. Mobility 2030: The Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Dallas-Fort Worth Area 2009 Amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Central Texas Council of Governments

    2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    the airports via DART light rail. DCTA will connect to the system in Carrollton. ? Review surface access to aviation and related changes over time. St udy alternative access and congestion scenarios at commercial airports based on alternative air travel... Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Kathryn Wilemon Councilm e m b e r, City of Arlingt on Michael Morris, P.E. Director of Transportation, NCTC OG Surface Transportation Technical Committee Jim Sparks, Chair City of Grand Prairi e...

  7. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Gregory Graham; Newkirk, Jay Ronald; Borst, Frederick Jon

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the 2001 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the predominant radiation exposure pathway, direct and scattered radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  8. Methodology for the evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.; White, D.L.; Huang, H.L.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army and a private energy service company are developing a comprehensive energy efficiency project to upgrade the family housing at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The project includes converting the space conditioning systems of more than 4,000 housing units to geothermal (or ground-source) heat pumps (GHPs). This interim report describes the methodology of the evaluation associated with this project, including the field monitoring that has been conducted at the base.

  9. Energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis army installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AH McMakin; RE Lundgren; EL Malone

    2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY1999, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis Army Installation near Tacoma, Washington. Preliminary weather-corrected calculations show energy savings of 10{percent} from FY98 for energy use in family housing. This exceeded the project's goal of 3{percent}. The work was funded by the U.S. DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The project adapted FEMP's national ``You Have the Power Campaign'' at the local level, tailoring it to the military culture. The applied research project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tailored, research-based strategies to promote energy conservation in military family housing. In contrast to many energy efficiency efforts, the campaign focused entirely on actions residents could take in their own homes, as opposed to technology or housing upgrades. Behavioral change was targeted because residents do not pay their own utility bills; thus other motivations must drive personal energy conservation. This campaign augments ongoing energy savings from housing upgrades carried out by Fort Lewis. The campaign ran from September 1998 through August 1999. The campaign strategy was developed based on findings from previous research and on input from residents and officials at Fort Lewis. Energy use, corrected to account for weather differences, was compared with the previous year's use. Survey responses from 377 of Fort Lewis residents of occupied housing showed that the campaign was moderately effective in promoting behavior change. Of those who were aware of the campaign, almost all said they were now doing one or more energy-efficient things that they had not done before. Most people were motivated by the desire to do the right thing and to set a good example for their children. They were less motivated by other factors.

  10. The justification of budget requests utilizing a grounds resource inventory at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Vivian Lee

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS ARM UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Record of Study THE JUST1FICATION OF BUDGET REQUESTS UTILIZING A GROUNDS RESOURCE INVENTORY AT THE FORT WORTH BOTANIC GARDEN A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Vivian Lee Powers Submitted to the College of Agriculture... budget requests. Anaheim City Park's Superintendent Chris Jarvi knew that when the new Riverdaie Park was completed it would require him to hire 1. 3 addition maintenance workers. (I) He could also prove this to the budget analysts, city manager...

  11. Energy saving potential of residential HVAC options at Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, D.L.; Stucky, D.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated heating and cooling system options for existing family housing at Fort Irwin, California. The purpose of this work was to quantify the energy conservation potential of alternative system types and to identify the most cost-effective technology available. The conventional residential heating/cooling systems at Fort Irwin are separate propane forced-air furnaces and central air conditioners. The options examined included air- and ground-source heat pumps, a natural gas furnace with central air conditioning, and a natural-gas-fired heat pump. The most cost-effective technology applicable to Fort Irwin was found to be the high-efficiency ground-source heat pumps. If all conventional units were replaced immediately, the net energy savings would be 76,660 MBtu (80.9 TJ) per year and a reduction in electrical demand of approximately 15,000 kW-month. The initial investment for implementing this technology would be approximately $7.1 million, with a savings-to-investment ratio of 1.74.

  12. Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) process at Fort Drum, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rowley, S.E. [Directorate of Engineering & Housing, Ft. Drum, NY (United States); Gillespie, A.H. [Army Forces Command, Ft. McPherson, GA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal energy manager has been directed by the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) to reduce energy consumption by 20% from 1985 levels, by the year 2000. However, the tools and funding to capture this resource in a cost-effective manner have not been provided. In an effort to assist federal agencies in meeting EPAct requirements, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) to identify, evaluate, and acquire all cost-effective energy projects at selected federal facilities. PNL has developed and applied the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) methodology at the Fort Drum FORSCOM facility near Watertown, New York. The FEDS methodology is a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that result in a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost justified fashion over a 5 to 10 year period. At Fort Drum, the net present value (NPV) of the installed cost of all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROS) is over $16 million (1992 $). The NPV of the savings associated with this investment is nearly $47 million (1992 $), for an overall NPV of approximately $31 million. By implementing all the cost-effective EROS, Fort Drum will reduce annual energy use by over 230,000 MBtu, or 15%. Annual energy expenditures will decrease by over $2.4 million, or a 20% reduction.

  13. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  14. Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association Annual Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join more than 2,500 industry professionals from all over the country at the 2012 Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association (OIGA) Conference and Trade Show specifically devoted to all aspects of the...

  15. Entomosporium Leafspot of Photinia and Indian Hawthorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Kevin

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Entomosporium Leaf Spot Photinia and Indian Hawthorn Kevin Ong, Assistant Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist Symptoms The first signs of Entomosporium leaf spot disease are tiny, circular, often bright red spots on both surfaces...

  16. SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School 1501 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM 87505 P.O. Box 5340 Santa Fe, NM 87502 Main: (505) 989-6300 www.sfindianschool.org Main and only Entrance...

  17. Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities...

  18. Fort Huachuca Water Awareness Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #2: Information and Education Programs, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study overview of the U.S. Army Fort Huachuca water awareness practice as part of FEMP's water efficiency best management practice series.

  19. Green Business Development in Indian Country Training | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development in Indian Country Training Green Business Development in Indian Country Training May 31, 2015 8:00AM MDT to June 5, 2015 5:00PM MDT Pine Ridge, South Dakota Red Cloud...

  20. Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02 Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and...

  1. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar June 24, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM...

  2. ani edenes indian: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you use. 3. If F is a field, show that the ring of n Hagen, Thomas 303 INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai...

  3. ani nitab indian: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you use. 3. If F is a field, show that the ring of n Hagen, Thomas 271 INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai...

  4. Geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Fort Polk, LA: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gordon, R. [Applied Energy Management Techniques, Corvallis, OR (United States); Giffin, T. [SAIC/The Fleming Group, East Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of 4,003 military family housing units have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). At the same time, other efficiency measures, such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow shower heads, and attic insulation, were installed. An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk ESPC was carried out. Findings indicate that the project has resulted in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing, for a typical meteorological year. Peak electrical demand has also been reduced by 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak demand. Natural gas savings are about 260,000 therms per year. In addition, the ESPC has allowed the Army to effectively cap its future expenditures for family housing HVAC maintenance at about 77% of its previous costs. Given these successful results, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other ESPCs in both the public and the private sectors. The purpose of this paper is to outline the method by which the ESPC was engineered and implemented, both from the standpoint of the facility owner (the US Army) and the energy services company (ESCO) which is carrying out the contract. The lessons learned from this experience should be useful to other owners, ESCOs and investors in the implementation of future ESPCs. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

  5. Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the major programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs.

  6. Fort Devens: Cold Climate, Energy-Efficient, Market-Rate Townhomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoeller, W.; Slattery, M.; Grab, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, Mass Development issued an RFQ and subsequent RFP for teams to develop moderately priced high-efficiency homes on two sites within the Devens Regional Enterprise Zone. MassDevelopment, a Massachusetts agency that owns the Devens site (formerly Fort Devens Army Base, in Harvard, Massachusetts), set a goal of producing a replicable example of current and innovative sustainable building practices with a near-zero energy potential. Metric Development, as primary developer and construction manager, formed one of the successful teams that included CARB and Cambridge Seven Architects (C7A).

  7. Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: Sept. 1, 2001 To Aug. 31, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Sung, Y. H.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    ESL-TR-02/12-02 BASELINE REPORT FOR THE FORT HOOD ARMY BASE: SEPT. 1, 2001 TO AUG. 31, 2002 A Research Project for the U.S. Army C.E.R.L. and the Ft. Hood Energy Office Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Juan...-Carlos Baltazar Cervantes Yong Hoon Sung David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P.E. W. Dan Turner, Ph.D., P.E. December 2002 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System FT. HOOD BASELINE...

  8. The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

  9. Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting ControlWyoming:Rhode Island: EnergyLincoln-Fort

  10. Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOEDepartment of EnergyUpdated FebruaryFort

  11. 2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformation 2-M Probe At DesertFort

  12. Translating Indian miniature paintings into a time-based medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidya, Aradhana

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    : Visualization Sciences iii ABSTRACT Translating Indian Miniature Paintings into a Time-based Medium. (May 2008) Aradhana Vaidya, B.Arch., Nagpur University, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Prof. Carol LaFayette The purpose of this research... ................................ 4 II VISUAL ANALYSIS OF MINIATURE PAINTINGS....................... 8 II.1 Characteristics of Indian miniature paintings..................... 8 II.2 Themes of Indian miniature paintings................................ 23 III...

  13. CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    1 CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER FOR : PROPOSED HOSTEL BLOCK AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, FELLOWS RESIDENCY NEXT TO ISRO QUARTERS, JALAHALLI AND PLUMBING WORKS : 136-138 #12;3 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080 NOTICE INVITING TENDER SEALED

  14. CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER : PROPOSED INTERIORS FOR CABIN CUM MEETING ROOM AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, C V RAMAN AVENUE, BANGALORE COMPLEX, KAMARAJ ROAD, II CROSS, BANGALORE - 560042 #12;INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080

  15. Fort Rucker

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR May 7 - 8, 2014 Virginia Beach, VA UESC Program Case Study - Ft. Rucker * Contract Value 16.6MTotal Project Lifetime Savings...

  16. INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai 600036 (INDIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhashyam, Srikrishna

    INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus for Heat and Mass Transfer Department of Mechanical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Madras Society for Heat and Mass Transfer (Regd.) I/We agree that I/We will be governed by Rules and Regulations

  17. SEC. 203. TRIBAL PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM. (a) DEFINITION OF INDIAN TRIBE.--In this section, the term ``Indian tribe'' has the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ``Indian tribe'' has the meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education and the heads of other Federal agencies, the Secretary may study and determine the feasibility of carrying out) are located primarily within Indian country (as defined in section 1151 of title 18, United States Code

  18. Indian Gasohol Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian BureauIndian

  19. Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  20. Seeing Savings from an ESPC Project in Fort Polk's Utility Bills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal agencies have implemented many energy efficiency projects over the years with direct funding or alternative financing vehicles such as energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). While it is generally accepted that these projects save energy and costs, the savings are usually not obvious in the utility bills. This is true for many valid technical reasons, even when savings are verified in other ways to the highest degree of certainty. However, any perceived deficiency in the evidence for savings is problematic when auditors or other observers evaluate the outcome of energy projects and the achievements of energy management programs. This report discusses under what circumstances energy savings should or should not be evident in utility bills. In the special case of a large ESPC project at the Army's Fort Polk, the analysis of utility bills carried out by the authors does unequivocally confirm and quantify savings. The data requirements and methods for arriving at definitive answers through utility bill analysis are demonstrated in our discussion of the Fort Polk project. The following paragraphs address why the government generally should not expect to see savings from ESPC projects in their utility bills. We also review lessons learned and best practices for measurement and verification (M&V) that can assure best value for the government and are more practical, straightforward, and cost-effective than utility bill analysis.

  1. Installation-wide energy-conservation demonstration at Fort McClellan, Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windingland, L.M.; Lilly, B.P.; Shonder, J.A.; Underwood, D.M.; Augustine, L.J.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the installation-wide energy conservation demonstration at Fort McClellan, AL, was to evaluate the effectiveness of applying available energy-conservation technologies and techniques to produce significant and predictable reductions in energy use and cost. Five major areas of energy conservation were identified and investigated: (1) pressure reduction in district-steam-heating systems; (2) reduction of outdoor air in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems; (3) replacement of oversized and inefficient motors in HVAC systems; (4) reduction of outdoor air infiltration in family housing; and (5) combustion optimization of gas-fired heating equipment. Other areas of investigation included radio-controlled exterior lighting, and temperature reduction in the high-temperature hot-water system. Each conservation project was evaluated on a small scale to verify energy savings before it was implemented. An energy-information management system was developed to maintain annual consumption data for each building. The system provides immediate feedback on energy use so managers can make correct decisions on conservation measures. The energy conservation programs implemented at Fort McClellan contributed to the 14% reduction in baseline (weather independent) energy consumption from FY84 to FY86. These programs have wide applicability to other U.S. Army installations. This research has also shown the importance of preliminary, small-scale testing of energy-conservation programs before implementation.

  2. Depositional history of the Mississippian Ullin and Fort Payne Formations in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasemi, Z.; Treworgy, J.D.; Norby, R.D. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field and subsurface data suggest that the mid-Mississippian Ullin Limestone in the Illinois Basin is composed of coalesced Waulsortian-type mounds and porous bryozoan-dominated buildups. Waulsortian mounds in the basin contain a lime mudstone to wackestone core that is flanked and capped by in situ porous bryozoan bafflestone or transported crinoidal-bryozoan packstone and grainstone. The mound core facies appear to be most common in the lower part of the Ullin and is thicker in a deeper outer-ramp setting. Shoreward and up-section (upper part of the outer-ramp through mid-ramp setting), the core facies is generally thinner, while the flanking and capping facies are thicker. Isopachous maps of the Ullin and Fort Payne suggest the presence of several large areas of thick carbonate buildups (Ullin) surrounded by a deep-water, sub-oxic environment (Fort Payne) in the Illinois Basin. Progradation of these buildups and associated facies resulted in a shallower ramp setting during deposition of the upper Ullin. Storm-generated carbonate sandwaves became widespread on this ramp. Sandwaves were mobile and for the most part unfavorable sites for further development of thick mud mounds and/or in situ bryozoan buildups. However, isolated mounds and flanking buildups are present in the upper part of the Ullin, and, together with the sandwaves, formed an irregular topography that led to the development of oolitic grainstone shoals during deposition of the overlying Salem Limestone.

  3. Dust Plume Modeling from Ranges and Maneuver Areas on Fort Bliss and the White Sands Missile Range: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Barnard, James C.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Shaw, William J.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for air quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating on and between the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss and White Sands Missile Range was investigated. This report details efforts by the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Fort Bliss Directorate of Environment in this investigation. Dust emission and dispersion from typical move-out activities occurring on the installations were simulated using the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN. Major assumptions associated with designing the modeling scenarios are summarized and results of simulations conducted under these assumptions are presented for four representative meteorological periods.

  4. Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sponsored by the Association on American Indian Affairs, this one-day conference is for federal, state, and local government officials and business leaders who have a need to develop working relationships with tribes and organizations.

