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1

Renewable Energy Development on Fort Mojave Reservation Feasiblity Study  

SciTech Connect

The Ft. Mojave tribe, whose reservation is located along the Colorado River in the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada near the point where all three states meet, has a need for increased energy supplies. This need is a direct result of the aggressive and successful economic development projects undertaken by the tribe in the last decade. While it is possible to contract for additional energy supplies from fossil fuel sources it was the desire of the tribal power company, AHA MACAV Power Service (AMPS) to investigate the feasibility and desirability of producing power from renewable sources as an alternative to increased purchase of fossil fuel generated power and as a possible enterprise to export green power. Renewable energy generated on the reservation would serve to reduce the energy dependence of the tribal enterprises on off reservation sources of energy and if produced in excess of reservation needs, add a new enterprise to the current mix of economic activities on the reservation. Renewable energy development would also demonstrate the tribe’s support for improving environmental quality, sustainability, and energy independence both on the reservation and for the larger community.

Russell Gum, ERCC analytics LLC

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption Duquesne (now the site of Pittsburgh) set fire to an oil-slicked creek as part of a religious ceremony. As settlement by Europeans proceeded, oil' was discovered in many places in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York-to tile frequent dismay of the well-owners, who were drilling for salt brine./ >' Cons umption/ In the mid-1800s expanding uses for oil extracted from coal and shale began to hint at the value of rock oil and encouraged the search for readily accessible A Production supplies. This impetus launched the modem petroleum age, which began on a t 10 - Sunday afternoon in August 1859 at Oil Creek, near Titusville in northwestern-\

3

Geothermal Direct Use Feasibility Study on the Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation (FBIR) is rich in renewable energy resources. Development of its geothermal resources has the potential to profoundly affect the energy and economic future of the FBIC. Geothermal energy can contribute to making the reservation energy self-sufficient and, potentially, an energy exporter. The feasibility study assessed the feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating system to provide low-cost, efficient heating of existing and planned residences, community buildings and water, using an existing geothermal well, FB-3.

Dale Merrick

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Mojave River and the Central Mojave Desert: Native Settlement, Travel, and Exchange in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and east of the lower Colorado River. REFERENCES Anderton,J. Porriia Turanzas. Colorado River Agency 1921 Census ofthe Mojave Indians of the Colorado River Agency on June 30,

Earle, David D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Identifying Oil Exploration Leads using Intergrated Remote Sensing and Seismic Data Analysis, Lake Sakakawea, Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, Willistion Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, inhabited by the Arikara, Mandan and Hidatsa Tribes (now united to form the Three Affiliated Tribes) covers a total area of 1530 mi{sup 2} (980,000 acres). The Reservation is located approximately 15 miles east of the depocenter of the Williston basin, and to the southeast of a major structural feature and petroleum producing province, the Nesson anticline. Several published studies document the widespread existence of mature source rocks, favorable reservoir/caprock combinations, and production throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas indicating high potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. This technical assessment was performed to better define the oil exploration opportunity, and stimulate exploration and development activities for the benefit of the Tribes. The need for this assessment is underscored by the fact that, despite its considerable potential, there is currently no meaningful production on the Reservation, and only 2% of it is currently leased. Of particular interest (and the focus of this study) is the area under the Lake Sakakawea (formed as result of the Garrison Dam). This 'reservoir taking' area, which has never been drilled, encompasses an area of 150,000 acres, and represents the largest contiguous acreage block under control of the Tribes. Furthermore, these lands are Tribal (non-allotted), hence leasing requirements are relatively simple. The opportunity for exploration success insofar as identifying potential leads under the lake is high. According to the Bureau of Land Management, there have been 591 tests for oil and gas on or immediately adjacent to the Reservation, resulting in a total of 392 producing wells and 179 plugged and abandoned wells, for a success ratio of 69%. Based on statistical probability alone, the opportunity for success is high.

Scott R. Reeves; Randal L. Billingsley

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater aquifer. While beneficial uses may be found for these geothermal fluids, even higher temperatures (in excess of 260 F) may be found directly beneath the town of Poplar and the new residential development which is being planned in the area. This project is primarily concerned with the use of geothermal energy for space heating and domestic hot water for the town of Poplar (Figure 2 and Photograph 1) and a new residential development of 250 homes which is planned for an area approximately 4 miles east of Poplar along U.S. Route 2 (Figure 2 and Photograph 2). A number of alternative engineering design approaches have been evaluated, and the cost of these systems has been compared to existing and expected heating costs.

Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

1980-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

7

Renewable Energy Development on Fort Mojave Reservation Feasiblity Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

quality, sustainability, and energy independence both on the reservation and for the larger community.

Russell Gum, ERCC analytics LLC

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fourth exploration well within Fort Bidwell Indian Community (FBIC) lands has been successfully drilled to a total depth of 4,670 feet. Mud return temperatures and cuttings analysis are consistent with the hydrothermal model on which the well location was based. Wireline surveys have encountered an obstruction just below the casing shoe, and further evaluation of this well and resource awaits clean-out and testing activities. Author(s): Joe LaFleur, Anna Carter, Karen Moore, Ben Barker, Paul

9

Joshua Tree and Mojave Go Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Until late 1998, Joshua Tree National Park and Until late 1998, Joshua Tree National Park and Mojave National Preserve in southern California used diesel generators to produce electricity in remote areas. Like many park energy systems, the diesel generators at Joshua Tree's Cottonwood Campground also produced potentially harmful emissions: 120 tons of carbon dioxide, 5,770 pounds of nitrous oxides, 286 pounds of sulfur dioxide, and 218 pounds of suspended particulates every year. Today, Joshua Tree has cut those emissions dramati- cally while reducing annual operating costs by an impressive 90%, thanks to a new photovoltaic (PV) system that harnesses the sun's energy to produce clean electric power. Mojave has also had good results. And both parks continue to provide high- quality experiences for visitors while preserving

10

Mojave, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mojave, California: Energy Resources Mojave, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0524699°, -118.1739645° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0524699,"lon":-118.1739645,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Tribal Solar Energy Partnerships  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOLAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIPS SOLAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIPS Chairman Timothy Williams - Fort Mojave Indian Tribe Perry Fontana - First Solar Fort Mojave Indian Reservation Fort Mojave Project Site Mohave Generating Station (MGS) RESERVATION FARM LAND HISTORY * DOE funded renewable energy Feasibility Study found wind resource on Fort Mojave reservation marginal, but solar resource significant * Project was to be developed on 640 acres of Fort Mojave land in Arizona * Other parties included Tax and Equity financing entities, and solar developers (NEXT Light) * Group bid the project into the 2007 AZ and CA Utility PPA Request for Offers * Project was not shortlisted by any of the AZ or CA utility companies. * Fort Mojave made more land available in CA and partnered with NextLight to bid a

12

Waginogans and Other Indian Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waginogans and Other Indian Homes Waginogans and Other Indian Homes Nature Bulletin No. 578 October 31, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor Richard Becker, Naturalist WAGINOGANS AND OTHER INDIAN HOMES The American Indians built homes of many types that varied according to the materials available and the customs and culture of each tribe or nation. Sioux and other plains Indians who followed the buffalo lived in teepees. The "longhouse" of the Iroquois, built of poles covered with bark and surrounded by a palisade, was a large permanent structure housing several families. So, too, were the fort-like pueblos and cliff dwellings built of rocks and adobe clay by some of the southwestern "agricultural" Indians.

13

Revised History of Fort Watauga.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The history of the Revolutionary War Fort Watauga located in present day Elizabethton, TN has yet to be completed. The critique of several Tennessee historians… (more)

Compton, Brian Patrick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Fort Calhoun  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fort Calhoun" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

15

Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Facility...

16

World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave April 16, 2010 - 4:47pm Addthis A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world's largest solar energy system by the end of 2013. The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, located just a few miles from the California - Nevada border near Interstate 15, will generate approximately 400 MW of energy per year, almost doubling the amount of solar thermal energy produced in the United States. Ivanpah will focus sunlight from mirrors placed on poles, which don't require the land to be graded and can be placed around areas that are already in use or environmentally sensitive. The project of Oakland, Calif.-based BrightSource Energy, Inc. will likely generate enough power

17

Mojave/Morowind Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mojave/Morowind Wind Farm Mojave/Morowind Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mojave/Morowind Wind Farm Facility Mojave/Morowind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Tomen Developer Tomen Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

Robichaud, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Joshua Tree and Mojave Go Solar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case study describes two of the many projects in which the Department of the Interior's National Park Service works with private contractors and other agencies, such as the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to replace fossil-fuel-powered diesel generators with renewable energy systems in the nation's parks. This is done to reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions, such as carbon dioxide and nitrous oxides, associated with using fossil fuels to generate electric power in remote areas of the parks. Two solar electric (photovoltaic) systems were installed in Joshua Tree National Park and Mojave National Preserve in southern California, and more are planned. The systems are cleaner and less noisy than the old generators they replaced; they are connected to storage batteries and backed up by new propane generators in case of a prolonged period without sunlight.

Epstein, K.; Pitchford, P.

2001-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

20

FORT UNION DEEP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FORT UNION DEEP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fort Sill Tribal Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma has concluded an energy project funded through the “First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency” program provided by the Department of Energy. The intent of the project was to include the establishment of a tribal Energy Office, an energy audit of tribal facilities, and a Strategic Energy Plan.

Shamieka Ross

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

FORT HALL INDIAN RESERVATION PHONE (2OB) 478-3700  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Springs Hatchery Facility and Satellite Facilities, BpA project No. 200g-906-00 Dear Mr. Grover: The shoshone/summer Chinook that are essential for recovery of the Snake River spring/summer Chinook ESU. Because

24

Mojave Solar Park Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Park Solar Power Plant Solar Park Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Mojave Solar Park Solar Power Plant Facility Mojave Solar Park Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer Solel Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Mojave 90 (4) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farm Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mojave 90 (4) Wind Farm Facility Mojave 90 (4) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida) Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings...

28

NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs - Fort Carson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Carson NREL is helping Fort Carson, Colorado, meet its net zero energy, water, and waste by 2020 goal by conducting technology demonstrations and providing support for...

29

Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP)...

30

Thermochronometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermochronometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Thermochronometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

31

U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document describes the project lease issued for the Fort Carson photovoltaic (PV) power purchase agreement (PPA).

32

Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

Fenstermaker Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bliss Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

34

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Carson has built a successful and Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

35

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Piñon Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

36

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

City of Fort Worth - Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program eligibility Advocate for and develop commercial PACE program Support On program 1 INTRODUCTION Fort Worth is a rapidly growing city of over 700,000 people. The City's...

38

Fort Hood solar energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period April 1975 to March 1978, the American Technological University (ATU) of Killeen, Texas, was awarded several follow-on contracts by the Division of Solar Energy (DSE), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), which subsequently became the Division of Solar Technology (DST), Department of Energy (DOE). The contracts were to design a solar total energy system for use at Fort Hood, Texas. A review encompassing the period of the project from January 1975 to March 1978, was conducted by the Office of Inspector General (IG), DOE. The review examined both the management of the project by ATU and ERDA personnel and the award and administration by ERDA of the contracts to ATU for support of the project. The IG review found that: (1) there was a lack of continuity in the management of the project by both ATU and ERDA; (2) ERDA failed to maintain control of the project and failed to issue specific project direction to ATU; (3) ERDA failed to follow existing procurement regulations for the review and acceptance of unsolicited proposals from ATU; (4) the ERDA Headquarters program Manager and the Contract Administrator for the conceptual design phase of the project had failed to ensure that all the tasks which had been funded were performed by ATU; and (5) the decision by the Director, ERDA/DSE, to award successive contracts to ATU was questionable in view of ATU's performance on the project.

Not Available

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mojave 90 (3 & 5) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& 5) Wind Farm & 5) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mojave 90 (3 & 5) Wind Farm Facility Mojave 90 (3 & 5) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources/Tomen Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Indian Section  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bringing together professionals in the geographic area of India. Indian Section Sections achievement application award awards canadian distinguished division fats member membership memorial network nomination oils poster program recognizing resear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

42

Limited energy studies, Fort Rucker, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of building and operating a liquified petroleum gas (LPG) storage facility at Fort Rucker. The primary heating fuel at Fort Rucker is natural gas; it is used in central steam plants and in central forced-air furnaces for family housing. Natural gas is purchased from the Southeast Alabama Gas District at there lowest rate. However, Fort Rucker also pays a natural gas demand charge based on the amount of natural gas used during curtailment. During a curtailment period, the natural gas demand is intended to be reduced as much as possible by switching the central steam plants to oil; but the family housing area continues to use nature gas. storage system would provide the capability of injecting a mixture of air and propane into the natural as distribution system during curtailment to reduce natural gas demand. This would result in lower gas bills throughout the year.

NONE

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fort Totten Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Totten Wind Farm Totten Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Totten Wind Farm Facility Fort Totten Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Spirit Lake Sioux Energy Purchaser Spirit Lake Sioux Location Fort Totten ND Coordinates 47.9817°, -99.0029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.9817,"lon":-99.0029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8617,"lon":-120.1592,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (30) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6,"lon":-112.55,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Sill, Oklahoma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Sill, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Sill took place on June 10, 2010.

Boyd, Brian K.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bidwell Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8617,"lon":-120.1592,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area (Redirected from Cove Fort Geothermal Area - Vapor) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (30) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6,"lon":-112.55,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Bliss headquarters building, lighting retrofit, Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to analyze the use of high efficiency fluorescent lighting with energy efficient lamps and electronic ballast for the Headquarters Building (Bldg. number 2) at Fort Bliss.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fort Payne Improvement Auth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Auth Auth Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Payne Improvement Auth Place Alabama Utility Id 6612 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Business Commercial Commercial Commercial Industrial Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0894/kWh Commercial: $0.0907/kWh Industrial: $0.0810/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Fort_Payne_Improvement_Auth&oldid=41071

52

Fort Loudoun Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Loudoun Electric Coop Fort Loudoun Electric Coop Place Tennessee Utility Id 6608 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Rate-Schedule GSA 1 Commercial General Power Rate-Schedule GSA 2 Commercial General Power Rate-Schedule GSA 3 Commercial OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 150 Watt Metal Halide) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 250 Watt HPS) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 400 Watt HPS) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 400 Watt Metal Halide) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE( 100 Watt HPS) Lighting

53

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Indian Relics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relics Relics Nature Bulletin No. 210-A December 11, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN RELICS The American Indians, before the coming of the white man, were Stone Age people. Theirs was a hand culture, employing tools of stone, bone, shell and wood. Certain tribes used copper found near Lake Superior and elsewhere, but no Indian had learned to use metals like bronze and iron. Others had learned to weave and made baskets or clothing out of plant materials. Most tribes made pottery: molding and baking vessels of clay tempered with sand, powdered rock or shell; some crude; some very good. They had learned to farm and had domesticated many useful plants such as corn, beans, squash and tobacco, but they had not discovered the wheel, nor the plow, and the dog was their only domestic animal. Some tribes, like the Sioux of the great plains, were wandering hunters depending upon the buffalo for food and clothing.

55

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fort St Vrain - 011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fort St Vrain - 011 Fort St Vrain - 011 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fort St Vrain (011) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation is located in Weld County, Colorado. In 1965, the U.S. Atomic Energy (a predecessor agency to DOE) agreed to provide permanent storage for a large portion of the Fort St. Vrain¿s spent nuclear fuel. Originally, Fort St. Vrain was a nuclear power generating facility that operated from 1976 to 1989. In 1989, the nuclear power plant was decommissioned and the plant was converted to a natural gas power plant.

56

Multispectral Imaging At Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. Vegetalspectral analysis at Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah was tested as a method of detecting hidden faults in exploration efforts. This effort proved to be successful and resulted in the Following published paper: Nash, G. D., J. N. Moore, and T. Sperry, 2003. "Vegetal-spectral anomaly detection at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal anomaly, Utah, USA: implications for use in geothermal exploration." Geothermics, v. 32, p.

57

City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October 2011 City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October 2011 The City of Fort Collins provided comments to the Department of Energy's notice of intent to seek approval of an extension of Information Collection 1910-5149 for Recovery Act Smart Grid Investment Grant reporting for four years, which was published in the Federal Register August 10, 2011, Vol. 76, No. 154, page 49460. Fort Collins finds the current collection period burdensome and recommends quarterly reporting. View information on Recovery Act Smart Grid Investment Grants. View the Federal Register Notice. City of Fort Collins FRN Information Collection comments.pdf More Documents & Publications

58

Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...

59

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RefrigeratorFreezer Recycling: 35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers....

60

NETL: News Release - Federal Environmental Laboratory at Fort...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Laboratory at Fort Meade to be Powered by Revolutionary Fuel Cell Power Plant Richardson, Browner Announce Government "Showcase" Project WASHINGTON, DC - The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

62

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale,...

63

Fort Loramie, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 4th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Fort Loramie, Ohio LP Hoying, LLC References US Census Bureau...

64

U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Fort Carson's hazardous waste. g. If it is determined by the Environmental Baseline Survey andlor NEPA process that there is the potential for hazardous waste, fuel, and...

65

Town of Fort Supply, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Fort Supply Place Oklahoma Utility Id 6618 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP...

66

Pressure Temperature Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Pressure Temperature Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

67

Fort Thompson, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Fort Thompson, South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia...

68

DOE Office of Indian Energy Announces New Indian Country Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces New Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group Members DOE Office of Indian Energy Announces New Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group...

69

Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm I Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm I Jump to: navigation, search Name Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm I Facility Mojave 16/17/18 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources/Tomen Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Sediment yield and runoff frequency of small drainage basins in the Mojave Desert, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desert (outlined in red), which covers 25,000 square miles. Elevation in the Mojave Desert ranges from of which falls during the winter season. Figure 2. Aerial view of the former Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad National Park Nevada Test Site 50 km Burlington Northern & Santa Fe RR Carson & Colorado RR Barnwell

71

School of Social Work Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment and graduating social work practitioners who excel in their professional lives. Students-time; or taking your courses in Thornton, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins or on-line, the School of Social WorkSchool of Social Work Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586 Phone (970) 491-6612 Fax (970) 491

Stephens, Graeme L.

72

Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Radiometrics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radiometrics_At_Fort_Bliss_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402615" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863747441

73

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Spontaneous Potential Well Log At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Spontaneous Potential Well Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric Imaging, G. Michael Hoversten. The project title derived from its inception. The project however moved from the application of MT on Kilauea in 2003 to the use of combined SP and conductivity mapping (MT) in 2004. The beginning of 2004 saw the completions of the Kilauea MT experiment by the acquisition of an additional 45 MT stations on Kilauea. We therefore decided to use the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell

74

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

75

2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

76

Density Log at Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Density Log at Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Density Log at Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

77

Fort Valley Utility Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Comm Utility Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Valley Utility Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 6617 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL: #20 Commercial INDUSTRIAL LARGE POWER: #26/28 Industrial INSTITUTIONAL: #14 Commercial Industrial Small Power Industrial RESIDENTIAL: #10 Residential SMALL COMMERCIAL: #22 Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0787/kWh Commercial: $0.1030/kWh Industrial: $0.0772/kWh References

78

Master environmental plan for Fort Devens, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a master environmental plan (MEP) for Fort Devens, Massachusetts, for the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. The MEP is an assessment based on environmental laws and regulations of both the federal government and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MEP assess the physical and environmental status of 58 potential hazardous waste sites, including 54 study areas (SAs) that pose a potential for releasing contamination into the environment and 4 areas of concern (AOCs) that are known to have substantial contamination. For each SA or AOC, this MEP describes the known history and environment, identifies additional data needs, and proposes possible response actions. Most recommended response actions consist of environmental sampling and monitoring and other characterization studies. 74 refs., 63 figs., 50 tabs.

Biang, C.A.; Peters, R.W.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Operational testing highlights of Fort St. Vrain  

SciTech Connect

The Fort St. Vrain program has progressed through construction, preoperational testing, fuel loading, initial criticality, and operational testing at power levels up to 2 percent related power. To date, all tests necessary before the rise to full power have been completed, and the rise-to- power program is expected to be resumed again in late 1975. Major plant systems, including the prestressed concrete reactor vessel and circulators, have demonstrated adequate performance. Extensive tests on the reactor core at zero power and up to 2 percent power have demonstrated the accuracy in the design predictions of such core characteristics as critical rod position, control system worths, neutron flux distributions, and temperature coefficients. Gaseous fission product release measurements to date have confirmed the extensive analytical estimates. 6 references (auth)

Cadwell, J.J.; McEachern, D.W.; Read, J.W.; Simon, W.A.; Walker, R.F.

1975-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fort Pierce Utilities Auth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Auth Utilities Auth Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Pierce Utilities Auth Place Florida Utility Id 6616 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Demand Commercial Commercial General Service High Load Factor Industrial General Service Large Demand Industrial Non-Demand Commercial Single Phase Commercial Non-Demand Commercial Three Phase Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1440/kWh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army's Fort Carson installation was selected to serve as a prototype for net zero energy assessment and planning. NREL performed the comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of Fort Carson to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. This study is part of a larger cross-laboratory effort that also includes an assessment of renewable opportunities at seven other DoD Front Range installations, a microgrid design for Fort Carson critical loads and an assessment of regulatory and market-based barriers to a regional secure smart grid.

