National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for forms clouds precipitates

  1. New insights to cloud seeding for enhancing precipitation and for hail suppression Daniel Rosenfeld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    New insights to cloud seeding for enhancing precipitation and for hail suppression Daniel Rosenfeld microphysical observations of the impacts of aerosols on cloud microstructure and precipitation forming- forming processes to the role of aerosols in the rate of conversion of cloud droplets into precipitation

  2. Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j eCommitteeCloud-Resolving3

  3. IMPACT OF AEROSOLS ON CONVECTIVE CLOUDS AND PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    IMPACT OF AEROSOLS ON CONVECTIVE CLOUDS AND PRECIPITATION Wei-Kuo Tao,1 Jen-Ping Chen,2 Zhanqing Li effects on clouds could further extend to precipitation, both through the formation of cloud particles mechan- isms behind these effects, in particular, the ones connected to precipitation, are not yet well

  4. Impact of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols on clouds and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols on clouds and precipitation: A review of recent and precipitation: A review of recent progresses Chien Wang Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E19-439K, 77 atmospheric circulation, and hence clouds and precipitation. Recent studies have suggested that the changes

  5. Aerosol-Cloud interactions : a new perspective in precipitation enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar

    2010-01-01

    Increased industrialization and human activity modified the atmospheric aerosol composition and size-distribution during the last several decades. This has affected the structure and evolution of clouds, and precipitation ...

  6. Effects on precipitation, clouds, and temperature from long-range transport of idealized aerosol plumes in WRF-Chem simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Zhan; Pritchard, Michael S; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-01-01

    on intense convective precipitation in the northeastern US,aerosols on regional precipitation over East Asia, J.of aerosols on surface precipitation from clouds: An attempt

  7. Capacitance studies of cobalt oxide films formed via electrochemical precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Capacitance studies of cobalt oxide films formed via electrochemical precipitation Venkat prepared by electrochemically precipitating the hydroxide and heating it in air to form Co3O4, it is desirable to study the generality of the electrochemical precipitation technique as a means of fab- ricating

  8. New Observations of Precipitation Initiation in Warm Cumulus Clouds JENNIFER D. SMALL AND PATRICK Y. CHUANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Patrick Y.

    New Observations of Precipitation Initiation in Warm Cumulus Clouds JENNIFER D. SMALL AND PATRICK Y) to initiate precipitation (termed collision­coalescence initiators or CCIs) are found preferentially at cloud locally enhances collision­coalescence rates. 1. Introduction The initiation of precipitation in warm

  9. Intensification of precipitation extremes with warming in a cloud resolving model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Caroline

    A cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the effect of warming on high percentiles of precipitation (precipitation extremes) in the idealized setting of radiative-convective equilibrium. While this idealized setting ...

  10. On the Feasibility of Precisely Measuring the Properties of a Precipitating Cloud with a Weather Radar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runnels, R.C.

    1967-01-01

    In this paper the results of an investigation are presented that are concerned with the feasibility of employing a weather radar to make precise measurements of the properties of a precipitating cloud. A schematic cloud ...

  11. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  12. Cloud top microphysics as a tool for precipitation measurements Daniel Rosenfeld, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Cloud top microphysics as a tool for precipitation measurements Daniel Rosenfeld, Hebrew University of the electromagnetic radiation that is scattered and emitted from the clouds, precipitation and the underlying surface with the cloud and precipitation particles strongly depends on their composition and size distribution

  13. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  14. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; et al

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore »and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  15. Cloud-to-ground lightning-precipitation relationships in the South Central United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Despite the general coexistence of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning and precipitation, there have been few studies on the nature of the relationship between these two phenomena. This study endeavors to explore this relationship, ...

  16. The role of precipitation size distributions in km-scale NWP simulations of intense precipitation: Evaluation of cloud properties and surface precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg K.; Vogelmann A.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbec, L.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties and surface precipitation to assumptions regarding the size distributions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a one-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Three sensitivity experiments were applied to two composites of 15 convective and 15 frontal stratiform intense precipitation events observed in a coastal midlatitude region (Belgium), which were evaluated against satellite-retrieved cloud properties and radar-rain-gauge derived surface precipitation. It is found that the cloud optical thickness distribution was well captured by all experiments, although a significant underestimation of cloudiness occurred in the convective composite. The cloud-top-pressure distribution was improved most by more realistic snow size distributions (including a temperature-dependent intercept parameter and non-spherical snow for the calculation of the slope parameter), due to increased snow depositional growth at high altitudes. Surface precipitation was far less sensitive to whether graupel or hail was chosen as the rimed ice species, as compared to previous idealized experiments. This smaller difference in sensitivity could be explained by the stronger updraught velocities and higher freezing levels in the idealized experiments compared to typical coastal midlatitude environmental conditions.

  17. Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhanqing; Niu, F.; Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yangang; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol has complex effects on clouds and precipitation that may augment or offset each other contingent upon a variety of variables. As a result, its long-term impact on climate is largely unknown. Using 10 years of the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) measurements, strong aerosol effects of climatologically significance are detected. With increasing total aerosol number concentration (condensation nucleus, CN) measured near the ground, both cloud top height and precipitation change systematically for mix-phase clouds of warm-base (cloud base <1km) and cold-top (above the freezing level), but not for pure liquid and ice clouds. Cloud thickness can increase systematically with the CN concentration by up to a factor of 2. The response of precipitation to CN depends on cloud liquid water path (LWP). As CN increases, rain occurs more frequently for high LWP but less frequently for low LWP. Such strong signals of aerosol long-term impact on cloud and precipitation have not been reported and have significant implications for climate change studies, especially concerning regional and global climate change induced by pollution.

  18. The Nature of Zn Precipitates Formed in the Presence of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    D D O N A L D L . S P A R K S Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, NewarkThe Nature of Zn Precipitates Formed in the Presence of Pyrophyllite R O B E R T G . F O R D * A N

  19. MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF A15 SUPERCONDUCTORS FORMED BY DIRECT PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, M.

    2010-01-01

    early stage of the precipitation process. c C c S. Fooer, E.FORMED BT DIRECT PRECIPITATION M. Hong, D. R. D l e c d e ron the details of the precipitation process, which determine

  20. Binary Formation in Star-Forming Clouds with Various Metallicities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro N. Machida

    2008-03-01

    Cloud evolution for various metallicities is investigated by three-dimensional nested grid simulations, in which the initial ratio of rotational to gravitational energy of the host cloud \\beta_0 (=10^-1 - 10^-6) and cloud metallicity Z (=0 - Z_\\odot) are parameters. Starting from a central number density of n = 10^4 cm^-3, cloud evolution for 48 models is calculated until the protostar is formed (n \\simeq 10^23 cm^-3) or fragmentation occurs. The fragmentation condition depends both on the initial rotational energy and cloud metallicity. Cloud rotation promotes fragmentation, while fragmentation tends to be suppressed in clouds with higher metallicity. Fragmentation occurs when \\beta_0 > 10^-3 in clouds with solar metallicity, while fragmentation occurs when \\beta_0 > 10^-5 in the primordial gas cloud. Clouds with lower metallicity have larger probability of fragmentation, which indicates that the binary frequency is a decreasing function of cloud metallicity. Thus, the binary frequency at the early universe (or lower metallicity environment) is higher than at present day (or higher metallicity environment). In addition, binary stars born from low-metallicity clouds have shorter orbital periods than those from high-metallicity clouds. These trends are explained in terms of the thermal history of the collapsing cloud.

  1. Wind speed response of marine non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds over a diurnal cycle in cloud-system resolving simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2015-10-21

    Observed and projected trends in large scale wind speed over the oceans prompt the question: how might marine stratocumulus clouds and their radiative properties respond to future changes in large scale wind speed? Wind speed drives the surface fluxes of sensible heat, moisture, and momentum, and thereby acts on cloud liquid water path (LWP) and cloud radiative properties. We present an investigation of the dynamical response of non-precipitating, overcast marine stratocumulus clouds to different wind speeds, all else equal. In cloud-system resolving simulations, we find that higher wind speed leads to faster boundary layer growth and stronger entrainment. The dynamicalmore »driver is enhanced buoyant production of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) from latent heat release in cloud updrafts. LWP is enhanced during the night and in the morning at higher wind speed, and more strongly suppressed later in the day. Wind speed hence accentuates the diurnal LWP cycle by expanding the morning – afternoon contrast. The higher LWP at higher wind speed does not, however, enhance cloud top cooling because in clouds with LWP ⪆ 50 g m?2, long wave emissions are very insensitive to LWP. This leads to the more general conclusion that in sufficiently thick stratocumulus clouds, additional boundary layer growth and entrainment due to a boundary layer moistening arises by stronger production of TKE from latent heat release in cloud updrafts, rather than from enhanced longwave cooling. We find furthermore that large scale wind modulates boundary layer decoupling. At nighttime and at low wind speed during daytime, it enhances decoupling in part by faster boundary layer growth and stronger entrainment, and in part because circulation driven by shear from large scale wind in the sub-cloud layer hinders vertical moisture transport between the surface and cloud base. With increasing wind speed, however, in decoupled daytime conditions, shear-driven circulation due to large scale wind takes over from buoyancy-driven circulation in transporting moisture from the surface to cloud base, and thereby reduces decoupling and helps maintain LWP. The cloud radiative effect (CRE) responds to changes in LWP and cloud fraction, and higher wind speed translates to a stronger diurnally averaged CRE. However, the sensitivity of the diurnally averaged CRE to wind speed decreases with increasing wind speed.« less

  2. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Kollias, Pavlos; Lewis, Ernie R.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporatedmore »before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)« less

  3. Clouds, Precipitation, and Marine Boundary Layer Structure during the MAGIC Field Campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xiaoli [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Lewis, Ernie R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biological, Environmental, and Climate Sciences Dept.

    2015-03-01

    The recent ship-based MAGIC (Marine ARM GCSS Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI) Investigation of Clouds) field campaign with the marine-capable Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) deployed on the Horizon Lines cargo container M/V Spirit provided nearly 200 days of intraseasonal high-resolution observations of clouds, precipitation, and marine boundary layer (MBL) structure on multiple legs between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii. During the deployment, MBL clouds exhibited a much higher frequency of occurrence than other cloud types and occurred more often in the warm season than in the cold season. MBL clouds demonstrated a propensity to produce precipitation, which often evaporated before reaching the ocean surface. The formation of stratocumulus is strongly correlated to a shallow MBL with a strong inversion and a weak transition, while cumulus formation is associated with a much weaker inversion and stronger transition. The estimated inversion strength is shown to depend seasonally on the potential temperature at 700 hPa. The location of the commencement of systematic MBL decoupling always occurred eastward of the locations of cloud breakup, and the systematic decoupling showed a strong moisture stratification. The entrainment of the dry warm air above the inversion appears to be the dominant factor triggering the systematic decoupling, while surface latent heat flux, precipitation, and diurnal circulation did not play major roles. MBL clouds broke up over a short spatial region due to the changes in the synoptic conditions, implying that in real atmospheric conditions the MBL clouds do not have enough time to evolve as in the idealized models. (auth)

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA ContactsProductsSACR26, 2015 [FacilityJanuary10,24,Cloud

  5. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  6. Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011 mountain barrier. Together with the weak vertical transport,

  7. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Edward J.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

    2011-10-04

    The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean graupel and snow water contents across models.

  8. Precipitating clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document w1.½tank |A suggestion for a new focus on

  9. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam C.; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Ed; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

    2011-06-24

    The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. 29 In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling 30 observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases 31 more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce 32 unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several 33 simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size 34 distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect 35 simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean 36 graupel and snow water contents across models. 37

  10. The frequency of tropical precipitating clouds as observed by the TRMM PR and ICESat/GLAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Sean Patrick

    2009-06-02

    Convective clouds in the tropics can be grouped into three categories: shallow clouds with cloud-top heights near 2 km above the surface, mid-level congestus clouds with tops near the 0°C level, and deep convective clouds ...

  11. New insights to cloud seeding for enhancing precipitation and hail suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    that seeding of thin super-cooled layer clouds could glaciate the cloud and so create light snow. This has been (Rosenfeld, 2000) particulate air pollution. We "seed" the clouds negatively by pollution aerosols on a much

  12. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-01-03

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for assessing aerosol effects on cold season precipitation in California.

  13. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Robert

    2013-05-31

    The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP?MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

  14. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  15. Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1: precipitation scavenging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Papers are presented under the headings: cloud studies, precipitation chemistry, plume studies, gas scavenging, microphysics and models.

  16. Formation of water and methanol in star forming molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ankan Das; Kinsuk Acharyya; Sonali Chakrabarti; Sandip Kumar Chakrabarti

    2008-06-29

    We study the formation of water and methanol in the dense cloud conditions to find the dependence of its production rate on the binding energies, reaction mechanisms, temperatures, and grain site number. We wish to find the effective grain surface area available for chemical reaction and the effective recombination timescales as functions of grain and gas parameters. We used a Monte Carlo simulation to follow the chemical processes occurring on the grain surface. We find that the formation rate of various molecules is strongly dependent on the binding energies. When the binding energies are high, it is very difficult to produce significant amounts of the molecular species. Instead, the grain is found to be full of atomic species. The production rates are found to depend on the number density in the gas phase. We show that the concept of the effective grain surface area, which we introduced in our earlier work, plays a significant role in grain chemistry. We compute the abundance of water and methanol and show that the results strongly depend on the density and composition in the gas phase, as well as various grain parameters. In the rate equation, it is generally assumed that the recombination efficiencies are independent of the grain parameters, and the surface coverage. Presently, our computed parameter $\\alpha$ for each product is found to depend on the accretion rate, the grain parameters and the surface coverage of the grain. We compare our results obtained from the rate equation and the one from the effective rate equation, which includes $\\alpha$. At the end we compare our results with the observed abundances.

  17. AEROSOL-CLOUD INTERACTIONS CONTROL OF EARTH RADIATION AND LATENT HEAT RELEASE BUDGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    AEROSOL-CLOUD INTERACTIONS CONTROL OF EARTH RADIATION AND LATENT HEAT RELEASE BUDGETS D. ROSENFELD simulations show that cloud development is strongly mod- ulated by the impact of cloud-aerosol interactions on precipitation forming processes. New insights into the mechanisms by which aerosols dominate the cloud cover

  18. Clouds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Uncertainties associated with the microphysical and radiative properties of ice clouds remain an active research area because of the importance these clouds have in atmospheric radiative transfer problems and the energy balance of the Earth...

  19. Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the radiative influence of mixed-phase clouds. Further, its impact on the development and evaluation of retrieval schemes from ground- and satellite-based remote sensors is...

  20. MODELING THE ATOMIC-TO-MOLECULAR TRANSITION AND CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TURBULENT STAR-FORMING CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bisbas, Thomas G.; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6B (United Kingdom); Bell, Tom A., E-mail: stella.offner@yale.edu [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10

    We use 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemistry code for modeling photodissociation regions (PDRs), to post-process hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent, star-forming clouds. We focus on the transition from atomic to molecular gas, with specific attention to the formation and distribution of H, C{sup +}, C, H{sub 2}, and CO. First, we demonstrate that the details of the cloud chemistry and our conclusions are insensitive to the simulation spatial resolution, to the resolution at the cloud edge, and to the ray angular resolution. We then investigate the effect of geometry and simulation parameters on chemical abundances and find weak dependence on cloud morphology as dictated by gravity and turbulent Mach number. For a uniform external radiation field, we find similar distributions to those derived using a one-dimensional PDR code. However, we demonstrate that a three-dimensional treatment is necessary for a spatially varying external field, and we caution against using one-dimensional treatments for non-symmetric problems. We compare our results with the work of Glover et al., who self-consistently followed the time evolution of molecule formation in hydrodynamic simulations using a reduced chemical network. In general, we find good agreement with this in situ approach for C and CO abundances. However, the temperature and H{sub 2} abundances are discrepant in the boundary regions (A{sub v} {<=} 5), which is due to the different number of rays used by the two approaches.

  1. Kinetic Energy Decay Rates of Supersonic and Super-Alfvenic Turbulence in Star-Forming Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen; Andreas Burkert; Michael D. Smith

    1997-12-01

    We present numerical studies of compressible, decaying turbulence, with and without magnetic fields, with initial rms Alfven and Mach numbers ranging up to five, and apply the results to the question of the support of star-forming interstellar clouds of molecular gas. We find that, in 1D, magnetized turbulence actually decays faster than unmagnetized turbulence. In all the regimes that we have studied 3D turbulence-super-Alfvenic, supersonic, sub-Alfvenic, and subsonic-the kinetic energy decays as (t-t0)^(-x), with 0.85 < x < 1.2. We compared results from two entirely different algorithms in the unmagnetized case, and have performed extensive resolution studies in all cases, reaching resolutions of 256^3 zones or 350,000 particles. We conclude that the observed long lifetimes and supersonic motions in molecular clouds must be due to external driving, as undriven turbulence decays far too fast to explain the observations.

  2. Investigation of the optical and cloud forming properties of pollution, biomass burning, and mineral dust aerosols 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong Seob

    2006-08-16

    that were observed during this period. The predicted cloud condensation nuclei concentrations were used in a cloud model to determine the impact of the different aerosol types on the expected cloud droplet concentration. RH-dependent aerosol extinction...

  3. Thermal and Fragmentation Properties of Star-forming Clouds in Low-metallicity Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Omukai; T. Tsuribe; R. Schneider; A. Ferrara

    2005-03-01

    The thermal and chemical evolution of star-forming clouds is studied for different gas metallicities, Z, using the model of Omukai (2000), updated to include deuterium chemistry and the effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. HD-line cooling dominates the thermal balance of clouds when Z \\~ 10^{-5}-10^{-3} Z_sun and density ~10^{5} cm^{-3}. Early on, CMB radiation prevents the gas temperature to fall below T_CMB, although this hardly alters the cloud thermal evolution in low-metallicity gas. From the derived temperature evolution, we assess cloud/core fragmentation as a function of metallicity from linear perturbation theory, which requires that the core elongation E := (b-a)/a > E_NL ~ 1, where a (b) is the short (long) core axis length. The fragment mass is given by the thermal Jeans mass at E = E_NL. Given these assumptions and the initial (gaussian) distribution of E we compute the fragment mass distribution as a function of metallicity. We find that: (i) For Z=0, all fragments are very massive, > 10^{3}M_sun, consistently with previous studies; (ii) for Z>10^{-6} Z_sun a few clumps go through an additional high density (> 10^{10} cm^{-3}) fragmentation phase driven by dust-cooling, leading to low-mass fragments; (iii) The mass fraction in low-mass fragments is initially very small, but at Z ~ 10^{-5}Z_sun it becomes dominant and continues to grow as Z is increased; (iv) as a result of the two fragmentation modes, a bimodal mass distribution emerges in 0.01 0.1Z_sun, the two peaks merge into a singly-peaked mass function which might be regarded as the precursor of the ordinary Salpeter-like IMF.