  5. Geothermal space heating applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Final report, August 20, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birman, J.H.; Cohen, J.; Spencer, G.J.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a first-stage evaluation of the overall feasibility of utilizing geothermal waters from the Madison aquifer in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana for space heating are reported. A preliminary assessment of the resource characteristics, a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating district and an analysis of environmental and institutional issues are included. Preliminary investigations were also made into possible additional uses of the geothermal resource, including ethanol production. The results of the resource analysis showed that the depth to the top of the Madison occurs at approximately 5,500 feet at Poplar, and the Madison Group is characterized by low average porosity (about 5 percent) and permeability (about 0.004 gal/day-ft), and by hot water production rates of a few tens of gallons per minute from intervals a few feet thick. The preliminary heating district system effort for the town of Poplar included design heat load estimates, a field development concept, and preliminary design of heat extraction and hot water distribution systems. The environmental analysis, based on current data, indicated that resource development is not expected to result in undue impacts. The institutional analysis concluded that a Tribal geothermal utility could be established, but no clear-cut procedure can be identified without a more comprehensive evaluation of legal and jurisdistional issues. The economic evaluation found that, if the current trend of rapidly increasing prices for fossil fuels continues, a geothermal heating district within Poplar could be a long-term, economically attractive alternative to current energy sources.

  6. Indian Monsoon Depression: Climatology and Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Huang, Wan-Ru (Judy) [Judy

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The monsoon climate is traditionally characterized by large seasonal rainfall and reversal of wind direction (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Most importantly this rainfall is the major source of fresh water to various human activities such as agriculture. The Indian subcontinent resides at the core of the Southeast Asian summer monsoon system, with the monsoon trough extended from northern India across Indochina to the Western Tropical Pacific (WTP). Large fraction of annual rainfall occurs during the summer monsoon season, i.e., June - August with two distinct maxima. One is located over the Bay of Bengal with rainfall extending northwestward into eastern and central India, and the other along the west coast of India where the lower level moist wind meets the Western Ghat Mountains (Saha and Bavardeckar 1976). The rest of the Indian subcontinent receives relatively less rainfall. Various weather systems such as tropical cyclones and weak disturbances contribute to monsoon rainfall (Ramage 1971). Among these systems, the most efficient rain-producing system is known as the Indian monsoon depression (hereafter MD). This MD is critical for monsoon rainfall because: (i) it occurs about six times during each summer monsoon season, (ii) it propagates deeply into the continent and produces large amounts of rainfall along its track, and (iii) about half of the monsoon rainfall is contributed to by the MDs (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Therefore, understanding various properties of the MD is a key towards comprehending the veracity of the Indian summer monsoon and especially its hydrological process.

  7. INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit Bangalore Announces Certification Program for SIX SIGMA.isi@gmail.com, sanjitisi@yahoo.co.in 6th - 8th, 12th ­ 14th September; 2014 Bangalore #12;EXPECTATION! Six Sigma is like, Dean Witter, Discover & Co. (Report on Business Magazine, October 1997) Six Sigma initiative has

  8. INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit Bangalore Announces Certification Program for SIX SIGMA.isi@gmail.com, sanjitisi@yahoo.co.in #12;EXPECTATION! Six Sigma is like that old Wella Balsam shampoo commercial: `She Magazine, October 1997) Six Sigma initiative has become a rage. Every organization wants to implement Six

  9. Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080 QUOTATIONS FROM entry fees will be paid by the Academy against production of coupons. 5. Rates for outstation trips. 8. The Academy will pay 10 paise hike for every extra rupee rise in fuel charges and vice versa

  10. Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080 QUOTATIONS FROM TRAVEL AGENTS FOR PROVIDING TRANSPORT. Parking charges and other entry fees will be borne by the Academy on production of coupons. 5. Rates. The Academy will pay 10 paise hike for every extra rupee rise in fuel charges and vice versa during the year

  11. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MADRAS CHENNAI600036

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Anurag

    Engg. Trade Apprentices ITI Certificate Holders Fitter, Sheet Metal Worker, Electrician the Principals of Polytechnic Tamil Nadu/Puducherry Sir/Madam, Sub: Engagement of Trade Apprentices/Technician ApprenticesReg. Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai600 036 is looking to engage

  12. Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne [DRI] DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI] DRI; Cablk, Mary E. [DRI] DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI] DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Grand Junction, Colorado] DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

  13. U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS HURRICANE SANDY COASTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION 130 Wainwright Dr. Fort Hamilton, NY 11209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS ­ HURRICANE SANDY COASTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION 130 Wainwright Dr. Fort,000 miles of coastline within the North Atlantic Division that were affected by Hurricane Sandy. The study response to the devastation in the wake of Hurricane Sandy represents a need to address as a regional

  14. GROUND PENETRATING RADAR STUDY OF THE CHEKO LAKE AREA (SIBERIA) M.Pipan, L.Baradello, E.Forte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curci, Gabriele

    .Forte University of Trieste, Department of Geological, Environmental and Marine Sciences via Weiss 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy pipan@univ.trieste.it barad@geops15.univ.trieste.it ema@geops15.univ.trieste.it L.Gasperini, E of the Exploration Geophysics Group of the University of Trieste (Italy) in the framework of a scientific cooperation

  15. Quality site seasonal report, Fort Devens Launderette, SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) 1751, December 1984 through June 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logee, T.L.

    1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the Fort Devens Launderette was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system was one of eight systems selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort was to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal buildings. The launderette is part of the Post Exchange complex at the Fort Devens Army Post in Fort Devens, Massachusetts. The solar system preheats hot water for the coin operated laundry which has an estimated 25,000 customers per year. There are 108 collector panels comprising the 2563-square foot collector array. Collected solar energy is stored in a 3800-gallon tank. Propylene glycol is used to protect the solar array from freezing. Two immersed heat exchangers provide heat transfer from the propylene glycol to directly heat the DHW supply water in the storage tank. Auxiliary energy is supplied by gas and oil boilers. This solar system can be considered one of a kind and as such is a prototype. The lessons learned from building and operating this system should be used to correct design deficiencies and improve the performance of future solar systems for this application. Highlights of the system performance at the Fort Devens Launderette solar system during the December 1984 through June 1985 monitoring period are presented in this report.

  16. Development of a Monitoring and Verification (M&V) Plan and Baseline for the Fort Hood ESPC Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Lynn, B.; Underwood, D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fort Hood has selected an Energy Services Performance Contract (ESPC) contractor to help achieve its energy reduction goals as mandated by Executive Order. This ESPC is expected to be a $3.8 million, 20 year contract, which includes five primary...

  17. Preliminary assessment report for Fort Custer Training Center, Installation 26035, Augusta, Michigan. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Michigan Army National Guard property near Augusta, Michigan. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Custer Training Center, phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations associated with the property are (1) storage of hazardous materials and hazardous waste, (2) storage and dispensing of fuel, (3) washing of vehicles and equipment, and (4) weapons training ranges that may have accumulated lead.

  18. Preliminary assessment report for Fort Jacob F. Wolters, Installation 48555, Mineral Wells, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (TXARNG) property near Mineral Wells, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Wolters property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  19. Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

  20. The evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an independent evaluation of an energy retrofit of 4,003 family housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana, under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Replacement of the heating, cooling, and water heating systems in these housing units with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) anchored the retrofit; low-flow shower heads and compact fluorescent lighting were also installed, as well as attic insulation where needed. Statistically valid findings indicate that the project will save 25.8 million kWh, or 32.5% of the pre-retrofit whole-community electrical consumption, and 100% of the whole-community natural gas previously used for space conditioning and water heating (260,000 therms) in a typical meteorological year. At the end-use level, the GHPs were found to save about 42% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption for heating, cooling, and water heating in housing units that were all-electric in the pre-retrofit period. This report also demonstrates an improved method of predicting energy savings. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-retrofit energy use data collected in the field, the method predicted actual energy savings on one of the electric feeders at Fort Polk with a very high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of this model was in turn dependent on data-calibrated models of the geothermal heat pump and ground heat exchanger that are described in this report. In addition this report documents the status of vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (BHEx) design methods at the time this project was designed, and demonstrates methods of using data collected from operating GHP systems to benchmark BHEx design methods against a detailed engineering model calibrated to date. The authors also discuss the ESPC`s structure and implementation and how the experience gained here can contribute to the success of future ESPCs.

  1. Dual Use of Veterans Health Administration and Indian Health Service: Healthcare Provider and Patient Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, B. Josea; Vivrette, Rebecca L.; Satter, Delight E.; Jouldjian, Stella; McDonald, Leander Russell

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to care in the Indian health service. Health Affairs. 1993;VHA) and Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities, and thankAffairs or the Indian Health Service. Conflict of Interest:

  2. President Theodore Roosevelt and the American Indian, 1901-1909 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, David Harris

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , this relatively un- ?39 coordinated program never achieved widespread success. By 1848, despite some setbacks, the general outlook for Indian education was rather promising. "There were . . . 16 manual training ?40 schools, 87 boarding schools and other..., American Indian Education, 59. "Territorial Affairs, " The Outlook, 60 (December 3, 1898), p. 799. 53 1 d 9. WEt, 1'6 ~R* 61' E, 1B69-ABBR: 6 ~dd 1 Administrative ~Histor , 188. 20 CHAPTER I I THE FORMULATION OF INDIAN POLICY DURING THE ROOSEVELT...

  3. New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (Million CubicYearNonhydrocarbonIndian

  4. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovemberInvestigationsCommitteeBlog Archive Indian Energy Blog Archive RSS July

  5. Indian Energy News Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY ANDAlaska

  6. Approved Members of the Indian Country Energy And Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG APPROVED MEMBERS Blue Lake Rancheria Jana Ganion, BLR Energy Director Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs...

  7. american indians living: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    positive correlations with the Indian Chang, Chih-Pei 262 Developing solutions for sustainable living-the Urban Living Laboratory: The world's largest 'living laboratory'...

  8. apache indian reservation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    survival or death 1. However, these statistical methods are constrained Sudarshan, S. 2 Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Environmental...

  9. DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Renewable Energy Project Developmen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing Essentials Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs is responsible for...

  10. DOE Office of Indian Energy Professional Course: Tribal Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Professional Courses: Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing Essentials (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "DOE Office of Indian...

  11. Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian Energy Policy and Makes Available 2 Million for Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands Department of Energy Names Director...

  12. DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 24: Live Webinar on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country: Natural Resources and Agriculture Webinar Webinar Sponsors: White House Office of Public Engagement, White...

  13. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

  14. Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, including background, goals, mission, activities, and initiatives.

  15. President Theodore Roosevelt and the American Indian, 1901-1909

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, David Harris

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This legislation was to have a 19 profound impact on Indian affairs for many years. The act defined Indian country as areas outside any state boundaries; the overwhelming 20 bulk of such land lay to the west of the Mississippi River. The practice of issuing... lands that had been secured by the United States through treaties with the several Indian tribes. It was now decreed that annuities should be paid to the chiefs or other designated representatives rather than to individual Indians. The previous policy...

  16. Cultural colonizers : persistence and empire in the Indian antiremoval movement, 1815-1859

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzales, Christian Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New York: Harper & Row, 1988. Gallay, Alan. The Indian slavelabor force. Historian Alan Gallay has explained that in therose sharply. See Alan Gallay, The Indian Slave Trade: The

  17. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (2003)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Newkirk; F. J. Borst, CHP

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the 2003 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the predominant radiation exposure pathway, direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  18. Fort Worth Museum of Science and History: Reports on Federal Awards Program for the year ended September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Six reports by independent accountants of the financial statements of the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1994 are presented. The audits were performed on the financial statements on the (1) schedule of federal awards, (2) internal control structure, (3) compliance with laws, regulations, contracts, and grants, (4) the internal control structure used in administering federal awards, (5) compliance with general requirements, (6) compliance with specific requirements applicable to non-major program actions.

  19. History told from the depths of Lake Champlai: 1992-1993 Fort Ticonderoga-Mount Independence submerged cultural resource survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Scott Arthur

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Campano Virginia West Funding The Fort Ticonderoga-Mount Independence Project could not have been completed without the cooperative efforts and funds from a number of federal and state government agencies. Federal funding was pmvided by the New... at its mouth (Johnson 1984). The topography and landforms visible today sunoundng the project area are products of ancient mountain-building process' and erosional forces of glaciers and rivers that gouged the valleys and scoured the surfaces...

  20. Regional analysis of rhythmic bedding in the Fort Hays limestone member, Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous), US western interior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laferriere, A.P.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a regional stratigraphic investigation of the rhythmically bedded Fort Hays limestone member of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico indicate at least two levels of cyclicity. Regional development of these cycles strongly supports the hypothesis that they are climatic in origin. Departures from simple cyclical patterns resulted from sedimentary effects of Late Cretaceous orogenic activity, erosional events associated with eustatic sea level changes, diagenetic modification, and possibly from interference between orbital parameters having different periodicities. The vulnerability of Milankovitch-type cyclicity to overprinting by tectono-sedimentologic effects makes units such as the Fort Hays useful as indicators of subtle tectonic activity. Regional thickness changes in groups of shale-limestone couplets were identified, correlated, and mapped in the subsurface using geophysical well log information in order to locate subtle structural elements that influenced Fort Hays sedimentation. In the Denver-Julesburg Basin of Colorado and western Kansas, thinning of the section between Fort Hays marker horizons occurs dominantly along northeastwardly trending belts that resulted apparently from Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental Arch. Isotopic and petrographic analyses were conducted on pelagic (carbonate matrix) and benthic (inoceramid bivalve) constituents of selected shale/limestone couplets. These data suggest that there was little difference in temperature or salinity between times of terrigenous detrital input and times of nearly pure carbonate deposition. Isotopic information from matrix samples suggests a westward decrease in salinity of surface water in the Western Interior Sea. Isotopic data from largely unaltered inoceramid bivalves indicate bottom-water conditions of near-normal marine salinity.

  1. SAOT signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Indian CSIR-Institute ,,Indian Institute of Petroleum"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    of Petroleum" The Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) of the University Erlangen of Understanding - MoU) with the Indian Institute of Petroleum (IIP) which is one of 37 constituent institutes of Petroleum, Dr. M O Garg (left), and Prof. Dr. A. Leipertz (right), accompanied on the left-hand side by Dr

  2. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Cancels DOE O 1230.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-6-09, cancels DOE O 144.1.

  6. Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Cancels DOE O 1230.2.

  7. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information on Tribes in the lower 48 states selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  8. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  9. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native governments selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  10. Advancing Energy Development in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  11. Hierarchical Beta Processes and the Indian Buffet Romain Thibaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Hierarchical Beta Processes and the Indian Buffet Process Romain Thibaux Computer Science Division Department of Statistics November 5, 2006 Abstract We show that the beta process is the de Finetti mixing distribution underlying the Indian buffet process of [2]. This result shows that the beta process plays

  12. Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program at Argonne

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program for Renewable Energy at Argonne National Laboratory. Principal Contacts; Harold Myron (ANL), Anthony Dvorak (ANL), Freddie Cardenas (BIA). Supported by; United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Education, and Argonne National Laboratory

  13. Department of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh Yatindra Nath

    of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 3Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing Institute of Technology Kanpur 4Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing Networks · Whenever you of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 6Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing

  14. Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations from housekeeping agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations from housekeeping agencies Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore (Academy), invites quotations for Housekeeping services at its office will be provided by the Academy. Please Note: The Academy reserves the right to reject/not to accept any quotation

  15. Indian Academy of Sciences NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for catering services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

  16. Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations for catering services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    1 Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations for catering services 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for Catering Services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

  17. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Study of well logs from Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, W.E.; Ross, H.P.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Union Oil Company drilled four geothermal test wells in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA between 1975 and 1979. A fairly complete suite of well logs were recorded for the three deeper holes, and these data are presented as composite well log plots in this report. The composite well log plots have facilitated the interpretation of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartz-monzonite, serpentine, and volcanic lithologies and the identification of numerous fractures. This has been especially helpful because of the extensive lost circulaton zones and poor cuttings recovery. Intraformational flow was identified by a fluid migration-temperature tracer log at depth in CFSU 31-33. Well log crossplots were computed to assist in lithologic identification and the determination of physical properties for specific depth intervals in a given hole. The presence of hydrous minerals sometimes results in neutron porosity somewhat higher than the true nonfracture porosity, which is generally less than 4%. Permeability is clearly controlled by fractures. A maximum well temperature of 178.9/sup 0/C, low flow rates and low probable percent flash indicate these wells are subeconomic for electric generation at present. The well log study has substantially improved our understanding of the reservoir as presently drilled.