Anderson, K.; Markel, T.; Simpson, M.; Leahey, J.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Lisell, L.; Burman, K.; Singer, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2001. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting willows at sites on Diggie Creek, Clear Creek and Spring Creek. In addition, many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). In 2001, exclosure fences were erected on Diggie Creek (250 m barbed wire; (70 m jack), Wood Creek (500 m jack), Clear Creek (20 m jack), Ross Fork Creek (200 m jack), West Fork Creek (200 m jack)) and the Portneuf River (1 km barbed wire; 100 m jack). Jack and rail exclosure fences that had deteriorated over the past ten years were repaired at numerous areas throughout the Reservation. Physical sampling during 2001 included sediment and depth surveys (SADMS) in Big Jimmy Creek and Diggie Creek. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for eight and nine strata in the Big Jimmy and Diggie Creek, respectively. Baseline SADM data was collected in Diggie Creek to monitor the effects of bank sloping and revegetation on channel morphology and sediment levels through time. Water temperature was monitored (hourly) in Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Ross Fork Creek and Big Jimmy Creek. Biotic sampling included invertebrate sampling in the 200 and 300 series of Clear Creek. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in Clear Creek 200 and 300 series. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Clear Creek 300 series remained similar to 2000 while numbers of fish in Clear Creek 200 series dropped to near pre project levels. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were significantly higher than 2000. A mark-recapture study was initiated in spring 2001 to estimate numbers of spawning adults using the Head End of Spring Creek Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams increased from 0.55 in 2000 to 0.77 fish per hour in 2001. Numbers of fish 18 inches caught by anglers decreased from 0.41 in 2000 to 0.19 in 2001.

Moser, David C.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microsoft Word - JAS-Fort Nelson.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Nelson Demonstration Test Fort Nelson Demonstration Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP DEMONSTRATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase III Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Darin Damiani, U.S. Department of Energy, Darin.Damiani@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name Fort Nelson Demonstration Test Test Location British Columbia, Canada Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Approximately 1.2 million tons of CO 2 per year Source Fort Nelson natural gas-processing plant Spectra Energy Natural Resources Canada Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) British Columbia Ministry of Energy, Mines, and Petroleum Resources

84

Clean Cities: Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities Coalition Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities Coalition The Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Pamela Burns 817-704-2510 pburns@nctcog.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Pamela Burns Photo of Pamela Burns Pamela Burns has been a co-coordinator of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Clean Cities coalition since 2007. She is also a communications coordinator with the North Central Texas Council of Governments, the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) area. The MPO serves the region by developing transportation plans and programs that address the transportation needs of the rapidly growing metropolitan area. Burns works

85

City of Fort Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) (Redirected from City of Fort Collins Utilities) Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Collins City of Place Fort Collins, Colorado Utility Id 6604 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project was awarded $18,101,263 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $36,202,527. Utility Rate Schedules

86

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Small Commercial Appliance and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Program Info Funding Source Fort Collins Utilities and the Governor's Energy Office State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes washer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers. The appliance rebate program offers a $50 rebate for Energy Star rated clothes washers and $25 for Energy Star dishwashers. Applications for equipment rebates are available on the Fort Collins web site as well as at select local manufacturers and

87

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Insulation: $300 Room A/C Units: 2 per household All other equipment: 1 per customer account Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room A/C Unit: $150 Insulation: $0.40/sq ft (NEW); $0.125/sq ft (ADDED) Central A/C System/Heat Pumps: $50 - $2,100; varies by size and efficiency Programmable Thermostat: $25 Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $50 Provider Fort Pierce Utilities Authority

88

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program (Colorado) Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 - $15,000 Fort Collins offers its residential customers low-interest loans that may be used to finance a variety of projects including adding insulation, replacing a furnace, upgrading water and space heating systems, and

89

Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Fort Knox Strikes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Fort Knox Strikes Energy-Savings Gold in Partnership with Utility to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy...

90

Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing tremendous energy savings by cutting down consumption. Using an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant from the Recovery Act, the city was able to have the building retrofitted and install a building management system. The system allows library staff to control the indoor climate of the library from one location to reduce operating costs of the facility. Addthis Related Articles Captured data from the monitoring system at the public library shows that energy usage was highest at 10:30a.m., a time when a number of patrons in the library would be using computers and lighting. | Photo courtesy of Texas Institute for Sustainable Technology Research

91

Microsoft Word - JAS-Fort Nelson.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Name Fort Nelson Demonstration Test Test Location British Columbia, Canada Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Approximately 1.2 million tons of CO 2 per year Source...

92

Four years of operations and results with FORTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

Klingner, P. L. (Phillip L.); Carlson, L. D. (Leslie D.); Dingler, R. D. (Robert D.); Esch-Mosher, D. M. (Diana M.); Jacobson, A. R.; Roussel-Dupre, D. (Diane)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

FOUR YEARS OF OPERATIONS AND RESULTS WITH FORTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

D. ROUSSEL-DUPRE; P. KLINGNER; L. CARLSON; ET AL

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Indian/Alaska.pmd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Indian & Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy American Indian & Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AMERICAN INDIAN & ALASKA NATIVE TRIBAL GOVERNMENT POLICY PURPOSE This Policy sets forth the principles to be followed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure an effective implementation of a government to government relation- ship with American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments. This Policy is based on the United States Constitution, treaties, Supreme Court decisions, Execu- tive Orders, statutes, existing federal policies, tribal laws, and the dynamic political relationship between Indian nations and the Federal government 1 . The most impor- tant doctrine derived from this relationship is the trust responsibility of the United States to protect tribal sover-

95

29171 SB Indian Summer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribe Ben Rinehart Consulting EngineerScientist Indian Summer VI Cultural diversity is like an orchestra. Each cultural group, like each instrument, retains its...

96

Thunderstorm and Lightning Studies using the FORTE Optical Lightning System (FORTE/OLS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary observations of simultaneous RF and optical emissions from lightning as seen by the FORTE spacecraft are presented. RF/optical pairs of waveforms are routinely collected both as individual lightning events and as sequences of events associated with cloud-to-ground (CG) and intra-cloud (IC) flashes. CG pulses can be distinguished from IC pulses based on the properties of the RF and optical waveforms, but mostly based on the associated RF spectrograms. The RF spectrograms are very similar to previous ground-based VHF observations of lightning and show signatures associated with return strokes, stepped and dart leaders, and attachment processes,. RF emissions are observed to precede the arrival of optical emissions at the satellite by a mean value of 280 microseconds. The dual phenomenology nature of these observations are discussed in terms of their ability to contribute to a satellite-based lightning monitoring mission.

Argo, P.; Franz, R.; Green, J.; Guillen, J.L.; Jacobson, A.R.; Kirkland, M.; Knox, S.; Spalding, R.; Suszcynsky, D.M.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

City of Fort Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Collins City of Place Fort Collins, Colorado Utility Id 6604 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project was awarded $18,101,263 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $36,202,527. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GENERAL SERVICE Single Phase 200 AMP Service Commercial

98

Central Energy System Modernization at Fort Jackson, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of technology options was conducted for the central energy systems at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. There were two objectives in conducting this study. From a broader viewpoint, the Army would like to develop a systematic approach to management of its central energy systems and selected Fort Jackson for this ''pilot'' study for a prospective Central Energy System Modernization Program. From a site-specific perspective, the objective was to identify the lowest life-cycle cost energy supply option(s) at Fort Jackson for buildings currently served by central boilers and chillers. This study was co-funded by the Army's Southeast Region and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program.

Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.; Dirks, James A.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Drum, New York  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Drum, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Drum took place on May 4 and 5, 2010.

Brown, Scott A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Solana, Amy E.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Hand, James R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rowley, Steven; Nesse, Ronald J.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of...

102

Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm II Wind Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Mojave 16-17-18 Wind Farm II Facility Mojave 16/17/18 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources/Tomen Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

103

Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

MOJAVE: Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments. IV. The Parent Luminosity Function of Radio-Loud Blazars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected on the basis of relativistically beamed 15 GHz radio flux density (MOJAVE: Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) to derive the parent radio luminosity function (RLF) of bright radio-selected blazar cores. We use a maximum likelihood method to fit a beamed RLF to the observed data and thereby recover the parameters of the intrinsic (unbeamed) RLF. We analyze two subsamples of the MOJAVE sample: the first contains only objects of known FR II class, with a total of 103 sources, and the second subsample adds 24 objects of uncertain FR class for a total of 127 sources. Both subsamples exclude four known FR I radio galaxies and two gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources. We obtain good fits to both subsamples using a single power law intrinsic RLF and a pure density evolution function of the form z m exp [ ?1/2((z ? z0)/?) 2]. We find that a previously reported break in the observed MOJAVE RLF actually arises from using incomplete bins (because of the luminosity cutoff) across a steep and strongly evolving RLF, and does not reflect a break in the intrinsic RLF. The derived space density of the parent population of the FR II sources from the MOJAVE sample (with

M. Cara; M. L. Lister

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

FINISHED CORRECTIONS for the reprint of Barton H. Barbour, Fort Union and the Upper Missouri Fur Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackfeet torched Fort Piegan in 1832, and the Company built a new post, Fort McKenzie, a few miles away

Barrash, Warren

106

Energy survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Jackson, South Carolina; executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of energy conservation opportunities at the Fort Jackson Laundry Facility. This study was conducted under Contract Number DACA21-85-C-0587 entitled `Energy Survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Bragg, North Carolina and Fort Jackson, South Carolina.` The Fort Jackson portion of this study was initiated on March 26, 1986 by letter from Jerry T. Hines, Lieutenant Colonel, Corps of Engineers.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fort Union Regional Task Forces, proceedings. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming created seven task forces to study the interstate effects of the Fort Union Coal Formation which underlies parts of each of these states. Volume 2 discusses the following: (1) social and economic impact; (2) taxation of energy resources; and (3) water quality and quality problems. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fort Union Regional Task Forces, proceedings. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming created seven task forces to study the interstate effects of the Fort Union Coal Formation which underlies parts of each of these states. Volume 1 covers: (1) air quality; (2) common data element and information exchange; (3) energy development, regulation, and plant siting; and (4) reclamation and land use. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Indian Energy Blog Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Energy Blog Archive Office of Indian Indian Energy Blog Archive Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington DC 20585 (202) 586-1272 en From Theory to Reality: Visit to NREL Heightens Student's Desire to Become an Engineer http://energy.gov/indianenergy/articles/theory-reality-visit-nrel-heightens-students-desire-become-engineer From Theory to Reality: Visit to NREL Heightens Student's Desire to Become an Engineer

111

Indian Energy News Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

indian-energy-news-archive Office of Indian indian-energy-news-archive Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington DC 20585 (202) 586-1272 en November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development Resources http://energy.gov/indianenergy/articles/november-27-webinar-feature-broad-array-tribal-energy-development-resources November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development Resources

112

The natural geochemistry of tetrafluoromethane and sulfur hexafluoride : : studies of ancient Mojave Desert groundwaters, North Pacific seawaters and the summit emissions of Kilauea Volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 is detectable, and the source rock for CF 4 in upwellingsource of lithospheric CF 4 and SF 6 to Mojave Desert groundwaters is accessory fluorites contained in granitic rock.

Deeds, Daniel A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Natural Geochemistry of Tetrafluoromethane and Sulfur Hexafluoride : Studies of Ancient Mojave Desert Groundwaters, North Pacific Seawaters and the Summit Emissions of Kilauea Volcano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 is detectable, and the source rock for CF 4 in upwellingsource of lithospheric CF 4 and SF 6 to Mojave Desert groundwaters is accessory fluorites contained in granitic rock.

Deeds, Daniel A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

DOE Indian Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Indian Policy DOE Indian Policy Department of Energy Indian Policy as established in January 2006 DOE Indian policy Rev January 2006.pdf More Documents & Publications U.S....

116

Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

The effect of drought on four plant communities in the northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

Desert plant communities contain many perennial plant species that are well adapted to arid environments; therefore, one would intuitively believe that perennial desert species readily survive drought conditions. Abundant research on plant-soil-water relationships in North American deserts has shown that many species can maintain water uptake and growth when the soil-water potential is low. Little research, however, has focused on how prolonged drought conditions affect plant species in vegetation associations in desert ecosystems. A prolonged and widespread drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the Northern Mojave Desert, from 1987 through 1991. During this drought period vegetation characterization studies, initiated in 1990, by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG and G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both desert vegetation associations and desert plant species reacted to a prolonged drought. This paper presents the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States); Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

City of Fort Morgan, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Morgan Fort Morgan Place Colorado Utility Id 6610 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL AREA LIGHTING (FLAT RATE) Lighting HIGHWAY FOG LIGHTING (FLAT RATE) Lighting INDUSTRIAL TRANSMISSION LEVEL Industrial INTERRUPTIBLE LOAD MANAGEMENT SERVICE Industrial IRRIGATION Commercial LARGE COMMERCIAL Commercial MUNICIPAL Commercial RESIDENTIAL DEMAND METERED Residential RESIDENTIAL GENERAL Residential RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING (FLAT RATE) Lighting SMALL COMMERCIAL DEMAND METERED Commercial

119

MHK Projects/Fort Adams | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Adams Fort Adams < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.0533,"lon":-91.5651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

U.S. Army Fort Carson Environmental Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE 3 Phases Energy Services Land Lease Us Army Installation Management Command Headquarters, United States Army Garrison, Fort Carson 1.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this Finding of Suitability to Lease (FOSL) is to document the environmental suitability of property at Fort Carson, Colorado, for leasing and construction of a 2 Megawatt (2 MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) plant consistent with Department of Defense (DOD) and Army policy. In addition, the FOSL identifies use restrictions as specified in the attached Environmental Protection Provisions necessary to protect human health or the environment and to prevent interference with existing and planned environmental restoration activities. 2.0 PROPERTY DESCRIPTIONS The property to be leased consists of approximately 18.1518 acres of land located inside a

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Boralex Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boralex Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Facility Boralex Fort Fairfield Sector Biomass Location Aroostook County, Maine Coordinates 46.819941°, -68.4766064° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.819941,"lon":-68.4766064,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

122

Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002°, -116.2034505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

123

U.S. Army Fort Carson Environmental Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE 3 Phases Energy Services Land Lease Us Army Installation Management Command Headquarters, United States Army Garrison, Fort Carson 1.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this Finding of Suitability to Lease (FOSL) is to document the environmental suitability of property at Fort Carson, Colorado, for leasing and construction of a 2 Megawatt (2 MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) plant consistent with Department of Defense (DOD) and Army policy. In addition, the FOSL identifies use restrictions as specified in the attached Environmental Protection Provisions necessary to protect human health or the environment and to prevent interference with existing and planned environmental restoration activities. 2.0 PROPERTY DESCRIPTIONS The property to be leased consists of approximately 18.1518 acres of land located inside a

124

Fort Belknap Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belknap Electric Coop Inc Belknap Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Belknap Electric Coop Inc Place Texas Utility Id 6611 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1090/kWh Commercial: $0.1090/kWh Industrial: $0.0807/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Fort_Belknap_Electric_Coop_Inc&oldid=410715

125

City of Fort Meade, Florida (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meade, Florida (Utility Company) Meade, Florida (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Fort Meade Place Florida Utility Id 6609 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial, Demand Commercial Commercial, Non-Demand Commercial Residential, Inside City Residential Residential, Outside City Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1550/kWh Commercial: $0.1570/kWh Industrial: $0.1540/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Fort_Meade,_Florida_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409610

126

Force-limited vibration tests aplied to the FORTE` satellite  

SciTech Connect

A force limited random vibration test was conducted on a small satellite called FORTE{prime}. This type of vibration test reduces the over testing that can occur in a conventional vibration test. Two vibration specifications were used in the test: The conventional base acceleration specification, and an interface force specification. The vibration level of the shaker was controlled such that neither the table acceleration nor the force transmitted to the test item exceeded its specification. The effect of limiting the shake table vibration to the force specification was to reduce (or ``notch``) the shaker acceleration near some of the satellite`s resonance frequencies. This paper describes the force limited test conducted for the FORTE{prime} satellite. The satellite and its dynamic properties are discussed, and the concepts of force limiting theory are summarized. The hardware and setup of the test are then described, and the results of the force limited vibration test are discussed.

Stevens, R.R.; Butler, T.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Cedar Fort, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort, Utah: Energy Resources Fort, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3271707°, -112.1043852° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3271707,"lon":-112.1043852,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

Geothermal heat pumps at Fort Polk: Early results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Fort Polk, LA an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) is being converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under a performance contract. At the same time other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow water outlets, and attic insulation are being installed. If these contracts and this technology are to be used widely in US Department of Defense (DoD) facilities and other public buildings, better data from actual projects is the key. Being the first GHP project of this type and size, Fort Polk proved to be very challenging for all concerned. To get from RFP to start of construction took several years. This hard work by others created a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to address many of the due diligence issues that delayed the Fort Polk project. So that future projects can move faster, an evaluation has been undertaken to address the following barriers: absence of a documented large-scale demonstration of GHP energy, demand, and maintenance savings (a barrier to acceptance by federal customers, performance contractors, and investors); newness of large-scale facility capital renewal procurements at federal facilities under energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) or traditional appropriations (lack of case studies); and variability in current GHP design tools (increases risks and costs for federal customers, performance contractors, investors and designers). This paper presents early energy and demand savings results based on data collection through January 1996.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fort Hood Army base in central Texas has more than 5,200 buildings and can be considered as typical of large Department of Defense Army bases in the continental United States. The annual utility bill of the base exceeds $25 million. Baseline monthly models for electricity use, electricity demand, gas use, and water use for the three cantonment areas of Fort Hood have been developed. Such models can be used as screening tools for detecting changes in future utility bills and also to track/evaluate the extent to which Presidential Executive Order 12902, mandating 30% decrease in energy utility bills from 1985 to 2005, is being met. In this analysis, 1990 has been selected as the baseline year to illustrate the predictive capability of the models. Since ascertaining the uncertainty of our predictions is very important for meaningful evaluations, we have also presented the relevant equations for computing the 95% prediction intervals of the regression models and illustrated their use with measured data over the period of 1989-1993. This study also evaluated two different types of energy modeling software- the Princeton Scorekeeping method (PRISM) and EModel- in order to ascertain which is more appropriate for baseline modeling of large Army installations such as Fort Hood. It was found that the EModel software, which has more flexibility to handle different types of linear single variate change point models, gave more accurate modeling results.

Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fort Hood Army base in central Texas has more than 5,200 buildings and can be considered as typical of large Department of Defense Army bases in the continental United States. The annual utility bill of the base exceeds $25 million. Baseline monthly models for electricity use, electricity demand, gas use, and water use for the three cantonment areas of Fort Hood have been developed. Such models can be used as screening tools for detecting changes in future utility bills and also to track/evaluate the extent to which Presidential Executive Order 12902, mandating 30% decrease in energy utility bills from 1985 to 2005, is being met. In this analysis, 1990 has been selected as the baseline year to illustrate the predictive capability of the models. Since ascertaining the uncertainty of our predictions is very important for meaningful evaluations, we have also presented the relevant equations for computing the 95% prediction intervals of the regression models and illustrated their use with measured data over the period 1989 - 1993. This study also evaluated two different types of energy modeling software- the Princeton Scorekeeping method (PRISM) and EModel- in order to ascertain which is more appropriate for baseline modeling of large Army installations such as Fort Hood. It was found that the EModel software, which has more flexibility to handle different types of linear single variate change point models, gave more accurate modeling results.

Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location.

132

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

133

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

134

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Redirected from Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location.

135

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

136

Tools from the French and Indian War sloop Boscawen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 115-ton sloop Boscaweit was built by the British to drive the French from Lake Champlain near the end of the French and Indian War. She helped to defeat the French fleet in 1759 and took part in amphibious operations the next year against the French fort of lieaux-Noix at the north end of Lake Champlain. Part of her duties included moving men and matdriel for the British Army. The usefulness of the land-locked warship declined rapidly at the end of hostilities and, stripped of her armament and rigging, she sank at her moorings in the King's Shipyard near Fort Ticonderoga. The remains of the Boscawen were discovered in 1983 during a survey sponsored by the Champlain Maritime Society. Archaeological excavation of the hull in 1984 and 1985 revealed a surprisingly large number of artifacts. Tools represented a small but diverse segment of the total artifact assemblage. Few tools from the Boscaweii are comparable to the ship's carpenter's and shipwright's tools commonly associated with shipwrecks. Instead, the tools represent types which were commonly used by eighteenth-century armies for fortification, siegework, and fatigue duties. Both the French and British armies used large numbers of these types of tools along the shores of Lake Champlain. The crew of the Boscawen may have used some of the tools but most were probably some form of cargo, either usable tools for the British Army or scrap iron collected at British and French sites.

Grant, David Mitchell

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geochemical controls on production in the Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Newark East field (Barnett Shale) in the Fort Worth Basin, Texas currently has the largest daily production of any gas field in Texas. Major… (more)

Klentzman, Jana L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

139

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet covers the FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney barracks.

142

An evaluation of the Fort Polk energy savings performance contract  

SciTech Connect

The US Army, in cooperation with an energy services company (ESCO), used private capital to retrofit 4,003 family housing units on the Fort Polk, Louisiana, military base with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The project was performed under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) that provides for the Army and the ESCO to share the cost savings realized through the energy retrofit over the 20-year life of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, the ESCO is responsible for maintaining the GHPs and provides ongoing measurement and verification (M and V) to assure cost and energy savings to the Army. An independent evaluation conducted by the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the GHP systems in combination with other energy retrofit measures have reduced annual whole-community electrical consumption by 33%, and natural gas consumption by 100%. These energy savings correspond to an estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions of 22,400 tons per year. Peak electrical demand has been reduced by 43%. The electrical energy and demand savings correspond to an improvement in the whole-community annual electric load factor from 0.52 to 0.62. As a result of the project, Fort Polk saves about $450,000 annually and benefits from complete renewal of the major energy consuming systems in family housing and maintenance of those systems for 20 years. Given the magnitude of the project, the cost and energy savings achieved, and the lessons learned during its design and implementation, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other housing-related energy savings performance contracts in both the public and private sectors.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dynamic computer simulation of the Fort St. Vrain steam turbines  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation is described for the dynamic response of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear reactor regenerative intermediate- and low-pressure steam turbines. The fundamental computer-modeling assumptions for the turbines and feedwater heaters are developed. A turbine heat balance specifying steam and feedwater conditions at a given generator load and the volumes of the feedwater heaters are all that are necessary as descriptive input parameters. Actual plant data for a generator load reduction from 100 to 50% power (which occurred as part of a plant transient on November 9, 1981) are compared with computer-generated predictions, with reasonably good agreement.