  4. Structure analysis of aluminium silicon manganese nitride precipitates formed in grain-oriented electrical steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernier, Nicolas, E-mail: n.bernier@yahoo.fr [OCAS N.V., ArcelorMittal Global R and D Gent, Pres. J.F. Kennedylaan 3, 9060 Zelzate (Belgium); Xhoffer, Chris [OCAS N.V., ArcelorMittal Global R and D Gent, Pres. J.F. Kennedylaan 3, 9060 Zelzate (Belgium); Van De Putte, Tom, E-mail: tom.vandeputte@arcelormittal.com [OCAS N.V., ArcelorMittal Global R and D Gent, Pres. J.F. Kennedylaan 3, 9060 Zelzate (Belgium); Galceran, Montserrat [Université Libre de Bruxelles, 4MAT (Materials Engineering, Characterization, Synthesis and Recycling), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); CIC Energigune, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Miñano (Álava) (Spain); Godet, Stéphane [Université Libre de Bruxelles, 4MAT (Materials Engineering, Characterization, Synthesis and Recycling), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-12-15

    We report a detailed structural and chemical characterisation of aluminium silicon manganese nitrides that act as grain growth inhibitors in industrially processed grain-oriented (GO) electrical steels. The compounds are characterised using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), while their crystal structures are analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TEM in electron diffraction (ED), dark-field, high-resolution and automated crystallographic orientation mapping (ACOM) modes. The chemical bonding character is determined using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Despite the wide variation in composition, all the precipitates exhibit a hexagonal close-packed (h.c.p.) crystal structure and lattice parameters of aluminium nitride. The EDX measurement of ? 900 stoichiometrically different precipitates indicates intermediate structures between pure aluminium nitride and pure silicon manganese nitride, with a constant Si/Mn atomic ratio of ? 4. It is demonstrated that aluminium and silicon are interchangeably precipitated with the same local arrangement, while both Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} are incorporated in the h.c.p. silicon nitride interstitial sites. The oxidation of the silicon manganese nitrides most likely originates from the incorporation of oxygen during the decarburisation annealing process, thus creating extended planar defects such as stacking faults and inversion domain boundaries. The chemical composition of the inhibitors may be written as (AlN){sub x}(SiMn{sub 0.25}N{sub y}O{sub z}){sub 1?x} with x ranging from 0 to 1. - Highlights: • We study the structure of (Al,Si,Mn)N inhibitors in grain oriented electrical steels. • Inhibitors have the hexagonal close-packed symmetry with lattice parameters of AlN. • Inhibitors are intermediate structures between pure AlN and (Si,Mn)N with Si/Mn ? 4. • Al and Si share the same local arrangement; Mn is incorporated in both Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}. • Oxygen incorporation is invoked to account for the thermal stability of (Al,Si,Mn)N.

  5. Constructing a Merged CloudPrecipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of observations from three radars--the S-band dual-polarization Doppler radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile, and radiative heating rate retrievals. With this dataset the full spectrum of tropical convective clouds during, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Corresponding author address: Dr. Zhe Feng, Pacific

  6. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, M; Tsuboi, Y

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is fou...

  7. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; N. Kobayashi; Y. Tsuboi

    2005-06-27

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is found from a mid-infrared protostar L1448 IRS 3(A). The lack of detection of this source in our deep NIR images indicates that this source has a very steep spectral slope of > 3.2 in 2--10 micron.

  8. The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States DONGMIN LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States DONGMIN LEE GESTAR, University The authors examine the daytime precipitation characteristics of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology precipitation dataset used is the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation

  9. A METHOD FOR AIRCRAFT ICING DIAGNOSIS IN PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabry, Frederic

    A METHOD FOR AIRCRAFT ICING DIAGNOSIS IN PRECIPITATION François A. Turcotte Department precipitation event and its microphysics was simulated using a high resolution three-dimensional kinematic cloud

  10. Response to comments by Yuan Wang on “Trends of extreme precipitation in Eastern China and their possible causes”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    dependence of global precipitation extremes. Geo- phys. Res.2015: Trends of extreme precipitation in eastern China andon convective clouds and precipitation. Rev. Geophys. , 50,

  11. A Global View of Molecule-Forming Clouds in the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Steven J; Jolly, Christian S; Newton, Jonathan H; Bell, Aaron C; Spraggs, Mary E; Hughes, J Marcus; Tagliaboschi, Aaron M; Brunt, Christopher M; Taylor, A Russell; Stil, Jeroen M; Dame, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    We have mapped cold atomic gas in 21cm line HI self-absorption (HISA) at arcminute resolution over more than 90% of the Milky Way's disk. To probe the formation of H2 clouds, we have compared our HISA distribution with CO J=1-0 line emission. Few HISA features in the outer Galaxy have CO at the same position and velocity, while most inner-Galaxy HISA has overlapping CO. But many apparent inner-Galaxy HISA-CO associations can be explained as chance superpositions, so most inner-Galaxy HISA may also be CO-free. Since standard equilibrium cloud models cannot explain the very cold HI in many HISA features without molecules being present, these clouds may instead have significant CO-dark H2.

  12. ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProducts (VAP) VAP38 ARM6Aerosol

  13. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  14. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric Rivers Coming to a Cloud Near You

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Ruby

    2014-03-29

    Learn about the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign in this short video. Ruby Leung, PNNL's lead scientist on this campaign's observational strategy to monitor precipitation.

  16. Atmospheric Rivers Coming to a Cloud Near You

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Leung, Ruby

    2014-06-12

    Learn about the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign in this short video. Ruby Leung, PNNL's lead scientist on this campaign's observational strategy to monitor precipitation.

  17. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21°C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  18. Austin, P. H., Y. Wang, R. Pincus and V. Kujala, 1995: Precipitation in stratocumulus clouds: Ob-servation and modeling resuts. J. Atmos. Sci., 52, 23292352.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    1 REFERENCES Austin, P. H., Y. Wang, R. Pincus and V. Kujala, 1995: Precipitation in stratocumulus: A general mathematical formalism. J. Atmos. Ocean. Techn., 6, 575­584. Bretherton, C.S. and R. Pincus. 1995, B. A. Albrecht, T. P. Ackerman, J. Verlinde, D. M. Babb, R. M. Peters and W. J. Syrett, 1995

  19. Precipitation sensitivity to autoconversion rate in a Numerical Weather Prediction model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsham, John

    1 Precipitation sensitivity to autoconversion rate in a Numerical Weather Prediction model Céline;2 Summary Aerosols are known to significantly affect cloud and precipitation patterns and intensity. The impact of changing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), on cloud and precipitation evolution can

  20. Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j eCommitteeCloud-Resolving3

  1. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress. The evidence suggests that air pollution aerosols that are incorporated in orographic clouds slow down cloud

  2. Precipitation hydrometeor type relative to the mesoscale airflow in mature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Precipitation hydrometeor type relative to the mesoscale airflow in mature oceanic deep convection systems whose contiguous precipitation spans at least ~100 km in one direction [Houze 2004]. These cloud systems are composed of small, intensely precipitating convective regions and expansive stratiform regions

  3. Flood or Drought: How Do Aerosols Affect Precipitation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Flood or Drought: How Do Aerosols Affect Precipitation? Daniel Rosenfeld,1 * Ulrike Lohmann,2 and the initiation of precipitation. Large concentrations of human-made aerosols have been reported to both decrease hand, heavily polluted clouds evaporate much of their water before precipitation can occur, if they can

  4. Coupling dynamical and collisional evolution of small bodies II : Forming the Kuiper Belt, the Scattered Disk and the Oort Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Charnoz A. Morbidelli

    2006-09-29

    The Oort Cloud, the Kuiper Belt and the Scattered Disk are dynamically distinct populations of small bodies evolving in the outer regions of the Solar System. Whereas their collisional activity is now quiet, gravitational interactions with giant planets may have shaped these populations both dynamically and collisionally during their formation. Using a hybrid approach (Charnoz & Morbidelli 2003), the present paper tries to couple the primordial collisional and dynamical evolution of these three populations in a self-consistent way. A critical parameter is the primordial size-distribution. We show that the initial planetesimal size distribution that allows an effective mass depletion of the Kuiper belt by collisional grinding, would decimate also the population of comet-size bodies that end in the Oort Cloud and, in particular, in the Scattered Disk. As a consequence, the Scattered Disk and the Oort Cloud would be too anemic, by a factor 20 to 100, relative to the estimates achieved from the observation of the fluxes of long period and Jupiter family comets, respectively. For these two reservoirs to have a sufficient number of comets, the initial size distribution in the planetesimal disk had to be such that the mass depletion by collisional erosion of in the Kuiper belt was negligible. Consequently, the current mass deficit of the Kuiper belt, needs to be explained by dynamical mechanisms.

  5. Water Deuteration and Ortho-to-Para Nuclear Spin Ratio of H2 in Molecular Clouds Formed via Accumulation of HI Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuya, K; Hincelin, U; Hassel, G E; Bergin, E A; Vasyunin, A I; Herbst, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the water deuteration ratio and ortho-to-para nuclear spin ratio of H2 (OPR(H2)) during the formation and early evolution of a molecular cloud, following the scenario that accretion flows sweep and accumulate HI gas to form molecular clouds. We follow the physical evolution of post-shock materials using a one-dimensional shock model, with post-processing gas-ice chemistry simulations. This approach allows us to study the evolution of the OPR(H2) and water deuteration ratio without an arbitrary assumption concerning the initial molecular abundances, including the initial OPR(H2). When the conversion of hydrogen into H2 is almost complete, the OPR(H2) is already much smaller than the statistical value of three due to the spin conversion in the gas phase. As the gas accumulates, the OPR(H2) decreases in a non-equilibrium manner. We find that water ice can be deuterium-poor at the end of its main formation stage in the cloud, compared to water vapor observed in the vicinity of low-mass protostars w...

  6. CHASER: An Innovative Satellite Mission Concept to Measure the Effects of Aerosols on Clouds and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenfeld, Daniel

    The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. ...

  7. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with a cloud top temperature of -15C. While the cloud was water dominated, ice precipitation appears to have lowered the liquid water path to about 23 of the adiabatic value....

  8. Localized precipitation and runoff on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kite, Edwin S; Rafkin, Scot; Manga, Michael; Dietrich, William E

    2010-01-01

    We use the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) to simulate lake storms on Mars, finding that intense localized precipitation will occur for lake size >=10^3 km^2. Mars has a low-density atmosphere, so deep convection can be triggered by small amounts of latent heat release. In our reference simulation, the buoyant plume lifts vapor above condensation level, forming a 20km-high optically-thick cloud. Ice grains grow to 200 microns radius and fall near (or in) the lake at mean rates up to 1.5 mm/hr water equivalent (maximum rates up to 6 mm/hr water equivalent). Because atmospheric temperatures outside the surface layer are always well below 273K, supersaturation and condensation begin at low altitudes above lakes on Mars. In contrast to Earth lake-effect storms, lake storms on Mars involve continuous precipitation, and their vertical velocities and plume heights exceed those of tropical thunderstorms on Earth. Convection does not reach above the planetary boundary layer for lakes O(10^2) mbar. In...

  9. Forms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |FinalIndustrialFollowingForForklift4)Formation offorForms

  10. Forms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |FinalIndustrialFollowingForForklift4)Formation offorForms

  11. Review of Discrete X-Ray Sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Summary of the ASCA Results and Implication on the Recent Star Forming Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yokogawa; Kensuke Imanishi; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Katsuji Koyama; Mamiko Nishiuchi

    2003-02-09

    We made 22 observations on the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and covered full regions by the end of the ASCA mission. We detected 106 discrete sources with a criterion of S/N > 5 and performed systematic analyses on all of the sources. We determined the source positions with an ~40'' error radius (90% confidence) for sources detected in the central 20' radius of the GIS. We detected coherent pulsations from 17 sources. Among them, eight were newly discovered during this study. We classified most of these pulsars as X-ray binary pulsars (XBPs) based on their properties, such as the flux variability and the existence of an optical counterpart. We detected X-ray emission from eight supernova remnants (SNRs). Among them, five SNRs showed emission lines in their spectra, hence we regarded the five as thermal SNRs. We found that XBPs and thermal SNRs in the SMC can be clearly separated by their spectral hardness ratio. Applying this empirical law to faint (thus unclassified) sources, we found 19 XBP candidates and four thermal SNR candidates. We also found several tens of candidates for active galactic nuclei, both from the hardness ratio and the logN--logS relation of extragalactic sources. Based on these ASCA results and further information from other sattelites, we compiled comprehensive catalogues of discrete X-ray sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Using the catalogues, we derived the spatial distributions of XBPs and SNRs. XBPs and SNRs were found to be concentrated in the main body and eastern wing, which resembles the distribution of young stars with ages of ~2e7yr. By comparing the source populations in the SMC and our Galaxy, we suggest that the star-forming rate (per unit mass) in the SMC was much higher than the Galaxy 1e7yr ago. We also discuss the recent change of the star-forming rate in the SMC.

  12. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  13. Evidence that ice forms primarily in supercooled liquid clouds at temperatures > -27C2 C. D. Westbrook and A. J. Illingworth3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    layer of supercooled liquid water droplets at the25 top of ice-phase clouds has been observed in several cases (Rauber and Tokay 1991), but the26 fraction of ice clouds which have liquid water at the top has case where the air35 was supersaturated with respect to ice but below liquid water saturation: ice

  14. Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we need them most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we inferences of air pollution suppressing precipitation lead us to investigate historical climate records of precipitation in locations that are dominated by clouds that are most susceptible to the detrimental impacts

  15. An analysis of winter precipitation in the northeast and a winter weather precipitation type forecasting tool for New York City 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Christopher James

    1999-01-01

    Winter storms produce a wide array of precipitation types across the northeast United States. Immense problems are created for all parts of today's society when the precipitation falls in the form of snow or freezing rain. ...

  16. STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY-dimensional morphology and life cycle of clouds. Detailing key cloud processes as they transit from the formation stage to precipitation onset and cloud dissipation is critical towards establishing uncertainties in climate models

  17. ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility six dual frequency cloud radar systems. These radars will be used by the Atmospheric Radiation on the effects of clouds and precipitation on the climate. Four cloud radar systems will be permanently installed

  18. PRECIPITATION DOWNSCALING: METHODOLOGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    PRECIPITATION DOWNSCALING: METHODOLOGIES AND HYDROLOGIC APPLICATIONS Efi Foufoula-Georgiou St/or other information. #12;PREMISES OF STATISTICAL DOWNSCALING Precipitation exhibits space-time variability) There is a substantial evidence to suggest that despite the very complex patterns of precipitation

  19. Geometrical Characterization of Precipitation Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir; Nasrollahi, Nasrin; Li, Jingjing; Imam, Bisher; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2011-01-01

    ing quantitative precipitation forecast. J. Geophys. Res. ,in satellite-based precipitation estimates. J. Geophys.Application to multi-sensor precipitation estimates. Hydrol.

  20. ORIENTATION RELATIONSHIPS IN PRECIPITATION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmen, U.

    2013-01-01

    ORIENTATION RELATIONSHIPS IN PRECIPITATION SYSTEMS U. DahmenOrientation Relationships in Precipitation Systems U. Dahmenorientation relationships in precipitation systems b~c/hcp a

  1. TECHNICAL BRIEF Mass spectrometry-based immuno-precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamond, Angus I.

    TECHNICAL BRIEF Mass spectrometry-based immuno-precipitation proteomics ­ The user's guide Sara ten Revised: December 7, 2010 Accepted: December 10, 2010 Immuno-precipitation (IP) experiments using MS but not described in the form of protocols. Keywords: Cell biology / Cumulative analysis / Immuno-precipitation

  2. Preface: Crowds and Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    crowdsourcing, cloud computing, big data, and Internetdata include “cloud computing,” “algorithms,” “filters,” “cloud of claims about cloud computing and big data settle

  3. Classi cation Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langford, John

    on future inputs #12; rain snow 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Precipitation Temperature Unknown Function Samples Training Sample #12; rain snow 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 Precipitation Temperature Learned Function (Classifier) guess 1 guess 2 guess 3 #12; rain snow 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Precipitation Temperature Future

  4. PRECIPITATION CLIMATOLOGY IN COLORADO Compile and quality control a nine-year archive (2002-2011) of operational surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRECIPITATION CLIMATOLOGY IN COLORADO TASK: Compile and quality control a nine-year archive (2002-2011) of operational surface precipitation and radar observations from the regional domain shown in Figure below. Our aim is to document patterns of cloud and precipitation characteristics as they vary across

  5. Cloud Seeding By: Julie Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    , smoke, that then are cooled because of the high altitudes. As the water or condensation nuclei cool more titled "Cat's Cradle" a young scientist has in his possession an ice crystal that has the power to freeze of those clouds. Winds can form suddenly and blow clouds away from the targeted area. Some experiments show

  6. Global Precipitation Retrievals Using the NOAA AMSU Millimeter-Wave Channels: Comparisons with Rain Gauges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    A surface-precipitation-rate retrieval algorithm for 13-channel Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) millimeter-wave spectral observations from 23 to 191 GHz is described. It was trained using cloud-resolving fifth-generation ...

  7. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth MARK D. ZELINKA Department of Atmospheric Sciences received 12 May 2011, in final form 15 November 2011) ABSTRACT Cloud radiative kernels and histograms

  8. RETRIEVING THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE USING A TOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Wiscombe January 2008 To be presented at the 15th Conference on Clouds and Precipitation Cancun, Mexico the cloud models were mature enough to make much headway. Now, the time is ripe for a renewed push. We have with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges

  9. Precipitation-Regulated Star Formation in Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voit, G Mark; O'Shea, Brian W; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy growth depends critically on the interplay between radiative cooling of cosmic gas and the resulting energetic feedback that cooling triggers. This interplay has proven exceedingly difficult to model, even with large supercomputer simulations, because of its complexity. Nevertheless, real galaxies are observed to obey simple scaling relations among their primary observable characteristics. Here we show that a generic emergent property of the interplay between cooling and feedback can explain the observed scaling relationships between a galaxy's stellar mass, its total mass, and its chemical enrichment level, as well as the relationship between the average orbital velocity of its stars and the mass of its central black hole. These relationships naturally result from any feedback mechanism that strongly heats a galaxy's circumgalactic gas in response to precipitation of colder clouds out of that gas, because feedback then suspends the gas in a marginally precipitating state.

  10. Using MSG-SEVIRI Cloud Physical Properties and Weather Radar Observations for the Detection of Cb/TCu Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeits, Maurice

    , but the former shows a false-alarm ratio that is about 8% lower. Moreover, a big advantage of the newly developed, the energy supply industry, the construction industry, and farmers. The Cb and TCu clouds may pose a serious Society #12;wind shear, heavy precipitation, and lightning, that is associated with these clouds. Also

  11. Stratiform and Convective Precipitation Observed by Multiple Radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Min; Kollias, Pavlos; Feng, Zhe; Zhang, Chidong; Long, Charles N.; Kalesse, Heike; Chandra, Arunchandra; Kumar, Vickal; Protat, Alain

    2014-11-01

    The motivation for this research is to develop a precipitation classification and rain rate estimation method using cloud radar-only measurements for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) long-term cloud observation analysis, which are crucial and unique for studying cloud lifecycle and precipitation features under different weather and climate regimes. Based on simultaneous and collocated observations of the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR), two precipitation radars (NCAR S-PolKa and Texas A&M University SMART-R), and surface precipitation during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign, a new cloud radar-only based precipitation classification and rain rate estimation method has been developed and evaluated. The resulting precipitation classification is equivalent to those collocated SMART-R and S-PolKa observations. Both cloud and precipitation radars detected about 5% precipitation occurrence during this period. The convective (stratiform) precipitation fraction is about 18% (82%). The 2-day collocated disdrometer observations show an increased number concentration of large raindrops in convective rain compared to dominant concentration of small raindrops in stratiform rain. The composite distributions of KAZR reflectivity and Doppler velocity also show two distinct structures for convective and stratiform rain. These indicate that the method produces physically consistent results for two types of rain. The cloud radar-only rainfall estimation is developed based on the gradient of accumulative radar reflectivity below 1 km, near-surface Ze, and collocated surface rainfall (R) measurement. The parameterization is compared with the Z-R exponential relation. The relative difference between estimated and surface measured rainfall rate shows that the two-parameter relation can improve rainfall estimation.

  12. The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

    2012-07-04

    Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open cells. Additional analyses of the same simulations show that the suppression of rain is well described in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12-14 um. Cloud water starts to get depleted when column-maximum rain intensity (Rmax) exceeds 0.1 mm h-1. This happens when cloud-top re reaches 14 um. Rmax is mostly less than 0.1 mm h-1 at re<14 um, regardless of the cloud water path, but increases rapidly when re exceeds 14 um. This is in agreement with recent aircraft observations and theoretical observations in convective clouds so that the mechanism is not limited to describing marine stratocumulus. These results support the hypothesis that the onset of significant precipitation is determined by the number of nucleated cloud drops and the height (H) above cloud base within the cloud that is required for cloud drops to reach re of 14 um. In turn, this can explain the conditions for initiation of significant drizzle and opening of closed cells providing the basis for a simple parameterization for GCMs that unifies the representation of both precipitating and non-precipitating clouds as well as the transition between them. Furthermore, satellite global observations of cloud depth (from base to top), and cloud top re can be used to derive and validate this parameterization.