  19. Electrical Energy and Demand Savings from a Geothermal Heat Pump ESPC at Fort Polk, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Fort Polk, Louisiana, the space-conditioning systems of an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) under an energy savings performance contract. At the same time, other efficiency measures, such as compact fluorescent lights, low-flow hot water outlets, and attic insulation, were installed. Pre- and post-retrofit data were taken at 15-minute intervals on energy flows through the electrical distribution feeders that serve the family housing areas of the post. Fifteen-minute interval data were also taken on energy use from a sample of the residences. The analysis presented in this paper shows that for a typical meteorological year, the retrofits result in an electrical energy savings of approximately 25.6 million kWh, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical use in family housing. Peak electrical demand has also been reduced by about 6.8 MW, which is 40% of pre-retrofit peak demand. In addition, the retrofits save about 260,000 therms per year of natural gas. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the 'apparent' energy savings observed in the monitored data and are not to be mistaken for the 'contracted' energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the 'contracted' energy savings, the 'apparent' energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteri, addition of ceiling fans, and other factors.

  20. Fort Saint Vrain HTGR (Th/U carbide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Larry Lorin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments and total fuel mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. For the HTGR group, the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) reactor fuel has been chosen for the evaluation of viability for waste co-disposal. The FSV reactor was operated by Public Service of Colorado as a licensed power reactor. The FSV fuel employs a U/Th carbide matrix in individually pyrolytic carbon-coated particles. These individual particles are in turn coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and contained within fuel compacts, that are in turn embedded in graphite blocks that comprised the structural core of the reactor.

  1. Characterization plan for Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom graphite fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maarschman, S.C.; Berting, F.M.; Clemmer, R.G.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.; Morgan, W.C.; Sliva, P.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) and most of the Peach Bottom (PB) reactor spent fuels are currently stored at INEL and may remain in storage for many years before disposal. Three disposal pathways have been proposed: intact disposal, fuels partially disassembled and the high-level waste fraction conditioned prior to disposal, and fuels completed disassembled and conditioned prior to disposal. Many options exist within each of these pathways. PNL evaluated the literature and other reference to develop a fuels characterization plan for these fuels. This plan provides guidance for the characteristics of the fuel which will be needed to pursue any of the storage or disposal pathways. It also provides a suggested fuels monitoring program for the current storage facilities. This report recommends a minimum of 7 fuel elements be characterized: PB Core 1 fuel: one Type II nonfailed element, one Type II failed element, and one Type III nonfailed element; PB Core 2 fuel: two Type II nonfailed fuel elements; and FSV fuel: at least two fuel blocks from regions of high temperature and fluence and long in-reactor performance (preferably at reactor end-of- life). Selection of PB fuel elements should focus on these between radial core position 8 and 14 and on compacts between compact numbers 10 and 20. Selection of FSV fuel elements should focus on these from Fuel Zones II and III, located in Core Layers 6, 7, and possibly 8.

  2. Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

  3. Bureau of Indian Affairs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to:Brunei:HillBureau of Indian Affairs

  4. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment and Department ofIndian

  5. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment and Department ofIndianJanuary

  6. Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar2014 || DepartmentMarchINDIAN COUNTRY

  7. Indian Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian Bureau

  8. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY ANDAlaska EnergyDOE-IEBlog

  9. Using Polysyllabic units for Text to Speech Synthesis in Indian languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivalingam, Krishna M.

    of Computer Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology - Madras Chennai 600 036 Email: {vinodh

  10. Relative risk site evaluation for buildings 7740 and 7741 Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Gilmore, T.J.; Bronson, F.J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings 7740 and 7741 are a part of a former nuclear weapon`s storage and maintenance facility located in the southeastern portion of Fort Campbell, Kentucky. This underground tunnel complex was originally used as a classified storage area beginning in 1949 and continuing until 1969. Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently completed a detailed Relative Risk Site Evaluation of the facility. This evaluation included (1) obtaining engineering drawings of the facility and associated structures, (2) conducting detailed radiological surveys, (3) air sampling, (4) sampling drainage systems, and (5) sampling the underground wastewater storage tank. Ten samples were submitted for laboratory analysis of radionuclides and priority pollutant metals, and two samples submitted for analysis of volatile organic compounds. No volatile organic contaminants were detected using field instruments or laboratory analyses. However, several radionuclides and metals were detected in water and/or soil/sediment samples collected from this facility. Of the radionuclides detected, only {sup 226}Ra may have come from facility operations; however, its concentration is at least one order of magnitude below the relative-risk comparison value. Several metals (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, copper, mercury, lead, and antimony) were found to exceed the relative-risk comparison values for water, while only arsenic, cadmium, and lead were found to exceed the relative risk comparison values for soil. Of these constituents, it is believed that only arsenic, beryllium, mercury, and lead may have come from facility operations. Other significant hazards posed by the tunnel complex include radon exposure and potentially low oxygen concentrations (<19.5% in atmosphere) if the tunnel complex is not allowed to vent to the outside air. Asbestos-wrapped pipes, lead-based paint, rat poison, and possibly a selenium rectifier are also present within the tunnel complex.

  11. Rudyard Kipling's search for an integrated Anglo-Indian personality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Don Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the Raj. I should explain at this point that I apply these considerations only to Kipling's male Anglo-Indian characters. Though he does write of Indians male and female, as well as of the Englishwomen of the Raj, they are not, as a rule, his primary... of the Anglo-Indian Kipling was trying to create via Duncan Parrenness. As pointed out earlier, this is the only short story in Haining's collection in which the narrator and the protagonist are the same, Writing of himself under the influence of alcohol...

  12. Handwritten Character Recognition of South Indian Scripts: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jomy, John; Kannan, Balakrishnan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handwritten character recognition is always a frontier area of research in the field of pattern recognition and image processing and there is a large demand for OCR on hand written documents. Even though, sufficient studies have performed in foreign scripts like Chinese, Japanese and Arabic characters, only a very few work can be traced for handwritten character recognition of Indian scripts especially for the South Indian scripts. This paper provides an overview of offline handwritten character recognition in South Indian Scripts, namely Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada and Telungu.

  13. Indian National Institute of Ocean Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |IndianIndianIndian

  14. Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Sherman Indian School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs has found a good way to reduce energy costs, replace inefficient lighting and aging building equipment, and install renewable energy systems without huge increases in the BIA budget. The agency is doing all this by making use of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) at BIA schools and facilities throughout the country.

  15. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army Project 181 Implementation Challenges in Deployment of an Energy Security Microgrid for Army Reserve Facilities located on the Former Fort Devens Army Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warwick, William M.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents reports on a request for technical assistance from Fort Devens to analyze procurement of energy from nearby renewable generating resources.

  16. A preliminary analysis of league bowlers, casual bowlers, and non-bowlers in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolian area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Larry Ray

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Fort Worth metropolitan area. The differ nce in the age of the classif. ications of bowlers would seem to indicate that, new sources of revenue lie with the young casual bowler. 1f proprietors can convert the young casual bowlers to young league bowlers... the apparatus of a game very similar to modern day bowling. Sir Flinders of Petrie, emeritus professor o f Egyptology, the Univer- sity of London, found nine pieces of stone, used as pins and a stone ball (The National Bowling Council, 1974) The parishioners...

  17. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Fort Smith quadrangle, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fort Smith quadrangle in western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma overlies thick Paleozoic sediments of the Arkoma Basin. These Paleozoics dominate surface exposure except where covered by Quaternary Alluvial materials. Examination of available literature shows no known uranium deposits (or occurrences) within the quadrangle. Seventy-five groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and most appeared to be of cultural origin. Magnetic data show character that suggest structural and/or lithologic complexity, but imply relatively deep-seated sources.

  18. Indian Energy & Energy Infrastructure to be Showcased at RES...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to discuss economic development. Indian energy and energy infrastructure are at the heart of our conversations that will be happening at RES. Tracey LeBeau, the Director of our...

  19. Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center is excited to present its first Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop. Whether you are a beginner, an expert, or...

  20. american indian community: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cherokee were also the first American Indian nation to create and finance its own police, fire, and sanitary departments... Swafford, Tamrala Greer 2004-03-01 128 Logging the...

  1. american indian communities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cherokee were also the first American Indian nation to create and finance its own police, fire, and sanitary departments... Swafford, Tamrala Greer 2004-03-01 128 Logging the...

  2. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 Table 6. Sales of fossil fuel production from federal and Indian lands by statearea, FY 2003-13 trillion Btu State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Alabama...

  3. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    on Indian lands. Offshore federal only includes areas in federal waters. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Natural...

  4. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  5. The Origin of Indian Corn and its Relatives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph); Reeves, R. G. (Robert Gatlin)

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    if it were not that when it hybridizes with Zea, some of the segregates are indistinguishable from Mexican varieties. Zea L. Maize, Indian Corn The genus Zea usually is distinguished from its near relatives by having separate staminate and pistillate...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 574 (Monograph) MAY 1939 THE ORIGIN OF INDIAN CORN AND ITS RELATIVES P. C. MANGELSDORF AND R. G. REEVES Division of Agronomy (In cooperation...

  6. American Indian Complex to Cool Off Using Ice Storage System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Oklahoma City, summer temperatures can get above 100 degrees, making cooling more of a necessity than a luxury. But the designers of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum (AICCM) wanted to make cooling choices that reflect American Indian cultures' respect for the land. So, rather than using conventional air-conditioning, the museum's main complex will use an ice storage system estimated to save 644,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year.

  7. DETERMINANTS OF INTERNATIONAL NEWS COVERAGE BY INDIAN ENGLISH- LANGUAGE NEWSPAPERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Alok

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    significant. Table 4. Infrastructure News Contribution Frequency Percent API/AFP/Reuters 123 42.7 Indian News Agency 96 33.3 Indian Correspondents 40 13.9 Foreign News Org. 22 7.6 Collaboration 7 2.4 Total 288 100.0 Researchers identified... 4 World of Determinants 5 Religion and Science & Technology 7 National Threat and National Traits 8 Relatedness and Cultural Affinity 9 Deviance, Involvement, and Prominence...

  8. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  9. Fort Peck-Havre transmission line project, Hill, Blaine, Phillips, Valley and McCone Counties, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and operation of a 180-mile, 230-kilovlt (kV) transmission line between Fort Peck and Havre, Montana is proposed to provide a replacement for the 161-kV line that currently runs between the two cities. The new line would be carried on woodpole, H-frame structures. The existing 161-kV line would be removed, and the Richardson Coulee Substation would be relocated. Intermediate facilities to be improved would include the Fort Peck Switchyard and the Richardson Coulee, Malta, Harlem, and Havre substations.Construction of the line would commence in August 1983, and operation would commence in January 1986. The expected life of the transmission system would be 100 years. Estimated cost of the project, in 1983 dollars, is $36.1 million. The project would upgrade an essential element of the Western Area Power Administration's electric power system and the Montana Power Company's interconnected transmission network. Continued electric service reliability would be improved, and safety conditions affecting personnel who maintain the line would be enhanced. Additional transmission capacity would be provided to accommodate future load growth, precluding the need for multiple transmission lines. The line would eleminate seven acres of productive land and create physical conflicts with present and future agricultural activities. The line would traverse areas characterized by concentrations of archaeological resources and cultural resources of importance to native Americans. Transmission structures could mar scenery in areas with historically significant architecture and would interfere with waterfowl.

  10. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 282 Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Gordon, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Brian K.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Nesse, Ronald J.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Gordon, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Gordon took place on March 9, 2010.

  11. What is an Indian Family? The Indian Child Welfare Act and the Renascence of Tribal Sovereignty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Pauline Turner

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The case arose soon after Richard Adams and Cindy Ruiz gave up their twin daughters for adoption. Adams was the son of a Porno Indian, although at the time of the adoption he was not an enrolled member. Three months after the adoption, Adams and Ruiz... attempted to withdraw their consent to the adoption on the grounds that the adoption had not followed the ICWA's procedures and placement preferences. The Porno tribe, at the request of Adams's mother, inter vened in the case. The California courts were...

  12. Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase III Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program and Training #12;Acknowledgments The Indian Forest Service Officer Training program coordinators at Colorado University Center for Protected Area Management and Training · Colorado State University Warner College

  13. Intermediate-depth circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans measured by autonomous floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Russ E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,runs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans using the EstimatingIndian and (right) Pacific Oceans from the JPL–ECCO data-

  14. Alternative Energy Development in Indian Country: Lighting the Way for the Seventh Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies increasingly show that Indian country may be uniquely positioned to develop alternative energy. Indian country in general constitutes a significant portion of land in the United States. In recognition of the increasing interest...

  15. British Troops, Colonists, Indians, and Slaves in Southeastern North America, 1756-1763

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Wu

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work recasts the world of the North American Southeast during the Seven Years’ War by examining the intersecting stories of British soldiers, colonists, Indians, and enslaved and free Africans. Populated with diverse Indians, Europeans...

  16. Modelling the influence of North Atlantic multidecadal warmth on the Indian summer rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mean meridional streamflow as well as widespread low surface pressure over North Africa, the Middle East and the western Indian Ocean contributing to a strengthened Indian monsoon trough and increased

  17. Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Leading to Development of the Native Spirit Solar Energy Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carolyn Stewart; Tracey LeBeau

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-funded renewable energy feasibility study conducted by Red Mountain Tribal Energy on behalf of the Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium (SWTEC). During the course of the study, SWTEC members considered multiple options for the organization structure, selected a proposed organization structure, and drafted a Memorandum of Understanding for the SWTEC organization. High-level resource assessments for SWTEC members were completed; surveys were developed and completed to determine each member’s interest in multiple participation options, including on-reservation projects. With the survey inputs in mind, multiple energy project options were identified and evaluated on a high-level basis. That process led to a narrowing of the field of technology options to solar generation, specifically, utility-scale Concentrating Solar-Powered Generation projects, with a specific, tentative project location identified at the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation -- the Native Spirit Solar Energy Facility.

  18. DOI Bureau of Indian Affairs Mineral Development Grants to Help with Development of Tribal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) is offering grants to federally-recognized Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that help the development of a tribal energy and mineral resource inventory, a tribal energy and mineral resource on Indian land, or for the development of a report necessary to the development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands.

  19. Phyllosilicate orientation demonstrates early timing of compactional stabilization in calcite-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth Basin, Texas (U.S.A) Ruarri J. Day-Stirrat a in revised form 8 April 2008 Accepted 16 April 2008 Keywords: Barnett Shale Goniometry Concretions Fabric Calcite-cemented zones in the prolific gas-producing Barnett Shale (Ft. Worth Basin, Texas) preserve very

  20. 3-DOF potential air flow manipulation by inverse modeling control Anne Delettre, Guillaume J. Laurent, Nadine Le Fort-Piat and Christophe Varnier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    3-DOF potential air flow manipulation by inverse modeling control Anne Delettre, Guillaume J. Laurent, Nadine Le Fort-Piat and Christophe Varnier Abstract-- Potential air flows can be used to perform non- prehensile contactless manipulations of objects gliding on air- hockey table. In this paper, we

  1. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  2. Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the Indian Solar City Programme, provides an overview of one city's Master Plan and implementation progress, describes NREL's support of the Indian Solar City Programme, and outlines synergies and differences between the Indian and American programs including unique challenges and opportunities India is facing.