Conklin, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Wind Monitoring Report for Fort Wainwright's Donnelly Training Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the wind data collected at a location in Fort Wainwright’s Donnelly Training Area (DTA) near the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) test track, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the gross and net energy productions that proposed turbine models would have produced exposed to the wind resource measured at the meteorological tower (met tower) location during the year of measurement. Calculations are based on the proposed turbine models’ standard atmospheric conditions power curves, the annual average wind speeds, wind shear estimates, and standard industry assumptions.

Orrell, Alice C.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Targeting Net Zero Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kate Anderson, Tony Markel, Mike Simpson, John Leahey, Caleb Rockenbaugh, Lars Lisell, Kari Burman, and Mark Singer October 2011 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

146

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Geology of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located on the northwestern margin of the Marysvale volcanic field in southwestern Utah. The geology of the KGRA is dominated by lava flows and ash-flow tuffs of late Oligocene to mid-Miocene age that were deposited on faulted sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic to Mesozoic age. The geothermal system of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA is structurally controlled by normal faults. High-angle faults control fluid flow within the geothermal reservoir, while the gravitational glide blocks provide an impermeable cap for the geothermal system in the central part of the field. Surficial activity occurring to the north and south of the glide blocks is characterized by the evolution of hydrogen sulfide and deposition of native sulphur. Intense acid alteration of the aluvium, resulting from downward migration of sulphuric acid, has left porous siliceous residues that retain many of the original sedimentary structures. Detailed logs of Union Oil Company drill holes Forminco No. 1, Utah State 42-7, and Utah State 31-33 are included.

Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the site’s training mission. In addition, the site’s blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ¢/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect

This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

153

Thermal design of the fast-on-orbit recording of transient events (FORTE) satellite  

SciTech Connect

Analytical tools were used to design a thermal control system for the FORTE satellite. An overall spacecraft thermal model was developed to provide boundary temperatures for detailed thermal models of the FORTE instruments. The thermal design will be presented and thermal model results discussed.

Akau, R.L.; Behr, V.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitaker, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Controlled_Source_Audio_MT_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598122"

155

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598123

156

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Vapor_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598134"

157

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al., Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598125" Categories: Exploration Activities

158

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Magnetics_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598118" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages

159

EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, 2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska SUMMARY DOE (lead agency), Denali Commission (cooperating agency) and USDA Rural Utilities Services (cooperating agency) are proposing to provide funding to support the final design and construction of a biomass combined heat and power plant and associated district heating system to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments and the Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation. The proposed biomass district heating system would be located in Fort Yukon Alaska. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 2013 EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska

160

City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider The City of Fort Collins The City Council of Fort Collins passed a resolution in September 2006, establishing green building goals for new city-owned buildings of 5,000 square feet or more. New buildings must be designed and constructed to

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161

EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, 2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska SUMMARY DOE (lead agency), Denali Commission (cooperating agency) and USDA Rural Utilities Services (cooperating agency) are proposing to provide funding to support the final design and construction of a biomass combined heat and power plant and associated district heating system to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments and the Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation. The proposed biomass district heating system would be located in Fort Yukon Alaska. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 2013 EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska

162

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Gravity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598130" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities

163

Indian Wind Energy Outlook 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. ?The status of wind energy in India ? 4 Indian power sector?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????5 Renewable Energy in India ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????5 Wind potential???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? ? 7

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Efficiency Program Home Efficiency Program Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See Program Website Air Sealing: $200 - $500 Conditioned Crawl Space Insulation: $0.30/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft. Cold Crawl Space: $0.30/sq ft. - $0.45/sq ft. Basement Wall Insulation:$0.50/sq ft. - $1.00/sq ft., Cantilever Floor Insulation: $0.50/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft. Frame Floor Insulation Over Garage: $0.50/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft.

165

United States Army; Fort Gordon, Georgia, Range Control Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT DRAFT Joint Standard Operating Procedures (JSOP) For Military Training at the Savannah River Site August 2011 U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Site And U.S. Department Of The Army, Fort Gordon, Georgia DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 Chapter 1 General, 1.1 Purpose, page 8 1.2 Scope, page 8 1.3 Explanation of abbreviation and terms, page 8 1.4 Applicability, page 8 1.5 Deviations and Amendments, page 8 Chapter 2 Responsibilities 2.1 DOE-Savannah River Point of Contact (DOE-SR POC), page 10 2.2 DOE-Assistant Manager for Integration and Planning (AMIP), page 10 2.3 SRNS Interface Management Office, page 10 2.4 Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security (DPTMS), Page 10

166

Barnett shale rising star in Fort Worth basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippian-age Barnett shale of the Fort Worth basin, North Texas, has emerged as a new and active natural gas play. Natural gas production from the Barnett shale at Newark East field in Denton and Wise counties, Texas, has reached 80 MMcfd from more than 300 wells. However, very little publicly available information exists on resource potential and actual well performance. The US Geological Survey 1995 National Assessment of US Oil and Gas Resources categorized the Mississippian Barnett shale play (play number 4503) as an unconventional gas play but did not quantitatively assess this resource. This article, which expands upon a recent USGS open-file resource assessment report, provides an updated look at the Barnett shale and sets forth a new quantitative assessment for the play.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Koperna, G. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Schmoker, J.W.; Quinn, J.C. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fort Collins Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Fort Collins Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Building Tune Up: $50,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Roof Top A/C: $100 - $150, plus $5 for each 0.1 SEER or IEER above minimum requirement Variable Frequency Drives: $85 - $120/HP Packaged Terminal A/C: $50, plus $5 for each 0.1 EER above minimum

168

Fort Worth, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worth, Texas: Energy Resources Worth, Texas: Energy Resources (Redirected from Fort Worth, TX) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.725409°, -97.3208496° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.725409,"lon":-97.3208496,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DACA45-1-07-6037 DACA45-1-07-6037 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY LEASE FORT CARSON MILITARY INSTALLATION EL PAS0 COUNTY, COLORADO THIS LEASE, made on behalf of the United States, between the SECRETARY OF THE ARMY, hereinafter referred to as the Secretary, and Carson Solar I, LLC., a limited liability company organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Delaware, with its principal office at 31 897 Del Obispo, Suite 220, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675, hereinafter referred to as the Lessee. WITNESSETH: The Secretary, by the authority of Title 10, United States Code, Section 2667, and for the consideration hereinafter set forth, hereby leases to the Lessee the property over, across, in and upon lands of the United States, identified in Exhibits "A" and "B," attached hereto and made a

170

Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum  

SciTech Connect

This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

System specification for Fort Hood Solar Cogeneration Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The characteristics and design and environmental requirements are specified for a solar cogeneration facility at the Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Characteristics of the system and major elements are described, and applicable standards, codes, laws and regulations are listed. Performance requirements for the total system and for each individual subsystem are presented. Survival requirements are given for various environmental extremes, with consideration given to lightning protection and effects of direct or adjacent lightning strikes. Air quality control standards are briefly mentioned. The facility operates in two principal modes: energy collection and energy utilization. The plant is capable of operating in either mode independently or in both modes simultaneously. The system is also operational in transitional and standby/inactive modes. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Preliminary assessment of Fort Hood solar cogeneration plant performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis has been performed to enable a preliminary assessment of the performance that can be expected of a solar thermal cogeneration system designed to serve a selected group of buildings at Fort Hood, Texas. A central receiver system utilizing a molten salts mixture as the receiver coolant, heat transfer fluid, and storage medium is assumed. The system is to supply a large share of the space heating, air conditioning, domestic hot water, and electricity needs of a 20-building Troop Housing Complex. Principal energy loads are graphed and tabulated, and the principal electric parasitic loads are tabulated and the methodology by which they are estimated is reviewed. The plant model and the performance calculations are discussed. Annual energy displacement results are given. (LEW)

Ator, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypothesis include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production thorugh an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plan production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plan and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plan-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform.

Smith, Stanley D. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nowak, Robert S. [University of Nevada, Reno

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Liquid (Combs 2006) - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598127"

176

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nash, Et Al., 2002) Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah thermal anomaly, in relation to geology References Gregory D. Nash, Christopher Kesler, Michael C. Adam (2002) Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And

177

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Nash, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nash, Et Al., Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah thermal anomaly, in relation to geology References Gregory D. Nash, Christopher Kesler, Michael C. Adam (2002) Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management

178

Fuel selection study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Fuel Selection Study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri were: (1) to evaluate specified sources of heating energy - electric or fuel oil, and the necessary associated conversion work for meeting the heating requirements of selected buildings at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri; and (2) to determine the impact on energy usage and cost savings which would result from increasing insulation levels in the building under review. The buildings considered in this study included 2,862 family housing units, 5 Bachelor Officers' Quarters, an Enlisted Women's Barracks, the Medical Detachment Building, and the Heating Plant supporting the main Fort laundry.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fuel selection study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Fuel Selection Study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri were: (1) to evaluate specified sources of heating energy - electric or fuel oil, and the necessary associated conversion work for meeting the heating requirements of selected buildings at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri; and (2) to determine the impact on energy usage and cost savings which would result from increasing insulation levels in the building under review. The buildings considered in this study included 2,862 family housing units, 5 Bachelor Officers' Quarters, an Enlisted Women's Barracks, the Medical Detachment Building, and the Heating Plant supporting the main Fort laundry.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Resistivity_Log_At_Fort_Bliss_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689878" Categories: Exploration Activities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

182

Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort Detrick, Maryland December 2013 The Army, on Friday November 29, announced a notice of intent to award a contract to build an 18.6-megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) facility at Fort Detrick, in Frederick, Maryland. This action will help the service meet its goal of deploying one gigawatt of renewable energy by 2025. The selected contractor is Framingham, Mass.-based Ameresco. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), through its Environmental Energy Technologies Division, provided essential technical services, over a span of two years, to make this project happen. Supported by the Federal Energy Management Program, Berkeley Lab renewable power expert Gerald Robinson provided the Army, Fort Detrick staff, its Energy

183

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

184

Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling.

185

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

186

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Spanish Fort Middle School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Spanish Fort Middle School Spanish Fort Middle School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Spanish Fort Middle School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Spanish Fort Middle School team, from Spanish Court, AL, explores the

187

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2002) Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a

188

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl® Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl® April 30, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Poudre High School from Fort Collins, Colorado won the 2007 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl® for high school students today at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center. Poudre High School beat State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania in the national championship match. Teams representing 64 high schools from across the United States competed in the National Finals. Members of the winning team include Patrick Chaffey, Sam Elder, Winston Gao, Sam Sun, Logan Wright and coach Jack Lundt. The team won a science

189

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reactor Site - Fort Belvoir - VA 0-02  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Site - Fort Belvoir - VA Reactor Site - Fort Belvoir - VA 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REACTOR SITE - FORT BELVOIR (VA.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Fort Belvoir , Virginia VA.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 VA.0-02-1 Site Operations: No evidence of AEC involvement with reactor operations. AEC conducted health and safety inspections of this site. Probably a licensed operation. VA.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD VA.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Reactor fuel Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Reactor Fuel Radiological Survey(s): Health and safety inspections VA.0-02-1 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD VA.0-02-1

190

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

191

Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

192

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

193

Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero November 18, 2010 - 2:23pm Addthis Ian Hamos What does this mean for me? Using electricity during "peak periods" requires more fuel and creates more emissions to produce the same amount as energy as non-peak periods. By integrating demand-side resources, distributed and renewable power sources, and smart grid technologies, Fort Collins is creating a net Zero Energy District (ZED) -- potentially creating hundreds of permanent jobs and setting an example for cities nationwide. Just like traffic has peaks at rush hour, electricity demand rises and falls at particular times of day. During electricity's peak periods, power plants turn on gas-fired turbines and other supplemental energy

194

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

195

An Unusual Summertime Downslope Wind Event in Fort Collins, Colorado, on 3 July 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unseasonal, severe downslope windstorm along the eastern foothills of the Colorado Rocky Mountains is described. The storm, which occurred on 3 July 1993, produced wind guts in Fort Collins, Colorado, over 40 m s?1 and resulted in extensive ...

William R. Cotton; John F. Weaver; Brian A. Beitler

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the history, design, performance, supporting activities, and management plans for the Solar Total Energy System for the troop housing complex at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. (WHK)

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reassembling the rolling bridge : an art gallery at Fort Point Channel, Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spanning the Fort Point Channel for nearly a century, Boston's Rolling Bridge is a familiar landmark to many railway commuters and residents of the city. Its robust steel assembly, characterized by three anthropomorphic ...

Lim, Winston E

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes When the U. S. Army was in the planning stages for a geothermal exploration program at Ft. Bliss, they approached the Geothermal Research Department for input on the structure of this progrm, this consultation led to a Work-for-Others (WFO) contract from the Army to Sandia for assistance on the exploratory holes. That assistance included consultation and dmection of drilling operations, numerous temperature logs during and after drilling, and project documentation. This report comprises a summary of

199

Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Gamma Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

200

EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

Nowak, Robert S.

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the US Army US Forces Command (FORSCOM) Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 2, Baseline Detail, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment.

Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

DOE Indian Energy Purchase Preference Policy Guidance | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Energy Purchase Preference Policy Guidance DOE Indian Energy Purchase Preference Policy Guidance PDFFINAL DOE Indian Energy purchase preference policy guidance.pdf More...

203

American Indian Research and Education Initiative (AIREI) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Indian Research and Education Initiative (AIREI) American Indian Research and Education Initiative (AIREI) American Indian Research and Education Initiative (AIREI)...

204

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Final Site Radiation Survey: Summary Report and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final step in the decommissioning process at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCo) Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. The final site radiation survey documents that all nuclear facility surfaces meet the established release limits for unrestricted use. The survey formed the legal basis for the termination of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear license, which occurred in August 1997. The lessons learned in this process will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown p...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) assessment at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, by a team of PNNL engineers under contract to the Installation Management Agency (IMA) Southeast Region Office (SERO). Funding support was also provided by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The purpose of the assessment was to determine how energy is consumed at Fort Buchanan, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Role of the Indian and Pacific Oceans in the Indian Summer Monsoon Variability .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The role of the Indian and Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) variability in the intraseasonal and interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall is… (more)

Achuthavarier, Deepthi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Continuous Commissioning® of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DFW International Airport is one of the largest and busiest airports in the world. Located in North Texas, squarely between the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, the DFW Airport not only serves a huge population in the North Texas area for domestic flights but also is a major airport for international flights. The Energy and Transportation Management (ETM) Department, at the Airport, is responsible for reducing energy within their facilities, and they are very aggressive in energy management. In recent years they have renovated or replaced much of the equipment in their central utilities plant and added a huge 90,000 ton-hr (316.5 MWh) chilled water thermal storage system. The electric bills, for the accounts managed by ETM, was $29 million (€20 million) in 2007. Although the ETM staff had initiated many energy efficiency measures, they felt that the energy consuming systems could be optimized to realize additional energy and cost savings. The Energy Systems Laboratory was hired to apply the Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) process at the airport. Five projects have been identified to date including: 1. An energy audit and assessment of Terminal B and a lighting demonstration pilot project. 2. CC of the Consolidated Rent-A-Car Center. 3. CC of the Airport Administration Building. 4. CC of the new International Terminal D (on-going). 5. CC of the Utilities Plant, Energy Plaza (on-going). This paper will focus on the completed projects: the Consolidated Rent-A-Car Center, the Airport Administration Building, and the major on-going projects, CC of Terminal D and Energy Plaza.

Yazdani, B.; Schroeder, F.; Kramer, L.; Baltazar, J. C.; Turner, W. D.; Wei, G.; Deng, S.; Henson, R.; Dennis, J. R.; T., R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Olivella Grooved Rectangle Beads from a Middle Holocene Site in the Fort Rock Valley, Northern Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Fort Rock and other local sources. The primary culturalRock Valley currently receives no water from a perennial source.

Jenkins, Dennis L; Erlandson, Jon M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Extremes of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, ENSO and equatorial Indian Ocean oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extremes of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, ENSO and equatorial Indian Ocean oscillation Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) are linked to El Nin~o and Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We show that large), Extremes of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, ENSO and equatorial Indian Ocean oscillation, Geophys. Res

Gadgil, Siddhartha

211

Savings Report for the Fort Hood Army Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents electricity consumption and electric demand savings analysis for the Thermal Plant, buildings located in the 87000 block, III Corp building and other buildings that were determined to be part of the ESPC project at Ft. Hood, a total of 21 sites. The savings analysis for the Thermal Plant is not completed due to lack of post-retrofit data and will be included in the report upon receiving more data from Fort Hood. The data used for savings calculations were collected through the synergistic loggers installed at the Thermal Plant and III Corp building and portable loggers attached to Watt-hour meters in selected buildings. For each site, the hourly data collected for the pre- and post periods are converted to daily usage and then modeled with ASHRAE’s IMT change-point linear models. The electricity consumption savings is then calculated for the months post-retrofit data are available. The weather-independent analysis, which utilizes 24-hour profiles that were developed using ASHRAE’s 1093-RP diversity factor procedures, combined with ASHRAE’s IMT change-point linear models, are used to evaluate demand savings. In Section 1 of the report, savings summaries for the sites measured and all the sites are given. In summary, the total measured savings of 1,034,473 kWh for the measured period corresponds to 60.7% of the audit-estimated electricity savings. The total of the measured demand savings of 1,220 kW for the measured period corresponds to 37.2% of the audit-estimated savings. Both measured electricity and demand savings fall short of expectations. The projected annual savings, which include the projected annual measured savings for the sites measured and the stipulated annual savings for the sites not measured, to match the JCI estimates for all the 57 sites, is also presented in Section 1. 78.2% of the audit-estimated electricity savings and 72.0% of the audit-estimated demand savings could be achieved assuming that the sites not measured were achieving 100% of the audit-estimated savings. The detailed savings summary and the plots showing the savings analysis for each site are presented in Sections 2 to 22. An Appendix is also provided that includes the list of data files in the accompanying CDROM with this report.

Song, S.; Liu, Z.; Cho, S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Latta: Handbook of Yokuts Indians (second edition)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the contribution of this Handbook. It is animpor- tant book. Handbook of Yokuts Indians. Frank F.This second edition of the Handbook of Yokuts Indians is 478

Heizer, Robert F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Programs in Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to the cleanup of sites that were once part of the Nation's nuclear weapons complex. Several of these sites are located close or adjacent to sovereign Tribal nations and impact Indian lands and/or resources. Consistent with the Department's American

214

Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, & Venetie Biomass Boiler Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of ten Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes settled in 10 remote villages and are linked by the Yukon River System. The CATG mission is to maintain the Yukon Flats region as Indian Country by asserting traditional rights and taking responsibility for developing tribal technical capacity to manage the land and resources. It is the intent of CATG to explore and develop all opportunities for a renewable and self-sufficient energy program for each of the villages. CATG envisions utilization of forest resources both for construction and energy as one of the best long-term strategies for integrating the economic goals for the region as well as supporting the cultural and social issues. The intent for this feasibility project is to focus specifically on biomass utilization for heat, first, and for future electrical generation within the region, second. An initial determination has already been made regarding the importance of wood energy as a primary source of renewable energy to displace diesel fuel in the Yukon Flats region. A desktop study of other potential renewable resources was conducted in 2006.

Greg Koontz, ME William A. Wall, PhD

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, & Venetie Biomass Boiler Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of ten Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes settled in 10 remote villages and are linked by the Yukon River System. The CATG mission is to maintain the Yukon Flats region as Indian Country by asserting traditional rights and taking responsibility for developing tribal technical capacity to manage the land and resources. It is the intent of CATG to explore and develop all opportunities for a renewable and self-sufficient energy program for each of the villages. CATG envisions utilization of forest resources both for construction and energy as one of the best long-term strategies for integrating the economic goals for the region as well as supporting the cultural and social issues. The intent for this feasibility project is to focus specifically on biomass utilization for heat, first, and for future electrical generation within the region, second. An initial determination has already been made regarding the importance of wood energy as a primary source of renewable energy to displace diesel fuel in the Yukon Flats region. A desktop study of other potential renewable resources was conducted in 2006.

Greg Koontz, ME William A. Wall, PhD

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage facility study Fort Gordon, Georgia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Fort Gordon currently purchases natural gas from Atlanta Gas Light Company under a rate schedule for Large Commercial Interruptible Service. This offers a very favorable rate for `interruptible` gas service, however, Fort Gordon must maintain a base level of `firm gas`, purchased at a significantly higher cost, to assure adequate natural gas supplies during periods of curtailment to support family housing requirements and other single fuel users. It is desirable to provide a standby fuel source to meet the needs of family housing and other single fuel users and eliminate the extra costs for the firm gas commitment to Atlanta Gas Light Company. Therefore, a propane-air standby fuel system is proposed to be installed at Fort Gordon.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead City of Fort Collins Utilities Country United States Headquarters Location Fort Collins, Colorado Recovery Act Funding $18,101,263.00 Total Project Value $36,202,527.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project Coordinates 40.5852602°, -105.084423° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

218

Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Drilling for the four holes followed the same general pattern: 1) set a conductor casing to a depth of 30-50', 2) drill - 6" hole through mostly sand/clay sedentary formations to 500-600', 3) set 4-1/2" surface casing at that depth 4) core HQ (3.89" dia.) mostly through limestone/dolornite or

219

Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration

220

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a non-equilibrated maximum temperature probably in the range of 157degrees C and a very complicated geologic structure.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Warpinski, Et Al., (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598126" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here

222

Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion provides a detailed model of the Cove Fort geothermal region.