  13. Precipitation HMM Recalls on BNT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuel, Gregory

    Precipitation HMM Recalls on BNT Results Exact Belief Propagation in Bayesian Networks: from to Algorithms #12;Precipitation HMM Recalls on BNT Results Outline 1 Precipitation HMM Definition Marginal to Algorithms #12;Precipitation HMM Recalls on BNT Results Definition Marginal Distributions Recursions

  14. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  15. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  16. Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain and Climatic Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain 2004, in final form 30 March 2005) ABSTRACT Hydrologic and ecologic studies in mountainous terrain mountain precipitation using only precipi- tation gauge data. The ASOADeK model considers both

  17. Dispelling Clouds of Uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lewis, Ernie; Teixeira, João

    2015-06-15

    How do you build a climate model that accounts for cloud physics and the transitions between cloud regimes? Use MAGIC.

  18. Cloud Computing Adam Barker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

  19. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

  20. How Long Can Tiny HI Clouds Survive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Nagashima; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka; Hiroshi Koyama

    2006-03-10

    We estimate the evaporation timescale for spherical HI clouds consisting of the cold neutral medium surrounded by the warm neutral medium. We focus on clouds smaller than 1pc, which corresponds to tiny HI clouds recently discovered by Braun & Kanekar and Stanimirovi{\\'c} & Heiles. By performing one-dimensional spherically symmetric numerical simulations of the two-phase interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the timescales as a function of the cloud size and of pressure of the ambient warm medium. We find that the evaporation timescale of the clouds of 0.01 pc is about 1Myr with standard ISM pressure, $p/k_{B}\\sim 10^{3.5}$ K cm$^{-3}$, and for clouds larger than about 0.1 pc it depends strongly on the pressure. In high pressure cases, there exists a critical radius for clouds growing as a function of pressure, but the minimum critical size is $\\sim$ 0.03 pc for a standard environment. If tiny HI clouds exist ubiquitously, our analysis suggests two implications: tiny HI clouds are formed continuously with the timescale of 1Myr, or the ambient pressure around the clouds is much higher than the standard ISM pressure. We also find that the results agree well with those obtained by assuming quasi-steady state evolution. The cloud-size dependence of the timescale is well explained by an analytic approximate formula derived by Nagashima, Koyama & Inutsuka. We also compare it with the evaporation rate given by McKee & Cowie.

  1. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  2. Interstellar Turbulence, Cloud Formation and Pressure Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

    1998-10-23

    We discuss HD and MHD compressible turbulence as a cloud-forming and cloud-structuring mechanism in the ISM. Results from a numerical model of the turbulent ISM at large scales suggest that the phase-like appearance of the medium, the typical values of the densities and magnetic field strengths in the intercloud medium, as well as Larson's velocity dispersion-size scaling relation in clouds may be understood as consequences of the interstellar turbulence. However, the density-size relation appears to only hold for the densest simulated clouds, there existing a large population of small, low-density clouds, which, on the other hand, are hardest to observe. We then discuss several tests and implications of a fully dynamical picture of interstellar clouds. The results imply that clouds are transient, constantly being formed, distorted and disrupted by the turbulent velocity field, with a fraction of these fluctuations undergoing gravitational collapse. Simulated line profiles and estimated cloud lifetimes are consistent with observational data. In this scenario, we suggest it is quite unlikely that quasi-hydrostatic structures on any scale can form, and that the near pressure balance between clouds and the intercloud medium is an incidental consequence of the density field driven by the turbulence and in the presence of appropriate cooling, rather than a driving or confining mechanism.

  3. Cloud and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j eCommittee offromand

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012III ARM Data DiscoveryIV (ARM-ACME IV) ARM

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012III ARM Data DiscoveryIV (ARM-ACME IV) ARMAerosols

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012III ARM Data DiscoveryIV (ARM-ACME IV)

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - Azores: Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)

  8. Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation OLE PETERS1,2,3 * AND J. DAVID NEELIN3 1 convection and precipitation (the order parameter)--with correlated regions on scales of tens to hundreds the climatological mean by an order of magnitude or more. Moist convection and the accompanying precipitation have

  9. PRECIPITATION AT ARMAGH OBSERVATORY 18381997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRECIPITATION AT ARMAGH OBSERVATORY 1838­1997 C.J. Butler, A.D.S. Coughlin and D.T. Fee ABSTRACT the longest in the British Isles. Here we present the monthly mean daily precipitation recorded at Armagh with the compilation and calibration of one such body of data, namely the precipitation recorded at Armagh Observatory

  10. Modeling microbially induced calcite precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    Modeling microbially induced calcite precipitation Erlangen, November 27th 2014 Johannes Hommel and storage uses require separation. sealing of leakage pathways is important sealing = mineral precipitation Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) is investigated as sealing technology. It is used as an exemplary

  11. Changes in high cloud conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himebrook, Richard Frank

    1974-01-01

    of contrails, while in a more humid environment contrails wi. ll form. ilovis et al. (1970) showed that, over the 0. 68-2. 4p wavelength interval, "naturally" formed ice clouds and a fresh contrail show different signatures (which could be observed... prime cause for a change in the amount of high clouds, the Location of stations with respect to the jet routes was also reviewed. Atlanta, Ceorgia, was selected because it is a ma ~or air Lr r- minal and its upper-air liow advects jet...

  12. Toward Securing Sensor Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Router Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless-Features-1GHz-Tegra-2-HigherRes-Screen/ #12;Router Router Router Router Mini Computer Mini Computer Mini Computer Mini Computer External Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud

  13. Disentangling the Multiple Sources of Large-Scale Variability in Australian Wintertime Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Steven

    Precipitation PENELOPE MAHER AND STEVEN C. SHERWOOD Climate Change Research Centre and ARC Centre of Excellence received 25 October 2013, in final form 4 March 2014) ABSTRACT Precipitation is influenced by multiple large-scale natural processes. Many of these large-scale precipitation ``drivers'' are not independent

  14. Transition metal co-precipitation mechanisms in silicon T. Buonassisi a,*, M. Heuer a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transition metal co-precipitation mechanisms in silicon T. Buonassisi a,*, M. Heuer a,1 , A Available online 18 September 2007 Abstract Formation mechanisms of precipitates containing multiple by synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques. Precipitates formed at low (655 °C) and high (1200 °C

  15. A unified parameterization of clouds and turbulence using CLUBB and subcolumns in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thayer-Calder, K.; Gettelman, A.; Craig, C.; Goldhaber, S.; Bogenschutz, P. A.; Chen, C.-C.; Morrison, H.; Höft, J.; Raut, E.; Griffin, B. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    Most global climate models parameterize separate cloud types using separate parameterizations. This approach has several disadvantages, including obscure interactions between parameterizations and inaccurate triggering of cumulus parameterizations. Alternatively, a unified cloud parameterization uses one equation set to represent all cloud types. Such cloud types include stratiform liquid and ice cloud, shallow convective cloud, and deep convective cloud. Vital to the success of a unified parameterization is a general interface between clouds and microphysics. One such interface involves drawing Monte Carlo samples of subgrid variability of temperature, water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice, and feeding the sample points into amore »microphysics scheme. This study evaluates a unified cloud parameterization and a Monte Carlo microphysics interface that has been implemented in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5.3. Results describing the mean climate and tropical variability from global simulations are presented. The new model shows a degradation in precipitation skill but improvements in short-wave cloud forcing, liquid water path, long-wave cloud forcing, precipitable water, and tropical wave simulation. Also presented are estimations of computational expense and investigation of sensitivity to number of subcolumns.« less

  16. A unified parameterization of clouds and turbulence using CLUBB and subcolumns in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thayer-Calder, K.; Gettelman, A.; Craig, C.; Goldhaber, S.; Bogenschutz, P. A.; Chen, C.-C.; Morrison, H.; Höft, J.; Raut, E.; Griffin, B. M.; et al

    2015-06-30

    Most global climate models parameterize separate cloud types using separate parameterizations. This approach has several disadvantages, including obscure interactions between parameterizations and inaccurate triggering of cumulus parameterizations. Alternatively, a unified cloud parameterization uses one equation set to represent all cloud types. Such cloud types include stratiform liquid and ice cloud, shallow convective cloud, and deep convective cloud. Vital to the success of a unified parameterization is a general interface between clouds and microphysics. One such interface involves drawing Monte Carlo samples of subgrid variability of temperature, water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice, and feeding the sample points intomore »a microphysics scheme. This study evaluates a unified cloud parameterization and a Monte Carlo microphysics interface that has been implemented in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5.3. Results describing the mean climate and tropical variability from global simulations are presented. The new model shows a degradation in precipitation skill but improvements in short-wave cloud forcing, liquid water path, long-wave cloud forcing, precipitable water, and tropical wave simulation. Also presented are estimations of computational expense and investigation of sensitivity to number of subcolumns.« less

  17. A unified parameterization of clouds and turbulence using CLUBB and subcolumns in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thayer-Calder, K.; Gettelman, A.; Craig, C.; Goldhaber, S.; Bogenschutz, P. A.; Chen, C.-C.; Morrison, H.; Höft, J.; Raut, E.; Griffin, B. M.; et al

    2015-12-01

    Most global climate models parameterize separate cloud types using separate parameterizations. This approach has several disadvantages, including obscure interactions between parameterizations and inaccurate triggering of cumulus parameterizations. Alternatively, a unified cloud parameterization uses one equation set to represent all cloud types. Such cloud types include stratiform liquid and ice cloud, shallow convective cloud, and deep convective cloud. Vital to the success of a unified parameterization is a general interface between clouds and microphysics. One such interface involves drawing Monte Carlo samples of subgrid variability of temperature, water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice, and feeding the sample points intomore »a microphysics scheme. This study evaluates a unified cloud parameterization and a Monte Carlo microphysics interface that has been implemented in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 5.3. Model computational expense is estimated, and sensitivity to the number of subcolumns is investigated. Results describing the mean climate and tropical variability from global simulations are presented. The new model shows a degradation in precipitation skill but improvements in shortwave cloud forcing, liquid water path, long-wave cloud forcing, precipitable water, and tropical wave simulation.« less

  18. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part I. chemically generated precipitates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C. B.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K.; Klein, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the current program was to evaluate the properties of chemical precipitates proposed by industry that have been used in sump strainer head loss testing. Specific precipitates that were evaluated included aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) and sodium aluminum silicate (SAS) prepared according to the procedures in WCAP-16530-NP, along with precipitates formed from injecting chemicals into the test loop according to the procedure used by one sump strainer test vendor for U.S. pressurized water reactors. The settling rates of the surrogate precipitates are strongly dependent on their particle size and are reasonably consistent with those expected from Stokes Law or colloid aggregation models. Head loss tests showed that AlOOH and SAS surrogates are quite effective in increasing the head loss across a perforated pump inlet strainer that has an accumulated fibrous debris bed. The characteristics of aluminum hydroxide precipitate using sodium aluminate were dependent on whether it was formed in high-purity or ordinary tap water and whether excess silicate was present or not.

  19. ARM - Word Seek: Precipitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical WesternWillPrecipitation

  20. ARM - Measurement - Precipitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home RoomparticlecontentnumbergovMeasurementsPrecipitation

  1. Ad hoc cloud computing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGilvary, Gary Andrew

    2014-11-27

    Commercial and private cloud providers offer virtualized resources via a set of co-located and dedicated hosts that are exclusively reserved for the purpose of offering a cloud service. While both cloud models appeal to ...

  2. Effects of Aerosols on Autumn Precipitation over Mid-Eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Qian, Yun; Ge, Jinming; Su, Jing

    2014-09-20

    Long-term observational data indicated a decreasing trend for the amount of autumn precipitation (i.e. 54.3 mm per decade) over Mid-Eastern China, especially after 1980s (~ 5.6% per decade). To examine the cause of the decreasing trend, the mechanisms associated with the change of autumn precipitation were investigated from the perspective of water vapor transportation, atmospheric stability and cloud microphysics. Results show that the decrease of convective available potential energy (i.e. 12.81 J kg-1/ decade) and change of cloud microphysics, which were closely related to the increase of aerosol loading during the past twenty years, were the two primary factors responsible for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Ours results showed that increased aerosol could enhance the atmospheric stability thus weaken the convection. Meanwhile, more aerosols also led to a significant decline of raindrop concentration and to a delay of raindrop formation because of smaller size of cloud droplets. Thus, increased aerosols produced by air pollution could be one of the major reasons for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Furthermore, we found that the aerosol effects on precipitation in autumn was more significant than in other seasons, partly due to the relatively more stable synoptic system in autumn. The impact of large-scale circulation dominated in autumn and the dynamic influence on precipitation was more important than the thermodynamic activity.

  3. CloudTransport: Using Cloud Storage for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houmansadr, Amir

    users' network traffic by tunneling it through a cloud storage ser- vice such as Amazon S3. The goal the bridge or identify other connections. CloudTransport can be used as a standalone service, a gateway

  4. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  5. Complex motion of precipitation bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagzi, I; Rácz, Z; Lagzi, Istvan; Papai, Peter; Racz, Zoltan

    2006-01-01

    Formation and dynamics of an Al(OH)_3 precipitation ring is studied by diffusing NaOH into a gel containing AlCl_3. Limited feeding of the outer electrolyte (NaOH) is found to yield an intricate ring-dynamics which involves stopping and reversal of the direction of motion of the precipitation ring, and evolution into stationary multi-ring structures. A model of the ring-dynamics is developed by combining a phase separation scenario for the precipitation with the redissolution (complex formation) of the precipitate in the excess of the outer electrolyte.

  6. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

  7. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part I: Operational Sampling Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollias, Pavlos; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Jo, Ieng; Johnson, Karen

    2014-03-01

    Probing clouds in three-dimensions has never been done with scanning millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radars in a continuous operating environment. The acquisition of scanning cloud radars by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and research institutions around the world generate the need for developing operational scan strategies for cloud radars. Here, the first generation of sampling strategies for the Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) is discussed. These scan strategies are designed to address the scientific objectives of the ARM program, however, they introduce an initial framework for operational scanning cloud radars. While the weather community uses scan strategies that are based on a sequence of scans at constant elevations, the SACRs scan strategies are based on a sequence of scans at constant azimuth. This is attributed to the cloud properties that are vastly different for rain and snow shafts that are the primary target of precipitation radars. A “cloud surveillance” scan strategy is introduced (HS-RHI) based on a sequence of horizon-to-horizon Range Height Indicator (RHI) scans that sample the hemispherical sky (HS). The HS-RHI scan strategy is repeated every 30 min to provide a static view of the cloud conditions around the SACR location. Between HS-RHI scan strategies other scan strategies are introduced depending on the cloud conditions. The SACRs are pointing vertically in the case of measurable precipitation at the ground. The radar reflectivities are corrected for water vapor attenuation and non-meteorological detection are removed. A hydrometeor detection mask is introduced based on the difference of cloud and noise statistics is discussed.

  8. Separation between Cloud-Seeding and Air-Pollution Effects AMIR GIVATI AND DANIEL ROSENFELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Separation between Cloud-Seeding and Air-Pollution Effects AMIR GIVATI AND DANIEL ROSENFELD by urban and industrial air pollution recently has been documented and quantified. Here it is shown of precipitation suppression by air pollution and enhancement by glaciogenic cloud seeding. Time series based

  9. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday of the physical states and processes of clouds and precipitation as well as atmospheric electricity and optics Thunderstorm charging Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES

  10. What Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos andSeminars andWeyl FermionsEveryIs

  11. Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-04-27

    We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

  12. On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Jui-Ting

    2013-01-01

    1.2 Cloud computing to Vehicular CloudM. Gerla. Vehicular Cloud Computing, VCA 2012 Proceedings,single vehicle cannot. Cloud computing to Vehicular Cloud

  13. Cloud Security by Max Garvey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolmach, Andrew

    Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service, performance SECaaS - Cloud hosted security measures Certifications - measurements for cloud security. #12;Cloud Questions If you have $0 security budget, could cloud be a security improvement? Who owns the data

  14. Development of precipitation retrievals at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths for geostationary satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    for precipitation retrieval from geostationary sensors based on mesoscale cloud modeling and radiative transfer resolution problem from a geostationary orbit. Adding the thermal infrared observations has a limited impact rain and the other hydrometeor profiles. These theoretical results are evaluated at close

  15. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at a well (which can lead to clogging). A final particularly attractive characteristic of this approach is its long-term sustainability; the remediation scheme is geared toward environments that are already saturated with respect to calcite, and in such systems the bulk of any newly precipitated calcite will remain stable once engineered manipulations cease. This means that the co-precipitated contaminants will be effectively sequestered over the long term. We are currently conducting integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate a) the relationships between urea hydrolysis rate, calcite precipitation rate, and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions; and b) the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and calcite precipitate distribution and metal uptake. We are also assessing the application of geophysical and molecular biological tools to monitor the relevant chemical and physical processes. The primary emphasis is on field-scale processes, with the laboratory and modeling activities designed specifically to support the field studies. Field experiments are being conducted in perched water (vadose zone) at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at the Idaho National Laboratory; the VZRP provides an uncontaminated setting that is an analog of the 90Sr-contaminated vadose zone at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. A summary of results to date will be presented.

  16. Program Analyses for Cloud Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetali, Sai Deep

    2015-01-01

    search. ” In CCSW 09: Cloud Computing Security Workshop, pp.ACM workshop on Cloud computing security workshop, CCSW ’11,aspects of cloud computing, including security, performance

  17. Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurements�

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sergey Matrosov

    2010-12-15

    The main objective of this project was to develop, validate and apply remote sensing methods to retrieve vertical profiles of precipitation over the DOE ARM CART sites using currently available remote sensors. While the ARM Program invested very heavily into developments of remote sensing methods and instruments for water vapor and non-precipitating cloud parameter retrievals, precipitation retrievals and studies lagged behind. Precipitation, however, is a crucial part of the water cycle, and without detailed information on rainfall and snowfall, significant improvements in the atmospheric models of different scales (i.e., one of the ARM Program's main goals) is difficult to achieve. Characterization of the vertical atmospheric column above the CART sites is also incomplete without detailed precipitation information, so developments of remote sensing methods for retrievals of parameters in precipitating cloud condition was essential. Providing modelers with retrieval results was also one of the key objectives of this research project.