  3. Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 No. : IASc/ /13 System' The Indian Academy of Sciences is in need of `Multi-point Video Conference System: The Purchase In-charge, Indian Academy of Sciences latest by 30th December 2013 by 15:00 PM. Technical

  4. NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307­313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp , and Dennis R. Decoteau1 Abstract - Sixteen selections of Apocynum cannabinum (Indian Hemp) and nine, adaxial stipple, similar to symptoms ascribed to ambient ozone in the field. Indian Hemp was more

  5. In Situ Redox Manipulation Proof-of-Principle Test at the Fort Lewis Logistics Center: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VR Vermeul; MD Williams; JC Evans; JE Szecsody; BN Bjornstad; TL Liikala

    2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a proof-of-principle test at the Fort Lewis Logistics Center to determine the feasibility of using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology for remediating groundwater contaminated with dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE). ISRM creates a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface to remediate redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater. The permeable treatment zone is formed by injecting a chemical reducing agent (sodium dithionite with pH buffers) into the aquifer through a well to reduce the naturally occurring ferric iron in the sediments to ferrous iron. Once the reducing agent is injected and given sufficient time to react with aquifer sediments, residual chemicals and reaction products are withdrawn from the aquifer through the same well used for the injection. Redox-sensitive contaminants such as TCE, moving through the treatment zone under natural groundwater flow conditions, are destroyed. TCE is degraded via reductive dechlorination within the ISRM treatment zone to benign degradation products (i.e., acetylene, ethylene). Prior to the proof-of-principle field test, the ISRM technology was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments for the reductive dechlorination of dissolved TCE using sediments from the Fort Lewis site. The Logistics Center was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 because of TCE contamination in groundwater beneath the site. A Federal Facilities Agreement between the Army, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology became effective in January 1990, and a Record of Decision (ROD) was signed in September 1990. The major components of the ROD included installation of two pump-and-treat systems for the upper aquifer and further investigation of the lower aquifer and other potential sources of contamination. The pump-and-treat systems became operational in August 1995. Fort Lewis asked PNNL to provide technical support in accelerating Installation Restoration Program site remediation and significantly reducing site life-cycle costs at the Logistics Center. In support of this program, ISRM was selected as an innovative technology for bench and field-scale demonstration. Emplacement of the ISRM treatment zone was accomplished through a series of four separate dithionite injection tests conducted between November 10, 1998 and March 29,2000. An extensive program of chemical monitoring was also performed before, during, and after each injection to evaluate the performance of ISRM. Prior to emplacement of the ISRM treatment zone, the site was extensively characterized with respect to geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Sediment core samples collected for the characterization studies were analyzed in bench-scale column tests at PNNL to determine reducible iron content. These site-specific hydrogeologic and geochemical data were used to develop the emplacement design of the pilot-scale (i.e., single injection well) ISRM treatment zone. Performance data obtained from the proof-of-principle test indicate that field-scale reductive dechlorination of TCE using the ISRM technology is feasible. A treatment zone was created in the subsurface that reduced TCE concentrations as much as 92% on the downgradient side of the reduced zone, from a background concentration of approximately 140 ppb to approximately 11 ppb. The appearance of the principal degradation product, acetylene, also confirmed that TCE destruction was occurring. Analysis of sediment samples collected from post-test boreholes showed a high degree of iron reduction, which helped to confirm the effectiveness of the treatment zone emplacement. Another important goal of the testing program was to provide assurances that chemical treatment of the subsurface did not result in undesirable secondary effects, including formation of toxic TCE degradation products, mobilization of trace elements, and degradation of hydraulic performance. Results obtained from the Fort Lewis ISRM proof-of-principle test, which are c

  6. EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG’s proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson County, Texas, for use in enhanced oil recovery operations; and demonstrate monitoring techniques to verify the permanence of geologic CO2 storage.

  7. Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |IndianIndian

  8. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: American Indian Religious Freedom Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Book contains a copy of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act and guidance for DOE compliance with the statute. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically.

  9. Foreign direct investment in the electricity sector: the Indian perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A.K.; Vohra, Ekta

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    So far, India is losing out in the competition against other emerging economies to attract more foreign direct investment to its electricity sector. This is in large part because the Indian approach towards power sector reforms is more haphazard than the more orderly and sensitive growth model of Singapore and Latin American economies. (author)

  10. Effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the Indian Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the Indian Economy Sourangsu Banerji Visiting study the effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) with respect to India and its economy. We try interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than

  11. ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACRONYMS ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs BLM Bureau of Land Wetlands Inventory ODA Oregon Department of Agriculture ODEQ Oregon Department of Environmental Quality ODF Department of Agriculture USDI United States Department of the Interior USFS United States Forest Service

  12. Research Investments in Large Indian Software Companies Pankaj Jalote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalote, Pankaj

    of the company can use to improve the business. Research is typically not a business or a profit center to bring out newer products in the market place. But why does a service company need investment in researchResearch Investments in Large Indian Software Companies Pankaj Jalote Professor, Department

  13. Quinault Indian Nation Renewable Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Hopps, Institute for Washington's Future; Jesse Nelson, Institute for Washington's Future

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quinault Indian Nation (Nation) initiated this study on conservation and production of renewable energy because this approach created the opportunity: • To become self-sufficient and gain greater control over the energy the Nation uses; • To generate jobs and businesses for its members; • To better manage, sustain, and protect its resources; • To express the cultural values of the Nation in an important new arena. The Nation has relatively small energy needs. These needs are concentrated at two separate points: the Quinault Beach Resort and Casino (QBRC) and Taholah on the Quinault Indian Reservation (QIR). Except for the town of Queets, energy needs are small and scattered. The needs vary greatly over the season. The small scale, widely dispersed, and variable nature of these needs presents a unique challenge to the Nation. Meeting these needs requires a resource and technology that is flexible, effective, and portable. Conservation is the most cost-effective way to meet any need. It is especially effective in a situation like this where production would leave a high per unit cost. This plan is based on first gaining energy savings through conservation. Major savings are possible through: 1. Upgrading home appliances on the QIR. 2. Weatherizing homes and facilities. 3. Changes in lighting/ventilation in the QBRC pool room. These elements of the plan are already being implemented and promise to save the Nation around a quarter of its present costs. Wood biomass is the best resource available to the QIN for energy production either on-site or for commercial development. It is abundant, flexible and portable. Its harvesting has high job potential and these jobs are a good fit for the present “skill set” of the QIN. This plan focuses on using wood biomass to produce energy and other value-added products. Our study considered various technologies and approaches to using wood for energy. We considered production for both on-site and commercial production. This plan calls for commercial-scale production only, with the QIN being the first “customer” for the product. This plan favors employing the pyrolysis technology to produce bio-oil, heat, and char. We favor this approach and technology because it is the most cost effective way to use the available resource. Its main product, bio-oil, has proven utility for the production of heat and electricity. It has promise for use as an alternative fuel, which is a much higher value than present uses of wood and it meets the QIN need for flexibility, scalability, and portability. Char, the secondary product from the pyrolysis process, has proven value-added uses. In addition to these direct benefits, the use of biomass in pyrolysis technology has significant indirect benefits. These benefits include the fact that the technology is a good fit with the Nation’s cultural values, i.e., environmental protection and the holistic use of a resource. It fits well with current QIN enterprises. For example, char could be processed into a charcoal co-product for QIN fish. Finally, the QIN can become a leader in developing and demonstrating this innovative approach to the use of wood. This plan proposes key organization steps to insure both excellent implementation of the plan and taking the best advantage of the processes and facilities put in place. This plan calls for two new QIN organizations: an energy production/distribution corporation and a community development corporation. The production/distribution corporation can be either a utility or a business enterprise that develops and markets renewable energy. The community development corporation can be a not-for-profit to support the QIN in taking best advantage of its energy opportunities. The production and distribution corporation is the subject of a further business planning effort now underway. This plan envisions a community development corporation that works directly with the Business Committee on research, education, and project development. Specifically, this corporation can seek grant funding to research energy m

  14. Department of Mechanical EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology KanpurIndian Institute of Technology Kanpur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    i t l V lid tiSt k P t l E i d it E i t l V lid tifor Small Twofor Small Two--Stroke Petrol Engines and its Experimental ValidationStroke Petrol Engines and its Experimental Validation Sponsored by Indian

  15. Field Demonstration of a High-Efficiency Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioning Unit at Fort Gordon, Augusta, GA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Peter R.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Parker, Graham B.

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a larger program targeting the market transformation of packaged rooftop air conditioning, five high-efficiency rooftop air conditioning products were selected in 2002 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Unitary Air Conditioner (UAC) Technology Procurement (http://www.pnl.gov/uac). In February 2003, Fort Gordon in Augusta, Georgia was chosen as the demonstration site. With the goal of validating the field performance and operation of one of the awarded products, a 10-ton high-efficiency packaged rooftop unit (RTU) manufactured by Global Energy Group (GEG) was installed at Fort Gordon in October 2003. Following equipment installation, power metering, air- and refrigerant-side instrumentation was installed on the GEG RTU and a 4-year old typical-efficiency 20-ton RTU manufactured by AAON . The GEG and AAON units were instrumented identically and operated May through July, 2005, to observe performance under a range of conditions. Based on the data collected as part of this demonstration, the GEG equipment performed at least 8% better in stage-1 (single compressor running) cooling and at least 16% better in stage-2 (both compressors running) than the baseline AAON equipment. Performance comparisons are based on what we call application EER normalized to equivalent specific fan power. The full-load, specific-fan-power-normalized application EERs at ARI design conditions were 10.48 Btu/Wh for the GEG and 9.00 Btu/Wh for the baseline machine. With a cost premium of nearly 50%, and slightly higher maintenance costs, the life-cycle cost analysis shows that the GEG technology pays for itself--a positive net-present value (NPV)--only in climates and buildings with long cooling seasons. Manufacture of this equipment on a larger scale can be expected to reduce costs to the point where it is more broadly cost-effective. The assumed 10-ton baseline and new-technology unit costs are $3824.00 and $5525.00 respectively. If the new technology cost is assumed to drop as sales increase to $4674.50 for a 10-ton unit (i.e. the original cost difference is halved), the life-cycle costs improve. A grid of first cost, annual maintenance cost and electricity price is enumerated and the results presented in the report show the sensitivity of life cycle cost to these three financial parameters in each of eight different climates.

  16. Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontractors. For this townhome project, MassDevelopment, the quasi-governmental agency owner, selected Metric Development of Boston, teaming with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) and Cambridge Seven Architects, to build very high performing market-rate homes. Fort Devens is part of a decommissioned army base in working-class Harvard, Massachusetts, approximately one hour northwest of Boston. The team proposed 12 net zero energy-ready townhomes, meaning that the application of renewable energy systems would result in annual net zero energy use in the homes. The homes were also designed to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 41 before adding renewables. For this project, CARB drew on its experience working with Rural Development Inc. on a series of affordable townhomes in northern Massachusetts. The team carefully planned the site to maximize solar access, daylighting, and efficient building forms. The basic strategy was to design a very efficient thermal enclosure while minimizing incremental cost increases compared with standard construction. Using BEopt modeling software, the team established the requirements of the enclosure and investigated multiple assembly options. They settled on double-wall construction with dense-pack cellulose fill. High performance vinyl windows (U-0.24, solar heat gain coefficient [SHGC]-0.22), a vented R-59 attic, and exceptional air sealing completed the package.

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Fort Wainwright, Operable Unit 2, Fairbanks North Star Borough, AK, March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the selected remedial actions for Operable Unit 2 (OU-2) at Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks, Alaska. OU-2 originally consisted in eight source areas: the defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, the Building 1168 Leach Well, the North Post Site, the 801 Drum Burial Site, the Engineers Park Drum Site, the Drum Site South of the Landfill, Building 3477, and the Tar Sites. The major components of the remedies at source areas are: in situ soil vapor extraction and air sparging of the groundwater to reduce volatile organic compounds to a level that meets state and federal MCLs; institutional controls that would include restrictions on groundwater well installations, site access restrictions, and maintenance of fencing at the DRMO Yard until state and federal MCLs are met; additional institutional controls, including a limitation on refilling the DRMO Yard fire suppression water tank from the existing potable water supply well, until state and federal MCLs are met (except in emergency situations); and natural attenuation to attain Alaska Water Quality Standards after reaching state and federal MCLs.

  18. Mojave, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen PolymersModular Energy Devices

  19. The Indians in the works of William Faulkner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigliazzo, Marc Anthony

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IASTER OF ARTS August 1967 hlajor Subject Engti sh THE INDIANS IN THE 1'/ORKS OF lVILL 1AM FAuLKNER A Thesis by htARC ANTHONY NIGL IAZZO Chairman of Committees (H. nH of . partn nt hlember August 1967 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chap ter I ~ I NTRODUCT! ON.... . . , ~ I I ~ A SHOR T H I 3 TORY OF THF CHOC TA'iY AND CHICKASA&d INDIANS I I I. CONTRAD!CTIONS IN FAULl!NER'S Pli'F SENTAi!ONS OF INDI AiN CHARAC TERS I V A COURTSHIP AND A JUSTICE ~ V. "RED LEAVES" AND "LOI" 37 VI . SAll FATHERS IN ' THE OLD Pr...

  20. Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A. C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

  1. Market-Based Indian Grid Integration Study Options: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoltenberg, B.; Clark, K.; Negi, S. K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian state of Gujarat is forecasting solar and wind generation expansion from 16% to 32% of installed generation capacity by 2015. Some states in India are already experiencing heavy wind power curtailment. Understanding how to integrate variable generation (VG) into the grid is of great interest to local transmission companies and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. This paper describes the nature of a market-based integration study and how this approach, while new to Indian grid operation and planning, is necessary to understand how to operate and expand the grid to best accommodate the expansion of VG. Second, it discusses options in defining a study's scope, such as data granularity, generation modeling, and geographic scope. The paper also explores how Gujarat's method of grid operation and current system reliability will affect how an integration study can be performed.

  2. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  3. American Indian Women of the Plains and Northern Woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlmann, Annette

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a short paragraph of quantitative data documenting American Indian poverty, health problems, high rates of alcoholism, and high birth rates. Only two, Kammeyer et, ale (1990) and Vander Zanden (1990) explore the continued exploitation of natural... and harvesting, dominated by women, as on hunting and warfare. They lived in 3 Mid-American Review ofSociology predominantly sedentary, economically autonomous, villages where women producedample food surplus. They not only owned the products of their labor...

  4. National Coexistence is Our Bull Durham: Revisiting "The Indian Today"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valandra, Edward C.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ); and the development of the St. Lawrence Seaway Project (Mohawk Nation), and their activism has been well documented.5 The Haudenosaunee Confederacy's proactive opposition to these colonial assaults caught the attention of Native Country, indicating that other... social movement to characterize the Indian movement is a deliberate choice. In their study of four different social or protest movements—unemployed workers, industrial workers, civil rights, and welfare rights—Frances F. Piven and Richard A. Cloward...

  5. Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushe, S.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (IREEED) developed in collaboration by the United States Department of Energy and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. IREEED provides succinct summaries of India's central and state government policies and incentives related to renewable energy and energy efficiency. The online, public database was developed under the U.S.- India Energy Dialogue and the Clean Energy Solution Center.