223

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

224

Wind resource assessment and wind energy system cost analysis: Fort Huachuca, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this joint DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project is to determine whether wind turbines can reduce costs by providing power to US military facilities in high wind areas. In support of this objective, one year of data on the wind resources at several Fort Huachuca sites was collected. The wind resource data were analyzed and used as input to an economic study for a wind energy installation at Fort Huachuca. The results of this wind energy feasibility study are presented in the report.

Olsen, T.L. [Tim Olsen Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Can states tax Indian land production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Supreme Court this term is expected to rule on whether Congress has authorized the states to impose the full array of mineral taxes on production from Indian reservations. In the case under consideration, Blackfeet Tribe of indians V. Montana, the tribes claim that the states no longer have congressional authorization to tax mineral leases under the Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 or joint ventures under the Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982. Operators claim it is unfair for mineral production on Indian reservations alone to be subject to double taxation.

Israel, D.H.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

DOE Office of Indian Energy Announces New Indian Country Energy and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces New Indian Country Energy and Announces New Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group Members DOE Office of Indian Energy Announces New Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group Members April 24, 2013 - 6:11pm Addthis Through the Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG), the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy works to collaborate with and seek out real-time tribal expertise and experiences representing obstacles and opportunities in energy and related infrastructure development as well as capacity building in Indian Country. The ICEIWG represents the Department's commitment to work collaboratively with Indian Country, and the goal of this active, ongoing dialogue is to reflect the priorities and needs of Indian Country to the Energy Secretary

227

FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

228

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

229

Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586 Phone (970) 491-6612  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practitioners who excel in their professional lives. Students frequently come to the classroom with work Springs, Fort Collins or on-line, the School of Social Work welcomes you to our learning community. ALL College of Health and Human Sciences School of Social Work http://www.ssw.chhs.colostate.edu Master

Stephens, Graeme L.

230

Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586 Phone (970) 491-6612  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment and graduating social work practitioners who excel in their professional lives. Students-time; or taking your courses in Thornton, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins or on-line, the School of Social Work College of Health and Human Sciences School of Social Work http://www.ssw.chhs.colostate.edu Master

Stephens, Graeme L.

231

Energy study of Laundry Facilities, Fort Knox, Kentucky: Executive summary (revised). Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Executive Summary of the Energy Survey of Laundry Facilities at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The purpose of this document is to briefly outline the existing and historical energy situation, summarize the methodology and results of the Energy Study, and present the specific energy conservation projects developed through the Energy Study.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Conceptual design report for the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was prepared that: (1) reviewed the operations necessary to perform the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements; (2) contained a description and survey of equipment capable of performing the necessary functions; and (3) performed a tradeoff study for determining the preferred concepts and equipment specifications. A preferred system was recommended and engineering specifications for this system were developed.

Lord, D.L. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wadsworth, D.C.; Sekot, J.P.; Skinner, K.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WS FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA: A SYNTHESIS By R.M. Flores and C coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

234

Two Floods in Fort Collins, Colorado: Learning from a Natural Disaster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flash flood in Fort Collins, Colorado, on 28 July 1997 resulted in 5 deaths, 62 injuries, and more than $250 million in property damage. Following the 1997 flood, a great many changes were made in the city's preparedness infrastructure. On 30 ...

John F. Weaver; Eve Gruntfest; Glenn M. Levy

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume III. Engineering drawings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering drawings are presented for the Solar Total Energy System at Fort Hood, Texas. Drawings are given for the solar collector subsystem, power conversion subsystem, instrumentation and control subsystem, thermal storage subsystem, site preparation, thermal storage area piping and equipment layout, heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystem, STES building and facility, and electrical distribution. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fission product behavior in the Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain HTGRs  

SciTech Connect

Actual operating data from Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain were compared with code predictions to assess the validity of the methods used to predict the behavior of fission products in the primary coolant circuit. For both reactors the measured circuit activities were significantly below design values, and the observations generally verify the codes used for large HTGR design.

Hanson, D.L.; Baldwin, N.L.; Strong, D.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT  

SciTech Connect

The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

THE ANALYSIS OF FATAL ACCIDENTS IN INDIAN D. Sengupta1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ANALYSIS OF FATAL ACCIDENTS IN INDIAN COAL MINES A. Mandal D. Sengupta1 Indian Statistical of Indian coal mines from April 1989 to March 1998. It is found that Indian mines have considerably higher over 600,000 miners and other workers. Safety in the Indian coal mines is therefore a very important

Mandal, Abhyuday

239

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort`s electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils {number_sign}2 and {number_sign}6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Individual and Combined Influences of ENSO and the Indian Ocean Dipole on the Indian Summer Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative influences of the ENSO and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events on the Indian summer rainfall were studied using observational data and an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The composite analysis of rainfall anomalies ...

Karumuri Ashok; Zhaoyong Guan; N. H. Saji; Toshio Yamagata

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Susanville Indian Racheria proposes to establish the EPA's Portfolio Manager tool to collect key

242

U.S. Department of Energy Amerian Indian Policy | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Amerian Indian Policy U.S. Department of Energy Amerian Indian Policy DOE Indian Policy Rev January 2006- Vers 3.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE...

243

Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands.

Fred Mayes

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indian Point" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

245

The State of the Indian Steel Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... domestic demand, their competitive position in respect of cost of production, ... In this paper a forecast of the Indian steel industry in the coming five years will ...

246

AMERICAN INDIAN LAW CAREER RESOURCE GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holdaway Box 7 FF 10 "The Cheyene Way" by Susan Horton Box 7 FF 11 "The Blackfeet Indians" by Wally Horn

Vasilyev, Oleg V.

247

Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case Studies ... Engineering and Human Resource Development: Design as a Common Language ... The Fundamentals of Gas Bubbling into Liquid Metals.

248

American Indian Science and Engineering Society Annual and National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Indian Science and Engineering Society Annual and National Conference American Indian Science and Engineering Society Annual and National Conference November 7, 2011 -...

249

Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As domestic dependent nations, Indian tribes exercise inherent sovereign powers over their members and territory. The United States continues to work with Indian...

250

American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference October 30, 2013 8:00AM MDT to November 2,...

251

Society of American Indian Government Employees Annual National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Society of American Indian Government Employees Annual National Training Program Society of American Indian Government Employees Annual National Training Program June 3, 2012...

252

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Strategic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course: Strategic Energy Planning (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational...

253

The 'Watcher's Stage' in Lower Colorado River Indian Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primitive Subsistence on the Lower Colorado and Gila Rivers.Watcher's Stage' in Lower Colorado River Indian AgricultureIndian tribes along the Colorado River to various interior

Lawton, Harry W.; Wilke, Philip J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Programs American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders Waste Management Nuclear Materials &...

255

Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.7374001°, -100.7514845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.7374001,"lon":-100.7514845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

256

Neutron Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Neutron Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Neutron Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

257

Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run tier completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

258

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Four wells have been successfully drilled into this resource since the early 1980s using a combination of funds provided by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the United State Department of Energy (USDOE). The first three wells, FB-1, -2 and -3 have been discussed in a previous paper (Barker et al., 2005). The current status of the FBIC project to evaluate the potential geothermal resource under the reservation is that a deep

259

Reinhabiting the Fort Point Channel : a proposal for transforming and extending the warehouse district in South Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this design investigation is the warehouse fabric of the Fort Point Channel and its potentials as a model for further development This extensive configuration of warehouses and access roads is the product of ...

Dale, John Randall

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis army installation  

SciTech Connect

In FY1999, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis Army Installation near Tacoma, Washington. Preliminary weather-corrected calculations show energy savings of 10{percent} from FY98 for energy use in family housing. This exceeded the project's goal of 3{percent}. The work was funded by the U.S. DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The project adapted FEMP's national ``You Have the Power Campaign'' at the local level, tailoring it to the military culture. The applied research project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tailored, research-based strategies to promote energy conservation in military family housing. In contrast to many energy efficiency efforts, the campaign focused entirely on actions residents could take in their own homes, as opposed to technology or housing upgrades. Behavioral change was targeted because residents do not pay their own utility bills; thus other motivations must drive personal energy conservation. This campaign augments ongoing energy savings from housing upgrades carried out by Fort Lewis. The campaign ran from September 1998 through August 1999. The campaign strategy was developed based on findings from previous research and on input from residents and officials at Fort Lewis. Energy use, corrected to account for weather differences, was compared with the previous year's use. Survey responses from 377 of Fort Lewis residents of occupied housing showed that the campaign was moderately effective in promoting behavior change. Of those who were aware of the campaign, almost all said they were now doing one or more energy-efficient things that they had not done before. Most people were motivated by the desire to do the right thing and to set a good example for their children. They were less motivated by other factors.

AH McMakin; RE Lundgren; EL Malone

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Methodology for the evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army and a private energy service company are developing a comprehensive energy efficiency project to upgrade the family housing at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The project includes converting the space conditioning systems of more than 4,000 housing units to geothermal (or ground-source) heat pumps (GHPs). This interim report describes the methodology of the evaluation associated with this project, including the field monitoring that has been conducted at the base.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.; White, D.L.; Huang, H.L.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Population size and contaminant exposure of bats using caves on Fort Hood Military Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal cave usage patterns were determined in an effort to understand the ecology of a bat colony at Shell Mountain Bat Cave in Fort Hood, Texas. Exit counts were conducted one night each month for 13 consecutive months to estimate the population and determine seasonal patterns. This cave was used as a maternity roost by a colony of cave myotis (myotis velifer) from March through October. Total colony size varies from month to month, becoming zero when bats leave during the winter. Old guano from two abandoned caves, Egypt and Tippet, on Fort Hood, and new guano from Shell Mountain was analyzed. Organochlorine residues showed higher levels of total chlordanes, endrin, dieldrin, mirex, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT in Egypt and Tippet caves; organophosphates showed higher amounts in the Shell Mountain guano. Organophosphates have never before been found in bat guano, and so what effects, if any, these amounts may indicate on the health of the colony are unknown. Some metals were also found in higher amounts in guano from Egypt and Tippet caves. Residue concentrations of organochlorines and metals in guano and carcasses collected from the three caves are low and probably of no concern. Comparisons among spring and fall guano smaples from Shell Mountain suggest that HCB, total chlordanes, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan II, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT are accumulated while the bats are at Fort Hood. Lindane appears to be the only chemical that increases while the bats are at Fort Hood. Organochlorines found in carcasses tended to show smallest amounts in a lactating female and largest amounts in nursing juveniles.

Land, Tarisha Ann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort's electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils [number sign]2 and [number sign]6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fort Hood solar total energy project. Technical support and systems integration. First semiannual report, May 1-October 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress on the design of a Solar Total Energy System which will supply a significant portion of the energy requirements of a troop housing complex at Fort Hood, Texas, is described. Selection and sizing of the distributed collector field are discussed, and parabolic trough collector technology is reviewed. Energy load measurements and insolation models for the Fort Hood site are described. Technical project support efforts are reviewed. (WHK)

None,

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) process at Fort Drum, New York  

SciTech Connect

The federal energy manager has been directed by the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) to reduce energy consumption by 20% from 1985 levels, by the year 2000. However, the tools and funding to capture this resource in a cost-effective manner have not been provided. In an effort to assist federal agencies in meeting EPAct requirements, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) to identify, evaluate, and acquire all cost-effective energy projects at selected federal facilities. PNL has developed and applied the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) methodology at the Fort Drum FORSCOM facility near Watertown, New York. The FEDS methodology is a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that result in a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost justified fashion over a 5 to 10 year period. At Fort Drum, the net present value (NPV) of the installed cost of all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROS) is over $16 million (1992 $). The NPV of the savings associated with this investment is nearly $47 million (1992 $), for an overall NPV of approximately $31 million. By implementing all the cost-effective EROS, Fort Drum will reduce annual energy use by over 230,000 MBtu, or 15%. Annual energy expenditures will decrease by over $2.4 million, or a 20% reduction.

Dixon, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rowley, S.E. [Directorate of Engineering & Housing, Ft. Drum, NY (United States); Gillespie, A.H. [Army Forces Command, Ft. McPherson, GA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy saving potential of residential HVAC options at Fort Irwin, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated heating and cooling system options for existing family housing at Fort Irwin, California. The purpose of this work was to quantify the energy conservation potential of alternative system types and to identify the most cost-effective technology available. The conventional residential heating/cooling systems at Fort Irwin are separate propane forced-air furnaces and central air conditioners. The options examined included air- and ground-source heat pumps, a natural gas furnace with central air conditioning, and a natural-gas-fired heat pump. The most cost-effective technology applicable to Fort Irwin was found to be the high-efficiency ground-source heat pumps. If all conventional units were replaced immediately, the net energy savings would be 76,660 MBtu (80.9 TJ) per year and a reduction in electrical demand of approximately 15,000 kW-month. The initial investment for implementing this technology would be approximately $7.1 million, with a savings-to-investment ratio of 1.74.

Hadley, D.L.; Stucky, D.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Unit. Final report, September 1977-July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three exploratory geothermal wells were drilled in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource area in southwestern Utah to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the US DOE's geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations which included the drilling of an earlier exploratory well at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area was also provided. Two of the wells were abandoned before reaching target depth because of severe lost circulation and hole sloughing problems. The two completed holes reached depths of 5221 ft. and 7735 ft., respectively, and a maximum reservoir temperature of 353/sup 0/F at 7320 ft. was measured. The deepest well flow was tested at the rate of 47,000 lbs/h with a wellhead temperature of 200/sup 0/F and pressure of 3 psig. Based upon current economics, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource is considered to be sub-commercial for the generation of electrical power. A synopsis is given of the exploratory drilling activities and results containing summary drilling, testing, geologic and geochemical information from four exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Census of Tribal Justice Agencies in Indian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Census of Tribal Justice Agencies in Indian Country, 2002 · Law enforcement · Courts Criminal Justice Reference Service 1-800-851-3420 #12;Census of Tribal Justice Agencies in Indian Country Figure 1 -- Map of States, by Public Law 83-280 Status Table 2 -- Number of tribes, by State, Public law

Hemmers, Oliver

270

Swift fox reintroductions on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oglala Blackfeet Uncpapa Indian Movements LITTLE BIGHORN BATTLEFIELD NATIONAL MONUMENT LITTLE BIGHORN

Foresman, Kerry R.

271

Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian 175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (2000) Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (2000) Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (2000). Establishes standards for regular and meaningful consultation with Tribal officials to strengthen the government-to-government relationships with Indian tribes, including establishment of fundamental principles, policymaking criteria, special requirements of legislative proposals, consultation, accountability principles, and increasing flexibility for Indian Tribal Waivers. EO 13175 supersedes EO 13084. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments (2000) More Documents & Publications

272

Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP: Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Application from Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151

273

Geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Fort Polk, LA: Lessons learned  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of 4,003 military family housing units have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). At the same time, other efficiency measures, such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow shower heads, and attic insulation, were installed. An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk ESPC was carried out. Findings indicate that the project has resulted in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing, for a typical meteorological year. Peak electrical demand has also been reduced by 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak demand. Natural gas savings are about 260,000 therms per year. In addition, the ESPC has allowed the Army to effectively cap its future expenditures for family housing HVAC maintenance at about 77% of its previous costs. Given these successful results, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other ESPCs in both the public and the private sectors. The purpose of this paper is to outline the method by which the ESPC was engineered and implemented, both from the standpoint of the facility owner (the US Army) and the energy services company (ESCO) which is carrying out the contract. The lessons learned from this experience should be useful to other owners, ESCOs and investors in the implementation of future ESPCs. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gordon, R. [Applied Energy Management Techniques, Corvallis, OR (United States); Giffin, T. [SAIC/The Fleming Group, East Syracuse, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon exploration techniques for future identification and confirmation of oil and gas prospects.

Lawrence M. Monson

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson  

SciTech Connect

This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fort Devens: Cold Climate, Energy-Efficient, Market-Rate Townhomes  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, Mass Development issued an RFQ and subsequent RFP for teams to develop moderately priced high-efficiency homes on two sites within the Devens Regional Enterprise Zone. MassDevelopment, a Massachusetts agency that owns the Devens site (formerly Fort Devens Army Base, in Harvard, Massachusetts), set a goal of producing a replicable example of current and innovative sustainable building practices with a near-zero energy potential. Metric Development, as primary developer and construction manager, formed one of the successful teams that included CARB and Cambridge Seven Architects (C7A).

Zoeller, W.; Slattery, M.; Grab, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6771 6771 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 104 / Wednesday, May 29, 1996 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13007 of May 24, 1996 Indian Sacred Sites By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, in furtherance of Federal treaties, and in order to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, it is hereby ordered: Section 1. Accommodation of Sacred Sites. (a) In managing Federal lands, each executive branch agency with statutory or administrative responsibility for the management of Federal lands shall, to the extent practicable, permitted by law, and not clearly inconsistent with essential agency functions, (1) accommodate access to and ceremonial use of Indian sacred sites by Indian religious practitioners and (2) avoid adversely affecting the physical integrity

278

Bureau of Indian Affairs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Indian Affairs Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Bureau of Indian Affairs Name Bureau of Indian Affairs Address 1849 C Street, N.W. Place Washington, DC Zip 20240 Year founded 1824 Phone number (202) 208-3710 Website http://www.bia.gov/ Coordinates 38.8935327°, -77.0425422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8935327,"lon":-77.0425422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

279

Indian Point-2 Flash Photography Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the EPRI Electromagnetic & Radio Frequency Interference Working Group on a flash photography event at the Indian Point-2 (IP-2) nuclear power plant.

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

280

Linear Prediction of Indian Monsoon Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a strategy for selecting the best linear prediction model for Indian monsoon rainfall. In this strategy, a cross-validation procedure first screens out all models that perform poorly on independent data, then the error ...

Timothy DelSole; J. Shukla

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association Annual Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join more than 2,500 industry professionals from all over the country at the 2012 Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association (OIGA) Conference and Trade Show specifically devoted to all aspects of the...

282

Advancing Clean Energy in Indian Country | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advancing Clean Energy in Indian Country Advancing Clean Energy in Indian Country Advancing Clean Energy in Indian Country November 7, 2011 - 3:16pm Addthis Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Director Tracey LeBeau meets with tribal leaders from across the United States in Portland, Oregon to discuss how to advance clean energy deployment in Indian Country. | The National Conference of State Legislatures Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Director Tracey LeBeau meets with tribal leaders from across the United States in Portland, Oregon to discuss how to advance clean energy deployment in Indian Country. | The National Conference of State Legislatures Tracey A. LeBeau Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs Last week, I attended the National Congress for American Indians (NCAI)

283

Primary coolant chemistry of the Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical impurities in the primary coolants of the Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain reactors are discussed. The impurity mixtures in the two plants were quite different because the sources of the impurities were different. In the Peach Bottom reactor, the impurities were dominated by H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/, which are decomposition products of oil. In the Fort St. Vrain reactor, there were high levels of CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O. Although oil ingress at Peach Bottom created carbon deposits on virtually all surfaces, its effect on reactor operation was negligible. Slow outgassing of water from the thermal insulation at Fort St. Vrain caused delays in reactor startup. The overall graphite oxidation in both plants was negligible.

Burnette, R.D.; Baldwin, N.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling soil quality thresholds to ecosystem recovery at Fort Benning, GA, USA  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to use a simple model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict nutrient thresholds to ecosystem recovery on degraded soils at Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern USA. Artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training at military installations can produce soil disturbance and potentially create barren, degraded soils. Ecosystem reclamation is an important component of natural resource management at military installations. Four factors were important to the development of thresholds to recovery of aboveground biomass on degraded soils: (1) initial amounts of aboveground biomass, (2) initial soil C stocks (i.e., soil quality), (3) relative recovery rates of biomass, and (4) soil sand content. Forests and old fields on soils with varying sand content had different predicted thresholds for ecosystem recovery. Soil C stocks at barren sites on Fort Benning were generally below predicted thresholds to 100% recovery of desired future ecosystem conditions defined on the basis of aboveground biomass. Predicted thresholds to ecosystem recovery were less on soils with more than 70% sand content. The lower thresholds for old field and forest recovery on more sandy soils were apparently due to higher relative rates of net soil N mineralization. Calculations with the model indicated that a combination of desired future conditions, initial levels of soil quality (defined by soil C stocks), and the rate of biomass accumulation determine the predicted success of ecosystem recovery on disturbed soils.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effect of military training on indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of soil disturbance on several key indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia. Military activities at Fort Benning that result in soil disturbance include infantry, artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training. Soil samples were collected along a disturbance gradient that included: (1) reference sites, (2) light military use, (3) moderate military use, (4) heavy military use, and (5) remediated sites. With the exception of surface soil bulk density, measured soil properties at reference and light use sites were similar. Relative to reference sites, greater surface soil bulk density, lower soil carbon concentrations, and less carbon and nitrogen in particulate organic matter (POM) were found at moderate use, heavy use, and remediated sites. Studies along a pine forest chronosequence indicated that carbon stocks in POM gradually increased with stand age. An analysis of soil C:N ratios, as well as soil carbon concentrations and stocks, indicated a recovery of soil quality at moderate military use and remediated sites relative to heavy military use sites. Measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen are ecological indicators that can be used by military land managers to identify changes in soil from training activities and to rank training areas on the basis of soil quality.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Seeing Savings from an ESPC Project in Fort Polk's Utility Bills  

SciTech Connect

Federal agencies have implemented many energy efficiency projects over the years with direct funding or alternative financing vehicles such as energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). While it is generally accepted that these projects save energy and costs, the savings are usually not obvious in the utility bills. This is true for many valid technical reasons, even when savings are verified in other ways to the highest degree of certainty. However, any perceived deficiency in the evidence for savings is problematic when auditors or other observers evaluate the outcome of energy projects and the achievements of energy management programs. This report discusses under what circumstances energy savings should or should not be evident in utility bills. In the special case of a large ESPC project at the Army's Fort Polk, the analysis of utility bills carried out by the authors does unequivocally confirm and quantify savings. The data requirements and methods for arriving at definitive answers through utility bill analysis are demonstrated in our discussion of the Fort Polk project. The following paragraphs address why the government generally should not expect to see savings from ESPC projects in their utility bills. We also review lessons learned and best practices for measurement and verification (M&V) that can assure best value for the government and are more practical, straightforward, and cost-effective than utility bill analysis.