  18. Clean Air and Environmental Quality Volume 40 No.2. May 2006 43 POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF AIR POLLUTION AEROSOLS ON PRECIPITATION IN AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Clean Air and Environmental Quality Volume 40 No.2. May 2006 43 POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF AIR POLLUTION AEROSOLS ON PRECIPITATION IN AUSTRALIA Potential impacts of air pollution aerosols on precipitation that anthropogenic air pollution downwind of urban and industrial developments affects clouds microphysics

  19. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore »using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m-2.« less

  20. PRE-PRECIPITATION PHENOMENA AT GRAIN BOUNDARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briceno-Valero, J.

    2010-01-01

    13820 DE82 0 1 2 7 9 4 PRE-PRECIPITATION PHENOMENA AT GRAINof any evidence suggesting precipitation has occurred. Theand grain boundary precipitation have shown (1) that there

  1. REGULAR ARTICLE Warming and increased precipitation frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Warming and increased precipitation frequency on the Colorado Plateau: implications in temperature and precipitation are expected to influence ecosystem processes worldwide. Despite their globally how increased temperature and frequency of summertime precipitation affect the contributions of crust

  2. PRECIPITATION-STRENGTHENED AUSTENITIC FE-MN-TI ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, K.-M.

    2010-01-01

    combined with the high PRECIPITATION-STRENGTHENED AUSTENITICMORPHOLOGY OF LAVES PHASE PRECIPITATION", •••. PRECIPITATECOLD WORK ON PRECIPITATION"",. , •• " , . , . " " , . , L~

  3. The MINIS Balloon Campaign: Duskside Relativistic Electron Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample, John Glen

    2013-01-01

    Energetic electron precipitation during substorm injectionenergetic electron precipitation fluxes into the atmosphere,modeling of microburst precipitation Geophys Res. Lett. ,

  4. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  5. PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 1 PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 2015-05-25 1 Web Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud Adobe Creative Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller(Windows )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac

  6. ESTABLISHMENT OF CLOUD REGIMES FOR SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION OF CLOUD MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTABLISHMENT OF CLOUD REGIMES FOR SYSTEMATIC EVALUATION OF CLOUD MODELING Wuyin Lin1 , Yangang Liu Distinct cloud regimes can exist locally and globally. Such cloud regimes usually have close association, the classification of cloud regimes may be based on cloud properties and/or meteorological conditions. This study

  7. PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 1999, VOL. 79, NO. 10, 2485 2504 Low-temperature dynamic precipitation in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 1999, VOL. 79, NO. 10, 2485± 2504 Low-temperature dynamic precipitation in revised form 18 November 1998] Abstract Dynamic precipitation during low-temperature deformation-situ resistivity in the temperature range 4.2± 300K. At 300K, dynamic precipitation is observed both

  8. Parametric Sensitivity Analysis of Precipitation at Global and Local Scales in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Hou, Zhangshuan; Johannesson, G.; Klein, Stephen A.; Lucas, Donald; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Swiler, Laura P.; Tannahill, John; et al

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the sensitivity of precipitation characteristics (mean, extreme and diurnal cycle) to a set of uncertain parameters that influence the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the cloud and aerosol processes in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). We adopt both the Latin hypercube and quasi-Monte Carlo sampling approaches to effectively explore the high-dimensional parameter space and then conduct two large sets of simulations. One set consists of 1100 simulations (cloud ensemble) perturbing 22 parameters related to cloud physics and convection, and the other set consists of 256 simulations (aerosol ensemble) focusing on 16 parameters related to aerosols and cloud microphysics.more »Results show that for the 22 parameters perturbed in the cloud ensemble, the six having the greatest influences on the global mean precipitation are identified, three of which (related to the deep convection scheme) are the primary contributors to the total variance of the phase and amplitude of the precipitation diurnal cycle over land. The extreme precipitation characteristics are sensitive to a fewer number of parameters. The precipitation does not always respond monotonically to parameter change. The influence of individual parameters does not depend on the sampling approaches or concomitant parameters selected. Generally the GLM is able to explain more of the parametric sensitivity of global precipitation than local or regional features. The total explained variance for precipitation is primarily due to contributions from the individual parameters (75-90% in total). The total variance shows a significant seasonal variability in the mid-latitude continental regions, but very small in tropical continental regions.« less

  9. Impact of cloud radiative heating on East Asian summer monsoon circulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Zhun; Zhou, Tianjun; Wang, Minghuai; Qian, Yun

    2015-07-17

    The impacts of cloud radiative heating on East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) over the southeastern China (105°-125°E, 20°-35°N) are explained by using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that the radiative heating of clouds leads to a positive effect on the local EASM circulation over southeastern China. Without the radiative heating of cloud, the EASM circulation and precipitation would be much weaker than that in the normal condition. The longwave heating of clouds dominates the changes of EASM circulation. The positive effect of clouds on EASM circulation is explained by the thermodynamic energy equation, i.e. themore »different heating rate between cloud base and cloud top enhances the convective instability over southeastern China, which enhances updraft consequently. The strong updraft would further result in a southward meridional wind above the center of the updraft through Sverdrup vorticity balance.« less

  10. Hyperscale Cloud Technical White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Hyperscale Cloud Technical White Paper Published: May 2015 Applies to: SQL Server 2016 CTP2, SQL in the cloud with greater scale and flexibility. Microsoft SQL Server is built for cloud integration--your organization can easily deploy SQL Server in a private cloud, hybrid cloud, or public cloud, and can use

  11. XSEDE Cloud Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

  12. Research Cloud Computing Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

  13. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  14. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative 2011) ABSTRACT This study proposes a novel technique for computing cloud feedbacks using histograms integrated cloud feedbacks computed in this manner agree remarkably well with the adjusted change in cloud

  15. Taiwan UniCloud: A Cloud Testbed with Collaborative Cloud Services Wu-Chun Chung*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Taiwan UniCloud: A Cloud Testbed with Collaborative Cloud Services Wu-Chun Chung* , Po-Chi Shih}@cs.nthu.edu.tw Abstract--This paper introduces a prototype of Taiwan UniCloud, a community-driven hybrid cloud platform for academics in Taiwan. The goal is to leverage resources in multiple clouds among different organizations

  16. Daily Precipitation Grids for South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robeson, Scott M.

    W Daily Precipitation Grids for South America --SCOTT M. ROBESON AND LESLIE A. ENSOR Indiana precipitation databases, such as that of Liebmann and Allured (2005, hereafter LA2005). Precipitation this important region has received limited attention with regard to precipitation data- bases (Cook et al. 2003

  17. Method of precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Kim, Yongman; Wan, Jiamin

    2013-08-20

    A method for precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium is presented. The method includes precipitating uranium as a uranyl vanadate through mixing an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium and a solution comprising a monovalent or divalent cation to form the corresponding cation uranyl vanadate precipitate. The method also provides a pathway for extraction of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment.

  18. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore »on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  19. Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    ` Relationship between Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Droplet is the relationship between below cloud base cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and satellite retrievals of cloud droplet cloud effective radius; however, satellites can not measure cloud condensation nuclei (CCN

  20. Community Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenge...

  1. Modelling the local and global cloud formation on HD 189733b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, G; Dobbs-Dixon, I; Juncher, D

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observations suggest that exoplanets such as HD 189733b form clouds in their atmospheres which have a strong feedback onto their thermodynamical and chemical structure, and overall appearance. Aims. Inspired by mineral cloud modelling efforts for Brown Dwarf atmospheres, we present the first spatially varying kinetic cloud model structures for HD 189733b. Methods. We apply a 2-model approach using results from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of the atmosphere as input for a detailed, kinetic cloud formation model. Sampling the 3D global atmosphere structure with 1D trajectories allows us to model the spatially varying cloud structure on HD 189733b. The resulting cloud properties enable the calculation of the scattering and absorption properties of the clouds. Results. We present local and global cloud structure and property maps for HD 189733b. The calculated cloud properties show variations in composition, size and number density of cloud particles which are strongest between the daysi...

  2. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  3. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

  4. APPENDIX III III.1 Precipitation Daily Totals Preceding Precipitation Events-----------------------------------------III-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    APPENDIX III III.1 Precipitation Daily Totals Preceding Precipitation Events-----------------------------------------III-2 Figure III.1.1 Precipitation daily totals preceding the a) calibration and b) and c) validationPRECIPITATION DAILY TOTALS PRECEDING PRECIPITATION EVENTS 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 9/19/819/21/819/23/819/25/819/27

  5. MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

    2012-10-03

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

  6. Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1. Precipitation scavenging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    These two volumes contain papers prepared for and presented at the Fourth International Conference on Precipitation Scavenging, Dry Deposition, and Resuspension (the Chamberlain Meeting) held during 29 November to 3 December, 1982 in Santa Monica, California. Papers presented are abstracted separately.

  7. Seafloor-precipitated carbonate fans in the Neoproterozoic Rainstorm Member, Johnnie Formation, Death Valley Region, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Seafloor-precipitated carbonate fans in the Neoproterozoic Rainstorm Member, Johnnie Formation Member of the Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, USA. The fans formed in a mixed carbonate of inhibitors to carbonate nucleation (perhaps Fe2+ under anoxic conditions) likely fostered precipitation

  8. Federated Cloud Security Architecture for Secure and Agile Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Federated Cloud Security Architecture for Secure and Agile Clouds Weiliang Luo, Li Xu, Zhenxin Zhan. This chapter introduces the novel federated cloud security architecture that includes proactive cloud defense technologies for secure and agile cloud development. The federated security architecture consists of a set

  9. The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud behaviour during the past 50 of cloud factors using both satellite and ground­based data. In particular, we search for evidence for the low cloud decrease predicted by the rising levels of solar activity and the low cloud­cosmic ray flux

  10. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  11. A STUDY OF PRECIPITATION IN INTERSTITIAL ALLOYS. I. PRECIPITATION SEQUENCE IN Ta-C ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmen, U.

    2010-01-01

    Acta Meta11urgica A STUDY OF PRECIPITATION IN INTERSTITIALALLOYS. I. PRECIPITATION SEQUENCE IN Ta-C ALLOYS U. Dahmen,ENG-48 y A Study of Precipitation in Interstitial Alloys. I.

  12. Cirrus clouds in a global climate model with a statistical cirrus cloud scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.

    2010-06-21

    A statistical cirrus cloud scheme that accounts for mesoscale temperature perturbations is implemented in a coupled aerosol and atmospheric circulation model to better represent both subgrid-scale supersaturation and cloud formation. This new scheme treats the effects of aerosol on cloud formation and ice freezing in an improved manner, and both homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are included. The scheme is able to better simulate the observed probability distribution of relative humidity compared to the scheme that was implemented in an older version of the model. Heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) are shown to decrease the frequency of occurrence of supersaturation, and improve the comparison with observations at 192 hPa. Homogeneous freezing alone can not reproduce observed ice crystal number concentrations at low temperatures (<205 K), but the addition of heterogeneous IN improves the comparison somewhat. Increases in heterogeneous IN affect both high level cirrus clouds and low level liquid clouds. Increases in cirrus clouds lead to a more cloudy and moist lower troposphere with less precipitation, effects which we associate with the decreased convective activity. The change in the net cloud forcing is not very sensitive to the change in ice crystal concentrations, but the change in the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere is still large because of changes in water vapor. Changes in the magnitude of the assumed mesoscale temperature perturbations by 25% alter the ice crystal number concentrations and the net radiative fluxes by an amount that is comparable to that from a factor of 10 change in the heterogeneous IN number concentrations. Further improvements on the representation of mesoscale temperature perturbations, heterogeneous IN and the competition between homogeneous freezing and heterogeneous freezing are needed.

  13. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  14. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-28

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

  15. Microphysical Consequences of the Spatial Distribution of Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-07-28

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds can persist even with steady ice precipitation fluxes, and the origin and microphysical properties of the ice crystals are of interest. Vapor deposition growth and sedimentation of ice particles along with a uniform volume source of ice nucleation, leads to a power law relation between ice water content wi and ice number concentration ni with exponent 2.5. The result is independent of assumptions about the vertical velocity structure of the cloud and is therefore more general than the related expression of Yang et al. [2013]. The sensitivity of the wi-ni relationship to the spatial distribution of ice nucleation is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking and ice growth with cloud-volume, cloud-top, and cloud-base sources of ice particles through a time-dependent cloud field. Based on observed wi and ni from ISDAC, a lower bound of 0.006 m^3/s is obtained for the ice crystal formation rate.

  16. Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2013-07-28

    The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

  17. Fig 2 -Cloud energy collect infrastructure Energy Efficient (Green) Cloud !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    Fig 2 - Cloud energy collect infrastructure Energy Efficient (Green) Cloud ! The Compatible software components Energy Monitoring of physical and virtual resources Energy usage exposing for users and clouds managers Energy monitoring streams for upper layers software Design Energy aware software

  18. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  19. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporatively Driven Entrainment in Cloud-Topped Mixed Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporatively Driven Entrainment in Cloud-Topped Mixed Layers TAKANOBU, Colorado (Manuscript received 1 March 2007, in final form 19 July 2007) ABSTRACT Cloud-top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between cloud-top entrain- ment and enhanced turbulence

  1. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  2. Program Analyses for Cloud Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetali, Sai Deep

    2015-01-01

    search. ” In CCSW 09: Cloud Computing Security Workshop, pp.and M. Walfish. “Depot: Cloud storage with minimal trust. ”the 3rd ACM workshop on Cloud computing security workshop,

  3. Phase field model for precipitates in crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    She, Minggang

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen precipitate caused by oxygen supersaturation is the most common and important defects in Czochralski (CZ) silicon. The presence of oxygen precipitate in silicon wafer has both harmful and beneficial effects on the ...

  4. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  5. Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum that precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid phase is described as a pure component

  6. Causal Electron Precipitation in Geospace Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    607080 18 Causal Electron Precipitation in Geospace Weather A Proposal submitted by Dartmouth;NSF: National Space Causal Electron Precipitation in Geospace Weather: W. Lotko, PI Weather Program and global characteristics of electron precipitation influence the magnetosphere-iono- sphere (MI

  7. Computationally Efficient Model for Dopant Precipitation Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    Computationally Efficient Model for Dopant Precipitation Kinetics Iuval Clejan and Scott T. Dunham and precipitates. Dopant deactivation is typically modeled using a steady­state solid solubility or clustering such as dopant activation/deactivation, it is essential to consider the fact that precipitation involves a range

  8. Changes in precipitation characteristics and extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Changes in precipitation characteristics and extremes Comparing Mediterranean to change Swiss characteristics Comparing Mediterranean to north-western European precipitation Master Thesis April 2012 Author precipitation 502) dvogel@student.ethz.ch Dr Richard Allan (University of Reading) Prof Dr Martin Wild (ETH

  9. Modelling of Precipitation in Superalloys Aikaterini Plati

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling of Precipitation in Superalloys Aikaterini Plati St. John's College A dissertation, and the size dis- tribution of phase. A review is made on previous attempts to model precipitation. All the proposed models failed to predict the nucleation and growth of the fine secondary precipitates in alloys

  10. Orographic Precipitation in Potentially Unstable Alpine Storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Orographic Precipitation in Potentially Unstable Alpine Storms: MAP IOPs 2b, 3, and 5 Socorro, ICAM/MAP Meeting, Brig, Switzerland, 19-23 May. See Following Pages #12;Orographic Precipitation ahead of strong baroclinic troughs. This pattern is commonly associated with large precipitation amounts

  11. A Nonhomogeneous Hidden Markov Model for Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    A Nonhomogeneous Hidden Markov Model for Precipitation S. P. Charles James P. Hughes Peter Guttorp for Precipitation James P. Hughes1 Peter Guttorp2 Stephen P. Charles3 September 22, 1997 1Dept. of Biostatistics A stochastic model for relating precipitation occurrences at multiple rain gauge stations to broad

  12. Daily Precipitation Statistics: An Intercomparison between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    Daily Precipitation Statistics: An Intercomparison between NCEP Reanalyses and Observations Vernon-2010. Resolution T382 (~0.3x0.3 degrees). #12;R1, R2, CFSR: Comparison to OI Station-based Precipitation Analyses station-based daily precipitation analysis data set (1979-2006). · The high-resolution reanalysis (CFSR

  13. Research Article Multivariate Interpolation of Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    Research Article Multivariate Interpolation of Precipitation Using Regularized Spline with Tension to interpolate daily and annual mean precipitation in regions with complex terrain. Tension, smoothing the spatial model of precipitation in terms of its predictive error, spatial pattern and water balance. 1

  14. Sandia Energy - Cloud Computing Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Cloud Computing Services Cloud...

  15. CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Rod

    as well as data processing and data storage. We show that energy consumption in transport and switching | Cloud computing; core networks; data centers; energy consumption I. INTRODUCTION The increasing to energy consumption and cloud computing seems to be an alternative to office-based computing. By Jayant

  16. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: COMBINED OBSERVATIONAL-MODELING-THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: COMBINED OBSERVATIONAL of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Cloud fraction and cloud albedo have long occupied the central stage as key cloud quantities in studying cloud-climate interaction; however their quantitative relationship

  17. Climate Change Effects on California Precipitation and Soil Moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Low Precipitation of the 2013/14 California2 Increased Precipitation Extremes Over California Under1 Twenty-first Century Precipitation Changes over the Los

  18. Systematic and random error components in satellite precipitation data sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir; Mehran, Ali; Norouzi, Hamidreza; Behrangi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    in satellite-based precipitation estimates, J. Geophys.Evaluating high-resolution precipitation products, Bull. Am.retrieved extreme precipitation rates across the central

  19. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yuxin

    2010-01-01

    induced sulfide precipitation, Journal of GeophysicalMicrobial Carbonate precipitation as a soil improvement2005), Effect of precipitation on low frequency electrical

  20. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  1. Copper precipitation in cobalt-alloyed precipitation-hardened stainless steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    Copper precipitation in cobalt-alloyed precipitation-hardened stainless steel Arpana S. Murthy-strength stainless steel was investigated using three-dimen- sional atom probe tomography. A decrease in copper; Stainless steels; First-principle electron theory; Casting; Precipitation Precipitation-hardened (PH) steels

  2. Capabilities of satellite precipitation datasets to estimate heavy precipitation rates at different temporal accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    Capabilities of satellite precipitation datasets to estimate heavy precipitation rates at different as alternative sources of precipitation information has been argued in numerous studies. Future developments in satellite precipitation algorithms as well as utilization of satellite data in operational applications rely

  3. OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION Precipitation that has been generated or modified by topography, typically through the forcing of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Gerard

    OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION Precipitation that has been generated or modified by topography, typically rainfall). Orographic effects on precipitation are also responsible for some of the planet's sharpest perpendicular to the prevailing winds, precipitation is greatly enhanced on the windward side and suppressed

  4. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  5. Radion clouds around evaporating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2009-09-03

    A Kaluza-Klein model, with a matter source associated with Hawking radiation from an evaporating black hole, is used to obtain a simple form for the radion effective potential. The environmental effect generally causes a matter-induced shift of the radion vacuum, resulting in the formation of a radion cloud around the hole. There is an albedo due to the radion cloud, with an energy dependent reflection coefficient that depends upon the size of the extra dimensions and the temperature of the hole.

  6. A Quantitative Analysis of IRAS Maps of Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennifer J. Wiseman; Fred C. Adams

    1994-04-20

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps; this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100$\\mu$m and 60$\\mu$m to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the ``output'' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental ``complexity'' of these star forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more ``complex'' environments.

  7. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  8. Precipitation in 18 wt% Ni maraging steel of grade 350

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, R.; Mazumder, S.; Batra, I.S.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2000-03-14

    The evolution of precipitates in maraging steel of grade 350 was studied using the complementary techniques of small angle X-ray scattering (SACS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These investigations revealed that ageing the steel at 703 K involved a rhombohedral distortion of the supersaturated b.c.c. martensite accompanied by the appearance of diffuse {omega}-like structures. This was followed by the appearance of well-defined {omega} particles containing chemical order. At the ageing temperature of 783 K, Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Mo) precipitates were the first to appear with a growth exponent of 1/3. The values of the Pored exponent obtained from the SAXS profiles indicated that the {omega} particles, formed below 723 K, had diffuse interfaces up to an ageing time of 48 h. On the other hand, Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Mo) precipitates, formed above 723 K, developed sharp interfaces in just about an hour. Also, the steel exhibited scaling in phase separation both at 703 and 783 K, but only during the early stages. Through this study it was established that at temperatures of ageing less than 723 K, evolution of {omega} particles takes place through the collapse of the unstable b.c.c. lattice and, at temperatures above 723 K, precipitation of A{sub 3}B type of phases through the mechanism of clustering and ordering of atomic species. Sharp interfaces develop rather quickly when the mechanism of precipitation involves development and amplification of a concentration wave along as in the nucleation of Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Mo) at 783 K than when an interplay of both the displacement and concentration waves is required as in the evolution of {omega} at 703 K. These results indicate towards the possibility of existence of two separate time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves, one for the evolution of {omega}-phase and another for nucleation and growth of Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Mo).

  9. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  10. Simulation of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the WRF Model at the Southern Great Plains Site 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Jonathan 1988-

    2012-08-21

    for the aerosol indirect effect and a modified Goddard shortwave radiation scheme for the aerosol direct effect. The three cases studied include a developing low pressure system, a low precipitation event of mainly cirrus clouds, and a cold frontal passage. Three...

  11. A developer's survey on different cloud platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, Dzung

    2009-01-01

    1 Introduction Cloud computing is a computing paradigm inFor this reason, cloud computing has also been describedparallel processing. Cloud computing can be contrasted with

  12. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    their research efforts in cloud security. Experiences andinvolving cloud resources and security guidance is thedynamic nature of cloud systems, the security controls must

  13. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    outsourcing to the cloud and data security. Depending onconcerned about data security in the cloud. Data stored inrun in the cloud, while protecting data security guarantees.

  14. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  15. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-18

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

  16. Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods and Observations from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods & Observations from Savannah River Site Dennis Jackson P.E. & Timothy Jannik - Savannah River National Laboratory Teresa Eddy - Savannah...