  6. EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications to provide training, and technical and outreach support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program.

  7. A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares Introduction Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares

  8. Aditya Soni, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, adityasoni1@gmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanathan, M.

    1 ________________ Aditya Soni, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, adityasoni1@gmail.com Ramanathan Muthuganapathy, Department of Engineering Design, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, India, ssndipan

  9. Impacts of Pacific and Indian Ocean Coupling on Wintertime Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation: A Basin-Coupling CGCM Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Shu-Ping; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the central Indian and Pacific oceans. We notice from FigureIP) Run, (c) the Pacific Ocean (PO) Run, and (d) the Indiantropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. Journal of Climate 10:

  10. DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects, Fall 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Fall 2012.

  11. Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

  12. Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation by Andrew D. Mills: ___________________________________________ Jane Stahlhut Date #12;Wind Energy in Indian Country A.D. Mills Abstract - ii - Abstract Utility-scale wind projects are increasingly being developed in rural areas of the United States. In the West

  13. Acculturation and Its Effects on Help-Seeking Attitudes among Asian Indians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Sarita

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lack of research in the mental health field and on help-seeking regarding the Asian Indian population. Asian Indians are the third largest Asian subgroup in the United States; thus, it is important to understand their culture...

  14. Closure of the global overturning circulation through the Indian, Pacific and Southern Oceans: schematics and transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    internal diapycnal transformation in the deep Indian and Pacific Oceans. All three northern-source Deep and Pacific Oceans; only 0.1 PW is gained at the surface in the Southern Ocean. Thus, while an adiabatic model full participation of the diffusive Indian and Pacific Oceans, with a basin-averaged diffusivity

  15. Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be? Harbor Branch launches new study of humans who eat fish and live around the estuary By Scott Wyland Tuesday, May 22, 2012 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A 20-year-old man fishes local waters every day for his meals and scoffs

  16. Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indian Solar Cities Programme supports 60 Indian cities in the development of EE and RE projects. Aims to reduce conventional energy demand by 10% by 2013, compared to a baseline year of 2008, and support is provided to municipal corporations for preparing and implementing a master plan.

  17. Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations from house keeping agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations from house keeping agencies Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore (Academy), invites quotations for House Keeping Services at its office into a formal agreement on a stamp paper of Rs 200/- the format of which will be provided by the Academy. Please

  18. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080. Indian Academy of the Academy consist of publication of scientific journals, election of Fellows, organizing scientific meetings, initiatives such as promoting science education,etc. The Academy is looking for a suitable person to fill

  19. Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 The Academy or email before 20 December 2013 to: The Executive Secretary Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue: 1. The Academy reserves the right to restrict the number of candidates for interview to a reasonable

  20. Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

  1. Is the deep Indian Ocean MOC sustained by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    % of the world ocean. [3] Here, the energy budget of the deep Indian Ocean MOC is assessed using a range of the Indian Ocean overturning circulation with estimates of energy sources (winds, tides, and geostrophic are capable of carrying energy from ocean boundaries into the interior, and are generally considered

  2. Low-risk and cost-effective prior savings estimates for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thornton, J.W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, the authors have collected energy use data which allowed them to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. They believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights. The analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper.

  3. Limited Energy Engineering Analysis (EEAP) study of summer boiler at high temperature hot water plants, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a study of the existing High Temperature Hot Water Distribution Systems at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. There are two systems with central boilers located in Buildings 1021 and 2369. The study focuses on the operation of the boilers during the summer months which is required to provide domestic hot water and sanitizing steam to various buildings. Because the boilers are operating under a reduced load condition, it may be cost effective in terms of energy conservation to implement one of the following energy conservation opportunities (ECO`s).

  4. Indian Reservations in Kansas and the Extinguishment of Their Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Annie Heloise

    1900-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1802.*f Her construction of that document was not consistent with the facts in the case; for the federal government had not promised to expel the In­ dians from Georgia, but only to extinguish their title within the reserved limits of the state " a...^ C i^J j ) INDIAN RESERVATIONS IN KANSAS ANI^EHE EXTINGUISHMENT OF THEIR TITLE. Thesis prepared in partial fulfilment of the requirement of the University of Kanowwfey ^ w degree of master of arts, by A N N A H B L O I S B A B E L , * of Salina...

  5. Office of Indian Energy Announces New Staff | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, July 29, 2009Office of Indian

  6. Office of Indian Energy START Team | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, July 29,Office of Indian Energy

  7. Before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteriesEnergy Committee on Energy andIndian Affairs

  8. Before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteriesEnergy Committee on Energy andIndian

  9. Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for #SpaceWeekOMB Policies OMBOffice ofOffice of Indian

  10. Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofC T OEnergyOffice of Indian Energy

  11. 2015 Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Flier | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, soFuel Cell24Industrial201516-17, 2015 |2015Indian

  12. Indian Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP WindSatelliteInSAR JumpRenewableChange | OpenIndian

  13. Indian Mesa Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP WindSatelliteInSAR JumpRenewableChange | OpenIndianI

  14. Indian Wells, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty,Jump7 Varnish cacheTransport(Redirected from Indian Wells,

  15. Indian Wells, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty,Jump7 Varnish cacheTransport(Redirected from Indian

  16. Indian Country Solar Energy Potential Estimates & DOE IE Updates

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar2014 || DepartmentMarchINDIAN

  17. Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian Bureau of

  18. Indian Institute of Petroleum Dehradrun | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian

  19. IndianOil CREDA Biofuels Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES)IndianOil CREDA

  20. Minto Upgrades Community Lodge with START Support, Fall/Winter 2014 (Newsletter), Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLE OF CONTENTSTogether withEnergy Most CatalystINDIAN

  1. Back-end of the fuel cycle - Indian scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wattal, P.K. [Nuclear Recycle Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-4000 85 (India)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has a key role in meeting the energy demands of India. This can be sustained by ensuring robust technology for the back end of the fuel cycle. Considering the modest indigenous resources of U and a huge Th reserve, India has adopted a three stage Nuclear Power Programme (NPP) based on 'closed fuel cycle' approach. This option on 'Recovery and Recycle' serves twin objectives of ensuring adequate supply of nuclear fuel and also reducing the long term radio-toxicity of the wastes. Reprocessing of the spent fuel by Purex process is currently employed. High Level Liquid Waste (HLW) generated during reprocessing is vitrified and undergoes interim storage. Back-end technologies are constantly modified to address waste volume minimization and radio-toxicity reduction. Long-term management of HLW in Indian context would involve partitioning of long lived minor actinides and recovery of valuable fission products specifically cesium. Recovery of minor actinides from HLW and its recycle is highly desirable for the sustained growth of India's NPPs. In this context, programme for developing and deploying partitioning technologies on industrial scale is pursued. The partitioned elements could be either transmuted in Fast Reactors (FRs)/Accelerated Driven Systems (ADS) as an integral part of sustainable Indian NPP. (authors)

  2. Development of energy-efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, P.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of advanced techniques in engineering simulation and economic analysis for the development of efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators is illustrated in this paper. A key feature of this methodology is refrigerator simulation to generate energy savings for a set of energy-efficient design options and life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis with these design options. The LCC of a refrigerator is analyzed as a function of five variables: nominal discount rate, fuel price, appliance lifetime, incremental price, and incremental energy savings. The frequency of occurrence of the LCC minimum at any design option indicates the optimum efficiency level or range. Studies carried out in the US and European Economic Community show that the location of the LCC minimum under different scenarios (e.g., variable fuel price, life-time, discount rate, and incremental price) is quite stable. Thus, an efficiency standard can be developed based on the efficiency value at the LCC minimum. This paper examines and uses this methodology in developing efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators. The potential efficiency standard value is indicated to be 0.65 kWh/day for a 165-liter, CFC-based, manual defrost, single-door refrigerator-freezer.

  3. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the use of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (FVNHS) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of electric vehicles (EVs) into the agencies’ fleet. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to EV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles) could fulfill the mission requirements. FVNHS identified three vehicles in its fleet for consideration. While the FVNHS vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and pool missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The logged vehicles included a pickup truck and a minivan. This report will show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for both mission categories, because each has sufficient range for individual trips and time available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle’s home base, high-use work areas, or in intermediate areas along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

  4. The role of private participation in enhancing the Indian transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Nand, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian transport sector, one of the largest transport networks in the world, faces some serious issues. These may be identified as follows: * Unmet demand for service and infrastructure * Conflicting responsibilities ...

  5. American Indian nations comprise a sig-nificant portion of the lands in the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    their wariness: Well-remem- bered episodes such as the Cold War pursuit of uranium on the Colorado Plateau, a recent form of geophysical exploration on Ameri- can Indian homelands, led to resource exploitation

  6. Does "InDIan BlooD" stIll Matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    18, 2011 ­ January 8, 2012. Quantum Leap: phOTO CApTION: Installation shot of "The Faces of Native Indians are defined not solely by self-designation but by federal, state, and tribal laws. Blood quantum

  7. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY ADVERTISEMENT NO. F 34 / 10 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY ADVERTISEMENT NO. F 34 / 10 11 Applications are invited) Secondary School (Class ten) certificate or its equivalent; and (b) Diploma/certificate in preschool

  8. Two sixteenth century chroniclers and the Indian policy of the Spanish state 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huffman, Sarah Phillips

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Castro, De la edad conf lictiva (Madrid: Taurus Ediciones, 1972), and La realidad histdrica de ~Es aPra (Mexico: Editorial Porrua, 1973+ 19 Liss, p. 34. 21 CHAPTER III SPANISH INDIAN POLICY: THEORIES AND PHILOSOPHIES Lewis Hanke, an eminent...

  9. 21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Arundhati

    This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through ...

  10. The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    Indian Ocean towards the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone at about 6o S. We show that especially biofuel air quality (3-5). In rural residential areas, notably in India, the burning of biofuels, such as wood

  11. Reformers Revealed: American Indian Progressives at Haskell Institute, Lawrence, Kansas, 1884-1909

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Eric P.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Haskell Institute opened in1884, an early example of federal off-reservation boarding schools for American Indian youth. The goal was assimilation: strip away traditional languages, spiritual beliefs, tribal customs, even ...

  12. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph. 2332 7311).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    YEAR BOOK 2014 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES #12;Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph Academy of Sciences C.V. Raman Avenue Post Box No. 8005 Sadashivanagar Post Bangalore 560 080 India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Role of the Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Statutes

  13. Prevalences of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hindu Indian subcommunities in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaiya, K L; Swai, A B; McLarty, D G; Bhopal, Raj; Alberti, K G

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBJECTIVES--To seek differences in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and other coronary heart disease risk factors, and to identify factors associated with these differences within a Hindu Indian community. DESIGN--Population ...

  14. Technological learning and the evolution of the Indian pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivas, Smita

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors have been characterised by three features considered analogous to technological stagnation: low R&D investments, "copying" on-patent drugs (legal in India if a novel ...

  15. Life-Cycle Assessment of the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in Indian Locomotives (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With India's transportation sector relying heavily on imported petroleum-based fuels, the Planning Commission of India and the Indian government recommended the increased use of blended biodiesel in transportation fleets, identifying Jatropha as a potentially important biomass feedstock. The Indian Oil Corporation and Indian Railways are collaborating to increase the use of biodiesel blends in Indian locomotives with blends of up to B20, aiming to reduce GHG emissions and decrease petroleum consumption. To help evaluate the potential for Jatropha-based biodiesel in achieving sustainability and energy security goals, this study examines the life cycle, net GHG emission, net energy ratio, and petroleum displacement impacts of integrating Jatropha-based biodiesel into locomotive operations in India. In addition, this study identifies the parameters that have the greatest impact on the sustainability of the system.

  16. Depositional and diagenetic history of some Jurassic carbonates, Indian Rock-Gilmer Field, Upshur County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall, Steven Anthony

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the origin of the paleostructure which pro- duced the shallow marine environments during Cotton Valley/Haynesvi lie deposition was a Paleozoic high. The Indian Rock-Gilmer Field was a shallow area in the Jurassic Cotton Valley/Haynesville sea situated...~ ~ ~ 0 '''j DEPOSITIONAL AND DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF SOME JURASSIC CARBONATES, INDIAN ROCK-GILMER FIELD, UPSHUR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY FALL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment...

  17. "Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeBeau, Patrick Russell

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University Patrick Russell LeBeau Motto Realizing the dreams of generations past, through preserving those of the future. Undergraduates... logo depicting the circle of life and situating the colors as we have, the American Indian Studies Program (AISP) at Michigan State University honors the Three Fires People of Michigan, the Chippewa (Ojibwe), Ottawa (Odawa), Pottawatomie (Potawatomie...

  18. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a unique clade in South Asia.

  19. Low-Risk and Cost-Effective Prior Savings Estimates for Large-Scale Energy Conservation Projects in Housing: Learning from the Fort Polk GHP Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many opportunities exist for large-scale energy conservation projects in housing: military housing, federally-subsidized low-income housing, and planned communities (condominiums, townhomes, senior centers) to name a few. Energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) is now receiving greater attention, as a means to implement such projects. This paper proposes an improved method for prior (to construction) savings estimates for these projects. More accurate prior estimates reduce project risk, decrease financing costs, and help avoid post-construction legal disputes over performance contract baseline adjustments. The proposed approach to prior estimates is verified against data from Fort Polk, LA. In the course of evaluating the ESPC at Fort Polk, Louisiana, we have collected energy use data - both at the electrical feeder level and at the level of individual residences - which allowed us to develop calibrated engineering models which accurately predict pre-retrofit energy consumption. We believe that such calibrated models could be used to provide much more accurate estimates of energy savings in retrofit projects, particularly in cases where the energy consumption of large populations of housing can be captured on one or a few meters. The improved savings estimating approach described here is based on an engineering model calibrated to field-collected data from the pre-retrofit period. A dynamic model of pre-retrofit energy use was developed for all housing and non-housing loads on a complete electrical feeder at Fort Polk. The feeder serves 46 buildings containing a total of 200 individual apartments. Of the 46 buildings, there are three unique types, and among these types the only difference is compass orientation. The model included the heat transfer characteristics of the buildings, the pre-retrofit air source heat pump, a hot water consumption model and a profile for electrical use by lights and other appliances. Energy consumption for all 200 apartments was totaled, and by adjusting thermostat setpoints and outdoor air infiltration parameters, the models were matched to field-collected energy consumption data for the entire feeder. The energy conservation measures were then implemented in the calibrated model: the air source heat pumps were replaced by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) with desuperheaters; hot water loads were reduced to account for the low-flow shower heads; and lighting loads were reduced to account for fixture delamping and replacement with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Our analysis of pre- and post-retrofit data (Shonder and Hughes, 1997) indicates that the retrofits have saved 30.3% of pre-retrofit electrical energy consumption on the feeder modeled in this paper. Using the method outlined, we have been able to predict this savings within 0.1% of its measured value, using only pre-construction energy consumption data, and data from one pilot test site. It is well-known that predictions of savings from energy conservation programs are often optimistic, especially in the case of residential retrofits. Fels and keating (1993) cite several examples of programs which achieved as little as 20% of the predicted energy savings. Factors which influence the sometimes large discrepancies between actual and predicted savings include changes in occupancy, take-back effects (in which more efficient system operation leads occupants to choose higher levels of comfort), and changes in base energy use (e.g. through purchase of additional appliances such as washing machines and clothes dryers). An even larger factor, perhaps, is the inaccuracy inherent in the engineering models (BLAST, DOE-2, etc.) commonly used to estimate building energy consumption, if these models are not first calibrated to site-monitored data. For example, prior estimates of base-wide savings from the Fort Polk ESPC were on the order of 40% of pre-retrofit electrical use; our analysis has shown the true savings for the entire project (which includes 16 separate electrical feeders) to be about 32%. It should be noted that the retrofits ca

  20. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  1. For details kindly visit the official website of Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur: www.iitk.ac.in A quarterly newsletter of Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur for Institute's alumni and friends 2005-06/I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    .iitk.ac.in A quarterly newsletter of Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur for Institute's alumni and friends 2005-06/I

  2. From Activism to Academics: The Evolution of American Indian Studies at San Fransisco State University, 1968-2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De La Torre, Joely

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the department of American Indian Studies. Students at SFSU such as Wilma Mankiller (Hall of Fame, SFSU), former Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, to current adjunct faculty Joesph Myers (Porno) Director of the National Indian Justice Center, offer a... University Self Study for Reaccredidation, WASC Report, Chapter 10, Enhancing Human Relations, Spring 2001. 13. Ibid. 14. Adjunct faculty Joseph Myers (Porno) is the founder and director of the National Indian Justice Center. Nicole Myers-Urn (Porno...