Shonder, J.A.

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report provides a concise retrospective and summary of all facets of the Sheldon Jackson College electrical Infrastructure Renovation portion of the Indian River Hydroelectric Project Grant of the City and Borough of Sitka, Alaska. The Project Overview describes the origins of the project, the original conditions that provided the impetus for the grant funding, how the grant amendment was developed, the conceptual design development, and the actual parameters of the final project as it went out to bid. The Project Overview also describes the ''before and after'' conditions of the project. The Objectives division of this Final Technical Report describes the amendment-funded goals of the project. It also describes the milestones of project development and implementation, as well as, the rationale behind the milestone array. The Description of Activities Performed division of this report provides an in-depth chronological analysis of progressive project implementation. Photographs will provide further illustration of particular functional aspects of the renovation project within project parameters. The Conclusions and Recommendations division of this report provides a comprehensive retrospective analysis of the project.

Rebecca Garrett

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geothermal space heating applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Final report, August 20, 1979-May 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a first-stage evaluation of the overall feasibility of utilizing geothermal waters from the Madison aquifer in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana for space heating are reported. A preliminary assessment of the resource characteristics, a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating district and an analysis of environmental and institutional issues are included. Preliminary investigations were also made into possible additional uses of the geothermal resource, including ethanol production. The results of the resource analysis showed that the depth to the top of the Madison occurs at approximately 5,500 feet at Poplar, and the Madison Group is characterized by low average porosity (about 5 percent) and permeability (about 0.004 gal/day-ft), and by hot water production rates of a few tens of gallons per minute from intervals a few feet thick. The preliminary heating district system effort for the town of Poplar included design heat load estimates, a field development concept, and preliminary design of heat extraction and hot water distribution systems. The environmental analysis, based on current data, indicated that resource development is not expected to result in undue impacts. The institutional analysis concluded that a Tribal geothermal utility could be established, but no clear-cut procedure can be identified without a more comprehensive evaluation of legal and jurisdistional issues. The economic evaluation found that, if the current trend of rapidly increasing prices for fossil fuels continues, a geothermal heating district within Poplar could be a long-term, economically attractive alternative to current energy sources.

Birman, J.H.; Cohen, J.; Spencer, G.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 5308 7/1/2013 0:41 Indian Fort Medical Emergency Hiker bit by snake on trail Report Filed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to unknown cause BFD Responded 5311 7/2/2013 13:15 Old Broom Craft Building Theft By Unlawful Taking Copper piping stolen from new construction BPD responded 5312 7/4/2013 13:45 James Hall Fire Alarm/6/2013 12:45 Visitor Center Theft By Unlawful Taking Older Huffy bicycle stolen from parking lot Report

Baltisberger, Jay H.

291

Fort Huachuca Water Awareness Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #2: Information and Education Programs (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension to provide comprehensive water and energy conservation awareness programs under its Water Wise and Energy Smart (WWES) program. Ongoing since 1998, this program provides outreach, education, and services to approximately 14,000 Fort Huachuca military and civilian employees and their families. Fort Huachuca is home of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center, Network Enterprise Technology Command/9th Army Signal Command, Joint Interoperability Test Command, and the Electronic Proving Ground. The military base encompasses approximately 78,000 acres and just over eight million square feet of real property. Fort Huachuca is located at the base of the Huachuca Moun- tains and adjacent to the City of Sierra Vista near Tucson,

292

Fort Huachuca Water Awareness Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #2: Information and Education Programs (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension to provide comprehensive water and energy conservation awareness programs under its Water Wise and Energy Smart (WWES) program. Ongoing since 1998, this program provides outreach, education, and services to approximately 14,000 Fort Huachuca military and civilian employees and their families. Fort Huachuca is home of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center, Network Enterprise Technology Command/9th Army Signal Command, Joint Interoperability Test Command, and the Electronic Proving Ground. The military base encompasses approximately 78,000 acres and just over eight million square feet of real property. Fort Huachuca is located at the base of the Huachuca Moun- tains and adjacent to the City of Sierra Vista near Tucson,

293

Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training activities on the Fort Hood Military Installation have imposed serious impacts to its grass-dominated landscape. Six decades of tracked vehicle impacts have caused soil compaction and vegetation reduction which has lead to severe surface erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted dairy manure may increase vegetation, while contour ripping may decrease discharge, both of which will lead to a decrease in erosion. Three small 0.30 ha watersheds were established on Fort Hood in January 2005. Each watershed had 0.46 m berms installed on all four sides with a 0.305 m H-flume and was equipped with automated storm sampling equipment. Soil samples were collected prior to any treatments, and twice after compost applications. Discharge and precipitation was collected continuously on each watershed. Stormwater samples were collected during storm events and analyzed for water quality parameters. Water quality samples, discharge and precipitation records were collected between January 2005 and July 2007. Three composted dairy manure application rates at 0, 28 and 57 m3 ha-1 were applied on watersheds C0, C1 and C2, respectively; watersheds were evaluated for effects on NO3 and soluble reactive phosphates (SRP) concentrations and loadings in storm events and on stormwater discharge. Twenty two months after the initial compost application, the two previously composted watersheds (C1 and C2) were treated with contour ripping and C2 received a second compost application. The compost application caused the spikes in NO3 and SRP concentrations and loads immediately after application. Both NO3 and SRP concentrations decreased as the number of days from application increased. Compost application did not appear to have an effect on the discharge from watersheds. Contour ripping had a significant effect on stormwater discharge. Contour ripping decreased discharge by 74 and 80% on C1 and C2, respectively when compared to the untreated control (C0).

Prcin, Lisa J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country May 21, 2012 7:45AM MST to May 22, 2012 12:30PM MST Scottsdale, Arizona At the fifth annual Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Conference, tribal leaders and professionals will discuss the significant opportunities for energy development in Indian Country, as well as the barriers that tribes must overcome to bring energy projects to fruition. Discussions will include increasing access to private capital, feasibility studies, and how tribes can create sustainable and environmentally responsible economies for the future generations of Indian Country. DOE Office of Indian Energy Director Tracey LeBeau will give the keynote at the conference entitled: "The Next Generation of Indian Energy and

295

Mesoscale Convective Complexes over the Indian Monsoon Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full disk infrared satellite imagery from the Indian National Satellite System (INSAT) geostationary meteorological satellite was examined to determine if mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) frequent the Indian subcontinent (ISC) region. Using ...

Arlenf G. Laing; J. Michael Fritsch

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy This Policy sets forth the principles to be followed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure an effective implementation of a government to government relationship with American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governements. This Policy is based on the United States Constitution, treaties, Supreme Court decisions, Executive Orders, statutes, existing federal policies, tribla laws, and the dynamic political relationship between Indian nations and the Federal government. DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Amerian Indian Policy DOE Order 144.1: Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government

297

Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) 07 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996) Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996). Designed to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, this EO directs each federal agency that manages federal lands to "(1) accommodate access to and ceremonial use of Indian sacred sites by Indian religious practitioners and (2) avoid adversely affecting the physical integrity of such sacred sites." This EO also directs each federal agency to report to the President on "procedures implemented or proposed to facilitate with appropriate Indian tribes and religious leaders." Several EM sites and facilities are located on Tribal aboriginal and treaty lands. Staff at these facilities work with the Tribes to allow Tribal members safe access to DOE sites for

298

Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02 Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP...

299

Climate Adjustments over Africa Accompanying the Indian Monsoon Onset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall and circulation changes accompanying the Indian monsoon onset are examined, focusing on the African continent and neighboring areas. The Indian Meteorological Department official monsoon onset dates over Kerala (MOK; on average on 1 June)...

P. Camberlin; B. Fontaine; S. Louvet; P. Oettli; P. Valimba

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Modeling Clean and Secure Energy Scenarios for the Indian Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean and Secure Energy Scenarios for the Indian Power Sector in 2030 Title Modeling Clean and Secure Energy Scenarios for the Indian Power Sector in 2030 Publication Type Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Interannual Sea Level in the Northern and Eastern Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly Indian and Pakistani sea level records, adjusted for the effect of atmospheric pressure, were used to examine interannual sea level variability in the northern Indian Ocean. The interannual sea level is correlated along the boundary. The ...

Allan J. Clarke; X. Liu

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Names Director for Office of Indian Energy Policy and Makes Available 2 Million for Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian...

303

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 This...

305

Ebeling: Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research has barely begun. Handbook of Indian Foods andeffort was remarkable, and his Handbook should be a standard

Sutton, Mark Q

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the major programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fort Lewis, Yakima Firing Center, and Vancouver Barracks/Camp Bonneville basewide energy use plan; executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary presents an overview of a series of studies, mostly energy related, of Fort Lewis, Yakima Firing Center, Vancouver Barracks, and Camp Bonneville. Collectively, the work is known as the Basewide Energy Use Plan and is a part of the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP).

Smiley, D.P.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Quality site seasonal report, Fort Devens Launderette, SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) 1751, December 1984 through June 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the Fort Devens Launderette was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system was one of eight systems selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort was to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal buildings. The launderette is part of the Post Exchange complex at the Fort Devens Army Post in Fort Devens, Massachusetts. The solar system preheats hot water for the coin operated laundry which has an estimated 25,000 customers per year. There are 108 collector panels comprising the 2563-square foot collector array. Collected solar energy is stored in a 3800-gallon tank. Propylene glycol is used to protect the solar array from freezing. Two immersed heat exchangers provide heat transfer from the propylene glycol to directly heat the DHW supply water in the storage tank. Auxiliary energy is supplied by gas and oil boilers. This solar system can be considered one of a kind and as such is a prototype. The lessons learned from building and operating this system should be used to correct design deficiencies and improve the performance of future solar systems for this application. Highlights of the system performance at the Fort Devens Launderette solar system during the December 1984 through June 1985 monitoring period are presented in this report.

Logee, T.L.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fort Campbell, Kentucky A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forest Management Plan. · Integrate military training support with habitat management, sustainable timber · Experience in the design and execution of forest inventories · Experience in forest inventory data analysis for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is located at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ORGANIZATION

310

Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 5, 2011 May 5, 2011 Two Tribal Success Stories from the EECBG Program The Duckwater Shoshone Tribe and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians are using their grant funds to make some much needed retrofits and upgrades. May 5, 2011 First Lady Michelle Obama and Secretary Chu Honor Employees for Public Service Recognition Week First Lady Michelle Obama thanks employees in this video for Public Service Recognition Week. May 4, 2011 Tribal Summit Live: 9:30-10 AM ET Today and All Day Tomorrow Video of the Indian Energy Tribal Summit, which builds on the Department's commitment to work with American Indian and Alaska Native leaders to support clean energy projects on trial lands. April 27, 2011 Mark Your Calendars: Department of Energy Tribal Summit May 4-5 Next week, on May 4th and 5th, the Department of Energy will host a Tribal

311

Indian Energy Program Initiatives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Program Initiatives Energy Program Initiatives Indian Energy Program Initiatives The Office of Indian Energy approach is, first and foremost, a collaborative one as it works with tribal nations, federal agencies, state governments, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to support tribally led development of the considerable energy resources that exist on tribal lands. To guide the strategic planning and implementation of the Department's tribal energy programs and policies, Energy Secretary Steven Chu established an Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group. After holding numerous and in-depth roundtables and DOE Tribal Summit conversations in early 2011 with tribal governments, tribal organizations, and Alaskan Native communities and leaders, the Office of

312

WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe WA-TRIBE- STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS WA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Stillaguamish Tribe proposes to expand its Stillaguamish Tribe Transit Services (STTS). For the past three years, the STTS has employed 14-passenger buses to transport clients to and from the tribal medical, dental, behavioral health and massage clinics. Often the demand-response requests that come to STTS are for one to three passengers at a time; therefore, funds are being requested to purchase a hybrid sedan to transport clients. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A1, B1.32, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

313

Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Preliminary assessment report for Fort Jacob F. Wolters, Installation 48555, Mineral Wells, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (TXARNG) property near Mineral Wells, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Wolters property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage on Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana: A Comparison of Surface Exploration Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, head gas and thermal desorption methods best match production; other methods also mapped depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, head gas along with microbial, iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, results are preliminary. Reconnaissance mapping of magnetic susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent soil gas and head gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential.

Monson, Lawrence M.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Multielement geochemistry of three geothermal wells, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from three geothermal wells, Utah State 42-7, Utah State 31-33 and Forminco No. 1, in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Utah, demonstrates that the distributions of different elements are the result of different chemical processes operating throughout the geologic history of the area. Statistical analysis of geochemical-data distributions confirm the presence of several distinct element associations. Of the 36 elements determined on the samples, 12 (V, Mo, Cd, Ag, Au, Sb, Bi, U, Te, Sn, B and Th) were present in concentrations at or below detection levels. Of the remaining 24 elements, only 3 (Ni, Co and Zr) are lognormally distributed. Distributions for the remaining elements are of aggregate populations which represent background, mineralization or other processes.

Christensen, O.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Objective Definition of the Indian Summer Monsoon Onset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The onset of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) over the southern tip of the Indian peninsula [also known as monsoon onset over Kerala (MOK)] has been considered the beginning of India’s rainy season. The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) makes ...

Bin Wang; Qinghua Ding; P. V. Joseph

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an independent evaluation of an energy retrofit of 4,003 family housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana, under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Replacement of the heating, cooling, and water heating systems in these housing units with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) anchored the retrofit; low-flow shower heads and compact fluorescent lighting were also installed, as well as attic insulation where needed. Statistically valid findings indicate that the project will save 25.8 million kWh, or 32.5% of the pre-retrofit whole-community electrical consumption, and 100% of the whole-community natural gas previously used for space conditioning and water heating (260,000 therms) in a typical meteorological year. At the end-use level, the GHPs were found to save about 42% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption for heating, cooling, and water heating in housing units that were all-electric in the pre-retrofit period. This report also demonstrates an improved method of predicting energy savings. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-retrofit energy use data collected in the field, the method predicted actual energy savings on one of the electric feeders at Fort Polk with a very high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of this model was in turn dependent on data-calibrated models of the geothermal heat pump and ground heat exchanger that are described in this report. In addition this report documents the status of vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (BHEx) design methods at the time this project was designed, and demonstrates methods of using data collected from operating GHP systems to benchmark BHEx design methods against a detailed engineering model calibrated to date. The authors also discuss the ESPC`s structure and implementation and how the experience gained here can contribute to the success of future ESPCs.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Unusual Central Indian Drought of Summer Monsoon 2008: Role of Southern Tropical Indian Ocean Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many of the previous positive Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) years were associated with above (below)-normal monsoon rainfall over central (southern) India during summer monsoon months [June–September (JJAS)], the IOD event in 2008 is associated ...

Suryachandra A. Rao; Hemantkumar S. Chaudhari; Samir Pokhrel; B. N. Goswami

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Indian Ocean Surface Circulations and Their Connection To Indian Ocean Dipole, Identified  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NOAA) By LT. Haris Sarwar Rana Pakistan Navy #12;Outline IntroductionIntroduction Indian Ocean and its Nuclears Ambitions to go Nuclear AfghanistanAfghanistan''s Instability ands Instability and disrupting

Chu, Peter C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Indian Country Solar Energy Potential Estimates & DOE IE Updates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pathways to Sustained Energy Pathways to Sustained Energy Development in Oklahoma Oklahoma Tribal Leader Forum - August 2012 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 1 Office of Indian Energy Goals and Objectives * Promote Indian tribal energy development, efficiency and use * Reduce or stabilize energy costs * Enhance and strengthen Indian tribal energy and economic infrastructure relating to natural resource development and electrification * Bring electrical power and service to Indian land and the homes of tribal members Energy Policy Act of 2005, Title V, Sec. 502 2 Office of Indian Energy Programs 3 * START (Strategic Technical Assistance Response Teams) - Providing Expert Development Technical Assistance Directly to Tribal Staff/Leaders/Projects - Targeted energy development assistance - post feasibility & pre

322

Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native 592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities (2011) Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities (2011) Superseded EO 13021 to ensure that all American Indian students, regardless of which institution they attend, receive support from the federal government at elementary through college levels. This EO also creates an Interagency Working Group on AI/AN Education to establish educational goals across the government. Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities (2011) More Documents & Publications

323

Indian Monsoon Depression: Climatology and Variability  

SciTech Connect

The monsoon climate is traditionally characterized by large seasonal rainfall and reversal of wind direction (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Most importantly this rainfall is the major source of fresh water to various human activities such as agriculture. The Indian subcontinent resides at the core of the Southeast Asian summer monsoon system, with the monsoon trough extended from northern India across Indochina to the Western Tropical Pacific (WTP). Large fraction of annual rainfall occurs during the summer monsoon season, i.e., June - August with two distinct maxima. One is located over the Bay of Bengal with rainfall extending northwestward into eastern and central India, and the other along the west coast of India where the lower level moist wind meets the Western Ghat Mountains (Saha and Bavardeckar 1976). The rest of the Indian subcontinent receives relatively less rainfall. Various weather systems such as tropical cyclones and weak disturbances contribute to monsoon rainfall (Ramage 1971). Among these systems, the most efficient rain-producing system is known as the Indian monsoon depression (hereafter MD). This MD is critical for monsoon rainfall because: (i) it occurs about six times during each summer monsoon season, (ii) it propagates deeply into the continent and produces large amounts of rainfall along its track, and (iii) about half of the monsoon rainfall is contributed to by the MDs (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Therefore, understanding various properties of the MD is a key towards comprehending the veracity of the Indian summer monsoon and especially its hydrological process.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Huang, Wan-Ru (Judy)

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Interannual Variability of Indian Ocean Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work in this paper builds upon the relatively well-studied seasonal cycle of the Indian Ocean heat transport by investigating its interannual variability over a 41-yr period (1958–98). An intermediate, two-and-a-half-layer thermodynamically ...

Galina Chirokova; Peter J. Webster

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Internal Variability of Indian Ocean SST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 40-yr integration of an eddy-resolving numerical model of the tropical Indian Ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability that is caused by the internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the equator in the ...