  17. CloudSafe: Securing Data Processing within Vulnerable Virtualization Environments in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    CloudSafe: Securing Data Processing within Vulnerable Virtualization Environments in the Cloud large-scale cloud applications. Index Terms--cloud security, outsourced computation, side- channel, newly discovered vulnerabilities in cloud virtualization envi- ronment have threatened the security

  18. Relativistic electron precipitation events driven by electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khazanov, G., E-mail: george.v.khazanov@nasa.gov; Sibeck, D. [NASA Goddard Space FlightCenter, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Tel'nikhin, A.; Kronberg, T. [Department of Physics and Technology, Altai State University, Barnaul (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming ?10?s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time ?tens of minutes.

  19. INFERENCE OF INHOMOGENEOUS CLOUDS IN AN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; De Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole; Zsom, Andras; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel; Heng, Kevin; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Gillon, Michael; Barclay, Thomas; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-10-20

    We present new visible and infrared observations of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b to determine its atmospheric properties. Our analysis allows us to (1) refine Kepler-7b's relatively large geometric albedo of Ag = 0.35 ± 0.02, (2) place upper limits on Kepler-7b thermal emission that remains undetected in both Spitzer bandpasses and (3) report a westward shift in the Kepler optical phase curve. We argue that Kepler-7b's visible flux cannot be due to thermal emission or Rayleigh scattering from H{sub 2} molecules. We therefore conclude that high altitude, optically reflective clouds located west from the substellar point are present in its atmosphere. We find that a silicate-based cloud composition is a possible candidate. Kepler-7b exhibits several properties that may make it particularly amenable to cloud formation in its upper atmosphere. These include a hot deep atmosphere that avoids a cloud cold trap, very low surface gravity to suppress cloud sedimentation, and a planetary equilibrium temperature in a range that allows for silicate clouds to potentially form in the visible atmosphere probed by Kepler. Our analysis does not only present evidence of optically thick clouds on Kepler-7b but also yields the first map of clouds in an exoplanet atmosphere.

  20. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-04-02

    Silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). In general, higher [H4SiO4] leads to lower dissolution rates. It has often been observed that the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products can cause the dissolution of the glass to increase, even after the rate has decreased significantly. However, it has also been observed that in the concentrations of these silica-bearing solution species do not significantly decrease while other elements continue to be released. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a silica-bearing alteration product, analcime (Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O). In this initial study and to simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The ‘cross affinity’ code option allowed us to account for the fact that glass is a thermodynamically unstable solid with respect to its alteration products in contact with water. The cross-affinity option in the Geochemist’s Workbench geochemical code allowed us to substitute the amorphous silica equilibrium-constant matrix for the glass equilibrium-constant matrix. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. In all cases, our results indicate that the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. Our results, compared in general terms with experiments, show the importance of the gel layer that forms during glass alteration. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

  1. Deuteration in infrared dark clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackington, Matias; Pineda, Jaime E; Garay, Guido; Peretto, Nicolas; Traficante, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Much of the dense gas in molecular clouds has a filamentary structure but the detailed structure and evolution of this gas is poorly known. We have observed 54 cores in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using N$_2$H$^+$ (1-0) and (3-2) to determine the kinematics of the densest material, where stars will form. We also observed N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2) towards 29 of the brightest peaks to analyse the level of deuteration which is an excellent probe of the quiescent of the early stages of star formation. There were 13 detections of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2). This is one of the largest samples of IRDCs yet observed in these species. The deuteration ratio in these sources ranges between 0.003 and 0.14. For most of the sources the material traced by N$_2$D$^+$ and N$_2$H$^+$ (3-2) still has significant turbulent motions, however three objects show subthermal N$_2$D$^+$ velocity dispersion. Surprisingly the presence or absence of an embedded 70 $\\mu$m source shows no correlation with the detection of N$_2$D$^+$ (3-2), nor does it correl...

  2. Very high resolution precipitation climatologies from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Steve

    Very high resolution precipitation climatologies from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar Stephen W. Nesbitt1 and Alison M. Anders2 Received 4 March 2009; revised 6 July 2009 of topography and precipitation, a tropics-wide (±36° latitude) high resolution (0.1°) ten year (1998

  3. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  4. The Effects of Secondary Mineral Precipitates on 90Sr Mobility at the Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2013-06-03

    The effects of secondary precipitates on 90Sr transport at the Hanford Site were investigated using quartz column experiments with simulated caustic tank waste leachates (STWL). Significantly enhanced retardation of Sr transport was observed in the column contacted with STWL due to Sr sorption and co-precipitation with neo-formed nitratecancrinite. However, the column results also suggest that neo-formed secondary precipitates could behave like native mobile colloids that can enhance Sr transport. Initially immobilized Sr within secondary precipitates could remobilize given a change in the porewater background conditions. The mobility of the neo-formed Sr-bearing precipitates increased with increased solution flow rate. In the field, porewater contents and flow rates can be changed by snowmelt (or storm water) events or artificial infiltration. The increased porewater flow rate caused by these events could affect the mobility of 90Sr-containing secondary precipitates, which can be a potential source for facilitated Sr transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

  5. CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services Soheil Qanbari, Samira Mahdi Zadeh Education (BIHE), Iran soroush.vedaeei@bihe.org Abstract--Cloud manufacturing refers to "as a Service" pro- duction model that exploits an on-demand access to a distributed pool of diversified manufacturing

  6. Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chen

    2014-07-15

    Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

  7. Software-Defined Mobile Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku, Ian

    2014-01-01

    M. Gerla. “Towards Software- Defined VANETs: ArchitectureI. Ku, Y. Lu, and M. Gerla. “Software-Defined Mobile Cloud:C. Peylo, “CloudMAC: towards software defined WLANs,” ACM

  8. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  9. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2004), 130, pp. 31193137 doi: 10.1256/qj.03.103 The simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Cloud Systems project, the problem of the simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation general- circulation model. The focus is on tropical South America and Africa where the diurnal cycle on surface temperature. It is primarily controlled by a change of vertical stability that arises as solar

  10. pCloud: A Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudkevich, Aleksandr; Goldis, Evgeniy

    2012-12-02

    This research conducted by the Newton Energy Group, LLC (NEG) is dedicated to the development of pCloud: a Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment. pCloud is offering power industry stakeholders the capability to model electricity markets and is organized around the Software as a Service (SaaS) concept -- a software application delivery model in which software is centrally hosted and provided to many users via the internet. During the Phase I of this project NEG developed a prototype design for pCloud as a SaaS-based commercial service offering, system architecture supporting that design, ensured feasibility of key architecture's elements, formed technological partnerships and negotiated commercial agreements with partners, conducted market research and other related activities and secured funding for continue development of pCloud between the end of Phase I and beginning of Phase II, if awarded. Based on the results of Phase I activities, NEG has established that the development of a cloud-based power market simulation environment within the Windows Azure platform is technologically feasible, can be accomplished within the budget and timeframe available through the Phase II SBIR award with additional external funding. NEG believes that pCloud has the potential to become a game-changing technology for the modeling and analysis of electricity markets. This potential is due to the following critical advantages of pCloud over its competition: - Standardized access to advanced and proven power market simulators offered by third parties. - Automated parallelization of simulations and dynamic provisioning of computing resources on the cloud. This combination of automation and scalability dramatically reduces turn-around time while offering the capability to increase the number of analyzed scenarios by a factor of 10, 100 or even 1000. - Access to ready-to-use data and to cloud-based resources leading to a reduction in software, hardware, and IT costs. - Competitive pricing structure, which will make high-volume usage of simulation services affordable. - Availability and affordability of high quality power simulators, which presently only large corporate clients can afford, will level the playing field in developing regional energy policies, determining prudent cost recovery mechanisms and assuring just and reasonable rates to consumers. - Users that presently do not have the resources to internally maintain modeling capabilities will now be able to run simulations. This will invite more players into the industry, ultimately leading to more transparent and liquid power markets.

  11. Filament formation in wind-cloud interactions. I. Spherical clouds in uniform magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banda-Barragán, Wladimir; Federrath, Christoph; Crocker, Roland; Bicknell, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, yet their formation, internal structure, and longevity have not been studied in detail. We report the results from a comprehensive numerical study that investigates the characteristics, formation, and evolution of filaments arising from magnetohydrodynamic interactions between supersonic winds and dense clouds. Here we improve on previous simulations by utilising sharper density contrasts and higher numerical resolutions. By following multiple density tracers, we find that material in the envelopes of the clouds is removed and deposited downstream to form filamentary tails, while the cores of the clouds serve as footpoints and late-stage outer layers of these tails. Aspect ratios >12, subsonic velocity dispersions ~0.1-0.3 of the wind sound speed, and magnetic field amplifications ~100 are found to be characteristic of these filaments. We also report the effects of different magnetic field strengths and orientations. The magnetic field strength...

  12. CLOUD CHEMISTRY STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    is considered bere to comprise both cloud composition and reactions that take place in clouds. Clouds are a very special subset of tbe atmosphere because they present substantial amounts of condensed-phase water (liquid, the examples developed bere focus on these chemical systems. However, much of the resulting undetstanding

  13. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  14. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

    2011-12-21

    The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

  15. PRECIPITATION The images above use daily precipitation statistics from NWS COOP, CoCoRaHS, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    PRECIPITATION The images above use daily precipitation statistics from NWS COOP, CoCoRaHS, and CoAgMet stations. From top to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7-days of accumulated precipitation in inches; current month-to-date accumulated precipitation in inches; last month's precipitation as a percent

  16. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS PRACTICES TRENDS AUDITS policies #12;2 Privacy & Information Security Annual Update Thursday, June 20, 2013 of Breach statistics Plan to comply with requirements · Training and Education Information Security · Risk

  17. Precipitation and Snowpack Figure 1: Month to Date Precipitation (1-23 January 2011). Figure 2: 7 Day Precipitation (17-23 January 11).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Precipitation and Snowpack Figure 1: Month to Date Precipitation (1-23 January 2011). Figure 2: 7 Day Precipitation (17-23 January 11). Much of the high country in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB.00" for January to date (Figure 1). Over the past seven days, however (Figure 2), precipitation has been

  18. Modelling simultaneous precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling simultaneous precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels. T. Sourmail and H. K developed for simultaneous precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels, taking into account for important phases in creep-resistant austenitic stainless steels. 1 Introduction Precipitation phenomena

  19. Reese/Doering 4/2004 TCA PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doering, Tamara

    Reese/Doering 4/2004 TCA PRECIPITATION OVERVIEW This is a standard method for precipitating protein-PAGE). It may also be used to precipitate a very dilute or low abundance sample, in which case a carrier protein

  20. PRECIPITATION HARDENING IN Fe-Ni BASE AUSTENITIC ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, K.-M.

    2010-01-01

    and H. J. Beattie: "Precipitation Processes in Steels," p.and S. Floreen: "Precipitation from Iron-Base Alloys," G. R.Element Content and Precipitation Behavior of Alloys Ingot

  1. Precipitation amount and intensity measurements with the Ott Pluvio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    Precipitation amount and intensity measurements with the Ott Pluvio Wiel Wauben Instrumental Department, INSA-IO, KNMI August 26, 2004 #12;#12;Precipitation amount and intensity measurements................................................................................... 1 2. Precipitation sensors................................................................... 5 2

  2. Precipitation Research at UMN: Multiscale variability and Uncertainty in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    Precipitation Research at UMN: Multiscale variability and Uncertainty in Rainfall Estimation Developing nonparametric schemes for merging multisensor precipitation products Gupta, R., V. Venugopal and E. Foufoula-Georgiou, A methodology for merging multisensor precipitation estimates based on expectation

  3. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  4. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 411, L41L45 (2011) doi:10.1111/j.1745-3933.2010.00988.x Tails of the unexpected: the interaction of an isothermal shell with a cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittard, Julian

    2011-01-01

    of the unexpected: the interaction of an isothermal shell with a cloud J. M. Pittard School of Physics and Astronomy clouds or globules is discussed. Numerical hydrodynamical models show that when a dense shell of swept-up matter overruns a cloud, material in the shell is focused behind the cloud to form a tail. This mode

  5. Cluster analysis of cloud properties : a method for diagnosing cloud-climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Neil D.

    2008-01-01

    Zhang (2004), Comparing clouds and their seasonal variationstropical greenhouse effect and cloud radiative forcing. J.thermodynamic components of cloud changes. Clim. Dyn. , 22,

  6. Estimating tropical cyclone precipitation risk in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Laiyin

    This paper uses a new rainfall algorithm to simulate the long-term tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology in Texas based on synthetic tropical cyclones generated from National Center for Atmospheric Research/National ...

  7. Modelling Precipitation of Carbides in Martensitic Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamasaki, Shingo

    The purpose of this work was to model carbide precipitation in steels of a quaternary system which includes two substitutional elements. The work focuses on secondary hardening steels which are used for high-strength components, where hydrogen...

  8. Processing NPP Bottoms by Ferrocyanide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savkin, A. E.; Slastennikov Y. T.; Sinyakin O. G.

    2002-02-25

    The purpose of work is a laboratory test of a technological scheme for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides by use of ozonization, ferrocyanide precipitation, filtration and selective sorption. At carrying out the ferrocyanide precipitation after ozonization, the specific activity of bottoms by Cs{sup 137} is reduced in 100-500 times. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of ferrocyanide precipitation depends on the quality of consequent filtration. Pore sizes of a filter has been determined to be less than 0.2 {micro}m for complete separation of ferrocyanide residue. The comparison of two technological schemes for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides, characterized by presence of the ferrocyanide precipitation stage has been performed. Application of the proposed schemes allows reducing volumes of radioactive waste in many times.

  9. Minimizing Biases in Radar Precipitation Estimates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McRoberts, Douglas B

    2014-12-08

    The demand for real-time drought information in recent years led to the development of a suite of objective drought indicators that relies on the high-resolution Stage IV precipitation estimates that are produced each day ...

  10. Testing Competing High-Resolution Precipitation Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilleland, Eric

    Testing Competing High-Resolution Precipitation Forecasts Eric Gilleland Research Prediction Comparison Test D1 D2 D = D1 ­ D2 copyright NCAR 2013 Loss Differential Field #12;Spatial Prediction Comparison Test Introduced by Hering and Genton

  11. Estimation of precipitable water from surface observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahan, Archie Marion

    1959-01-01

    This dissertation examines the causes of variations in tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) and the relationship between TCP and river discharge in Texas. The dissertation has three major objectives: 1) investigate the ...

  12. ARIMA Models versus Gene Expression Programming In Precipitation Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    ARIMA Models versus Gene Expression Programming In Precipitation Modeling ALINA BRBULESCU and ELENA, Precipitation 1 Introduction Time series are ubiquitous in the real world. They are usually generated

  13. Water clouds in Y dwarfs and exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Lupu, Roxana; Greene, Tom; Saumon, Didier; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-05-20

    The formation of clouds affects brown dwarf and planetary atmospheres of nearly all effective temperatures. Iron and silicate condense in L dwarf atmospheres and dissipate at the L/T transition. Minor species such as sulfides and salts condense in mid- to late T dwarfs. For brown dwarfs below T {sub eff} ? 450 K, water condenses in the upper atmosphere to form ice clouds. Currently, over a dozen objects in this temperature range have been discovered, and few previous theoretical studies have addressed the effect of water clouds on brown dwarf or exoplanetary spectra. Here we present a new grid of models that include the effect of water cloud opacity. We find that they become optically thick in objects below T {sub eff} ? 350-375 K. Unlike refractory cloud materials, water-ice particles are significantly nongray absorbers; they predominantly scatter at optical wavelengths through the J band and absorb in the infrared with prominent features, the strongest of which is at 2.8 ?m. H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} CIA are dominant opacity sources; less abundant species may also be detectable, including the alkalis, H{sub 2}S, and PH{sub 3}. PH{sub 3}, which has been detected in Jupiter, is expected to have a strong signature in the mid-infrared at 4.3 ?m in Y dwarfs around T {sub eff} = 450 K; if disequilibrium chemistry increases the abundance of PH{sub 3}, it may be detectable over a wider effective temperature range than models predict. We show results incorporating disequilibrium nitrogen and carbon chemistry and predict signatures of low gravity in planetary mass objects. Finally, we make predictions for the observability of Y dwarfs and planets with existing and future instruments, including the James Webb Space Telescope and Gemini Planet Imager.

  14. Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proga, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, the thermal instability is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field's theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one and two-dimensional (1-D/2-D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1-D simulations demonstrate that the thermal instability can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to ...

  15. Strategic Plan for a Scientific Cloud Computing infrastructure for Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lengert, Maryline

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the vision, concept and direction for forming a European Industrial Strategy for a Scientific Cloud Computing Infrastructure to be implemented by 2020. This will be the framework for decisions and for securing support and approval in establishing, initially, an R&D European Cloud Computing Infrastructure that serves the need of European Research Area (ERA ) and Space Agencies. This Cloud Infrastructure will have the potential beyond this initial user base to evolve to provide similar services to a broad range of customers including government and SMEs. We explain how this plan aims to support the broader strategic goals of our organisations and identify the benefits to be realised by adopting an industrial Cloud Computing model. We also outline the prerequisites and commitment needed to achieve these objectives.

  16. Molecular clouds have power-law probability distribution functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, Marco; Lada, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the shape of the probability distribution of column densities (PDF) in molecular clouds. Through the use of low-noise, extinction-calibrated \\textit{Herschel}/\\textit{Planck} emission data for eight molecular clouds, we demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, the PDFs of molecular clouds are not described well by log-normal functions, but are instead power laws with exponents close to two and with breaks between $A_K \\simeq 0.1$ and $0.2\\,\\mathrm{mag}$, so close to the CO self-shielding limit and not far from the transition between molecular and atomic gas. Additionally, we argue that the intrinsic functional form of the PDF cannot be securely determined below $A_K \\simeq 0.1\\,\\mathrm{mag}$, limiting our ability to investigate more complex models for the shape of the cloud PDF.

  17. A New WRF-Chem Treatment for Studying Regional Scale Impacts of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in Parameterized Cumuli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A new treatment of cloud-aerosol interactions within parameterized shallow and deep convection has been implemented in WRF-Chem that can be used to better understand the aerosol lifecycle over regional to synoptic scales. The modifications to the model to represent cloud-aerosol interactions include treatment of the cloud dropletnumber mixing ratio; key cloud microphysical and macrophysical parameters (including the updraft fractional area, updraft and downdraft mass fluxes, and entrainment) averaged over the population of shallow clouds, or a single deep convective cloud; and vertical transport, activation/resuspension, aqueous chemistry, and wet removal of aerosol and trace gases in warm clouds. Thesechanges have been implemented in both the WRF-Chem chemistry packages as well as the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization that has been modified to better represent shallow convective clouds. Preliminary testing of the modified WRF-Chem has been completed using observations from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) as well as a high-resolution simulation that does not include parameterized convection. The simulation results are used to investigate the impact of cloud-aerosol interactions on the regional scale transport of black carbon (BC), organic aerosol (OA), and sulfate aerosol. Based on the simulations presented here, changes in the column integrated BC can be as large as -50% when cloud-aerosol interactions are considered (due largely to wet removal), or as large as +35% for sulfate in non-precipitating conditions due to the sulfate production in the parameterized clouds. The modifications to WRF-Chem version 3.2.1 are found to account for changes in the cloud drop number concentration (CDNC) and changes in the chemical composition of cloud-drop residuals in a way that is consistent with observations collected during CHAPS. Efforts are currently underway to port the changes described here to WRF-Chem version 3.5, and it is anticipated that they will be included in a future public release of WRF-Chem.

  18. CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications Bhathiya Wickremasinghe1 , Rodrigo N. Calheiros2 , and Rajkumar Buyya1 1 The Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS) Laboratory Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University

  19. Cloud in a Bottle Demonstrate how pressure relates to cloud formation by making a cloud in a soda bottle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Cloud in a Bottle Demonstrate how pressure relates to cloud formation by making a cloud in a soda doesn't escape. 5. Squeeze the soda bottle and release, repeating several times. Eventually, a cloud construction paper (or anything dark) on half of the bottle may make the cloud easier to see. What Happened

  20. Anvil characteristics as seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, Kaycee Loretta

    2007-04-25

    the month-long field campaign. The morphology, evolution, and longevity of the anvil were analyzed as well as the relationship of the anvil to the rest of the precipitating system. In addition, idealized in-cloud radiative heating profiles were created based...