  3. Haskell Indian Nations University Roundtable: Increased Productions of Traditional and Other Foods in an Era of Abrupt Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hosted by the Haskell Indian University International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management and Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Working Group, this roundtable discussion will identify and...

  4. DOE Office of Indian Energy: Leveraging Tribal Resources to Support Department of Defense Strategic Energy Goals (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs fact sheet identifies tribal technology generation potential and Native American tribal lands located near military bases.

  5. Correlation and climate sensitivity of human health and environmental indicators in the Salish Sea- Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project focused on the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, whose traditional territories are particularly vulnerable to threats like sea-level rise and increased storms. These sensitivities of...

  6. U.S. DOE and the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on biofuels between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)

  7. Cost to the Indian economy of mining coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, N.K.; Bhave, A. [Indian Inst. of Technology, New Delhi (India). Centre of Energy Studies

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Like steel production, energy production is one of the significant parameters of stage of advancement of a developing economy. Availability of energy at the right price is vital for development. Coal is a primary resource of energy. The price of coal has been a very important parameter in the Indian economy. In the past 20 years coal has been marketed at administered prices. There has been a very complex mechanism at work for this purpose. There have been a lot of incentives given to thin industry. These, in fact, are tantamount to subsidies. The role of subsidies is well acknowledged and is considered quite useful to the economy. A detailed analysis by carefully studying the methodology of mining and delineating various stages in mining has been conducted, and the subsidies, which have traditionally not been quantified, have been calculated The impact of each parameter on the total subsidy has been studied to facilitate continuance or change in the subsidy by adopting a suitable strategy for coal pricing, as presently the considerations show unaccounted-for subsidies to be more than 70% of the price charged.

  8. Fear of fatness, eating attitudes, and anti-fat perspectives: a cross-cultural exploration of Euro-American and Indian university students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambwani, Suman

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Although recent data suggest the existence of anti-fat attitudes, fear of fatness, and maladaptive eating attitudes among Indian women, few researchers have examined the cross-cultural validity of their instruments before assessing Indian samples...

  9. National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal Submission to Museum Stores National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Our Museum Stores your craft for sale in our Museum Stores, vendor shall be responsible for complying with all applicable

  10. National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/ Jewelry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/ Jewelry Submission to Museum Stores National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Our Museum Institution your craft for sale in our Museum Stores, vendor shall be responsible for complying with all

  11. National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/Books & Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/Books & Media Submission to Museum Stores National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Our Museum Institution your craft for sale in our Museum Stores, vendor shall be responsible for complying with all

  12. The impact of agricultural intensification and irrigation on landatmosphere interactions and Indian monsoon precipitation --A mesoscale modeling perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    and Indian monsoon precipitation -- A mesoscale modeling perspective E.M. Douglas a, , A. Beltrán-Przekurat b convergence, mesoscale convection, and precipitation patterns over the Indian monsoon region. Four experiments pattern and changes in mesoscale precipitation. These agricultural changes, including irrigation modify

  13. Indian Journal of Marine Sciences VoL 35(2), June 2006, pp. 139-152

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    around 120 to Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) was conducted 150 km while the inland penetration breeze circulation along the west COllst of India during the Indian Ocean Experiment (1999 showed the extent of the sea breeze over the ocean to be 200 km. A mesoscale numerical model was used 10

  14. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Is the Indian Ocean MOC driven by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    of the ocean and that internal wave energy levels in the interior Indian Ocean are too weak to sustain, covering less than 20% of the world ocean. We assess the energy budget of the Indian Ocean MOC based circulation with published estimates of the energy put into the deep Indian Ocean by winds and tides. The main

  15. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K. [ITER- India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1x10{sup 18}/m{sup 3}, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  16. Sustainable solar thermal power generation (STPG) technologies in Indian context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.S. [Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, New Delhi (India). Solar Energy Centre

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    India is a fast developing country. Some of the factors like population growth, industrialization, liberalization in economic policies, green revolution and awareness toward the environment, are increasing the electricity demand rapidly. As per the 14th Power Survey Report, an energy deficit of (+) 9% and peak demand deficit of (+) 18% have been estimated. Keeping in view the liberalization in economic policies, this deficit may be higher by the year 2000 AD. An estimation indicates that India is blessed with solar energy to the tune of 5 x 10{sup 15} kWh/yr. Being clean and inexhaustible source of energy, it can be used for large-scale power generation in the country. Keeping in view the present state-of-art technologies for STPG in MW range, best possible efforts are required to be made by all the concerned, to develop sustainable STPG technology of the future, specially for tropical regions. Standardization of vital equipment is an important aspect. There are a few required criteria like simple and robust technology, its transfer and adaptation in tropical climate conditions; high plant load factor without fossil-fired backup; availability of plant during evening peak and night hours; least use of fragile components, and capacity optimization for MW plants as per solar irradiance and environmental factors. In this paper, efforts have been made to compare the different STPG technologies. On the basis, of literature surveyed and studies carried out by the author, it may be stated that Central Receiver System technologies using molten salt and volumetric air receiver, along with molten salt and ceramic thermal storage respectively seems to be suitable and comparable in Indian context. Performance of SOLAR-TWO and PHOEBUS plants may be decisive.

  17. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troge, Michael [Project Manager

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

  18. The distribution of dissolved and particulate organic carbon in the southeastern Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abd El-Reheim, Hussein Anwar

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . rbe rloSxee of NASTI. R OP SCIENCE Decerabex 1976 Na)or Subject: OueanoStaPby THE DISTRIBUTION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN THE SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN OCEAN A Thesis by HUSSEIN ANWAR ABD EL-REHEIM (Co-Chairman of ommittee) (Co...-C irman of Commit e) (Head of Department) (Member) r (Member) December 1976 ABSTtlACT The Distribution of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Carbon In the Southeastern Indian Ocean. (December 1976) Hussein Anwan Abd El-Reheim B. Sc. , Alexandria...

  19. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a “regional” science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school — grades 6 through 8 — students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach — although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair (NAISEF) and EXPO at the Albuquerque, NM Convention Center. Albuquerque is also the home of the AISES national office. The AISES staff also recruits volunteers to assist with implementation of the science and math bowl event. In 2011, there were 7 volunteers; in 2012, 15 volunteers, and in 2013, 19 volunteers. Volunteers are recruited from a variety of local sources, including Sandia Laboratories, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute students, Department of Defense, as well as family members of AISES staff. For AISES, the goals of the Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl project are to have more Native students learn science, for them to gain confidence in competing, and to reward their effort in order to motivate them to pursue studies in the sciences and engineering. For DOE, the goals of the project are to get more Native students to compete at the National Science Bowl, held in Washington, DC.

  20. The social construction of difference in the Asian Indian community at Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Susan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on a qualitative analysis of the social construction of difference between two groups in the Asian Indian community at Texas A&M University. one group is comprised of students who have come from India for graduate study at A...

  1. Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase III Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department & Center for Protected Area Management and Training #12;Report Authors This training program summary report was produced by Andrew W. Don Carlos, Tara L. Teel

  2. Interannual Rainfall Extremes over Southwest Western Australia Linked to Indian Ocean Climate Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Interannual Rainfall Extremes over Southwest Western Australia Linked to Indian Ocean Climate and Prediction, School of Mathematics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (Manuscript received 15 December 2004, in final form 24 August 2005) ABSTRACT Interannual rainfall extremes over southwest Western

  3. This article was downloaded by:[Indian Institute of Technology] On: 10 December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    of the complex valued non-linear regression model Debasis Kundu a a Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute, Debasis (1991) 'Asymptotic properties of the complex valued non-linear regression model', Communications of Technology, Kanpur Kanpur, PIN 208016, India Key Words and Phrases: Non-linear regression, Consistent Estima

  4. United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Testimony for the September 18, 2009 Roundtable on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    a study, which concluded that: The costs of continuing on our current energy path are steep. American and environment. If America continues along a business-as-usual energy path, U.S. fossil fuel spending is likely on Indian Energy and Energy Efficiency Opportunities by Daniel M. Kammen Professor in the Energy

  5. Indian agricultural development in the context of economic reforms. Causes of change and issues for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Indian agricultural development in the context of economic reforms. Causes of change and issues the influence of reforms in the 1990s regarding the agricultural development in India. Many studies have sector rather than on the agricultural sector. After India gained independence, the government

  6. Interactions between the Indonesian Throughflow and circulations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Tommy

    Interactions between the Indonesian Throughflow and circulations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans with the Indonesian Throughflow (IT), particularly concerning subsurface currents in the Pacific Ocean, are studied model (LOM), both confined to the Indo-Pacific basin; and a global, ocean general circulation model

  7. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY P.O. IIT Powai, Mumbai 400 076

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY P.O. IIT Powai, Mumbai ­ 400 076 Advertisement No. D-45 /08 ten) certificate or its equivalent ; and (ii) Diploma / certificate in pre-school teacher education/Electronics/ Printing Technology of three years duration. Knowledge of computer applications. * Scales are likely

  8. www.cleanenergysolutions.org INDIAN RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY POLICY DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.cleanenergysolutions.org INDIAN RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY POLICY DATABASE India efficiency and renewable energy technologies throughout the country. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) have partnered to develop an online database

  9. LLL reducing with the most significant bits Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villard, Gilles

    at a lower cost than using the entire initial basis. An approach for LLL-reducing a basis B may then be: 1LLL reducing with the most significant bits Saruchi Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi analyse an efficient reduction algorithm when B is itself a small deformation of an LLL-reduced basis

  10. Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper Quy-Toan Do (The World ABSTRACT Water pollution levels in many developing countries remain significantly higher than in the developed world. While such pollution is often a byproduct of economic activity, it also imparts a health

  11. Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Composition of Municipal Solid Waste- Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context of an eternally inherent low heating value on the other. Current status of Solid Waste Management The MSW Rules front in India17 . None of the major metros have any projects of significant scale of Solid Waste

  12. The Power (Law) of Indian Markets: Analysing NSE and BSE Trading Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Sitabhra

    The Power (Law) of Indian Markets: Analysing NSE and BSE Trading Statistics Sitabhra Sinha and Raj-tailed cumulative distribution, consistent with a power law having ex- ponent 3, similar to that observed in developed markets. However, the distributions of trading volume and the number of trades have a different na

  13. Newsletter of the Indian Academy of Sciences 2005 Annual Meeting ........................ 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    Newsletter of the Indian Academy of Sciences Inside... 2005 Annual Meeting. 43 March 2006 The seventy-first Annual Meeting of the Academy was held at Bharathidasan University in bridging physics and chemistry in selected areas. The opening lecture by the President of the Academy, TV

  14. Journal of Indian Society of Remote Sensing V. 32, No. 4 (December, 2004 Issue)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Journal of Indian Society of Remote Sensing V. 32, No. 4 (December, 2004 Issue) http in the Ganga basin. Aerosols are responsible for lowering of land surface temperature i.e. cooling effect which on radiative forcing that cause negative forcing (cooling) at surface and positive effect (warming) at top

  15. Seasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    energy and exert profound impacts on large-scale ocean circulations. Satellite altimeter ob- servations- sociations with the large-scale oceanic circulations and the climate. The global eddy kinetic energy (EKESeasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian

  16. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to collect preliminary site data. A report was prepared by Alaska Power & Telephone (Larry Coupe) including preliminary layouts, capacities, potential environmental issues, and projected costs. Findings and Conclusions Wind Energy The average wind resources measured at both sites were marginal, with annual average wind speeds of 13.6-14.0 mph at a 65-meter hub height, and wind shears of 0.08-0.13. Using GE 1.5 MW wind turbines with a hub height of 65 meters, yields a net capacity factor of approximately 0.19. The cost-of-energy for a commercial project is estimated at approximately 9.6 cents per kWh using current costs for capital and equipment prices. Economic viability for a commercial wind power station would require a subsidy of 40-50% of the project capital cost, loans provided at approximately 2% rate of interest, or a combination of grants and loans at substantially below market rates. Recommendations: Because the cost-of-energy from wind power is decreasing, and because there may be small pockets of higher winds on the reservation, our recommendation is to: (1) Leave one of the two anemometer towers, preferably the 50-meter southern unit MCC, in place and continue to collect data from this site. This site would serve as an excellent reference anemometer for the Olympic Peninsula, and, (2) If funds permit, relocate the northern tower (MCB) to a promising small site closer to the transmission line with the hope of finding a more energetic site that is easier to develop. Small Hydroelectric There are a very limited number of sites on the reservation that have potential for economical hydroelectric development, even in conjunction with water supply development. Two sites emerged as the most promising and were evaluated: (1) One utilizing four creeks draining the north side of the Cape Flattery peninsula (Cape Creeks), and (2) One on the Waatch River to the south of Neah Bay. The Cape Creeks site would be a combination water supply and 512 kW power generation facility and would cost a approximately $11,100,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 1,300,0

  17. An inverse analytical technique applied to a chloride contamination of groundwater at Indian School and Levering sites, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, Helen

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the Indian River Site. were used to store road salt. Seepage from precipitation on these road salt piles has resulted in chloride contamination of the groundwater down gradient of the storage areas. The resulting chloride plumes were examined using two... Descriptions. 3. 1. 1. Indian River Site, 3. 1. 2. Levering Site 3. 2. Modeling Results for the Michigan Sites . . . . . . . . 3. 2. 1. Modeling Results for the Indian River Site, 3. 2. 2, MOdeling Results for the Levering Site. . 20 20 22 23 34 4...

  18. Estimating the Energy, Demand and Cost Savings from a Geothermal Heat Pump ESPC Project at Fort Polk, LA Through Utility Bill Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are a method of financing energy conservation projects using the energy cost savings generated by the conservation measures themselves. Ideally, reduced energy costs are visible as reduced utility bills, but in fact this is not always the case. On large military bases, for example, a single electric meter typically covers hundreds of individual buildings. Savings from an ESPC involving only a small number of these buildings will have little effect on the overall utility bill. In fact, changes in mission, occupancy, and energy prices could cause substantial increases in utility bills. For this reason, other, more practical, methods have been developed to measure and verify savings in ESPC projects. Nevertheless, increasing utility bills--when ESPCs are expected to be reducing them--are problematic and can lead some observers to question whether savings are actually being achieved. In this paper, the authors use utility bill analysis to determine energy, demand, and cost savings from an ESPC project that installed geothermal heat pumps in the family housing areas of the military base at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The savings estimates for the first year after the retrofits were found to be in substantial agreement with previous estimates that were based on submetered data. However, the utility bills also show that electrical use tended to increase as time went on. Since other data show that the energy use in family housing has remained about the same over the period, the authors conclude that the savings from the ESPC have persisted, and increases in electrical use must be due to loads unassociated with family housing. This shows that under certain circumstances, and with the proper analysis, utility bills can be used to estimate savings from ESPC projects. However, these circumstances are rare and over time the comparison may be invalidated by increases in energy use in areas unaffected by the ESPC.