Markus Jochum; Raghu Murtugudde

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Development Act of 1982 Mineral Development Act of 1982 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Indian Mineral Development Act Year 1982 Url IndianDevelopment1982.jpg Description Provides for tribes to enter into energy development agreements with DOI approval References Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982[1] Bureau of Indian Affairs[2] The Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) 25 U.S.C. Secs. 2101-2108 was enacted to provide Indian tribes with flexibilty in the development and sale of mineral resources. S.Rep. No. 97-472, 97th Cong.2d Sess. 2 (1982). Foremost among the beneficial effects of IMDA was the opportunity for Indian tribes to enter into joint venture agreements with mineral developers. The contractual relationships permitted by IMDA were designed to meet two objectives: First, to further the policy of self-determination

327

American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Programs » Tribal Programs » American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders Over the course of American history, the Federal government's relationship with Indian Tribes has been defined and modified by treaties, executive orders, court decisions, specific legislation passed by Congress, and regulations. Important rights were guaranteed to Tribes by treaty, with many of these rights still enforceable today. Case law, over the years, has dealt with the status of Indian Tribes and their special relationship to the Federal government. Legislation, passed by Congress reflects the national Indian policy at the time of enactment. Current Federal Indian policy recognizes that Indian Tribes are an integral

328

Executive Order 13175-Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

75-Consultation and Coordination With Indian 75-Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments Executive Order 13175-Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to establish regular and meaningful consultation and collaboration with tribal officials in the development of Federal policies that have tribal implications, to strengthen the United States government-to-government relationships with Indian tribes, and to reduce the imposition of unfunded mandates upon Indian tribes; it is hereby ordered as follows: Executive Order 13175-Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments More Documents & Publications Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal

329

Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 Indian Energy Beat: News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country Fall 2012 Issue: DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects Message from the Director Sharing Knowledge: DOE Office of Indian Energy Commissions Regional Transmission and Renewable Energy Analysis Opening Doors: Seminole Tribe to Host Grant Proposal Writing Workshop Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Building Bridges: ICEIWG Quarterly Meeting Held in Portland DOE-IE Sponsors Two Sandia Student Interns Tribal Energy Transmission Webinars Leading the Charge: Women in Power Andrea Alexander Kathy Mayo

330

Launching the American Indian Research and Education Initiative |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launching the American Indian Research and Education Initiative Launching the American Indian Research and Education Initiative Launching the American Indian Research and Education Initiative July 27, 2011 - 5:22pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director What are the key facts? The Energy Department has began a unique partnership between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society to bring science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) research and education funding to American Indian students at our Nation's Tribal Colleges and Universities and other universities. American Indian communities are uniquely situated in the matrix of energy production and energy use. Tribal lands are often repositories of coal, oil and uranium, and have tremendous untapped energy potential in wind,

331

Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act of 1938 Act of 1938 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Indian Mineral Leasing Act Year 1938 Url IndianMineralLeasing1938.jpg Description Provides for leasing of minerals on tribal lands References IMLA[1] United States v. Navajo Nation[2] The Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 (IMLA) provides that "[u]nallotted lands within any Indian reservation," or otherwise under federal jurisdiction, "may, with the approval of the Secretary [of the Interior (Secretary)] ... , be leased for mining purposes, by authority of the tribal council or other authorized spokesmen for such Indians." 25 U.S.C. § 396a. The Act aims to provide Indian tribes with a profitable source of revenue and to foster tribal self-determination by giving Indians a greater

332

State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information This list was compiled by the federal government's Interagency Working Group on Indian Affairs (IWGIA) as an aid to federal agency consultation with federally recognized Indian tribes. It is not intended to be an exhaustive source of information about Indian tribes in each state or about which tribes must be consulted by federal agencies for a proposed action or program within a particular state. The IWGIA has not verified the accuracy of the information. It is intended only to provide possible sources to learn about which tribes may be ancestral to a particular state. If an Indian tribe is not mentioned on a state's website, it cannot be assumed that the tribe has no interest in

333

Effects of Heavy, Tracked-Vehicle Disturbance on Forest Soil Properties at Fort Benning, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the effects of heavy, tracked-vehicle disturbance on various measures of soil quality in training compartment K-11 at Fort Benning, Georgia. Predisturbance soil sampling in April and October of 2002 indicated statistically significant differences in soil properties between upland and riparian sites. Soil density was less at riparian sites, but riparian soils had significantly greater C and N concentrations and stocks than upland soils. Most of the C stock in riparian soils was associated with mineral-associated organic matter (i.e., the silt + clay fraction physically separated from whole mineral soil). Topographic differences in soil N availability were highly dependent on the time of sampling. Riparian soils had higher concentrations of extractable inorganic N than upland soils and also exhibited significantly greater soil N availability during the spring sampling. The disturbance experiment was performed in May 2003 by driving a D7 bulldozer through the mixed pine/hardwood forest. Post-disturbance sampling was limited to upland sites because training with heavy, tracked vehicles at Fort Benning is generally confined to upland soils. Soil sampling approximately one month after the experiment indicated that effects of the bulldozer were limited primarily to the forest floor (O-horizon) and the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil. O-horizon dry mass and C stocks were significantly reduced, relative to undisturbed sites, and there was an indication of reduced mineral soil C stocks in the disturbance zone. Differences in the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil also indicated a significant increase in soil density as a result of disturbance by the bulldozer. Although there was some tendency for greater soil N availability in disturbed soils, the changes were not significantly different from undisturbed controls. It is expected that repeated soil disturbance over time, which will normally occur in a military training area, would simply intensify the changes in soil properties that were measured following a one-time soil disturbance at the K-11 training compartment. The experiment was also useful for identifying soil measurements that are particularly sensitive to disturbance and therefore can be used successfully as indicators of a change in soil properties as a result of heavy, tracked-vehicle traffic at Fort Benning. Measurements related to total O-horizon mass and C concentrations or stocks exhibited changes that ranged from {approx}25 to 75% following the one-time disturbance. Changes in surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil density or measures of surface soil C and N following the disturbance were less remarkable and ranged from {approx}15 to 45% (relative to undisturbed controls). Soil N availability (measured as initial extractable soil N or N production in laboratory incubations) was the least sensitive and the least useful indicator for detecting a change in soil quality. Collectively, the results suggest that the best indicators of a change in soil quality will be found at the soil surface because there were no statistically significant effects of bulldozer disturbance at soil depths below 10 cm.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Erosion Potential of a Burn Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Interim Summary of One Year of Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in deserts in the Southwest U.S. is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. This increase in fires has implications for management of Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site office (NNSA/NSO) has responsibility. A series of studies has been initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn over to understand technical and perceived risk they might pose to site workers and public receptors in communities around the NTS, TTR, and NTTR; and to develop recommendations for stabilization and restoration after a fire. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob fire, a lightning-caused fire approximately 12 kilometers north of Hiko, Nevada, that burned approximately 200 ha between August 6-8, 2008, and is representative of a transition zone on the NTS between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, where the largest number of Soil Sub-Project CAUs/CASs are located.

V. Etyemezian, D. Shafer, J. Miller, I. Kavouras, S. Campbell, D. DuBois, J. King, G. Nikolich, and S. Zitzer

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Modeling Soil Quality Thresholds to Ecosystem Recovery at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to use a simple model of soil C and N dynamics to predict nutrient thresholds to ecosystem recovery on degraded soils at Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern USA. The model calculates aboveground and belowground biomass, soil C inputs and dynamics, soil N stocks and availability, and plant N requirements. A threshold is crossed when predicted soil N supplies fall short of predicted N required to sustain biomass accrual at a specified recovery rate. Four factors were important to development of thresholds to recovery: (1) initial amounts of aboveground biomass, (2) initial soil C stocks (i.e., soil quality), (3) relative recovery rates of biomass, and (4) soil sand content. Thresholds to ecosystem recovery predicted by the model should not be interpreted independent of a specified recovery rate. Initial soil C stocks influenced the predicted patterns of recovery by both old field and forest ecosystems. Forests and old fields on soils with varying sand content had different predicted thresholds to recovery. Soil C stocks at barren sites on Fort Benning generally lie below predicted thresholds to 100% recovery of desired future ecosystem conditions defined on the basis of aboveground biomass (18000 versus 360 g m{sup -2} for forests and old fields, respectively). Calculations with the model indicated that reestablishment of vegetation on barren sites to a level below the desired future condition is possible at recovery rates used in the model, but the time to 100% recovery of desired future conditions, without crossing a nutrient threshold, is prolonged by a reduced rate of forest growth. Predicted thresholds to ecosystem recovery were less on soils with more than 70% sand content. The lower thresholds for old field and forest recovery on more sandy soils are apparently due to higher relative rates of net soil N mineralization in more sandy soils. Calculations with the model indicate that a combination of desired future conditions, initial levels of soil quality (defined by soil C stocks), and the rate of biomass accumulation determines the predicted success of ecosystem recovery on disturbed soils.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of a Monitoring and Verification (M&V) Plan and Baseline for the Fort Hood ESPC Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fort Hood has selected an Energy Services Performance Contract (ESPC) contractor to help achieve its energy reduction goals as mandated by Executive Order. This ESPC is expected to be a $3.8 million, 20 year contract, which includes five primary types of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) in 56 buildings, and includes boiler insulation, control system upgrades, vending machine controls, cooling tower variable frequency drives (VFDs), and lighting retrofits. The plan of action for the ESPC includes cost effective M&V, using IPMVP Options B and C for the first two years after the retrofits are installed, and Option A combined with annual performance verification for the remainder of the contract. This paper discusses the development the Measurement and Verification (M&V) Plan for the Fort Hood Energy Services Performance Contract, and includes results of the baseline calculations (Haberl et al. 2002, 2003b).

Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Lynn, B.; Underwood, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

On the Relationship between Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperature and Asian Summer Monsoon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Relationship between Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperature and Asian Summer Monsoon Tim Li. Indian Ocean SST has been thought to play a weaker role in Indian summer monsoon rainfall than does-3 year) time scale the Indian monsoon rainfall has significant positive correlations with the Indian

Chang, Chih-Pei

338

DOE/EA-1354; Environmental Assessment for the Fort Collins 115kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project (12/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Fort Collins 115-kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project, Fort Collins, Colorado. AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE ACTION: Finding of no significant impact SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) is the lead federal agency for a proposed project to upgrade the electric transmission system in the Fort Collins, Colorado area. Platte River Power Authority (Platte River) is proposing to add additional generation at its Rawhide Power Plant, to rebuild and upgrade segments of Western's existing Flatiron-Poudre and Poudre-Richard's Lake 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines, and to install additional 230 kV transmission to Platte River's existing electrical system. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) titled "Fort Collins 115kV Transmission

339

Fort Hood solar total energy project: technical support and systems integration. Third semiannual report, May 1, 1979-October 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on the Fort Hood STES which was planned by DOE as a Large Scale Experiment for the Solar Total Energy Program is described. The history of the design evolution and management of the project which began in 1973 is summarized. The project was discontinued by DOE in December 1979. Supporting studies underway at the time are reported including: (1) reassessment of energy loads, (2) revised system concept, (3) plant sizing calculations, and (4) insolation variation measurement planning. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Study of well logs from Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company drilled four geothermal test wells in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA between 1975 and 1979. A fairly complete suite of well logs were recorded for the three deeper holes, and these data are presented as composite well log plots in this report. The composite well log plots have facilitated the interpretation of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartz-monzonite, serpentine, and volcanic lithologies and the identification of numerous fractures. This has been especially helpful because of the extensive lost circulaton zones and poor cuttings recovery. Intraformational flow was identified by a fluid migration-temperature tracer log at depth in CFSU 31-33. Well log crossplots were computed to assist in lithologic identification and the determination of physical properties for specific depth intervals in a given hole. The presence of hydrous minerals sometimes results in neutron porosity somewhat higher than the true nonfracture porosity, which is generally less than 4%. Permeability is clearly controlled by fractures. A maximum well temperature of 178.9/sup 0/C, low flow rates and low probable percent flash indicate these wells are subeconomic for electric generation at present. The well log study has substantially improved our understanding of the reservoir as presently drilled.

Glenn, W.E.; Ross, H.P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Energy survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report details Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) for the Laundry and Boiler Plant at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The ECOs noted in the table on the next page were evaluated for individual energy savings and are recommended for implementation. The energy savings and implementation costs for each measure are summarized on the following page in order of decreasing savings-to-investment (SIR) ratio. ECIP life cycle cost analyses were performed on all ECOs as a preliminary step, though all of the measures will fall into other funding categories. Because of the high internal heat gain produced in the Laundry, coupled with the fact that the laundry is not air conditioned, building envelope measures do not produce any energy savings. The most viable ECOs are related to the Boiler Plant (Boiler Replacement), recovering energy wasted in the wash water (Rinse Water Reuse) or utilizing Low Temperature Wash Water, and Changing the Hours of Laundry Operation. Additional operation and maintenance items are listed that can be addressed by the Directorate of Engineering and Housing (DEH) or the Laundry contractor, Integrity Management International, Inc., to generate quick energy savings. There are also several items included that will not produce energy savings but will improve the comfort level of the Laundry. These items should be given consideration as a method of improving productivity and/or employee morale. All ECOs evaluated by the project team are described in detail with engineering calculations for each following in Appendix 2.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fort Saint Vrain HTGR (Th/U carbide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis  

SciTech Connect

DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments and total fuel mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. For the HTGR group, the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) reactor fuel has been chosen for the evaluation of viability for waste co-disposal. The FSV reactor was operated by Public Service of Colorado as a licensed power reactor. The FSV fuel employs a U/Th carbide matrix in individually pyrolytic carbon-coated particles. These individual particles are in turn coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and contained within fuel compacts, that are in turn embedded in graphite blocks that comprised the structural core of the reactor.

Taylor, Larry Lorin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Characterization plan for Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom graphite fuels  

SciTech Connect

Part of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) and most of the Peach Bottom (PB) reactor spent fuels are currently stored at INEL and may remain in storage for many years before disposal. Three disposal pathways have been proposed: intact disposal, fuels partially disassembled and the high-level waste fraction conditioned prior to disposal, and fuels completed disassembled and conditioned prior to disposal. Many options exist within each of these pathways. PNL evaluated the literature and other reference to develop a fuels characterization plan for these fuels. This plan provides guidance for the characteristics of the fuel which will be needed to pursue any of the storage or disposal pathways. It also provides a suggested fuels monitoring program for the current storage facilities. This report recommends a minimum of 7 fuel elements be characterized: PB Core 1 fuel: one Type II nonfailed element, one Type II failed element, and one Type III nonfailed element; PB Core 2 fuel: two Type II nonfailed fuel elements; and FSV fuel: at least two fuel blocks from regions of high temperature and fluence and long in-reactor performance (preferably at reactor end-of- life). Selection of PB fuel elements should focus on these between radial core position 8 and 14 and on compacts between compact numbers 10 and 20. Selection of FSV fuel elements should focus on these from Fuel Zones II and III, located in Core Layers 6, 7, and possibly 8.

Maarschman, S.C.; Berting, F.M.; Clemmer, R.G.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.; Morgan, W.C.; Sliva, P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Lighthouse Solar Indian Valley | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Valley Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Lighthouse Solar Indian Valley Name Lighthouse Solar Indian Valley Address 5062 McLean Station Road Place Green Lane, PA Zip 18054 Sector Solar Phone number (215) 541-5464 Website http://www.lighthousesolar.com Coordinates 40.350689°, -75.475961° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.350689,"lon":-75.475961,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Indian Energy News Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 21, 2013 February 21, 2013 Tribal Renewable Energy Development Potential Webinar Learn about opportunities for feasible tribal renewable energy development during a free webinar on February 27. February 13, 2013 DOE Office of Indian Energy Partners with ACEP to Study Wind-Diesel Systems in Alaska Department of Energy's Office of Indian Energy is collaborating with the University of Alaska Fairbanks ACEP (Alaska Center for Energy and Power) to support in-depth technical and economic analysis of wind-diesel energy systems in rural Alaska. The resulting report will evaluate the costs and benefits of installing hybrid power systems in Alaska Native villages to alleviate high energy costs by reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels. January 30, 2013 Energy Department Expands Technical Assistance for Tribal Energy Projects

346

Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 23, 2012 February 23, 2012 Jim Manion, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon Leading the Charge: Jim Manion Change doesn't happen on its own. It's led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular Office of Indian Energy newsletter feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. February 15, 2012 Energy Department officials meet with Tribal leaders at the "Exploring the Business Link Opportunity: Transmission & Clean Energy Development in the West" forum held in Denver, CO. | Courtesy of NREL. Tribal Leaders and Energy Officials Team Up for Tribal Business Opportunities Top tribal leaders, industry and tribal executives, and federal

347

Indian Energy News Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 26, 2011 April 26, 2011 Department of Energy Releases Details of Tribal Summit Event will gather American Indian and Alaska Native Leaders, Obama administration officials, senior Department of Energy officials and members of Congress April 26, 2011 Department of Energy Releases Details of Tribal Summit Event will gather American Indian and Alaska Native Leaders, Obama administration officials, senior Department of Energy officials and members of Congress January 19, 2011 Secretary Chu Announces New Efforts to Promote Clean Energy in Tribal Communities WASHINGTON - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today two new initiatives to promote tribal energy development and continue strengthening the partnership between the Department of Energy and tribal nations. Up to

348

Indian Energy News Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 24, 2013 July 24, 2013 July 31 Webinar to Provide Guidance on Transmission Feasibility and System Impact Studies Join the next free tribal renewable energy series webinar and learn about analyzing and assessing the impacts, costs, and benefits of transmission line upgrades and additions. June 19, 2013 June 26 Webinar to Explore Renewable Energy Project Leasing on Tribal Lands Get an overview of leasing regulations and find out how the Hearth Act of 2012 can streamline approval of tribal leases on Indian land. June 14, 2013 Engaging stakeholders and identifying priorities is critical to developing a strong energy vision. Here, the START workshop held at the Passamaquoddy Tribes of Indian Township and Pleasant Point in Maine helped open the lines of communication between two reservations that exist under a single Tribe. Photo from Paul Dearhouse of Dearhouse Consulting Group, NREL 24503

349

Indian Tribes of the Northwest Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribes of the Northwest Territory Tribes of the Northwest Territory Nature Bulletin No. 388-A September 26, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN TRIBES OF THE NORTHWEST TERRITORY The white men found many tribes inhabiting what became the Northwest Territory in 1787, and all but one belonged to the largest and most important Indian family, the Algonquians. The powerful Shawnee occupied most of the Ohio valley and its tributaries extending south into Kentucky, West Virginia and Tennessee. Tecumseh and his brother, "The Prophet", were Shawnee. The Iliniwek, called 'Illinois" by the French, was an Algonquian confederacy which had, for a long time, occupied most of this state except the northwestern part and the Wabash valley. In addition to several small bands it included the Kaskaskia, Peoria, Cahokia, Moingewena, and the Michigamea. The latter, whom Father Marquette found living in Missouri and Arkansas, were finally forced to move back into southern Illinois.

350

Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited IREDA | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited IREDA Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited IREDA Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA) Place New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip 110003 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Focused on promoting, developing and extending financial assistance for renewable energy and energy efficiency/conservation projects in India. References Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA) is a company located in New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India . References ↑ "Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA)"

351

Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country March 5, 2012 - 6:27pm Addthis This event will take place May 21-22, 2012, in Scottsdale, Arizona. At the fifth annual Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Conference, tribal leaders and professionals will discuss the significant opportunities for energy development in Indian Country, as well as the barriers that tribes must overcome to bring energy projects to fruition. Discussions will include increasing access to private capital, feasibility studies, and how tribes can create sustainable and environmentally responsible economies for the future generations of Indian Country. Learn more and register on the Native Nation Events website. Addthis Related Articles Obama Administration Announces Additional $63,817,400 for Local Energy

352

U.S. Department of Energy American Indian Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Indian Policy The Department of Energy issued its first American Indian Policy in 1992 and subsequently issued DOE Order 1230.2 establishing the responsibilities and roles of DOE management in carrying out the policy. In 1998, at the request of and in consultation with Indian Nations, DOE revised the Policy to effect greater and comprehensive implementation. A revised American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy (DOE Indian Policy) was issued on October 31, 2000. On January 20, 2006, the Secretary reaffirmed the revised DOE Indian Policy that outlines the principles to be followed by the Department in its interactions with tribes. Further in 2009, the Department issued DOE Order 144.1, which cancelled

353

Executive Order 13096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

96: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) 96: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) Executive Order 13096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) Executive Order 13096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998). Affirms the Federal government's special and historic responsibility for the education of American Indian and Alaska native students. Directs federal agencies to improve the academic performance of American Indian and Alaska Native students via six goals: (1) improving reading and mathematics (2) increasing high school completion and postsecondary attendance rates (3) reducing the influence of long-standing factors that impede educational performance, such as poverty and substance abuse (4) creating strong, safe, and drug-free school environments (5) improving science education (6)

354

Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country March 5, 2012 - 6:27pm Addthis This event will take place May 21-22, 2012, in Scottsdale, Arizona. At the fifth annual Renewable Energy Projects in Indian Country Conference, tribal leaders and professionals will discuss the significant opportunities for energy development in Indian Country, as well as the barriers that tribes must overcome to bring energy projects to fruition. Discussions will include increasing access to private capital, feasibility studies, and how tribes can create sustainable and environmentally responsible economies for the future generations of Indian Country. Learn more and register on the Native Nation Events website. Addthis Related Articles Obama Administration Announces Additional $63,817,400 for Local Energy

355

Executive Order 13096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) 096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) Executive Order 13096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998) Executive Order 13096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998). Affirms the Federal government's special and historic responsibility for the education of American Indian and Alaska native students. Directs federal agencies to improve the academic performance of American Indian and Alaska Native students via six goals: (1) improving reading and mathematics (2) increasing high school completion and postsecondary attendance rates (3) reducing the influence of long-standing factors that impede educational performance, such as poverty and substance abuse (4) creating strong, safe, and drug-free school environments (5) improving science education (6)

356

CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE-SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-PAIUTE- SHOSHONE INDIANS OF THE LONE PINE COMMUNITY CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine Community propose to prepare a feasibility study for

357

DOE Office of Indian Energy Fall 2012 Newsletter, Indian Energy Beat  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SHARING SHARING KNOWLEDGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 OPENING DOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUILDING BRIDGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 LEADING THE CHARGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 WINNING THE FUTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY ROUNDUP . . . . . . . . . . 7 ON THE HORIZON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The DOE Office of Indian Energy (DOE-IE) is taking a hands-on approach to advancing next-generation energy development in Indian Country, providing on-site strategic technical assistance for Tribes on renewable energy project deployment. Through an application process, DOE-IE selected 11 Tribes in Alaska and the contiguous United States to receive tailored technical assistance through the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. The Office is working with DOE national laboratories and other partners to offer vari- ous Tribes unbiased

358

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course: Hydroelectric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Resource Map & Project Scales  Technology Overview: - Siting - Costs  Successful Project Examples  Policies Relevant to Project Development  Additional Information & Resources Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. As part of this commitment and on behalf of DOE, the Office of Indian Energy is leading education and capacity building efforts in

359

CHARTER INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORK GROUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHARTER CHARTER INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORK GROUP Official Designation Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group ("Working Group") Purpose The purpose of the Working Group is to provide advice and recommendations to the Director of the Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs (OIE) and the Secretary of Energy with respect to the strategic planning and implementation of OIE's energy resource, energy business and energy infrastructure development policy and programs. Objectives and Scope of Activities and Duties The Working Group shall: (a) make recommendations to the Director of the Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs

360

Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Office of Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program Community and Facility Scale Renewable Energy Project...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course: Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Wind Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Resource Map  Technology Overview(s): - Siting - Costs  Successful Project Example(s)  Policies Relevant to Project Development  Additional Information & Resources 2 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. As part of this commitment and on behalf of DOE, the Office of Indian Energy is leading education and capacity building efforts in

362

Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Spring 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spring 2013 Spring 2013 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Spring 2013 Indian Energy Beat: News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country Spring 2013 Issue: Federal Technical Assistance Aims to Accelerate Tribal energy Project Deployment Message from the Director Indian Country Energy Roundup: Conferences and Webinars Sharing Knowledge: Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands Winning the Future: Strategic Planning Opens Doors for Isolated Alaskan Village Building Bridges: NANA Regional Corporation Collaborates to Help Alaska Natives Tackle Energy Challenges Opening Doors Webinar Series Addresses Top Tribal Energy Development Considerations Education Program Helps Tribes Prepare for Energy Projects Leading the Charge: Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa

363

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GEOTHERMAL GEOTHERMAL Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Resource Map & Project Scales  Technology Overview(s): - Siting - Costs  Successful Project Example(s)  Policies Relevant to Project Development  Additional Information & Resources 2 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. As part of this commitment and on behalf of DOE, the Office of Indian Energy is leading

364

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course: Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Technologies SOLAR Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Resource Map & Project Scales  Technology Overview(s): - Siting - Costs  Successful Project Example(s)  Policies Relevant to Project Development  Additional Information & Resources Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. As part of this commitment and on behalf of DOE, the Office of Indian Energy is leading

365

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE OFFICE OF INDIAN ENERGY Foundational Courses Renewable Energy Technologies GEOTHERMAL Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover......