  1. Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband December 2011. [1] A Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) was developed and deployed) through an optically thin cloud (optical depth

  2. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ?15 pc and masses ?600 M {sub ?} above density n ? 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} (?2 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ?} at n > 50 cm{sup –3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ?0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup –2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ?30 M {sub ?} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –1}.

  3. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  4. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  5. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

  6. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more »The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  7. VO.sub.2 precipitates for self-protected optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gea, Laurence A. (Knoxville, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method for forming crystallographically coherent precipitates of vanadium dioxide in the near-surface region of sapphire and the resulting product is disclosed. Ions of vanadium and oxygen are stoichiometrically implanted into a sapphire substrate (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), and subsequently annealed to form vanadium dioxide precipitates in the substrate. The embedded VO.sub.2 precipitates, which are three-dimensionally oriented with respect to the crystal axes of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 host lattice, undergo a first-order monoclinic-to-tetragonal (and also semiconducting-to-metallic) phase transition at .about.77.degree. C. This transformation is accompanied by a significant variation in the optical transmission of the implanted region and results in the formation of an optically active, thermally "switchable" surface region on Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  8. VO{sub 2} precipitates for self-protected optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gea, L.A.; Boatner, L.A.

    1999-03-23

    A method for forming crystallographically coherent precipitates of vanadium dioxide in the near-surface region of sapphire and the resulting product is disclosed. Ions of vanadium and oxygen are stoichiometrically implanted into a sapphire substrate (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and subsequently annealed to form vanadium dioxide precipitates in the substrate. The embedded VO{sub 2} precipitates, which are three-dimensionally oriented with respect to the crystal axes of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} host lattice, undergo a first-order monoclinic-to-tetragonal (and also semiconducting-to-metallic) phase transition at ca. 77 C. This transformation is accompanied by a significant variation in the optical transmission of the implanted region and results in the formation of an optically active, thermally ``switchable`` surface region on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 5 figs.

  9. ADVANCED CONCEPTS ON REMOTE SENSING OF PRECIPITATION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    ADVANCED CONCEPTS ON REMOTE SENSING OF PRECIPITATION AT MULTIPLE SCALES by SorooSh SorooShian, amirTs Workshop on remoTe sensing of precipiTATion AT mulTiple scAles what: 50 participants from precipitation of remote sensing of precipitation whEn: 15­17 March 2010 whErE: University of California, Irvine Overview

  10. Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2007-09-03

    Any attempt to reconcile observed surface temperature changes within the last 150 years to changes simulated by climate models that include various atmospheric forcings is sensitive to the changes attributed to aerosols and aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, which are the main contributors that may well balance the positive forcings associated with greenhouse gases, absorbing aerosols, ozone related changes, etc. These aerosol effects on climate, from various modeling studies discussed in Menon (2004), range from +0.8 to -2.4 W m{sup -2}, with an implied value of -1.0 W m{sup -2} (range from -0.5 to -4.5 W m{sup -2}) for the aerosol indirect effects. Quantifying the contribution of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions remain complicated for several reasons some of which are related to aerosol distributions and some to the processes used to represent their effects on clouds. Aerosol effects on low lying marine stratocumulus clouds that cover much of the Earth's surface (about 70%) have been the focus of most of prior aerosol-cloud interaction effect simulations. Since cumulus clouds (shallow and deep convective) are short lived and cover about 15 to 20% of the Earth's surface, they are not usually considered as radiatively important. However, the large amount of latent heat released from convective towers, and corresponding changes in precipitation, especially in biomass regions due to convective heating effects (Graf et al. 2004), suggest that these cloud systems and aerosol effects on them, must be examined more closely. The radiative heating effects for mature deep convective systems can account for 10-30% of maximum latent heating effects and thus cannot be ignored (Jensen and Del Genio 2003). The first study that isolated the sensitivity of cumulus clouds to aerosols was from Nober et al. (2003) who found a reduction in precipitation in biomass burning regions and shifts in circulation patterns. Aerosol effects on convection have been included in other models as well (cf. Jacobson, 2002) but the relative impacts on convective and stratiform processes were not separated. Other changes to atmospheric stability and thermodynamical quantities due to aerosol absorption are also known to be important in modifying cloud macro/micro properties. Linkages between convection and boreal biomass burning can also impact the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, radiation and cloud microphysical properties via transport of tropospheric aerosols to the lower stratosphere during extreme convection (Fromm and Servranckx 2003). Relevant questions regarding the impact of biomass aerosols on convective cloud properties include the effects of vertical transport of aerosols, spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall, vertical shift in latent heat release, phase shift of precipitation, circulation and their impacts on radiation. Over land surfaces, a decrease in surface shortwave radiation ({approx} 3-6 W m{sup -2} per decade) has been observed between 1960 to 1990, whereas, increases of 0.4 K in land temperature during the same period that occurred have resulted in speculations that evaporation and precipitation should also have decreased (Wild et al. 2004). However, precipitation records for the same period over land do not indicate any significant trend (Beck et al. 2005). The changes in precipitation are thought to be related to increased moisture advection from the oceans (Wild et al. 2004), which may well have some contributions from aerosol-radiation-convection coupling that could modify circulation patterns and hence moisture advection in specific regions. Other important aspects of aerosol effects, besides the direct, semi-direct, microphysical and thermodynamical impacts include alteration of surface albedos, especially snow and ice covered surfaces, due to absorbing aerosols. These effects are uncertain (Jacobson, 2004) but may produce as much as 0.3 W m{sup -2} forcing in the Northern hemisphere that could contribute to melting of ice and permafrost and change in the length of the season (e.g. early arrival of Spring

  11. Model-Driven Integration for a Service Placement Optimizer in a Sustainable Cloud of Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Jun

    --"Cloud of clouds" (or federated cloud) is an emerg- ing style of software deployment and execution to interoperate, federated clouds, model-driven system integration and sustainable clouds I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing, cost effective (e.g., energy effi- cient) service/data placement and avoidance of "lock

  12. CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS , W. Paul Menzel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    6.4 CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS AND AIRS Jun Li * , W. Paul Menzel Observing System's (EOS) Aqua satellite enable global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. The MODIS is able to provide at high spatial resolution (1 ~ 5km) a cloud mask, surface and cloud types, cloud phase

  13. PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud 1 PC Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud 2015-05-25 1 Web Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud Adobe Creative Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller (Mac OS X )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac.jp/pdf

  14. Observation of Precipitation Evolution in Fe-Ni-Mn-Ti-Al Maraging Steel using Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereloma, E. V.; Stohr, R A; Miller, Michael K; Ringer, S. P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the full decomposition sequence in an Fe-Ni-Mn-Ti-Al maraging steel during isothermal annealing at 550 C. Following significant pre-precipitation clustering reactions within the supersaturated martensitic solid solution, (Ni,Fe){sub 3}Ti and (Ni,Fe){sub 3}(Al,Mn) precipitates eventually form after isothermal aging for {approx}60 seconds. The morphology of the (Ni,Fe){sub 3}Ti particles changes gradually during aging from predominantly plate-like to rod-like, and, importantly, Mn and Al were observed to segregate to these precipitate/matrix interfaces. The (Ni,Fe){sub 3}(Al,Mn) precipitates occurred at two main locations: uniformly within the matrix and at the periphery of the (Ni,Fe){sub 3}Ti particles. We relate this latter mode of precipitation to the Mn-Al segregation.

  15. Structure Profile by a Model of Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhenggang

    2009-01-01

    The organizational structure of a network is investigated with a simulated precipitation model which does not make use of prior knowledge about the community structure of the network. The result is presented as a structure profile through which various definitions of communities can be applied for specific applications. The simulated precipitation model performs the grouping of nodes so that nodes belonging to the same 'community' automatically aggregate, thereby revealing regions of the adjacency matrix with denser interconnections. The process is analogous to massive particles precipitating towards the lower potential layer. Without loss of the infrastructure information, a community structure profile of a network can be obtained as the ground state of the Hamiltonian. The method is also applicable to directed and weighted networks.

  16. SUPERGIANT SHELLS AND MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, J. R.; Dickey, John M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wong, T.; Hughes, A.; Fukui, Y.; Kawamura, A.

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the influence of large-scale stellar feedback on the formation of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Examining the relationship between H I and {sup 12}CO(J = 1-0) in supergiant shells (SGSs), we find that the molecular fraction in the total volume occupied by SGSs is not enhanced with respect to the rest of the LMC disk. However, the majority of objects ({approx}70% by mass) are more molecular than their local surroundings, implying that the presence of a supergiant shell does on average have a positive effect on the molecular gas fraction. Averaged over the full SGS sample, our results suggest that {approx}12%-25% of the molecular mass in supergiant shell systems was formed as a direct result of the stellar feedback that created the shells. This corresponds to {approx}4%-11% of the total molecular mass of the galaxy. These figures are an approximate lower limit to the total contribution of stellar feedback to molecular cloud formation in the LMC, and constitute one of the first quantitative measurements of feedback-triggered molecular cloud formation in a galactic system.

  17. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01

    1.1 Cloud Computing Applications 1.2Zaharia. A view of cloud computing. Communications of theM. Voelker, Co-Chair Cloud computing has emerged as a model

  18. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    4.3.1 Cloud Computing Attractive Features . 4.3.2A berkeley view of cloud computing. Technical Report UCB/matching computations on cloud computing platforms and hpc

  19. The Cloud Computing and Other Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borjon-Kubota, Martha Estela

    2011-01-01

    12. Fragments in Six 13. Cloud Computing 14. Phase 15.Note 48. Devoured vi Cloud Computing and other Variables I.CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Cloud Computing and Other Variables A

  20. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01

    the security implications of user-controlled cloud images?key security practices and policies on private clouds, suchand security poli- cies will remain, and sites moving to cloud

  1. Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance April 2015 #12;Trusted Cloud................................................................. 18 #12;Trusted Cloud: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance | April, 2015 Introduction: Microsoft Azure Security, Privacy, and Compliance | April, 2015 #12;3 Contents Introduction

  2. Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCurts, Katrina

    2014-03-24

    In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

  3. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena,” Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud,” Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

  4. Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2013-01-01

    2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

  5. V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RHSA-2012-1543-1 Secunia Advisory SA51472 CVE-2012-1986 CVE-2012-1987 CVE-2012-1988 CVE-2012-2139 CVE-2012-2140 CVE-2012-2660 CVE-2012-2661 CVE-2012-2694 CVE-2012-2695...

  6. Competition Not Concentration Matters when Forming Cloud-Influencing

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6Aerosols | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

  7. Star Formation triggered by cloud-cloud collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balfour, S K; Hubber, D A; Jaffa, S E

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of SPH simulations in which two clouds, each having mass $M_{_{\\rm{o}}}\\!=\\!500\\,{\\rm M}_{_\\odot}$ and radius $R_{_{\\rm{o}}}\\!=\\!2\\,{\\rm pc}$, collide head-on at relative velocities of $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}} =2.4,\\;2.8,\\;3.2,\\;3.6\\;{\\rm and}\\;4.0\\,{\\rm km}\\,{\\rm s}^{-1}$. There is a clear trend with increasing $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}}$. At low $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}}$, star formation starts later, and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into an array of predominantly radial filaments; stars condense out of these filaments and fall, together with residual gas, towards the centre of the layer, to form a single large-$N$ cluster, which then evolves by competitive accretion, producing one or two very massive protostars and a diaspora of ejected (mainly low-mass) protostars; the pattern of filaments is reminiscent of the hub and spokes systems identified recently by observers. At high $\\Delta v_{_{\\rm{o}}}$, star formation occurs sooner and the shock-compressed layer breaks up into a network of f...

  8. Bringing Clouds into Focus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen Plasma Asher An O2 RFand1120019Bringing Clouds into

  9. Identification and Quantitation of Urea Precipitates in Flexible Polyurethane Foam Formulations by X-ray Spectromicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with isocyanates to form carbamic acid, which decomposes to an amine and CO2. Rapid reaction of the primary. The heat evolved due to the exothermic nature of the reactions along with the CO2 produced helps to blowIdentification and Quantitation of Urea Precipitates in Flexible Polyurethane Foam Formulations

  10. Short Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Short Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous solution by Clostridium sp. C. Zhang a,b, , C.J. Dodge c , S.V. Malhotra a,1 , A.J. Francis c,d a Department of Chemistry t s Uranium forms various complexes with ionic liquids. Uranium bioreduction was affected by the type

  11. Digital Ecosystems in the Clouds: Towards Community Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns of privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. Community Cloud Computing makes use of the principles of Digital Ecosystems to provide a paradigm for Clouds in the community, offering an alternative architecture for the use cases of Cloud Computing. Its more technically challenging, dealing with issues of distributed computing, such as latency, differential resource management, and additional security requirements. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, its one we must pursue.

  12. High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC)

    2011-10-25

    A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

  13. Helices in the wake of precipitation fronts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibi Thomas; Istvan Lagzi; Ferenc Molnar Jr; Zoltan Racz

    2013-08-30

    A theoretical study of the emergence of helices in the wake of precipitation fronts is presented. The precipitation dynamics is described by the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the fronts are obtained by quenching the system into a linearly unstable state. Confining the process onto the surface of a cylinder and using the pulled-front formalism, our analytical calculations show that there are front solutions that propagate into the unstable state and leave behind a helical structure. We find that helical patterns emerge only if the radius of the cylinder R is larger than a critical value R>R_c, in agreement with recent experiments.

  14. 236tI1 1 NS II"HrNS (ON IND)t Si ,Y \\S.V(O \\1INS. \\ l. I,\\-\\17, NO. 2. M AR(H/APRI L1981 A New Current-Voltage Relation for Duct Precipitators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooperman, Gene

    Current-Voltage Relation for Duct Precipitators Valid for Low and High Current Densities GENE COOPERMAN Abstract-A closed-form analytic current-voltage formula for duct electrostatic precipitators is presented

  15. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01

    with access to computer clusters. Cloud technology coupledto computer clusters. The availability of cloud technology

  16. Effects of aerosols on precipitation from orographic clouds Barry Lynn,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    humidity, and magnitude of the dominating wind shear. Since urban zones affect both thermal stability; published 31 May 2007. [1] Spectral (bin) microphysics was coupled to the Weather Research Forecast model simulations with clean and dirty air were obtained when ice microphysical processes were included in the model

  17. ARM's efforts to address the need for 3D cloud and precipitation measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation DataStreamsTotal Ozone Mapping SpectrometerDemoInteractions

  18. DOE/SC-ARM-14-030 ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOE ProjectREMOTE-HANDLED TRU764 The6 User Executive0

  19. The dependence of cloud particle size and precipitation probability on non-aerosol-loading related variables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr. Jeffrey publication of the Group

  20. The Effect of Precipitation on Variability of Low Stratiform Clouds Over ARM SGP Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(active tab) 2016The DarkThe

  1. The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coghlan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    of computer security are evolving for cloud computingcomputer forensic space a way to integrate their tools with the cloudthe cloud business model. In addition to answering computer

  2. WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    WEATHER MODIFICATION BY AIRCRAFT CLOUD SEEDING BERYULEV G.P. Head, Department of Cloud Physics and Weather Modification Central Aerological Observatory Rosgidromet, Russian Federation #12

  3. THE MAGELLANIC INTER-CLOUD PROJECT (MAGIC). I. EVIDENCE FOR INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN BETWEEN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noeel, N. E. D.; Read, J. I. [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Conn, B. C.; Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Carrera, R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Dolphin, A., E-mail: noelia@phys.ethz.ch [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734-1337 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    The origin of the gas in between the Magellanic Clouds (MCs)-known as the ''Magellanic Bridge'' (MB)-is puzzling. Numerical simulations suggest that the MB formed from tidally stripped gas and stars in a recent interaction between the MCs. However, the apparent lack of stripped intermediate- or old-age stars associated with the MB is at odds with this picture. In this paper, we present the first results from the MAGellanic Inter-Cloud program (MAGIC) aimed at probing the stellar populations in the inter-Cloud region. We present observations of the stellar populations in two large fields located in between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC), secured using the WFI camera on the 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. Using a synthetic color-magnitude diagram technique, we present the first quantitative evidence for the presence of intermediate-age and old stars in the inter-Cloud region. The intermediate-age stars-which make up {approx}28% of all stars in the region-are not present in fields at a similar distance from the SMC in a direction pointing away from the LMC. This provides potential evidence that these intermediate-age stars could have been tidally stripped from the SMC. However, spectroscopic studies will be needed to confirm or rule out the tidal origin for the inter-Cloud gas and stars.

  4. ROUTINE CLOUD-BOUNDARY ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT FOR ARM MICROPULSE LIDAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript

  5. Mesoscale Predictability of an Extreme Warm-Season Precipitation Event FUQING ZHANG, ANDREW M. ODINS, AND JOHN W. NIELSEN-GAMMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale Predictability of an Extreme Warm-Season Precipitation Event FUQING ZHANG, ANDREW M Station, Texas (Manuscript received 22 November 2004, in final form 28 August 2005) ABSTRACT A mesoscale model is used to investigate the mesoscale predictability of an extreme precipitation event over central

  6. Contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2014-05-27

    Methods for contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical semiconductor device comprises: a first step that includes gettering of impurities from a semiconductor wafer and forming a backsurface field; and a second step that includes forming a front contact for the semiconductor wafer, wherein the second step is performed after completion of the first step.

  7. Modelling Precipitation of Carbides in Martensitic Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling Precipitation of Carbides in Martensitic Steels Shingo Yamasaki Darwin College appreciate Dr S. Aihara and Mr T. Tarui at Nippon Steel Corporation for giving me the opportunity to study at Nippon Steel Corporation. I am indebted to grants from the Personnel Division of Nippon Steel Corporation

  8. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  9. Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lamppa, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Voigt, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

  10. Quiet Time Precipitation Patterns of Energetic Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    in some of the most important parameters that de- pend on solar activity - Kp index, global average Solar Wind Speed and Particle Fluxes 9 4 Precipitation Patterns 11 4.1 Global Average Flux a potential hazard. This is evidenced by an especially strong solar storm on September 1-2, 1859, which

  11. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

  12. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

    1987-02-25

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Method for the preparation of thallium-containing superconducting materials by precipitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lamppa, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Voigt, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    This invention provides improved methods for the preparation of precursor powders that are used in the preparation of superconducting ceramic materials that contain thallium. A first solution that contains the hydrogen peroxide and metal cations, other than thallium, that will be part of the ceramic is quickly mixed with a second solution that contains precipitating anions and thallium (I) to form a precipitate which is dried to yield precursor powders. The precursor powders are calcined an sintered to produce superconducting materials that contain thallium.