  19. College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), was founded in 1971 and is located on 164 acres in northwest Albuquerque, New Mexico in the center of New Mexico`s agricultural and high-tech corridors. SIPI became accredited as a community college in 1993, serves Native Americans nationwide, and is governed by a nationally-tribally appointed Board of Regents (Jicarilla Apache, Joint Oklahoma Tribes, Mescalero Apache, Navajo Nation-Arizona, Navajo Nation-New Mexico, Ten Southern Pueblos, and Eight Northern Pueblos, Southern Ute, Inter-tribal Council of Arizona, and Oglala Sioux). In 1993, The US Department of Education, TRIO Programs no longer funded the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) Summer Math and Science Enrichment Program. However, with US Department of Energy funding SIPI was able to continue service to the Native American community under the new title of College Bound American Indian Math and Science (AIMS) Enrichment Program. This new program continued the goals and objectives of the TRIO program with an expanded focus that included students from more Native American communities nationwide. The program also interfaced with a teacher enrichment program (Rural American Indian Science Education-RAISE) sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Sandia National Labs (SNL). SIPI in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) Laboratory established a mathematics and science enrichment program at SIPI for students attending rural high schools serving predominantly Native American populations. The primary goal of the program was to provide 9th--12th grade students, mostly Native American, the skills and knowledge, interest and motivation, and strategies to remain in high school and pursue a college education in a math, science, or technology based field. Each year, the program included a six-week intensive residential summer program located at SIPI as well as academic year support activities at the student`s high school. A summary of the program activities during the grant period is given.

  20. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Anchorage, Alaska, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Anchorage, Alaska Roundtable on Tribal Energy Policy convened at 10:00 a.m., Thursday April 15th, at the downtown Anchorage Hilton. The meeting was held by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the Office of Indian Energy, and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the Office of Indian Energy, represented DOE. Approximately twenty?seven people attended the meeting, including representatives of three native Alaskan villages, four Alaskan tribal corporations representing more than 40 tribal governments, as well as representatives from tribal associations and conferences. Interested state, federal, and non?profit representatives also were present. A full list of attendees is at the end of this summary. The meeting was facilitated by the Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute).  

  1. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Pala, California, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    PALA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Pala, California, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Pala Resort. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, attended. Tribal leaders and representatives from five tribal communities also attended. There were thirteen participants. The meeting was facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). She was assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.   

  2. Crisis in cultural adjustment: a comparative study of Indian and Korean graduate students at Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, Lynda Jay

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to determine factors influencing acculturation to a host society. It also examined the coping strategies utilized for success in a new academic environment. International Indian and Korean graduate student groups were...

  3. The Importance of Historical Trauma & Stress as a Factor in Diabetes and Obesity Prevention among American Indian Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Jason William

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the last forty years, the federal government and tribal governments have developed and administered programs to lower the obesity and diabetes rates among American Indian populations. Despite these joint efforts, a ...

  4. Geographic variations in access and utilization of cancer screening services: examining disparities among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towne, Samuel D; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite recommendations for cancer screening for breast and colorectal cancer among the Medicare population, preventive screenings rates are often lower among vulnerable populations such as the small but rapidly growing older American Indian...

  5. Webinar: DOE Funding Opportunity for the Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands (DE-FOA-0001021)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The intent of this webinar is to provide information for potential applicants to the Energy Departments Funding Opportunity for the Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands ...

  6. Statistics of the French purse seine fleet targeting tropical tunas in the Indian Ocean (1991-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    tropical tunas, i.e. Thunnus albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Thunnus obesus in the Indian Ocean during albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus obesus, fishing aggregating device 1. Introduction The French purse

  7. Heterogeneity of coronary heart disease risk factors in Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and European origin populations: cross sectional study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhopal, Raj; Unwin, Nigel; White, M; Yallop, J; Walker, L; Alberti, K G; Harland, J; Patel, S; Ahmad, N; Turner, C; Watson, B; Kaur, D; Kulkarni, A; Laker, M; Tavridou, A

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: To compare coronary risk factors and disease prevalence among Indians, Pakistanis, and Bangladeshis, and in all South Asians (these three groups together) with Europeans. Design: Cross sectional survey. ...

  8. Aridification of the Indian subcontinent during the Holocene : implications for landscape evolution, sedimentation, carbon cycle, and human civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponton, Camilo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian monsoon affects the livelihood of over one billion people. Despite the importance of climate to society, knowledge of long-term monsoon variability is limited. This thesis provides Holocene records of monsoon ...

  9. Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf Flash2010-45.pdfFlash2011-43andPropertyForPlans FactFort Devens:

  10. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable on Tribal Energy Policy convened at 8:30 a.m., Tuesday, April 5th, at the downtown Phoenix Hyatt. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by the Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Approximately thirty?eight people attended the meeting, including representatives of ten different tribes, as well as representatives of the Colorado Indian Tribes, the All Indian Pueblo Council and the Inter?Tribal Council of Arizona. Interested state, federal, university, NGO and industry representatives also were present. A full list of attendees is at the end of this summary. DOE representatives were Tracey LeBeau, Directory of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, and David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs.

  11. DOE's Energy Savings Performance Contracts Stretch Budgets in the Bureau of Indian Affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs has found a good way to reduce energy costs, replace inefficient lighting and aging building equipment, and install renewable energy systems-all without huge increases in the BIA budget. The agency is doing this by making use of the U.S. Department of Energy's Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) at BIA schools and other facilities throughout the country. This two-page case study describes how one BIA facility-the Sherman Indian School in Riverside, California-is cutting its energy costs with badly needed new lighting and heating and cooling equipment, and installing a new photovoltaic energy system, under a DOE Super ESPC, in which the energy services provider pays up-front costs and is repaid out of the facility's resulting energy cost savings.

  12. SPIDERS Fort Carson Industry Day

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Info Tech BankingFinance Dams FoodAgriculture Communications Health Care Transportation Nuclear Government Chemical Crit Manufacturing Commercial...

  13. Fort Benning Indianhead Townhome Renovations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, R.; Roberts, S.; Butler, T.; Kim, E.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NAHB Research Center partnered with production builder Winchester/Camberley Homes to build a DOE Building America New Construction Test House (NCTH). This single family, detached house, located in the mixed-humid climate zone of Silver Spring, MD, was completed in June 2011. The primary goal for this house was to improve energy efficiency by 30% over the Building America B10 benchmark by developing and implementing an optimized energy solutions package design that could be cost effectively and reliably constructed on a production basis using quality management practices. The intent of this report is to outline the features of this house, discuss the implementation of the energy efficient design, and report on short-term testing results. During the interactive design process of this project, numerous iterations of the framing, air sealing, insulation, and space conditioning systems were evaluated for energy performance, cost, and practical implementation. The final design featured numerous advanced framing techniques, high levels of insulation, and the HVAC system entirely within conditioned space. Short-term testing confirmed a very tight thermal envelope and efficient and effective heating and cooling. In addition, relevant heating, cooling, humidity, energy, and wall cavity moisture data will be collected and presented in a future long-term report.

  14. EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory, Chautauqua County, Irving, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to the Seneca Nation of Indians, to design, permit, and construct a 1.7-megawatt wind turbine on Tribal common lands in the Cattaraugus Territory, New York. The turbine would be located near Lucky Lane and Gil Lay Arena. An Environmental Assessment (EA) will be prepared by DOE pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  15. Short-term modulation of Indian summer monsoon rainfall by West Asian dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinoj, V.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Landu, Kiranmayi; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian summer monsoon is the result of a complex interplay between radiative heating, dynamics and cloud and aerosol interactions. Despite increased scientific attention, the effect of aerosols on monsoons still remains uncertain. Here we present both observational evidence and numerical modeling results demonstrating a remote aerosol link to Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Rainfall over central India is positively correlated to natural aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia. Simulations using a state-of-the-art global climate model support this remote aerosol link and indicate that dust aerosols induce additional moisture transport and convergence over Central India, producing increased monsoon rainfall. The convergence is driven through solar heating and latent heating within clouds over West Asia that increases surface winds over the Arabian Sea. On the other hand, sea-salt aerosol tends to counteract the effect of dust and reduces rainfall. Our findings highlight the importance of natural aerosols in modulating the strength of the Indian summer monsoon, and motivate additional research in how changes in background aerosols of natural origin may be influencing long-term trends in monsoon precipitation.

  16. Quality site seasonal report: Cherokee Indian Hospital, SFBP 4058, December 1984 through April 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, M.G.

    1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and space heating system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The hospital serves the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokee Indian Tribe in Cherokee, North Carolina, near the eastern entrance to the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Solar energy is used to preheat domestic hot water (the cafeteria is the principal load) and for space heating. The hospital is expected to have a normal year-round occupancy of 200 people (patients, medical and maintenance personnel) with some 2775 expected visitors per year. The drainback solar system has 320 Owens-Illinois evacuated-tube collectors with a gross area of 5517 square feet. Solar energy is stored in a 6335-gallon storage tank. Solar energy from storage is supplied to a 700-gallon DHW preheat tank through a heat exchanger in the storage tank, and directly to heat exchangers in the heating ducts. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two large oil-fired boilers. Performance of the system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital during the period December 1984 through April 1985 are reported.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Mojave Desert near Barstow California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter Jim Pacheco (now in the Active Response and Denial Dept.) received an Entrepreneurial Spirit Award for his participation in Sandia's...

  18. Geologic evolution of Iron Mountain, central Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Stefan S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, petrologic study, and U-Pb geochronology at Iron Mountain, 20 km southwest of Barstow, California, place important constraints on the paleogeographic affinities of metasedimentary ...

  19. Aeolian depositional landforms of the south eastern Mojave Desert, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, William Thomas

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bristol Playa through the Cadiz and Danby Playas through Rice Valley to the Colorado River. The second path parallels the first and extends eastward from Dale Playa, over Clark's Pass to the Mule Mountains near the Colorado River. The location of sand...

  20. EA-1798: Abengoa Solar's Mojave Solar Project near Barstow, CA |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011D APPENDIXKahukuCounty, NVDepartment ofAgua Caliente

  1. Mojave 90 (3 & 5) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel,Moe Wind Farm

  2. Mojave 90 (4) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel,Moe Wind Farm4) Wind Farm

  3. Mojave Solar Park Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel,Moe Wind Farm4) Wind

  4. Mojave/Morowind Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel,Moe Wind Farm4)

  5. Use Of The Evidence Base In Substance Abuse Treatment Programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives: Pursuing Quality in the Crucible Of Practice And Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2003. 41.drug, and mental health services for American IndianAbuse and Mental Health Services Administration: Tribal

  6. Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushman, Chris

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Energy Program. This grant aimed to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce each building’s energy consumption by 30%. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use were selected for this study and included the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration Building, Bay Mills Community College main campus, Bay Mills Charter School and the Waishkey Community Center buildings. These five sites are the largest energy consuming Community buildings and comprised the study area of this project titled “Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community”. The end objective of this study, plan and the Tribe is to reduce the energy consumption at the Community’s most energy intensive buildings that will, in turn, reduce emissions at the source of energy production, reduce energy expenditures, create long lasting energy conscious practices and positively affect the quality of the natural environment. This project’s feasibility study and resulting plan is intended to act as a guide to the Community’s first step towards planned energy management within its buildings/facilities. It aims to reduce energy consumption by 30% or greater within the subject facilities with an emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency. The energy audits and related power consumption analyses conducted for this study revealed numerous significant energy conservation and efficiency opportunities for all of the subject sites/buildings. In addition, many of the energy conservation measures require no cost and serve to help balance other measures requiring capital investment. Reoccurring deficiencies relating to heating, cooling, thermostat setting inefficiencies, powering computers, lighting, items linked to weatherization and numerous other items were encountered that can be mitigated with the energy conservation measures developed and specified during the course of this project.

  7. Effects of the diurnal cycle in solar radiation on the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer variability during wintertime Madden-Julian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of the diurnal cycle in solar radiation on the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer September 2013; accepted 6 September 2013; published 3 October 2013. [1] The effects of solar radiation in the main run. The results show that the diurnal cycle of solar radiation generally warms the Indian Ocean

  8. Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility.

  9. Indian Ocean radiocarbon: Data from the INDIGO 1, 2, and 3 cruises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents {sup 14}C activities (expressed in the internationally adopted {Delta}{sup 14}C scale) from water samples taken at various locations and depths in the Indian and Southern oceans through the Indien Gaz Ocean (INDIGO) project. These data were collected as part of the INDIGO 1, INDIGO 2, and INDIGO 3 cruises, which took place during the years 1985, 1986, and 1987, respectively. These data have been used to estimate the penetration of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the Indian and Southern oceans. The document also presents supporting data for potential temperature, salinity, density (sigma-theta), {delta}{sup 13}C, and total CO{sub 2}. All radiocarbon measurements have been examined statistically for quality of sample counts and stability of counting efficiency and background. In addition, all data have been reviewed by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and assessed for gross accuracy and consistency (absence of obvious outliers and other anomalous values). These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of this document and a magnetic tape containing machine-readable files. This document provides sample listing of the Indian Ocean radiocarbon data as they appear on the magnetic tape, as well as a complete listing of these data in tabular form. This document also offers retrieval program listings, furnishes information on sampling methods and data selection, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, and provides reprints of pertinent literature. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

  11. The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empricial Analysis of Indian States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, A; Jamasb, Tooraj

    www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empirical Analysis of Indian States EPRG Working Paper 1001 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 1005 Anupama Sen... and Tooraj Jamasb As developing countries seek to improve their economic prospects, electricity reform has been widely viewed as a central part of this effort. While the focus of most research to date has been at economy or utility level; there has...

  12. Crystallization temperatures and oxygen fugacities of magmas from the Southeast Indian Ocean Ridge system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ongley, Lois Kathe

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 52 Eugster, H. P. , and Wones, D. R. 1962, Stability rela+ions of the ferrugenous biotite, annite, Jour. Petrol. , v. 3, p. 82-125. Frey, G. A. , Bryan, W. B. , and Thompson, G. , 1974, Atlantic Ocean Floor: Geochemistry and petrology of basalts.... , and Weissel, J . K, , 1974, Depth anomalies in the South- east Indian Ocean (abs. ), Abstracts with Programs, Geol. Soc. Amer. , v. 6, n. 7, p. 784. Kudo, A. M. and Weill, D. F. , 1970. An igneous plagioclase thermometer, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol, , v. Z5...

  13. Office of Indian Energy Sponsors Two Sandia Student Interns | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, July 29,Office of Indian

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Quinault Indian Nation Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies [Read-Only]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312),Microgrid Set-Top Box ProceedingMode]HowRQuinault Indian

  15. A review of "Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company" by Miles Ogborn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nechtman, Tillman W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2007. xiii + 318 pp. + 22 illus. $40.00. Review by TILLMAN W. NECHTMAN, SKIDMORE COLLEGE. The India Office Records... Company (EIC) and the English/British empire in South Asia. Miles Ogborn?s impressive new book, Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company, approaches this same archive from an important new direction. Rather than reading...