366

Extended Range Predictability And Prediction Of Indian Summer Monsoon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is an important component of the tropical climate system, known for its regular seasonality and abundance of rainfall over the country.… (more)

Xavier, Prince K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy formerly Ministry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

planning, programme formulation and implementation, R&D and other means of promoting alternative energy in India. References Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy...

368

2011 National Congress of American Indians | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

provided information about the Office of Indian Energy's efforts to develop training curriculum on renewable energy tribal project development and financing, including how to build...

369

Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chair, Indian Law Practice Ater Wynne LLP A Project for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. June 2010 Edition...

370

Young: The Ute Indians of Colorado in the Twentieth Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ute Indians of Colorado in the Twentieth Century.Bibliography of the Ute In- dians of Colorado.Beulder: University of Colorado Studies, Series in

Knack, Martha C.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Jump to: navigation, search...

372

Indian Wind Power Association IWPA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Association IWPA Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Wind Power Association (IWPA) Place Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Zip 600 020 Sector Wind energy Product Chennai-based wind...

373

Indian Renewable Energy Foundation Ltd IREF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Foundation Ltd IREF Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Renewable Energy Foundation Ltd. (IREF) Place Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Zip 400 055 Sector Wind energy...

374

Personal possessions from the H.M.S. Boscawen: life on board a mid eighteenth-century warship during the French and Indian War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From 1759 to 1760, during the later stages of the French and Indian War, the H.M.S Boscawen sailed with General Jeffrey Amherst's flotilla against French rivals on Lake Champlain. In addition to serving as a warship, the Boscawen was used to transport soldiers and supplies to British fortifications along the lake. With the formal conclusion of the war in 1763, the Boscawen was taken out of military service and moored at the King's Shipyard below Fort Ticonderoga. Stripped of armament and rigging, she rotted and sank into the mud. Between 1983 and 1985 the discovery and excavation of the sloop Boscawen were carried out as a multidisciplinary study of naval architecture, maritime history, shipboard life, and artifact conservation. The excavation produced over 5,000 artifacts; the assemblage reported here consists of 1,345 items relating to the crew's clothing, diet, and recreation. The study of these artifacts has contributed to our knowledge of shipboard life on British Army warships during the French and Indian War, indicating the terms of interaction between British and Provincial forces, and reflecting the relationship between the armies and navy.

Erwin, Gail

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, a geologic and geophysical case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geochemical and geophysical data are presented for one of the major geothermal systems in the western United States. Regional data indicate major tectonic structures which are still active and provide the conduits for the geothermal system. Detailed geologic mapping has defined major glide blocks of Tertiary volcanics which moved down from the Tushar Mountains and locally act as a leaky cap to portions of the presently known geothermal system. Mapping and geochemical studies indicate three periods of mineralization have affected the area, two of which are unrelated to the present geothermal activity. The geologic relationships demonstrate that the major structures have been opened repeatedly since the Tertiary. Gravity and magnetic data are useful in defining major structures beneath alluvium and basalt cover, and indicate the importance of the Cove Fort-Beaver graben and the Cove Creek fault in localizing the geothermal reservoir. These structures and a high level of microearthquake activity also suggest other target areas within the larger thermal anomaly. Electrical resistivity surveys and thermal gradient holes both contribute to the delineation of the known reservoir. Deep exploration wells which test the reservoir recorded maximum temperatures of 178 C and almost isothermal behavior beginning at 700 to 1000 m and continuing to a depth of 1800 m. Costly drilling, high corrosion rates and low reservoir pressure coupled with the relatively low reservoir temperatures have led to the conclusion that the reservoir is not economic for electric power production at present. Plans are underway to utilize the moderate-temperature fluids for agribusiness, and exploration continues for a deep high-temperature reservoir.

Ross, Howard P.; Moore, Joseph N.; Christensen, Odin D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Limited site investigation of Landfills 1 and 4, Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this report was collected during limited site investigation activities conducted in the vicinity of Landfills 1 and 4 at Fort Lewis. The purpose of this work was to provide a means of detecting and evaluating the impacts of these inactive landfills on ground-water quality and adjacent lands. This effort included the design and construction of ground-water monitoring systems for compliance with applicable federal and state regulations governing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-type landfills. Ground-water samples were collected from both existing (1981 and 1984) wells and the newly installed (1988) wells. The analytical results from the water samples indicate that the ground water in and around Landfill 1 contains limited contamination. Contaminants may include volatile organic compounds and nitrate. The primary concern in the area around Landfill 1 was the determination that ground water from two wells may contain cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. Nitrate levels in the downgradient wells were greater than those in upgradient wells and exceeded drinking water standards in some of the less-representative samples. Analyses of ground-water samples from wells in and around Landfill 4 indicate several contaminants may be present. These include volatile organic compounds (principally cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene), coliform, oil and grease, and perhaps some metals (iron and magnesium). The primary concern in the area around Landfill 4 was the determination that ground water from five wells contained cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. The source of contaminants beneath either landfill cannot yet be identified. Insufficient data exist to disprove or confirm either landfill as possible contributors. 19 refs., 32 figs., 17 tabs.

Last, G.V.; Eddy, P.A.; Airhart, S.P.; Olsen, K.R.; Raymond, J.R.; Dahl, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy end-use metering in two modular office buildings at Fort Irwin, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the application of the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) at Fort Irwin for the period 21 December 1989 to 27 January 1992. The purpose of the test was to monitor electrical demands in Buildings 567 and 571 by end use and to monitor the response of the HVAC systems to internal and external loads. Results of two years of monitoring are summarized below. The observed energy-use intensities (EUIs) were 13.7 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 567 and 10.4 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 571. The corresponding numbers for HVAC energy were 5.9 and 5.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr. Lighting used about 35%, primary HVAC 40% (heating 8%, cooling 32%), supply fans 3% and other equipment (mostly plug loads) about 20% of the total. Over 10% of the primary HVAC energy used in Building 567 was the result of simultaneous heating and cooling. Six energy conservation measures were evaluated: (1) delamping and retrofit of T-12 fluorescent fixtures with T-8 systems; (2) installation of two-speed fans with operation at the lower speed (67% of rated airflow) during occupied periods whenever a unit is not heating or cooling; (3) retrofit of heat pump compressors with two-speed compressors; (4) installation of controls that eliminate non-productive simultaneous heating and cooling and provide improved night and weekend setback; (5) coating the existing black roof material with a white reflective material; and (6) adding an economizer system to provide outside air cooling. The estimated energy savings as a percent of whole-building energy use are: Lighting HVAC Savings -- 26%; Two-Speed Fans -- 2%; Two-Speed Compressors -- 11%; Improved HVAC Controls -- 5%; White Roof Coating -- 5%; Economizer Cooling -- 5 %. The total energy savings that can be achieved through the measures is 49%.

Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Impact of globalisation and trade liberalisation on the Indian industry : a case analysis of the Indian pharmaceutical industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The study is designed to carry out the impact of trade liberalization and globalisation on the Indian industry with the help of a case analysis… (more)

Vishwajit, Vibha.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

In justice to our Indian allies: The government of Texas and her Indian allies, 1836-1867.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Traditional histories of the Texas frontier overlook a crucial component: efforts to defend Texas against Indians would have been far less successful without the contributions… (more)

Yancey, William C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC’s) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

S&P- no rating impact from Indian Oil’s,3rd Qtr Net loss  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Standard & Poor's Ratings Services said today that the net loss of Indian rupee (Re) 58.3 million (US$1.3 million) reported by Indian Oil Corp. ...

382

Pre-monsoon Indian Ocean SST in contrasting years of Indian summer monsoon rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anomalous change in SST of June with reference to May studied for the Indian Ocean region (0-120°E, 40°S-40°N) during 1998 to 2005. The change in monthly SST anomaly in the equatorial region were studied along with changes in water ...

S. K. Sasamal

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Land surface conditions over Eurasia and Indian summer monsoon rainfall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land surface conditions over Eurasia and Indian summer monsoon rainfall Alan Robock and Mingquan Mu, surface air temperature, atmospheric circulation, and Indian summer monsoon precipitation from 1870 to 2000, we examine the relationship between interannual variations of the strength of the monsoon

Robock, Alan

384

Mass, Heat and Freshwater Fluxes in the South Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six hydrographic sections were used to examine the circulation and property fluxes in the South Indian Ocean from 10° to 32°S. The calculations were made by applying an inverse method to the data. In the interior of the South Indian Ocean, the ...

Lee-Lueng Fu

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Interactive Feedback between ENSO and the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feedback process of the Indian Ocean SST on ENSO is investigated by using observed data and atmospheric GCM. It is suggested that warming in the Indian Ocean produces an easterly wind stress anomaly over Indonesia and the western edge of the ...

Jong-Seong Kug; In-Sik Kang

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides information on Tribes in the lower 48 states selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native governments selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Advancing Energy Development in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army Project 181 Implementation Challenges in Deployment of an Energy Security Microgrid for Army Reserve Facilities located on the Former Fort Devens Army Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This documents reports on a request for technical assistance from Fort Devens to analyze procurement of energy from nearby renewable generating resources.

Warwick, William M.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG March 14, 2013 Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino Las Vegas, Nevada MEETING OVERVIEW The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (IE) hosted an Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) Meeting on Thursday, March 14, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. IE solicited nominations for new members to ICEIWG-current, new and potential new members, as well as other tribal leaders and intertribal organization representatives were encouraged to attend. PARTICIPANTS ICEIWG Members Barney Enos, District 4 Councilman, Gila River Indian Community Jim Manion, General Manager of Warm Springs Power, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation William Micklin, CEO, Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians

393

Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Summer 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer 2012 Summer 2012 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Summer 2012 Indian Energy Beat News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country Summer 2012 Issue: Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects Message from the Director Opening Doors: New Energy Resource Library for Tribes Education Program in Development Building Bridges: Transmission in Indian Country Sharing Knowledge: Energy Surety Micro Winning the Future: Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security On the Horizon: Upcoming Events Leading the Charge: Harold "Gus" Frank 54943_IE_Newsletter_Summer 2012_FINAL.pdf More Documents & Publications START Program: Alaska Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012 ICEIWG Meeting Agenda: March 14, 2013

394

India-Improving Walkability in Indian Cities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-Improving Walkability in Indian Cities India-Improving Walkability in Indian Cities Jump to: navigation, search Name Improving Walkability in Indian Cities Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia, Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation Partner Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Transport Sector Land Focus Area People and Policy, Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://cleanairasia.org/portal Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country India Southern Asia References Improving Walkability in Indian Cities[1] Overview "With a support from Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation, Clean Air Asia center managed to conduct a walkability study in six Indian cities. The scope includes the following cities: three big cities namely Chennai, Pune,

395

Announcing the American Indian Research and Education Initiative |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announcing the American Indian Research and Education Initiative Announcing the American Indian Research and Education Initiative Announcing the American Indian Research and Education Initiative July 25, 2011 - 11:58am Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director A new pilot program to connect Department of Energy Resources with American Indian students American Indian communities are uniquely situated in the matrix of energy production and energy use and efficiency. Tribal lands are often repositories of coal, oil, and uranium, and have tremendous untapped energy potential in wind, hydropower, and solar resources. However, Tribal Lands are also home to the highest rates for fuel and electricity, and have the highest percentage of un-electrified and un-weatherized homes. These issues create significant need and significant opportunity to develop

396

Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Department of Interior Grant Proposals Due Feb. 18 The U.S. Department of the Interior Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development is soliciting grant proposals from Indian Tribes and Alaska Native regional and village corporations for projects to build tribal capacity for energy resource development and promote the processing, use, or development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands. Read more White House Tribal Nations Conference: Promoting Prosperous, Resilient Tribal Nations The White House Tribal National Conference on November 13 was an opportunity for tribal leaders across the country to connect directly with President Obama and his Administration and explore ways to build on recent progress toward tribal self-determination and self-governance.

397

Bureau of Indian Affairs - Supai Village, Arizona | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Affairs - Supai Village, Arizona Indian Affairs - Supai Village, Arizona Bureau of Indian Affairs - Supai Village, Arizona October 7, 2013 - 9:48am Addthis Photo of Photovoltaic Energy System at Havasupai Indian Reservation Village of Supai, Arizona The Havasupai Indian Reservation village of Supai, Arizona, is located approximately 40 miles northwest of Grand Canyon Village, AZ. It is one of the most remote Native American communities in the nation. Most supplies must be either flown in by helicopter or trekked in on horseback or by mule trains. Three photovoltaic (PV) energy systems will supply up to 2 kilowatts of electrical power each to three facilities, which include a school, a jail, and a government complex that houses local teachers and police officers. This community of 2,000 people experiences three or more electrical outages

398

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention March 13, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities. Be sure to visit the Office of Indian Energy booth! Learn more on the NIGA website. Addthis Related Articles Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Byron Washom, Director of Strategic Energy Initiatives at the University of California at San Diego, poses with an electric vehicle and some of the solar panels that cover UCSD's campus.| Photo courtesy of UCSD Q&A With Byron Washom of the University of California at San Diego

399

Improving Walkability in Indian Cities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improving Walkability in Indian Cities Improving Walkability in Indian Cities Jump to: navigation, search Name Improving Walkability in Indian Cities Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia, Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation Partner Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Transport Sector Land Focus Area People and Policy, Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://cleanairasia.org/portal Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country India Southern Asia References Improving Walkability in Indian Cities[1] Overview "With a support from Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation, Clean Air Asia center managed to conduct a walkability study in six Indian cities. The scope includes the following cities: three big cities namely Chennai, Pune,

400

Indian Institute of Technology IIT Madras | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IIT Madras IIT Madras Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Institute of Technology(IIT Madras) Place Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Zip 600 036 Sector Biomass, Renewable Energy, Solar Product The mechanical engineering department is heavily focused on the different types of renewable energy, such as fuel cells, biomass and solar power. References Indian Institute of Technology(IIT Madras)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Indian Institute of Technology(IIT Madras) is a company located in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India . References ↑ "Indian Institute of Technology(IIT Madras)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Indian_Institute_of_Technology_IIT_Madras&oldid=346853

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Educational Curriculum Supports Tribal Energy Development Efforts Summer/Fall 2013 (Newsletter), Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN ENERGY BEAT INDIAN ENERGY BEAT On THe HOrizOn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Summer/Fall 2013 News on Actions to Accelerate Energy Development in Indian Country U.S. DOE OFFICE OF INDIAN ENERGY Educational Curriculum Supports Tribal Energy Development Efforts Vernon Masayesva of Black Mesa Trust, Gerald Warrington of the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin, Vince Gomez of the Pueblo of Isleta, and Lori Bear of Skull Valley Band of Geschute Indians playing a game of Jeopardy during the Commercial-Scale Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop held in July. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL 26517 UpCOmING WORkShOpS Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop September 18-20, 2013, Denver, Colorado Will walk tribal leaders and staff through five

402

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

403

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

404

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States with consumption of nearly 1.5 quads/year of energy (10{sup 15} quad = 1015 Btu) and cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) seeks to evaluate new energy -- saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP with funding support from the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of 4 candidate energy-saving technology-a water heater conversion system to convert electrically powered water heaters to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Interim report, 1994 Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This interim report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology-a hot water heater conversion system to convert electrically heated hot water tanks to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 282 Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Gordon, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Gordon, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Gordon took place on March 9, 2010.

Boyd, Brian K.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG May 29, 2013 Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Casino Chandler, Arizona MEETING OVERVIEW The U.S. Department of Energy Office (DOE) of Indian Energy (IE) hosted an Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) Meeting on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 in Chandler, Arizona. IE welcomed reappointed and new members to ICEIWG. The ICEIWG meeting was held prior to the seventh Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals." Arizona tribal leaders and intertribal organization representatives were encouraged to attend this meeting.

409

Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Blog Archive Indian Energy Blog Archive RSS November 21, 2013 From Theory to Reality: Visit to NREL Heightens Student's Desire to Become an Engineer As a student at New Mexico State University majoring in electrical engineering technology with a minor in renewable energy technology, I want to help my community by incorporating renewable energy technology so power will be distributed to every home, business, or school at an affordable cost to both my community and the electrical company. Visiting the NREL facility not only heightened my desire to become an engineer but also to see my goals come to fruition. November 21, 2013 Environmental Science Student Encouraged to Pursue Personal and Tribal Goals During NREL Tour As a senior studying environmental science at the University of New Mexico

410

Indian Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop, Inc Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Electric Coop, Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 9246 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service - HLF Commercial General Service Multi-Phase Commercial General Service Single-Phase Commercial Industrial Industrial Large Commercial Commercial Medium Commercial Residential Residential Service City Residential Residential Service Rural Residential Security Lighting MV/HPS 175 W Lighting Security Lighting MV/HPS 250 W Lighting

411

IndianEnergySummitBasicFactSHEET  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMIT BASIC FACTS SHEET SUMMIT BASIC FACTS SHEET WHAT: DOE TRIBAL LEADERS ROUNDTABLES AND ENERGY SUMMIT WHO: Tribal Leadership and Tribal Policy Makers Secretary Chu and DOE Senior Leadership DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs WHEN: MAY 4 th and 5 th , 2011 WHERE: WASHINGTON, D.C., AREA Summit Location CRYSTAL GATEWAY MARRIOTT www.marriott.com/hotels/.../wasgw-crystal-gateway-marriott/ 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway Arlington, Virginia (703) 920-3230 REGISTRATION: There are NO registration fees to participate. Tribal Leaders will have to make their own arrangements for travel and accomodations. Summit Working Session meals/refreshments (limited) are included by the hotel. Please confirm your attendance by completing the registration form (WEB link to

412

Indian Energy News Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

News News Archive Indian Energy News Archive RSS November 20, 2013 November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development Resources Attend this webinar to learn about the broad array of "go-to" resources available through DOE and other federal, state, and local offices to assist Tribes in getting their energy projects online. November 14, 2013 Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Deploy Tribal Clean Energy Projects As part of the Obama Administration's commitment to strengthening partnerships with Tribal nations and building stronger, more resilient communities that are better prepared for a changing climate, the Energy Department announced nine tribal clean energy projects to receive more than $7 million. November 12, 2013 Legal Landscape of Tribal Renewable Energy Development Conference Discount

413

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG June 21, 2012 GOLDEN, COLORADO National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 AGENDA MEETING ROOM - NREL ROOM 344C THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012 9:00am MEET IN HOTEL LOBBY Denver Marriott West Hotel 1717 Denver West Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 The hotel will provide a shuttle to take the group to NREL. Please be in the hotel lobby by 9:00am. Continental breakfast will be served onsite. 9:30am - 12:00pm WELCOME, INTRODUCTIONS & REVIEW OF AGENDA Tracey LeBeau, Director, U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy INTRODUCTION OF ICEIWG MEMBERS New and current working group members will have the opportunity to introduce themselves and to share their tribe's expertise and interests in Indian

414

Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indian Affairs Indian Affairs Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs Name Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs Address 130 State Capitol Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80202 Year founded 1976 Website http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Sat Coordinates 39.7392291°, -104.9848151° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7392291,"lon":-104.9848151,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

St. Michael Indian School Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michael Indian School Wind Project Michael Indian School Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name St. Michael Indian School Wind Project Facility St. Michael Indian School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location AZ Coordinates 35.647106°, -109.097389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.647106,"lon":-109.097389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

416

Guide on Consultation and Collaboration with Indian Tribal Governments and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide on Consultation and Collaboration with Indian Tribal Guide on Consultation and Collaboration with Indian Tribal Governments and the Public Participation of Indigenous Groups and Tribal Members in Environmental Decision Making Guide on Consultation and Collaboration with Indian Tribal Governments and the Public Participation of Indigenous Groups and Tribal Members in Environmental Decision Making This report and recommendations have been written as a part of the activities of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council, a public advisory committee providing extramural policy information and advice to the Administrator and other officials of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Guide on Consultation and Collaboration with Indian Tribal Governments and the Public Participation of Indigenous Groups and Tribal Members in

417

WI-TRIBE-STOCKBRIDGE-MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WI-TRIBE-STOCKBRIDGE-MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS WI-TRIBE-STOCKBRIDGE-MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS Location: Tribe WI-TRIBE- STOCKBRIDGE- MUNSEE BAND OF MOHICAN INDIANS WI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians proposes to conduct energy efficient audits of residential and commerical buildings. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

418

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References

419

CA-TRIBE-TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRIBE-TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS TRIBE-TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE- TUOLUMNE BAND OF MEWUK INDIANS CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Tuolumne Band of MeWuk Indians proposes to reduce their fossil fuel emissions through increased energy efficiency and the implementation of renewable energy where applicable. Currently, the Tribe has contracted with the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL) of the University of California, Berkeley, to identify the most cost-effective opportunities for increased energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. The Tribe proposes to use a portion of the funding to allocate funds to RAEL for technical consultant services to assist the Tribe in identifying, prioritizing, and coordinating site specific

420

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course: Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BIOMASS BIOMASS Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Resource Map & Project Scales  Technology Overview(s): - Siting - Costs  Successful Project Example(s)  Policies Relevant to Project Development  Additional Information & Resources Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. As part of this commitment and on behalf of DOE, the Office of Indian Energy is leading education and capacity building efforts in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center is excited to present its first Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop. Whether you are a beginner, an expert, or...

422

DOE American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 20,2006 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: SUBJECT: HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS n SAMUEL W. BODMAN s 4 W d d b L DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives...