  14. Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft NISTIR 80061 NIST Cloud Computing2 Forensic Science Challenges NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Computing11 Forensic Science Challenges 12 NIST Cloud Computing Forensic Science Working Group13 Information challenges77 faced by experts when responding to incidents that have occurred in a cloud-computing ecosystem

  15. Secure Cloud Computing With Brokered Trusted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secure Cloud Computing With Brokered Trusted Sensor Networks Profs. Steven Myers,Apu Kapadia, Xiao-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless Bridge Security Threats 1. Cloud or Grid 2. Communication Channels 3 Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless Bridge Security

  16. An Architecture for Trusted Clouds Mike Burmester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burmester, Mike

    reasoning will play a major role. In this paper we analyze the cloud paradigm from a security point of view, but it is also technically easier to secure. Finally, the Cloud has a dark side, at least from a security point regulatory and security policies; and hybrid clouds. Services. There are three basic cloud on demand

  17. Why the network matters in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    this promise, and security concerns still loom AT&T NetBond AT&T network enabled cloud computing provides highly-secure access, with the cloud functioning just like another MPLS VPN site. It also allowsWhy the network matters in cloud computing The promise of cloud hinges on flexibility, agility

  18. NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII Kevin Mills, NIST July 9, 2015 #12;NIST Cloud Project Research Goals Kevin Mills, NIST #12;NIST Cloud Computing Forum and Workshop VIII July 2 015 failure scenarios in a cloud system · Ongoing work on run-time methods · Where to find more information 3

  19. EWI PDS A.Iosup Research Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Research, PDS Group, TU Delft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    EWI PDS A.Iosup Research Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Research, PDS Group, TU Delft Cloud Computing Research http://www.pds.ewi.tudelft.nl/~iosup/research_cloud.html Rationale why and how is this work relevant? Cloud computing is an emerging commercial infrastructure paradigm that promises

  20. Storm Clouds Rising: Security Challenges for IaaS Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storm Clouds Rising: Security Challenges for IaaS Cloud Computing Brian Hay Kara Nance Matt Bishop on security concerns for computational cloud computing from the perspectives of cloud service users, cloud.hay@alaska.edu klnance@alaska.edu bishop@cs.ucdavis.edu Abstract Securing our digital assets has become increasingly

  1. Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloudVision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud

  2. EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES AND THEIR CONNECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 dataset exhibits a 2.6% per decade decrease in the global all-cloud cloud

  3. Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey December 2013 A method for separating the three components of the marine stratocumulus (MSC) aerosol cloud interactions radiative effects, i.e., the cloud cover, liquid water path (LWP) and cloud drop radius (Twomey

  4. Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosup, Alexandru

    1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

  5. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

  6. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment Matthew D a 35-GHz cloud radar and the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program operated a suite Clouds Experiment took place during April­July 1998, with the primary goal of investigating cloud

  7. A CloudSat cloud object partitioning technique and assessment and integration of deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    A CloudSat cloud object partitioning technique and assessment and integration of deep convective, USA Abstract A cloud object partitioning algorithm is developed to provide a widely useful database of deep convective clouds. It takes contiguous CloudSat cloudy regions and identifies various length

  8. On star formation in primordial protoglobular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; Raul Jimenez; Bernard Jones

    1996-04-11

    Using a new physical model for star formation (Padoan 1995) we have tested the possibility that globular clusters (GCs) are formed from primordial mass fluctuations, whose mass scale ($10^8$ - $10^9$ M$_{\\odot}$) is selected out of a CDM spectrum by the mechanism of non-equilibrium formation of $H_2$. We show that such clouds are able to convert about 0.003 of their total mass into a bound system (GC) and about 0.02 into halo stars. The metal enriched gas is dispersed away from the GC by supernova explosions and forms the galactic disk. These mass ratios between GCs, halo and disk depend on the predicted IMF which is a consequence of the universal statistics of fluid turbulence. They also depend on the ratio of baryonic over non-baryonic mass ,$X_b$, and are comparable with the values observed in typical spiral galaxies for $X_b \\approx 0.1-0.2$. The computed mass and radius for a GC ( $5\\times 10^5$ M$_{\\odot}$ and 30 pc) are in good agreement with the average values in the Galaxy. The model predicts an exponential cut off in the stellar IMF below 0.1 M$_{\\odot}$ in GCs and 0.6 M$_{\\odot}$ in the halo. The quite massive star formation in primordial clouds leads to a large number of supernovae and to a high blue luminosity during the first two Gyr of the life of every galaxy.

  9. Sensitivity of tropical precipitation extremes to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul Ambrose

    Precipitation extremes increase in intensity over many regions of the globe in simulations of a warming climate1, 2, 3. The rate of increase of precipitation extremes in the extratropics is consistent across global climate ...

  10. Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung-Eun

    Tropical rainforests are known to exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability compared with oceanic areas with similar mean precipitation in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of ...

  11. A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

  12. Diurnal Precipitation Variations in South-Central New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.

    1993-07-01

    Orographic forcing of diurnal precipitation variations in south-central New Mexico is examined. Harmonic analysis reveals a strong diurnal cycle in precipitation frequency at all stations studied. In addition, relatively ...

  13. Characterization of uncertainty in remotely-sensed precipitation estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Satellite-derived retrievals of precipitation have increased in availability and improved in quality over the last decade. There are now several satellites in orbit with instruments capable of precipitation retrieval with ...

  14. Caribbean Precipitation in Observations and IPCC AR4 Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elinor Ruth

    2012-10-19

    Caribbean precipitation and mechanisms related to precipitation in the region. Not only were errors seen in the annual mean, with CMIP models underestimating both rainfall and sea surface temperature (SST) and AMIP models overestimating rainfall, the annual...

  15. Future precipitation changes and their implications for tropical peatlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Future precipitation changes and their implications for tropical peatlands Wenhong Li,1 Robert E. Dickinson, R. Fu, G.-Y. Niu, Z.-L. Yang, and J. G. Canadell (2007), Future precipitation changes

  16. precipitation frequency & intensity in instantaneous and aggregated data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    precipitation frequency & intensity in instantaneous and aggregated data Michela Biasutti1, Sandra - Ocean Implications (and a suggestion for model diagnostics) Outline #12;4 Minute-by-minute precipitation

  17. Precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution prepared by solidification under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jie, J.C., E-mail: jiejc@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Special Processing of Raw Materials and School of Material Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, H.W.; Zou, C.M.; Wei, Z.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, T.J. [Laboratory of Special Processing of Raw Materials and School of Material Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution containing 21.6 at.% Mg prepared by solidification under 2 GPa was investigated. The results show that the ?-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} phase is formed and the ?? phase cannot be observed in the solid solution during ageing process. The precipitation of ? and ? phases takes place in a non-uniform manner during heating process, i.e. the ? and ? phases are first formed in the interdendritic region, which is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of Mg atoms in the solid solution solidified under high pressure. Peak splitting of X-ray diffraction patterns of Al(Mg) solid solution appears, and then disappears when the samples are aged at 423 K for different times, due to the non-uniform precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution. The direct transformation from the ? to ? phase is observed after ageing at 423 K for 24 h. It is considered that the ? phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of ? + ? ? ? which needs the diffusion of Mg atoms across the interface of ?/? phases. - Highlights: • The ? phase is formed and the ?? phase is be observed in Al(Mg) solid solution. • Peak splitting of XRD pattern of Al(Mg) solid solution appears during aged at 150 °C. • The ? phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of ? + ? ? ?.

  18. Waves on the surface of the Orion molecular cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Berné; Núria Marcelino; José Cernicharo

    2010-11-01

    Massive stars influence their parental molecular cloud, and it has long been suspected that the development of hydrodynamical instabilities can compress or fragment the cloud. Identifying such instabilities has proved difficult. It has been suggested that elongated structures (such as the `pillars of creation') and other shapes arise because of instabilities, but alternative explanations are available. One key signature of an instability is a wave-like structure in the gas, which has hitherto not been seen. Here we report the presence of `waves' at the surface of the Orion molecular cloud near where massive stars are forming. The waves seem to be a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that arises during the expansion of the nebula as gas heated and ionized by massive stars is blown over pre-existing molecular gas.

  19. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  20. AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION INTERACTIONS IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION INTERACTIONS IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS A Thesis by GINGER MARIE of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 2011 Department of Geography and Planning #12;AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION and Graduate Studies #12;Copyright by Ginger Marie Kelly 2011 All Rights Reserved #12;iv ABSTRACT AEROSOL-PRECIPITATION

  1. PRICING PRECIPITATION BASED DERIVATIVES RENE CARMONA AND PAVEL DIKO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    PRICING PRECIPITATION BASED DERIVATIVES REN´E CARMONA AND PAVEL DIKO ABSTRACT. We consider the problem of pricing a derivative contract written on the precipitation at a specific location during of the underlying precipitation. Our model is based on pulse Poisson process models widely used in hydrology. We

  2. Influences of soil moisture and vegetation on convective precipitation forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Influences of soil moisture and vegetation on convective precipitation forecasts over the United and vegetation on 30 h convective precipitation forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting model over, the complete removal of vegetation produced substantially less precipitation, while conversion to forest led

  3. Precipitation amount and intensity measurements using a windscreen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    Precipitation amount and intensity measurements using a windscreen Wiel Wauben Instrumental Department, INSA-IO, KNMI June 21, 2004 #12;#12;Precipitation amount and intensity measurements using................................................................................... 1 2. Precipitation gauge and measurement setup............................ 3 2.1. KNMI electronic

  4. ULF Waves Associated with Enhanced Subauroral Proton Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ULF Waves Associated with Enhanced Subauroral Proton Precipitation Thomas J. Immel, S. B. Mende, H Abstract. Several types of sub-auroral proton precipitation events have been identified using and solar wind conditions and the mechanism driving the precipitation has often been assumed

  5. Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity for the overall transformation kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in austenite that takes into account the precipitation and coarsening reactions to be treated in a single model. The model is compared with published

  6. Stochastic precipitation generation based on a multivariate autoregression model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Stochastic precipitation generation based on a multivariate autoregression model Oleg V. Makhnin of stochastic precipitation generation has long been of interest. A good generator should produce time series with statistical properties to match those of the real precipitation. Here, we present a multivariate

  7. Tubular precipitation and redox gradients on a bubbling template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    Tubular precipitation and redox gradients on a bubbling template David A. Stone* and Raymond E) Tubular structures created by precipitation abound in nature, from chimneys at hydrothermal vents to soda oxides precipitate on the surface of bubbles that linger at the tube rim and then detach, leaving behind

  8. SPATIOTEMPORAL MODELS IN THE ESTIMATION OF AREA PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisbon, University of

    SPATIOTEMPORAL MODELS IN THE ESTIMATION OF AREA PRECIPITATION Eduardo Severino and Teresa Alpuim University of Lisbon, Portugal SUMMARY Since area precipitation measurements are difficult to obtain because of the large spatial and time variability of the precipitation field, the development of statistical methods

  9. Precipitation event distribution in Central Argentina: spatial and temporal patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Precipitation event distribution in Central Argentina: spatial and temporal patterns Patricio N, C1417DSE Buenos Aires, Argentina ABSTRACT The annual amount of precipitation inputs received, these inputs have to escape runoff, favoured by large and less frequent precipitation events, and evaporation

  10. Precipitation distributions for explicit versus parameterized convection in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Precipitation distributions for explicit versus parameterized convection in a large-domain high.J. and Lister, G.M.S. (2012) Precipitation distributions for explicit versus parameterized convection in a large. Meteorol. Soc. 138: 1692­1708, October 2012 A Precipitation distributions for explicit versus parametrized

  11. Energetic ion precipitation at Titan T. E. Cravens,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Energetic ion precipitation at Titan T. E. Cravens,1 I. P. Robertson,1 S. A. Ledvina,2 D. Mitchell observed in Saturn's outer magnetosphere and can precipitate into Titan's atmosphere where they deposit energy, ionize, and drive ionospheric chemistry. Ion production rates caused by this precipitation

  12. Precipitation and Northern Hemisphere regimes Christoph C. Raiblea,*, Ute Lukschb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raible, Christoph C.

    Precipitation and Northern Hemisphere regimes Christoph C. Raiblea,*, Ute Lukschb , Klaus-correlations between the precipitation in the tropical and subtropical western Atlantic illustrate the changes of the Hadley cell with El Nin~o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO).The precipitation anomaly pattern in the north

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Winter westerly disturbance dynamics and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles

    ORIGINAL PAPER Winter westerly disturbance dynamics and precipitation in the western Himalaya, allowing for a comprehensive study of the factors that relate WWD to orographic precipitation of disturbances, the state of the background environ- ment during their propagation, and precipitation totals

  14. Appendix to regridding NCDCs meteorological data 1 PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    10 Appendix to regridding NCDCs meteorological data 1 PRECIPITATION 1.1 cmb_prcp.dly Daily precipitation file downloaded directly from Earthinfo CDs. One year is on one line although you can not see.2 cmb_prcp.sta Precipitation station file downloaded from Earthinfo CDs MT|24|2827|EUREKA RS Prcp|771

  15. AGCM Precipitation Biases in the Tropical Atlantic M. BIASUTTI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    AGCM Precipitation Biases in the Tropical Atlantic M. BIASUTTI Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory precipitation in the Southern Hemisphere in boreal spring and in the Caribbean region in boreal summer precipitation maximum does not occur there. This is the case even though these GCMs accurately place the maximum

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER An improved reconstruction of MayJune precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    ORIGINAL PAPER An improved reconstruction of May­June precipitation using tree-ring data from developed a high quality reconstruction of May­June precipitation for the interior region of southwest- ern . Tree ring . Precipitation reconstruction . Black pine . Volcanic eruption . Turkey Introduction

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming impact on the dominant precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    ORIGINAL PAPER Global warming impact on the dominant precipitation processes in the Middle East a good job of simulating the precipitation for most of the domain, though it performs relatively poorly. The results also show widespread decreases in precipitation over the eastern Mediterranean and Turkey

  18. LOCALIZED PRECIPITATION, LAKE-EFFECT STORMS, AND EROSION ON MARS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOCALIZED PRECIPITATION, LAKE-EFFECT STORMS, AND EROSION ON MARS. Edwin. S. Kite*, Earth], this hypothesis has never been modeled. We report numerical tests of localized precipitation using MRAMS ephemeral lakes. For a given vapor injection rate or lake surface temperature, localized precipitation

  19. Precipitation processes in the Middle East , R. Smitha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Precipitation processes in the Middle East J. Evansa , R. Smitha and R.Oglesbyb a Dept. Geology and topography in generating precipitation in the Middle East. The model is run for five years (1990 thru 1994 that exhibit precipitation regimes disparate from one-another are identified and examined. The models ability

  20. The sensitivity of hillslope bedrock erosion to precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amundson, Ronald

    The sensitivity of hillslope bedrock erosion to precipitation Justine J. Owen,1 * Ronald Amundson,1) through their dependence on soil thickness, and precipitation is an important control on soil formation. Surprisingly though, compilations of hillslope denudation rates suggest little precipitation sensitivity

  1. PRECIPITATION OF RADIATION BELT ELECTRONS BY LIGHTNING-GENERATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRECIPITATION OF RADIATION BELT ELECTRONS BY LIGHTNING-GENERATED MAGNETOSPHERICALLY REFLECTING-order model to estimate the L-shell dependence of the precipitation flux of energetic electrons driven by MR L-shell extent) peak in the precipitation signature can result due to the focusing of the whistler

  2. Precipitation controls Sahel greening trend Thomas Hickler,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardö, Jonas

    Precipitation controls Sahel greening trend Thomas Hickler,1 Lars Eklundh,1 Jonathan W. Seaquist,2 variability between 1982 and 1998. Changes in precipitation were identified as the primary driver. Smith, J. Ardo¨, L. Olsoon, M. T. Sykes, and M. Sjo¨stro¨m (2005), Precipitation controls Sahel greening

  3. Urgent need for a common metric to make precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    Letters Urgent need for a common metric to make precipitation manipulation experiments comparable of altered precipitation patterns, by contrast, have received far less atten- tion. The results of precipitation manipulation experiments were only recently synthesized for the first time (Wu et al., 2011

  4. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  5. Properties of a Molecular Cloud in NGC 185

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Young

    2001-07-10

    The dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 185- the closest early-type galaxy with detectable molecular gas- offers a unique opportunity for high angular resolution studies of the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies. I present interferometric images (17 pc $\\times$ 14 pc resolution) of CO emission from NGC 185. The majority of the molecular gas in NGC 185 is in one resolved cloud, closely associated with dust and an HI structure which may be a photodissociated envelope. The high spatial resolution also reveals a velocity gradient across the cloud, which allows a dynamical mass estimate independent of the H2/CO conversion factor or the virial theorem. The linear sizes, velocity gradients, and dynamical masses of the molecular clouds in NGC 185 and NGC 205, a similar dwarf elliptical, are comparable to those of the largest Galactic giant molecular clouds (GMCs). If the dynamical masses of the clouds are assumed to be good estimates of their true masses, the inferred H2/CO conversion factor in NGC 185 is at least eight times larger than a standard Galactic conversion factor, and the reasons for this difference are not yet understood. In any case, it seems clear that structures similar to Galactic GMCs can form in small elliptical or early type galaxies, even in the absence of spiral density waves.

  6. Trends of extreme precipitation in eastern China and their possible causes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in different-class precipitation over eastern China un- derwet and dry season precipitation. Nature Geoscience, 6, 263–to the orographic precipitation in the Qinling Mountains.

  7. Species-specific phenological responses to winter temperature and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazer, SJ; Gerst, KL; Matthews, ER; Evenden, A

    2015-01-01

    to winter temperature and precipitation in a water-limitedthe timing and magnitude of precipitation (i.e. , larger butof monthly and annual precipitation (PPT, mm), mean monthly

  8. Potential remediation approach for uranium-contaminated groundwaters through potassium uranyl vanadate precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokunaga, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    and secondary phase precipitation in aqueous suspension.Potassium Uranyl Vanadate Precipitation Tetsu K. Tokunaga,uranium (U) through precipitation under oxidizing conditions

  9. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    and K. Tan (2005), Precipitation patterns alter growth ofobserved global land precipitation variations during 1900 –and changes in global precipitation patterns: What do we

  10. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Ray G; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2012-01-01

    in satellite-based precipitation measurements, Geophys. Res.and A. Y. Hou (2010), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)2005), Eval- uation of precipitation estimates from PRISM

  11. High Recovery Desalination of Brackish Water by Chemically-Enhanced Seeded Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCool, Brian Carey

    2012-01-01

    Improved compact accelerated precipitation softening (CAPS).Using Interstage Calcium Precipitation. Desalination, 2012.Enhanced Seeded Precipitation,” Desalination, 264, 256-267 (

  12. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    P. , Microbial Carbonate precipitation as a soil improvementTo Enhance Calcite Precipitation . Environ. Sci. Technol.Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Ureolytic Subsurfface

  13. Precipitation response to land subsurface hydrologic processes in atmospheric general circulation model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2011-01-01

    LO AND FAMIGLIETTI: PRECIPITATION RESPONSE TO LAND PROCESSES2006), Regional tropical precipitation change mechanisms inrobustness of tropical precipitation asymmetry, J. Clim. ,

  14. Production of crystalline refractory metal oxides containing colloidal metal precipitates and useful as solar-effective absorbers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narayan, Jagdish (Knoxville, TN); Chen, Yok (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    This invention is a new process for producing refractory crystalline oxides having improved or unusual properties. The process comprises the steps of forming a doped-metal crystal of the oxide; exposing the doped crystal in a bomb to a reducing atmosphere at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature effecting precipitation of the dopant metal in the crystal lattice of the oxide but insufficient to effect net diffusion of the metal out of the lattice; and then cooling the crystal. Preferably, the cooling step is effected by quenching. The process forms colloidal precipitates of the metal in the oxide lattice. The process may be used, for example, to produce thermally stable black MgO crystalline bodies containing magnetic colloidal precipitates consisting of about 99% Ni. The Ni-containing bodies are solar-selective absorbers, having a room-temperature absorptivity of about 0.96 over virtually all of the solar-energy spectrum and exhibiting an absorption edge in the region of 2 .mu.m. The process parameters can be varied to control the average size of the precipitates. The process can produce a black MgO crystalline body containing colloidal Ni precipitates, some of which have the face-centered-cubic structure and others of which have the body-centered cubic structure. The products of the process are metal-precipitate-containing refractory crystalline oxides which have improved or unique optical, mechanical, magnetic, and/or electronic properties.

  15. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Collins, W. : Effect of clouds on photolysis and oxidants insimulation of in- and below-cloud photolysis in troposphericS. , and Liu, X. : Effects of cloud overlap in photochemical

  16. A SYNERGY OF MICROWAVE CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY AND SCANNING RADAR: MOVING TOWARD A 3D VIEW OF CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SYNERGY OF MICROWAVE CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY AND SCANNING RADAR: MOVING TOWARD A 3D VIEW OF CLOUDS D complementary techniques, i.e., cloud microwave tomography and scanning radar, to retrieve 3D cloud properties the sixth moment of cloud droplets, while cloud tomography, by remotely probing cloud microwave emission

  17. Redefining the Cloud based on Beneficial Service Characteristics A New Cloud Taxonomy Leads to Economically Reasonable Semi-cloudification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redefining the Cloud based on Beneficial Service Characteristics A New Cloud Taxonomy Leads, Germany kemmler@lrz.de Keywords: Cloud, Semi-cloud, Service, Cloud Service, Semi-cloud Service, Service Management. Abstract: Cloud services promise benefits for customers and providers such as scalability

  18. Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic model. It was found that the precipitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Summary Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic model. It was found that the precipitated wax phase can exhibit retrograde phenomena similar of precipitated wax may first increase, then decrease, then increase again. The effect of pressure on wax

  19. Resource Allocation and Scheduling in Heterogeneous Cloud Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Gunho

    2012-01-01

    1] Open Cirrus cloud computing testbed. http://10] Early experiments in cloud computing. http://on Hot topics in cloud computing, pages 12–12, 2009. [29

  20. Cloud Computing and Validation of Expandable In Silico Livers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ropella, Glen EP; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-01-01

    benefit analysis of cloud computing versus desktop grids.as: Ropella and Hunt: Cloud computing and validation ofCloud computing and validation of expandable in silico

  1. RFID Asset Management Solution with Cloud Computation Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, Arunabh

    2012-01-01

    A berkeley view of cloud computing”, EECS Department,and S. Sarma, “Cloud computing, rest and mashups to simplifyand/or frameworks. Cloud computing can be defined as

  2. Simulations of Midlatitude Frontal Clouds by Single-Column and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and 4 cloud resolving models (CRMs) in simulating a strong midlatitude frontal cloud system taken from the Spring 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period at the ARM Southern...