  16. Forecasting of Indian Rupee (INR) / US Dollar (USD) Currency Exchange Rate Using Artificial Neural Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perwej, Yusuf; 10.5121/ijcsea.2012.2204

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large part of the workforce, and growing every day, is originally from India. India one of the second largest populations in the world, they have a lot to offer in terms of jobs. The sheer number of IT workers makes them a formidable travelling force as well, easily picking up employment in English speaking countries. The beginning of the economic crises since 2008 September, many Indians have return homeland, and this has had a substantial impression on the Indian Rupee (INR) as liken to the US Dollar (USD). We are using numerational knowledge based techniques for forecasting has been proved highly successful in present time. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of several important neural network factors on model fitting and forecasting the behaviours. In this paper, Artificial Neural Network has successfully been used for exchange rate forecasting. This paper examines the effects of the number of inputs and hidden nodes and the size of the training sample on the in-sample and out-of-sample...

  17. Lack of uniform trends but increasing spatial variability in observed Indian rainfall extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Subimal [ORNL; Das, Debasish [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies disagree on how rainfall extremes over India have changed in space and time over the past half century, as well as on whether the changes observed are due to global warming or regional urbanization. Although a uniform and consistent decrease in moderate rainfall has been reported, a lack of agreement about trends in heavy rainfall may be due in part to differences in the characterization and spatial averaging of extremes. Here we use extreme value theory to examine trends in Indian rainfall over the past half century in the context of long-term, low-frequency variability.We show that when generalized extreme value theory is applied to annual maximum rainfall over India, no statistically significant spatially uniform trends are observed, in agreement with previous studies using different approaches. Furthermore, our space time regression analysis of the return levels points to increasing spatial variability of rainfall extremes over India. Our findings highlight the need for systematic examination of global versus regional drivers of trends in Indian rainfall extremes, and may help to inform flood hazard preparedness and water resource management in the region.

  18. These professional development opportunities were made possible by the 2008 OPI Indian Education for All Montana University System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    These professional development opportunities were made possible by the 2008 OPI Indian Education grants from the Office of Public Instruction (OPI), and support from the Office of the Commissioner Conference Eighty guests from OPI, OCHE, the Council of Elders, Bozeman Public Schools, and students, staff

  19. Writing the life of the self: constructions of identity in autobiographical discourse by six eighteenth-century American Indians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruett, David Alan

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    is gone home about three weeks a goe because we hear enemies is coming: but their was nothing in it. for all our Mohoaks are Pice with us yet: and hear I meet mr Gunn He come from Onohoguagee: He sead their is nodenger a mong the Indians at Onohoguagee...

  20. RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD IN GUJARAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD for complementarities between the present system of water supply and the alternative system of rainwater harvesting IN GUJARAT (Akil AMIRALY1 , Nathalie PRIME2 , Joginder P. SINGH3 ) ABSTRACT Water scarcity

  1. RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD IN GUJARAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD their water requirements. Rainwater harvesting is one of them. It was functioning in the Old city of Ahmedabad and the alternative system of rainwater harvesting, in a context of water scarcity. The objective of the research

  2. Asymmetry of the Indian Ocean Basinwide SST Anomalies: Roles of ENSO and IOD* CHI-CHERNG HONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    2009, in final form 31 December 2009) ABSTRACT A basinwide warming (cooling) in the Indian Ocean significantly larger than the cooling. A composite analysis reveals that the amplitude asymmetry (positive to the ENSO remote forcing. The asymmetry of the mixed layer depth (MLD) between warm and cold events

  3. Speciation of ambient fine organic carbon particles and source apportionment of PM2.5 in Indian cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Mei

    Speciation of ambient fine organic carbon particles and source apportionment of PM2.5 in Indian, and Chandigarh is speciated to quantify sources contributing to fine particle pollution. Gas chromatography patterns of the impact of these five sources are observed. On average, primary emissions from fossil fuel

  4. Dynamic and Thermodynamic AirSea Coupling Associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Diagnosed from 23 WCRP CMIP3 Models*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Dynamic and Thermodynamic Air­Sea Coupling Associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Diagnosed from and the thermodynamic air­sea coupling in shaping the different model behaviors. The Bjerknes feedback processes include of the dynamic and ther- modynamic feedback processes. The distinctive features in the dynamic and thermodynamic

  5. Role of AirSea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~oInduced North Indian Ocean Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Walker circulation adjustments, causing a sustained SST warming in the tropical southwest IO (SWIO) where in the equatorial Pacific with pro- found influences on the global climate. For example, El Nin~o causes sea surfaceRole of Air­Sea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~o­Induced North Indian Ocean Warming

  6. Observed Synoptic-Scale Variability during the Developing Phase of an ISO over the Indian Ocean during MISMO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    Observed Synoptic-Scale Variability during the Developing Phase of an ISO over the Indian Ocean A case study of an intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) is investigated in the period leading up to its for a convectively active phase of the ISO. The prominent shallow heating during this period may explain the rather

  7. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Las Vegas, Nevada, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    LAS VEGAS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Las Vegas, Nevada DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on March 16th, at the Las Vegas Hilton. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by JR Bluehouse, Program Manager, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Mr. Bluehouse was assisted by Tamara, Underwood, Program Assistant, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal governments and communities attended the roundtable. Tracey LeBeau, newly appointed Director of the Office of Indian Energy attended.    LaMont Jackson from DOE’s Office of Electricity attended. Also attending from the administration and federal agencies were Kim Teehee, Senior Policy Advisor for Native American Affairs, The White House; Charlie Galbraith, Associate Director of the Office of Public Engagement and Deputy Associate Director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, The White House; Jodi Gillette, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Economic Development, the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  8. Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians Energy Conservation and Options Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Turner

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians was awarded a grant through the Department of Energy First Steps program in June of 2006. The primary purpose of the grant was to enable the Tribe to develop energy conservation policies and a strategy for alternative energy resource development. All of the work contemplated by the grant agreement has been completed and the Tribe has begun implementing the resource development strategy through the construction of a 1.0 MW grid-connected photovoltaic system designed to offset a portion of the energy demand generated by current and projected land uses on the Tribe’s Reservation. Implementation of proposed energy conservation policies will proceed more deliberately as the Tribe acquires economic development experience sufficient to evaluate more systematically the interrelationships between conservation and its economic development goals.

  9. Respiratory survey of North American Indian children living in proximity to an aluminum smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, P.; Thomas, D.; Becklake, M.R.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explored the relationship of respiratory symptoms and lung function to exposure to ambient air pollution consisting of particulate and gaseous fluorides. The subjects were 253 North American Indian children 11 to 17 yr of age living on the Akwasasne reserve, which is adjacent to an aluminum smelter. Among boys, closing volume (CV/VC%) was increased in those raised closest to the smelter as opposed to those having lived most of their lives farthest from this source of air pollution. In both sexes, there was a significant linear relationship between increasing CV/VC% and the amount of fluoride contained in a spot urine sample. We conclude that exposure to fluoride air pollution in the community may be associated with abnormalities in small airways. The implication of these abnormalities for future respiratory health is unknown.

  10. Modern Realities of the 'Jurisdictional Maze' in Indian Country: Case Studies on Methamphetamines Use and the Pressures to Ensure Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronk, Elizabeth Ann; Thompson, Heather Dawn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because legal jurisdction in Indian country can involve three separate actors -- the tribe, the federal government, and potentially the state government -- the laws governing which entity has authority in various situations ...

  11. The Impacts of Indirect Soil Moisture Assimilation and Direct Surface Temperature and Humidity Assimilation on a Mesoscale Model Simulation of an Indian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Assimilation on a Mesoscale Model Simulation of an Indian Monsoon Depression VINODKUMAR AND A. CHANDRASEKAR-generation Pennsylvania State University­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) simulation utilized the humidity and temperature

  12. The influence of ridge geometry at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (9?-25?E) : basalt composition sensitivity to variations in source and process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standish, Jared Jeffrey

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 90-25° E on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge lie two sharply contrasting supersegments. One 630 km long supersegment erupts N-MORB that is progressively enriched in incompatible element concentrations ...

  13. Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

  14. Life assessment and emissions monitoring of Indian coal-fired power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the traveler, along with Dr. R. P. Krishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee spent three weeks in India planning and performing emissions monitoring at the coal-fired Vijayawada Thermal Power Station (VTPS). The coordination for the Indian participants was provided by BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore. The trip was sponsored by the PETC under the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Government of India (GOI)P Alternate Energy Resources Development (AERD) Project. The AERD Project is managed by PETC, and ORNL is providing the technical coordination and support for four coal projects that are being implemented with BHEL, Trichy. The traveler, after briefing the USAID mission in New Delhi visited BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore to coordinate and plan the emissions test program. The site selection was made by BHEL, CPRI, TVA, and PETC. Monitoring was performed for 4 days on one of the 4 existing 210 MW coal-fired boilers at the VTPS, 400 km north of Madras, India.

  15. Life assessment and emissions monitoring of Indian coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the traveler, along with Dr. R. P. Krishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee spent three weeks in India planning and performing emissions monitoring at the coal-fired Vijayawada Thermal Power Station (VTPS). The coordination for the Indian participants was provided by BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore. The trip was sponsored by the PETC under the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Government of India (GOI)P Alternate Energy Resources Development (AERD) Project. The AERD Project is managed by PETC, and ORNL is providing the technical coordination and support for four coal projects that are being implemented with BHEL, Trichy. The traveler, after briefing the USAID mission in New Delhi visited BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore to coordinate and plan the emissions test program. The site selection was made by BHEL, CPRI, TVA, and PETC. Monitoring was performed for 4 days on one of the 4 existing 210 MW coal-fired boilers at the VTPS, 400 km north of Madras, India.

  16. Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption in each sc

  17. Future projection of mean and variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean Climate systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annamalai, H [IPRC, University of Hawaii

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the ability of the CMIP3/5 models to simulate the Indian-Ocean monsoon systems. The PI along with post-docs investigated research issues ranging from synoptic systems to long-term trends over the Asian monsoon region. The PI applied diagnostic tools such as moist static energy (MSE) to isolate: the moist and radiative processes responsible for extended monsoon breaks over South Asia, precursors in the ENSO-monsoon association, reasons for the drying tendency over South Asia and the possible effect on tropical Indian Ocean climate anomalies influencing certain aspects of ENSO characteristics. By diagnosing various observations and coupled model simulations, we developed working hypothesis and tested them by carrying out sensitivity experiments with both linear and nonlinear models. Possible physical and dynamical reasons for model sensitivities were deduced. On the teleconnection front, the ability of CMIP5 models in representing the monsoon-desert mechanism was examined recently. Further more, we have applied a suite of diagnostics and have performed an in depth analysis on CMIP5 integrations to isolate the possible reasons for the ENSO-monsoon linkage or lack thereof. The PI has collaborated with Dr. K.R. Sperber of PCMDI and other CLIVAR Asian-Australian monsoon panel members in understanding the ability of CMIP3/5 models in capturing monsoon and its spectrum of variability. The objective and process-based diagnostics aided in selecting models that best represent the present-day monsoon and its variability that are then employed for future projections. Two major highlights were an invitation to write a review on present understanding monsoons in a changing climate in Nature Climate Change, and identification of an east-west shift in observed monsoon rainfall (more rainfall over tropical western Pacific and drying tendency over South Asia) in the last six decades and attributing that shift to SST rise over the tropical western Pacific. On the training of post-doctoral scientists: the PI spent considerable amount of time and efforts in introducing the post-docs into climate modeling and designing the numerical experiments. With training provided and knowledge gained, post-docs worked in the project obtained long term positions elsewhere. The PI also enjoyed the experience in managing the works and educating work ethics to the younger generation. Based on the research achievements and publications, the PI gave invited talks in major international monsoon conferences/workshops, and gave lectures in various research organizations in the last six years. Finally, during the project period, the PI attended all the DOE organized PIs meeting and presented the major results. Some of the major implications of the project include: (i) Sustained observational efforts are necessary to monitor the three-dimensional moisture distribution over the Asian monsoon region that would aid in better understanding, modeling and predicting severe monsoons well in advance and (ii) process-based diagnostics lead pathways for model improvements.

  18. Uncertainty in Resilience to Climate Change in India and Indian States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.; Brenkert, Antoinette L.

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This study builds on an earlier analysis of resilience of India and Indian states to climate change. The previous study (Brenkert and Malone 2005) assessed current resilience; this research uses the Vulnerability-Resilience Indicators Model (VRIM) to project resilience to 2095 and to perform an uncertainty analysis on the deterministic results. Projections utilized two SRES-based scenarios, one with fast-and-high growth, one with delayed growth. A detailed comparison of two states, the Punjab and Orissa, points to the kinds of insights that can be obtained using the VRIM. The scenarios differ most significantly in the timing of the uncertainty in economic prosperity (represented by GDP per capita) as a major factor in explaining the uncertainty in the resilience index. In the fast-and-high growth scenario the states differ most markedly regarding the role of ecosystem sensitivity, land use and water availability. The uncertainty analysis shows, for example, that resilience in the Punjab might be enhanced, especially in the delayed growth scenario, if early attention is paid to the impact of ecosystems sensitivity on environmental well-being of the state. By the same token, later in the century land-use pressures might be avoided if land is managed through intensification rather than extensification of agricultural land. Thus, this methodology illustrates how a policy maker can be informed about where to focus attention on specific issues, by understanding the potential changes at a specific location and time – and, thus, what might yield desired outcomes. Model results can point to further analyses of the potential for resilience-building.

  19. The Role of Moist Processes in the Intrinsic Predictability of Indian Ocean Cyclones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taraphdar, Sourav; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Zhang, Fuqing; Abhilash, S.; Goswami, B. N.

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of moist processes and the possibility of error cascade from cloud scale processes affecting the intrinsic predictable time scale of a high resolution convection permitting model within the environment of tropical cyclones (TCs) over the Indian region are investigated. Consistent with past studies of extra-tropical cyclones, it is demonstrated that moist processes play a major role in forecast error growth which may ultimately limit the intrinsic predictability of the TCs. Small errors in the initial conditions may grow rapidly and cascades from smaller scales to the larger scales through strong diabatic heating and nonlinearities associated with moist convection. Results from a suite of twin perturbation experiments for four tropical cyclones suggest that the error growth is significantly higher in cloud permitting simulation at 3.3 km resolutions compared to simulations at 3.3 km and 10 km resolution with parameterized convection. Convective parameterizations with prescribed convective time scales typically longer than the model time step allows the effects of microphysical tendencies to average out so convection responds to a smoother dynamical forcing. Without convective parameterizations, the finer-scale instabilities resolved at 3.3 km resolution and stronger vertical motion that results from the cloud microphysical parameterizations removing super-saturation at each model time step can ultimately feed the error growth in convection permitting simulations. This implies that careful considerations and/or improvements in cloud parameterizations are needed if numerical predictions are to be improved through increased model resolution. Rapid upscale error growth from convective scales may ultimately limit the intrinsic mesoscale predictability of the TCs, which further supports the needs for probabilistic forecasts of these events, even at the mesoscales.

  20. Enter Climate Change : Of beastly encounters, cervine disappearances, and categories of the state in the Indian Himalaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Nayanika

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or denialists. On the contrary, I very much believe that the Indian Himalaya is a precarious, ecological zone that is, to use the language of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), extremely “vulnerable” to the impact of climate change... like the bears – gone mad (pagal ho gaye hai) with their sorry plights. The bears are like humans in the sense that they don’t like seeing their natural environment being destroyed by things like ugly dams or mining or commercial deforestation. But...