423

Dynamics of Biweekly Oscillations in the Equatorial Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of the wind field over the equatorial Indian Ocean is spread throughout the intraseasonal (10–60 day) band. In contrast, variability of the near-surface ? field in the eastern, equatorial ocean is concentrated at biweekly frequencies ...

Toru Miyama; Julian P. McCreary Jr.; Debasis Sengupta; Retish Senan

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Predicting Extreme Phases of the Indian Summer Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme active and break phases of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) often bring about devastating floods and severe draughts. Here it is shown that these extreme phases exhibit distinctive precursory circulation conditions in both the tropics and ...

Qinghua Ding; Bin Wang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Constructing parallel corpora for six Indian languages via crowdsourcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work has established the efficacy of Amazon's Mechanical Turk for constructing parallel corpora for machine translation research. We apply this to building a collection of parallel corpora between English and six languages from the Indian subcontinent: ...

Matt Post; Chris Callison-Burch; Miles Osborne

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) Place Chennai, India Zip 601 302 Sector Wind energy...

427

Decadal Changes in the South Indian Ocean Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant change in properties of the thermocline is observed across the whole Indian Ocean 32°S section between 1987 and 2002. This change represents a reversal of the pre-1987 freshening and decreasing oxygen concentrations of the upper ...

Elaine L. McDonagh; Harry L. Bryden; Brian A. King; Richard J. Sanders; Stuart A. Cunningham; Robert Marsh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Wyoming dominates sales of coal produced from federal and Indian ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual sales of coal produced from federal and Indian lands in the United States ranged between 458 million and 509 million short tons from fiscal year (FY) 2003 to ...

429

Seismotectonics of the Coso Range-Indian Wells Valley region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Journal Geological Society of America, 2002 DOI 10.11300-8137-1195-9.277 Online Internet link for Seismotectonics of the Coso Range-Indian Wells Valley region, California:...

430

Intraseasonal Oscillations and Interannual Variability of the Indian Summer Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How and to what extent the intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) influence the seasonal mean and its interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon is investigated using 42-yr (1956–97) daily circulation data from National Centers for ...

B. N. Goswami; R. S. Ajaya Mohan

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Intraseasonal Variability Of The Equatorial Indian Ocean Circulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climatological winds over the equatorial Indian Ocean (EqlO) are westerly most of the year. Twice a year, in April-May ("spring") and October-December ("fall"), strong, sustained… (more)

Senan, Retish

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Warming and Freshening in the Abyssal Southeastern Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming and freshening of abyssal waters in the eastern Indian Ocean between 1994/95 and 2007 are quantified using data from two closely sampled high-quality occupations of a hydrographic section extending from Antarctica northward to the ...

Gregory C. Johnson; Sarah G. Purkey; John L. Bullister

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated in situ Indian Ocean observing system (IndOOS) is simulated using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with daily mean forcing, including an estimate of subdaily oceanic variability derived from observations. The ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; Matthew J. Harrison

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Seasonal Characteristics of Circulation in the Southeastern Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The circulation in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean is studied using historical temperature and salinity data. A southward shift of the subtropical gyre at increasing depth dominates the structure of the annual mean circulation. Near the ...

Tangdong Qu; Gary Meyers

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Heizer, ed.: Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 5, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a proposed 20- volume Handbook of North American Indi-publication of the Handbook of the Indians of California (incorporated in the new Handbook. The goal of this volume is

Aerni, Mary Jean

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Production of fossil fuel from federal and Indian lands fell ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales of fossil fuels from production on federal and Indian lands in fiscal year (FY) 2012 dropped 4% from FY 2011, according to data from the Department of the ...

438

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

Deep Velocity Measurements in the Western Equatorial Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of horizontal current collected in April and June 1979 in the western Indian Ocean revealed the presence of short vertical scale (150–300 m) deep zonal jets, trapped to within 1° of the equator. Meridional velocity records ...

Rui M. Ponte; James Luyten

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Upper Equatorial Indian Ocean. The Climatological Seasonal Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatological seasonal cycle of the upper equatorial Indian Ocean is discussed. A summary of the observations is given. Near the surface and below the equatorial thermocline, the observations indicate an intense variability of the equatorial ...

Gilles Reverdin

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fort mojave indian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Indian Ocean Intraseasonal Variability in an Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of atmospheric intraseasonal variability on the tropical Indian Ocean is examined with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). The model is forced by observation-based wind stresses and surface heat fluxes from an atmospheric ...

A. Schiller; J. S. Godfrey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Executive Order 13096: American Indian and Alaska Education (1998)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2681 2681 Federal Register Vol. 63, No. 154 Tuesday, August 11, 1998 Title 3- The President Executive Order 13096 of August 6, 1998 American Indian and Alaska Native Education By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, in affirmation of the unique political and legal relationship of the Federal Government with tribal governments, and in recognition of the unique educational and culturally related academic needs of American Indian and Alaska Native students, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Goals. The Federal Government has a special, historic responsibil- ity for the education of American Indian and Alaska Native students. Improv- ing educational achievement and academic progress for American Indian

443

AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska propose to conduct energy audits of tribally owned facilities. Specific retrofit activities will be determined based on the results of the audits, and these retrofit activities will be submitted for appropriate NEPA review. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

444

Three Years of Rainfall over the Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly rain failing on the Indian Ocean is mapped for the period 1979 through 1981 by means of observations of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer. Both stationary and mobile parts were found in the pattern of rain. The ...

David W. Martin; Barry B. Hinton; Brian A. Auvine

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Indian Wind Energy Association InWEA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InWEA Jump to: navigation, search Name Indian Wind Energy Association (InWEA) Place New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip 110016 Sector Wind energy Product Delhi-based wind industry...

446

Searching oURspace for Information on the Indian Act 2010, March 18 The oURspace digital repository contains both primary and secondary resources on the Indian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that link to read the full text of the item. Enter Indian Act in the Search oURSpace text box. This search the search further, the term "Canada" was used in addition to "Indian Act." Search other repositoriesSearching oURspace for Information on the Indian Act ­ 2010, March 18 The oURspace digital

Argerami, Martin

447

Phyllosilicate orientation demonstrates early timing of compactional stabilization in calcite-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth Basin, Texas (U.S.A) Ruarri J. Day-Stirrat a in revised form 8 April 2008 Accepted 16 April 2008 Keywords: Barnett Shale Goniometry Concretions Fabric Calcite-cemented zones in the prolific gas-producing Barnett Shale (Ft. Worth Basin, Texas) preserve very

448

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km{sup 2}, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.

Brumbaugh, W.D.; Cook, K.L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparative Study of the A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin DOE/NETL-2011/1478 Cover. Top left: The Barnett Shale exposed on the Llano uplift near San Saba, Texas. Top right: The Marcellus Shale exposed in the Valley and Ridge Province near Keyser, West Virginia. Photographs by Kathy R. Bruner, U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Bottom: Horizontal Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, Pennsylvania producing gas at 10 million cubic feet per day at about 3,000 pounds per square inch. Photograph by Tom Mroz, USDOE, NETL, February 2010. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors greatly thank Daniel J. Soeder (U.S. Department of Energy) who kindly reviewed the manuscript. His criticisms,

451

Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site  

SciTech Connect

A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

Miller, Julianne [DRI] DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI] DRI; Cablk, Mary E. [DRI] DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI] DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Grand Junction, Colorado] DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DOE Office of Indian Energy Renewable Energy Project Development Training: Tools and Information You Can Use  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Project Development Training: Curriculum Overview National Congress of American Indians Annual Meeting: November 1, 2011 Tracey A. LeBeau, Director, DOE Office of Indian Energy Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director, DOE Office of Indian Energy Dan Beckley, Jeff Bedard, and Liz Doris, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Matt Ferguson and Joe Cruz, The Reznick Group DOE Office of Indian Energy Mission: Direct, foster, coordinate, and implement energy planning, education, management, and programs that assist tribes with energy development, capacity building, energy infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. Why Are We Here? Indian Country contains a significant portion of United States energy resources

453

Westward propagation of the Indian monsoon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Being restricted in their vertical development by the Tibetan high, monsoon depressions propagate westward against monsoon westerlies embedded in the Indian monsoon trough. The cause of this peculiar propagation has not been well explained. Special characteristics of individual depressions were revealed from observations of previous studies; particularly, the major rainfall of a depression occurs over its west–south-west sector. The latent heat released by this rainfall forms east–west differential heating across the depression in developing an east–west asymmetric circulation. Because this east–west circulation is a part of the depression’s divergent circulation, a spatial quadrature relationship exists between this divergent circulation and the depression. Based on these characteristics, a westward propagation mechanism of the depression is introduced. The depression’s rainfall is supported by the convergence of water vapor transported by the low-level divergent circulation. In turn, the divergent circulation is maintained through a feedback of the latent heat released by the rainfall. The upward branch of the east–west circulation coupled with the convergent center of the low-level divergent circulation generates a negative streamfunction tendency. The depression is propagated westward by a dynamic interaction between rainfall/convection and this monsoon disturbance through the negative streamfunction tendency. The spatial quadrature relationship between a depression and its east–west (divergent) circulation rejuvenates the water vapor supply maintaining diabatic heating and the divergent circulation, and perpetuating

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fort Collins Utilities - Fort Collins Utilities - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eligible Technologies Building Insulation, Clothes Washers, Doors, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Windows,...

455

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 1970–2004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Böning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

U.S. DOE and the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DOE and the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on biofuels U.S. DOE and the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy...

457

The 30–60-Day Convection Seesaw between the Tropical Indian and Western Pacific Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical Indian and western Pacific oceans are two prominent action centers for tropical 30–60-day convective variability. When convection is enhanced over the equatorial Indian Ocean, the tropical western Pacific often experiences an ...

Baozhen Zhu; Bin Wang

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Seasonal Mixed Layer Heat Balance of the Southwestern Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature (SST) in the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean exerts a significant influence on global climate through its influence on the Indian summer monsoon and Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. In this study, ...

Gregory R. Foltz; Jérôme Vialard; B. Praveen Kumar; Michael J. McPhaden

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Oscillatory Climate Modes in the Indian Monsoon, North Atlantic and Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the three-way interactions between the Indian monsoon, the North Atlantic and the Tropical Pacific. Four climate records were analyzed: the monsoon rainfall in two Indian regions, the Southern Oscillation Index for the Tropical ...

Yizhak Feliks; Andreas Groth; Andrew W. Robertson; Michael Ghil

460

Effect of Preconditioning on the Extreme Climate Events in the Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature observations in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean (EEIO) during the period 1950–2003 indicate that Indian Ocean dipole/zonal mode (IODZM) events are strong in two decades, namely, the 1960s and 1990s. Atmospheric ...

H. Annamalai; J. Potemra; R. Murtugudde; J. P. McCreary

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Field Demonstration of a High-Efficiency Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioning Unit at Fort Gordon, Augusta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a larger program targeting the market transformation of packaged rooftop air conditioning, five high-efficiency rooftop air conditioning products were selected in 2002 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Unitary Air Conditioner (UAC) Technology Procurement (http://www.pnl.gov/uac). In February 2003, Fort Gordon in Augusta, Georgia was chosen as the demonstration site. With the goal of validating the field performance and operation of one of the awarded products, a 10-ton high-efficiency packaged rooftop unit (RTU) manufactured by Global Energy Group (GEG) was installed at Fort Gordon in October 2003. Following equipment installation, power metering, air- and refrigerant-side instrumentation was installed on the GEG RTU and a 4-year old typical-efficiency 20-ton RTU manufactured by AAON . The GEG and AAON units were instrumented identically and operated May through July, 2005, to observe performance under a range of conditions. Based on the data collected as part of this demonstration, the GEG equipment performed at least 8% better in stage-1 (single compressor running) cooling and at least 16% better in stage-2 (both compressors running) than the baseline AAON equipment. Performance comparisons are based on what we call application EER normalized to equivalent specific fan power. The full-load, specific-fan-power-normalized application EERs at ARI design conditions were 10.48 Btu/Wh for the GEG and 9.00 Btu/Wh for the baseline machine. With a cost premium of nearly 50%, and slightly higher maintenance costs, the life-cycle cost analysis shows that the GEG technology pays for itself--a positive net-present value (NPV)--only in climates and buildings with long cooling seasons. Manufacture of this equipment on a larger scale can be expected to reduce costs to the point where it is more broadly cost-effective. The assumed 10-ton baseline and new-technology unit costs are $3824.00 and $5525.00 respectively. If the new technology cost is assumed to drop as sales increase to $4674.50 for a 10-ton unit (i.e. the original cost difference is halved), the life-cycle costs improve. A grid of first cost, annual maintenance cost and electricity price is enumerated and the results presented in the report show the sensitivity of life cycle cost to these three financial parameters in each of eight different climates.

Armstrong, Peter R.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Parker, Graham B.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Facilities management: the development of a model for building condition assessment surveys conducted at Fort Riley, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the research and design of a condition assessment system for buildings by utilizing case study methods for the facilities located at Fort Riley, Kansas, an Army military installation. The design of the assessment or auditing system incorporates the following procedures: (1) identification of building components, (2) identification of building sub-components, (3) utilization of decision-tree logic diagrams to manage the information, and (4) production of inspection condition criteria and scoring for each sub-component (by visual inspection techniques) . The system was used by multiple inspectors to assess the buildings at Fort Riley. The inspectors received training in the system scoring and methodology. To verify the system's accuracy, ten percent (10%) of the buildings were re-inspected by the developers of the system (quality control) . The analysis of the system included a random sample of 20 buildings from the data collected. The data were analyzed for accuracy and consistency on the component and sub-component recognition and the inspection condition score (as compared to the quality control results) The actual inspection time was monitored to record the inspection efficiency. Statistical testing was conducted which did the following: (1) analyzed the data pair means for any significant differences, and (2) analyzed the strength of the pair relationships. From the data analysis the following was found: (1) the components and sub-components were recognized accurately and consistently, (2) the actual scores seemed to be accurate and consistent (after conducting the statistical test (T-Test) some of the means did indicate that there were some significant differences, while others indicated there were no significant differences) , (3) the data indicated that there was correlation between the data pairs. Also, it was found that this system provides reasonable inspection time and cost restraints. The building assessments are incorporated into an information system that assists the user in establishing priorities. The cost factors for each sub-component are based on building models that relate the quantities of the different sub-components to the actual floor area of the buildings. From these building models conceptual estimates can be generated and used as a tool to budget, justify, and anticipate maintenance and repair costs.

Riblett, Carl Olin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference October 30, 2013 8:00AM MDT to November 2, 2013 6:00PM MDT Denver, Colorado The American Inidan Science and Engineering Society (AISES) National Conference is a one-of-a-kind, three day event convening graduate, undergraduate, and high school junior and senior students, teachers, workforce professionals, corporate and government partners, and all members of the "AISES family". The AISES National conference has become the premier event for Native American Science, Engineering, and Math (STEM) professionals and students attracting over 1,600 attendees form across the country. The conference will be held at the Colorado Convention Center.

464

Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) March 20, 2007 - 11:37am Addthis Thank you Geoff (Pyatt) for that introduction. I'd like to thank FICCI for hosting this event and thank its leadership for their kind words. I'm very pleased to be here in India - and to be with all of you today. Since his very first days in office, President Bush has considered growing and strengthening the United States' bilateral relationship with India to be a top priority. The shared commitment of President Bush and Prime Minister Singh to building our relationship was evidenced by the historic strategic partnership initiatives announced during the President's visit here in March of last year.

465

Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group The Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) has been established to work collaboratively with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to assist in surveys, analysis, and recommendations related to those program and policy initiatives required to fulfill the DOE statutory authorizations and requirements of Title V of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. About ICEIWG Secretary Steven Chu announced the creation of the Working Group in May 2011 as an initiative to establish a working group of tribal government leaders and DOE to survey, analyze, and provide feedback to the DOE on its policy and program initiatives to meet the goals and programmatic

466

Indian Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and India's Energy Policy Agency/Company /Organization Stimson Sector Energy, Climate Topics Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Energy Security, Background analysis Website http://www.stimson.org/rv/pdf/ Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Climate Change and India's Energy Policy[1] "Indian Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges illustrates the complex constraints on Indian policymakers and provides material for more fruitful, better-informed discussions in Washington, Delhi, and all points between" References ↑ "Climate Change and India's Energy Policy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Indian_Climate_Policy:_Choices_and_Challenges&oldid=374308"

467

The major in American Indian Studies is one of the options within the Committee Interdisciplinary Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major (CIM) program. CIM majors "build" their own major by working with a committee of faculty members their personal educational and career objectives. The American Indian Studies CIM is an interdisciplinary program experience with American Indian people and their culture. UWMilwLetSci The American Indian Studies CIM

Saldin, Dilano

468

ORIGINAL PAPER Simulation of heavy rainfall events over Indian monsoon region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER Simulation of heavy rainfall events over Indian monsoon region using WRF-3DVAR data, 29­31 July 2004, and 7­9 August 2002) over the Indian monsoon region. For each event, two numerical the Indian monsoon region. Model verification and statis- tical skill were assessed with the help

Niyogi, Dev

469

Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper details the Indian Solar City Programme, provides an overview of one city's Master Plan and implementation progress, describes NREL's support of the Indian Solar City Programme, and outlines synergies and differences between the Indian and American programs including unique challenges and opportunities India is facing.

Kandt, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

DOE/EA-1354; Environmental Assessment for the Fort Collins 115kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project (12/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE FORT COLLINS 115kV TRANSMISSION LINE UPGRADE PROJECT Prepared for: Platte River Power Authority and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration DOE/EA 1354 September 2001 i TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY ............................................................................................................... S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1-1 1.1 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED PROJECT .................................................................. 1-1 1.3 PURPOSE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT....................................................

471

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Public Relations and Human Resources Issues: Personnel Plans and Communications During Decommissioni ng of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details aspects of the personnel plan instrumental in the successful decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. It includes discussion of the personnel retention program, actions taken to mitigate harassment and intimidation issues, and the communications plan. The report also discusses some decommissioning pitfalls encountered, signs of trouble brewing, and ways to mitigate personnel problems before they become serious issues. Project managers designed the document to be generic ...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions Reduction from Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) Measures at the Rent-A-Car Facility in the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, Texas A&M University System was contracted to fulfill a Continuous Commissioning® (CC®)project on the Rent-a-Car facility (RAC) of the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFWIA) in which energy savings are directly related to an emission reduction that can be credited. The purpose of this study is to estimate the creditable emissions reductions from energy efficiency CC® measures in the RAC of DFWIA.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontractors. For this townhome project, MassDevelopment, the quasi-governmental agency owner, selected Metric Development of Boston, teaming with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) and Cambridge Seven Architects, to build very high performing market-rate homes. Fort Devens is part of a decommissioned army base in working-class Harvard, Massachusetts, approximately one hour northwest of Boston. The team proposed 12 net zero energy-ready townhomes, meaning that the application of renewable energy systems would result in annual net zero energy use in the homes. The homes were also designed to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 41 before adding renewables. For this project, CARB drew on its experience working with Rural Development Inc. on a series of affordable townhomes in northern Massachusetts. The team carefully planned the site to maximize solar access, daylighting, and efficient building forms. The basic strategy was to design a very efficient thermal enclosure while minimizing incremental cost increases compared with standard construction. Using BEopt modeling software, the team established the requirements of the enclosure and investigated multiple assembly options. They settled on double-wall construction with dense-pack cellulose fill. High performance vinyl windows (U-0.24, solar heat gain coefficient [SHGC]-0.22), a vented R-59 attic, and exceptional air sealing completed the package.

Metzger, C.; Zoeller, W.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Technical and regulatory review of the Rover nuclear fuel process for use on Fort St. Vrain fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an analysis for processing and final disposal of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) irradiated fuel in Rover-type equipment or technologies. This analysis includes an evaluation of the current Rover equipment status and the applicability of this technology in processing FSV fuel. The analyses are based on the physical characteristics of the FSV fuel and processing capabilities of the Rover equipment. Alternate FSV fuel disposal options are also considered including fuel-rod removal from the block, disposal of the empty block, or disposal of the entire fuel-containing block. The results of these analyses document that the current Rover hardware is not operable for any purpose, and any effort to restart this hardware will require extensive modifications and re-evaluation. However, various aspects of the Rover technology, such as the successful fluid-bed burner design, can be applied with modification to FSV fuel processing. The current regulatory climate and technical knowledge are not adequately defined to allow a complete analysis and conclusion with respect to the disposal of intact fuel blocks with or without the fuel rods removed. The primary unknowns include the various aspects of fuel-rod removal from the block, concentration of radionuclides remaining in the graphite block after rod removal, and acceptability of carbon in the form of graphite in a high level waste repository.

Hertzler, T. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Geothermal investment analysis with site-specific applications to Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis and modeling of investment behavior in the development of hydrothermal electric power facilities are reported. This investment behavior reflects a degree of sensitivity to public policy alternatives concerning taxation and regulation of the resource and its related energy conversion facilities. The objective of the current research is to provide a realistic and theoretically sound means for estimating the impacts of such public policy alternatives. A stochastic simulation model was developed which offers an efficient means for site-specific investment analysis of private sector firms and investors. The results of the first year of work are discussed including the identification, analysis, quantification and modeling of: a decision tree reflecting the sequence of procedures, timing and stochastic elements of hydrothermal resource development projects; investment requirements, expenses and revenues incurred in the exploration, development and utilization of hydrothermal resources for electric power generation; and multiattribute investment decision criteria of the several types of firms in the geothermal industry. An application of the investment model to specific resource sites in the state of Utah is also described. Site specific data for the Known Geothermal Resource Areas of Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale are given together with hypothesized generation capacity growth rates.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Edelstein, R.H.; Blair, P.D.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z