  3. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud Results are presented...

  4. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P.; The ATLAS collaboration; Love, Peter; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Paterson, Michael; Gable, Ian; Sobie, Randall; Field, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This work will describe the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the VM management systems used for harnessing IAAS resources will be discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for managing VM images across multiple clouds, ...

  5. Precipitation Characteristics in Eighteen Coupled Climate Models National Center for Atmospheric Research,* Boulder, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Precipitation Characteristics in Eighteen Coupled Climate Models AIGUO DAI National Center) ABSTRACT Monthly and 3-hourly precipitation data from twentieth-century climate simulations by the newest-related variability, convective versus stratiform precipitation ratio, precipitation frequency and intensity

  6. JLF Forms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat PumpsfacilityviaGasforVendorsThu, 07JLF Forms

  7. Request Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclear NonproliferationRequestForm Sign In

  8. Request Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclear NonproliferationRequestForm Sign

  9. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does stellar feedback result in cloud death?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tasker, Elizabeth J; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Stellar feedback, star formation and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localised thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localised thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the low...

  10. An Inter-Cloud Architecture for Future Internet Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrakis, Euripides G.M.

    An Inter-Cloud Architecture for Future Internet Infrastructures STELIOS SOTIRIADIS, Technical, Technical University of Crete, Greece Iaan latest years, the concept of interconnecting clouds to allow of cloud resources from Internet users. An efficient common management between different clouds

  11. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  12. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the gould belt. VI. The Auriga-California molecular cloud observed with IRAC and MIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Harvey, Paul M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Tothill, Nicholas F. H. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Nutter, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queen's Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); DiFrancesco, James [National Research Council Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Jørgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø. (Denmark); Allen, Lori E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Chapman, Nicholas L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Merín, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC-ESA, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Peterson, Dawn E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 ?m observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg{sup 2} with IRAC and 10.47 deg{sup 2} with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkH? 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the relative fraction of YSOs in earlier (Class I and F) and later (Class II) classes compared to other clouds. We perform simple SED modeling of the YSOs with disks to compare the mid-IR properties to disks in other clouds and identify 14 classical transition disk candidates. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size, and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15-20 times fewer stars.

  13. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore »iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  14. PRECIPITATION The images above use daily precipitation statistics fromNWS COOP, CoCoRaHS, and CoAgMet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    PRECIPITATION The images above use daily precipitation statistics fromNWS COOP, CoCoRaHS, and CoAgMet stations. Fromtop to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7-days of accumulated precipitation in inches; current month-to-date accumulated precipitation in inches; last month's precipitation as a percent

  15. Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krikos, Alexis Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

  16. The Evolution of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ryan P; The ATLAS collaboration; Brasolin, Franco; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Desmarais, Ron; Field, Laurence; Gable, Ian; Giordano, Domenico; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Hover, John; Leblanc, Matthew Edgar; Love, Peter; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Zaytsev, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has successfully incorporated cloud computing technology and cloud resources into its primarily grid-based model of distributed computing. Cloud R&D activities continue to mature and transition into stable production systems, while ongoing evolutionary changes are still needed to adapt and refine the approaches used, in response to changes in prevailing cloud technology. In addition, completely new developments are needed to handle emerging requirements. This paper describes the overall evolution of cloud computing in ATLAS. The current status of the virtual machine (VM) management systems used for harnessing infrastructure as a service (IaaS) resources are discussed. Monitoring and accounting systems tailored for clouds are needed to complete the integration of cloud resources within ATLAS' distributed computing framework. We are developing and deploying new solutions to address the challenge of operation in a geographically distributed multi-cloud scenario, including a system for ma...

  17. VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floater, Michael S.

    VOLUMETRIC SNAPPING: WATERTIGHT TRIANGULATION OF POINT CLOUDS Tim Volodine KULeuven, Department: meshing, surface reconstruction, volumetric grid, contouring, point clouds. Abstract: We propose, a volumetric method that does not rely on a signed distance function was proposed recently by Hornung

  18. Simulation of polar stratospheric clouds in the specified dynamics version of the whole atmosphere community climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegner, T.

    We evaluate the simulation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model for the Antarctic winter 2005. In this model, PSCs are assumed to form ...

  19. AnonymousCloud: A Data Ownership Privacy Provider Framework in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlen, Kevin W.

    AnonymousCloud: A Data Ownership Privacy Provider Framework in Cloud Computing Safwan Mahmud Khan their computation results are ultimately delivered. To provide this data ownership privacy, the cloud's distributed-anonymity; authentication; cloud computing; in- formation security; privacy; Tor I. INTRODUCTION Revolutionary advances

  20. CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing Yi-Ruei Chen1, cloud computing, proxy re-encryption 1 Introduction Outsourcing data to cloud server (CS) becomes , Cheng-Kang Chu2 , Wen-Guey Tzeng3 , and Jianying Zhou4 1,3 Department of Computer Science, National

  1. CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    . Keywords: cloud computing, information policy, rechnology policy, grid computing, security, privacyCLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger

  2. IsYour Network Cloud Ready? Network EnableYour Cloud With MPLSVPNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    -enabled cloud that is highly-secure and reliable. It is critical for enterprises to evaluate a network, but the high level of shared infrastructure creates concerns about security risks.As a result, the public cloudIsYour Network Cloud Ready? Network EnableYour Cloud With MPLSVPNs A FROST & SULLIVAN EXECUTIVE

  3. Home is Safer than the Cloud! Privacy Concerns for Consumer Cloud Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for sensitive data over cloud storage. However, users desire better security and are ready to pay for services storage systems. General Terms Human Factors, Security, Privacy. Keywords Cloud Storage, Social FactorsHome is Safer than the Cloud! Privacy Concerns for Consumer Cloud Storage Iulia Ion , Niharika

  4. CloudWatcher: Network Security Monitoring Using OpenFlow in Dynamic Cloud Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Guofei

    CloudWatcher: Network Security Monitoring Using OpenFlow in Dynamic Cloud Networks (or: How to Provide Security Monitoring as a Service in Clouds?) Seungwon Shin SUCCESS Lab Texas A&M University Email, basically, we can employ existing network security devices, but applying them to a cloud network requires

  5. StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications Feifei. It requires the evaluation of system performance and energy consumption under a wide variety of realistic and energy consumption analysis tool for cloud applications in real-world cloud environments. Stress

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT on Cloud Physics, Portland, OR June 28-July 2, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Sciences Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)'s cloud tomography Intensive Observation Period (IOP

  7. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

  8. Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

  9. Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Trent

    Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

  10. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

  11. The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

  12. Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap C.M. Naud a, , B July 2006; accepted 3 September 2006 Abstract Coincident MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights retrieved March 2000 and October 2003. The difference between MODIS and MISR cloud-top heights is assessed

  13. Ralf Klessen: PPV, Oct. 24, 2005 Molecular CloudMolecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klessen,Ralf

    Ralf Klessen: PPV, Oct. 24, 2005 Molecular CloudMolecular Cloud Turbulence and Star formation three ,,steps" of star formation: 1.1. formation of molecular clouds in the disk of ourformation of molecular clouds in the disk of our galaxygalaxy 2.2. formation of protostellar coresformation

  14. Moving magnetic cloud -1Moving magnetic cloud -1 "Double change of frame" calculation...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    #12;19 Moving magnetic cloud - 1Moving magnetic cloud - 1 "Double change of frame" calculation... #12;eb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration -- E. Parizot (IPN Orsay) 21 Moving magnetic cloud - 2Moving magnetic cloud - 2 #12;Karlsruhe, 23-25 Feb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration

  15. To Cloud or Not to Cloud: Measuring the Performance of Mobile Gaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    To Cloud or Not to Cloud: Measuring the Performance of Mobile Gaming Chun-Ying Huang Department Tsing-Hua University Hsinchu, Taiwan chsu@cs.nthu.edu.tw ABSTRACT Mobile cloud gaming allows gamers an open source cloud gaming platform to conduct extensive experiments on real mobile clients. Our

  16. Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determination of cloud liquid water distribution using 3D cloud tomography Dong Huang,1 Yangang Liu; published 2 July 2008. [1] The cloud microwave tomography method for remotely retrieving 3D distributions of cloud Liquid Water Content (LWC) was originally proposed by Warner et al. in the 1980s but has lain

  17. CloudTracker: Using Execution Provenance to Optimize the Cost of Cloud Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    CloudTracker: Using Execution Provenance to Optimize the Cost of Cloud Use Geoffrey Douglas, Brian simulations using commercial clouds. We present a framework, called CLOUDTRACKER, that transparently records information from a simula- tion that is executed in a commercial cloud so that it may be "replayed" exactly

  18. The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing High Performance Network of cloud platforms and services have been developed for data intensive computing, including Hadoop, Sector, CloudStore (formerly KFS), HBase, and Thrift. In order to benchmark the performance of these systems

  19. The Cloud Computing and Other Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borjon-Kubota, Martha Estela

    2011-01-01

    bodies. Saturated. We watch clouds simmer over the stillnessnoise like a fountain spring simmers between your thighs. A

  20. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R. (Queens)

    2012-10-23

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  1. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  2. Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-07-29

    A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform well in the considered case. The explicitly predicted water partitioning indicates that the mean mass of droplets participating in the models aqueous chemistry calculations is proportional to the dry CCN size.

  3. Auditing the Structural Reliability of the Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    . Icebergs in the Clouds: the Other Risks of Cloud Computing. In HotCloud, 2012. #12;Correlated Failures of occurrences. #12;Talk Outline Challenges Our approach Evaluation #12;Talk Outline Challenges Our approach Evaluation #12;Challenges 1. How to acquire dependency information automatically? 2. How to organize

  4. Towards a Ubiquitous Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Merwe, Kobus

    Towards a Ubiquitous Cloud Computing Infrastructure Jacobus Van der Merwe, K.K. Ramakrishnan of a number of cloud computing use cases. We specifically consider cloudbursting and follow-the-sun and focus that are also network service providers. I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing is rapidly gaining acceptance

  5. Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samarati, Pierangela

    1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

  6. Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Shouhuai

    Security Architecture for Federated Mobile Cloud Computing Shouhuai Xu and E. Paul Ratazzi, federated mobile cloud computing imposes a diverse set of new chal- lenges, especially from a security clouds for security purposes? How should we deal with the tar- geted attackers that attempt to launch

  7. VULCAN: Vulnerability Assessment Framework for Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    services on Cloud is complex because the security depends on the vulnerability of infrastructure, platform services on Cloud is complex because the security depends on the vulnerability of infrastruc- ture?". Or "I want to host this software application in this cloud environment, what security vulnerabilities I

  8. Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration 20097733 Bobby Nielsen, 20003686 Frederik Kierbye}@cs.au.dk 20130324 Abstract This document presents a research in Enterprise Cloud Storage and Data Migration. The hypothesis is that, it is easy to migrate data between cloud platforms, including changing api

  9. MEBSURIXG CLOUD MOVEMENTS A Science Service Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -.- - MEBSURIXG CLOUD MOVEMENTS I A Science Service Feature Released upon receist but intended on Meteorology Vatching the clouds drift by, a traditional pastime of idle people, i s part Of the professional his head. He makes his cloud observations w i t h the aid of an instrument known as a nei

  10. Evaluation of moist processes during intense precipitation in km-scale NWP models using remote sensing and in-situ data: Impact of microphysics size distribution assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg, K.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of moist processes and surface precipitation during three extreme precipitation events over Belgium to the representation of rain, snow and hail size distributions in a bulk one-moment microphysics parameterisation scheme. Sensitivities included the use of empirically derived relations to calculate the slope parameter and diagnose the intercept parameter of the exponential snow and rain size distributions and sensitivities to the treatment of hail/graupel. A detailed evaluation of the experiments against various high temporal resolution and spatially distributed observational data was performed to understand how moist processes responded to the implemented size distribution modifications. Net vapor consumption by microphysical processes was found to be unaffected by snow or rain size distribution modifications, while it was reduced replacing formulations for hail by those typical for graupel, mainly due to intense sublimation of graupel. Cloud optical thickness was overestimated in all experiments and all cases, likely due to overestimated snow amounts. The overestimation slightly deteriorated by modifying the rain and snow size distributions due to increased snow depositional growth, while it was reduced by including graupel. The latter was mainly due to enhanced cloud water collection by graupel and reduced snow depositional growth. Radar reflectivity and cloud optical thickness could only be realistically represented by inclusion of graupel during a stratiform case, while hail was found indispensable to simulate the vertical reflectivity profile and the surface precipitation structure. Precipitation amount was not much altered by any of the modifications made and the general overestimation was only decreased slightly during a supercell convective case.

  11. Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop Daniel Rosenfeld of land use exposing the topsoil can initiate such a desertification feedback process. Satellite

  12. Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in a volumetrically significant space and to understand the physiological health of the cells that are responsible for the calcite precipitation. The specific...

  13. THE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE OF AN EXOZODIACAL DUST CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christopher C.

    2011-10-15

    Planets embedded within debris disks gravitationally perturb nearby dust and can create clumpy, azimuthally asymmetric circumstellar ring structures that rotate in lock with the planet. The Earth creates one such structure in the solar zodiacal dust cloud. In an edge-on system, the dust 'clumps' periodically pass in front of the star as the planet orbits, occulting and forward-scattering starlight. In this paper, we predict the shape and magnitude of the corresponding transit signal. To do so, we model the dust distributions of collisional, steady-state exozodiacal clouds perturbed by planetary companions. We examine disks with dusty ring structures formed by the planet's resonant trapping of in-spiraling dust for a range of planet masses and semi-major axes, dust properties, and disk masses. We synthesize edge-on images of these models and calculate the transit signatures of the resonant ring structures. The transit light curves created by dusty resonant ring structures typically exhibit two broad transit minima that lead and trail the planetary transit. We find that Jupiter-mass planets embedded within disks hundreds of times denser than our zodiacal cloud can create resonant ring structures with transit depths up to {approx}10{sup -4}, possibly detectable with Kepler. Resonant rings produced by planets more or less massive than Jupiter produce smaller transit depths. Observations of these transit signals may provide upper limits on the degree of asymmetry in exozodiacal clouds.

  14. Environmental regulation of cloud and star formation in galactic bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaud, F; Emsellem, E; Agertz, O; Athanassoula, E; Combes, F; Elmegreen, B; Kraljic, K; Motte, F; Teyssier, R

    2015-01-01

    The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find tha...

  15. Unlocking the Secrets of Clouds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clouds may look soft, fluffy and harmless to the untrained eye, but to an expert climate model scientist they represent great challenges. Fortunately the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate and Research Facility is kicking off a five-month study which should significantly clear the air.

  16. POTENTIAL OF CLOUD-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    .!! Cover!photos!courtesy!of!the!National!Energy!Research!Scientific!Computing!Center!and!Google.! #12;! ! ! The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study ! Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory June, 2013 Research Team Eric!Masanet! Arman!Shehabi! Jiaqi!Liang! Lavanya!Ramakrishnan! Xiao

  17. ARM Data for Cloud Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-10-02

    The PI's ARM investigation (DE-IA02-02ER633 18) developed a physically-based subgrid-scale saturation representation that fully considers the direct interactions of the parameterized subgrid-scale motions with subgrid-scale cloud microphysical and radiative processes. Major accomplishments under the support of that interagency agreement are summarized in this paper.

  18. Magneto-hydrodynamic Simulations of a Jet Drilling an HI Cloud: Shock Induced Formation of Molecular Clouds and Jet Breakup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asahina, Y; Kawashima, T; Furukawa, N; Enokiya, R; Yamamoto, H; Fukui, Y; Matsumoto, R

    2014-01-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of HI gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense HI gas. We found that the HI gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the HI gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km/s almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the HI-cavity drill...

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup –1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  20. Climatological data for clouds over the globe from surface observations, 1982--1991: The total cloud edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, C.J.; Warren, S.G.; London, J.

    1994-10-01

    Routine, surface synoptic weather reports from ships and land stations over the entire globe, for the ten-year period December 1981 through November 1991, were processed for total cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of clear sky, precipitation, and sky-obscured due to fog. Archived data, consisting of various annual, seasonal and monthly averages, are provided in grid boxes that are typically 2.5{degrees} {times} 2.5{degrees} for land and 5{degrees} {times} 5{degrees} for ocean. Day and nighttime averages are also given separately for each season. Several derived quantities, such as interannual variations and annual and diurnal harmonics, are provided as well. This data set incorporates an improved representation of nighttime cloudiness by utilizing only those nighttime observations for which the illuminance due to moonlight exceeds a specified threshold. This reduction in the night-detection bias increases the computed global average total cloud cover by about 2%. The impact on computed diurnal cycles is even greater, particularly over the oceans where is found, in contrast to previous surface-based climatologies, that cloudiness is often greater at night than during the day.

  1. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  2. The Formation and Destruction of Molecular Clouds and Galactic Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Iwasaki, Kazunari; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We describe an overall picture of galactic-scale star formation. Recent high-resolution magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of two-fluid dynamics with cooling/heating and thermal conduction have shown that the formation of molecular clouds requires multiple episodes of supersonic compression. This finding enables us to create a scenario in which molecular clouds form in interacting shells or bubbles on a galactic scale. First we estimate the ensemble-averaged growth rate of molecular clouds over a timescale larger than a million years. Next we perform radiation hydrodynamics simulations to evaluate the destruction rate of magnetized molecular clouds by the stellar FUV radiation. We also investigate the resultant star formation efficiency within a cloud which amounts to a low value (a few percent) if we adopt the power-law exponent -2.5 for the mass distribution of stars in the cloud. We finally describe the time evolution of the mass function of molecular clouds over a long timescale (>1Myr) and discuss the st...

  3. The influence of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Hu, J.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-12-15

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year data set from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction ?c). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle)more »to multi-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found the following: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 50–70 % to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 90 and 110 %, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10 %), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m?2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m?2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6 % in dry conditions and between 15 and 25 % in partially wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, even though precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced the magnitude of Rnet, LE increased from ≈ 10 to over 20 W m?2 due to increased evaporation. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above-canopy mean ?c during wet conditions was found to be about 2–3 ?mol mol?1 larger than ?c on dry days. This difference was fairly constant over the full diel cycle suggesting that it was due to synoptic weather patterns (different air masses and/or effects of barometric pressure). Finally, the effect of clouds on the timing and magnitude of daytime ecosystem fluxes is described.« less

  4. The effect of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-06-16

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year dataset from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction ?c). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle) tomore »multi-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 50–70% to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 70–80%, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10%), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m-2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m-2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6% in dry conditions and 20% in wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced Rnet and increased LE. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above-canopy mean ?c during wet conditions was found to be about 2–3 ?mol mol-1 larger than ?c on dry days. This difference was fairly constant over the full diel cycle suggesting that it was due to synoptic weather patterns (different air masses and/or effects of barometric pressure). In the evening hours during wet conditions, weakly stable conditions resulted in smaller vertical ?c differences compared to those in dry conditions. Finally, the effect of clouds on the timing and magnitude of daytime ecosystem fluxes is described.« less

  5. Precipitation characteristics of CAM5 physics at mesoscale resolution during MC3E and the impact of convective timescale choice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafson, William I.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-12-01

    The physics suite of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) has recently been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the behavior of the parameterization suite at high resolution and in the more controlled setting of a limited area model. The initial paper documenting this capability characterized the behavior for northern high latitude conditions. This present paper characterizes the precipitation characteristics for continental, mid-latitude, springtime conditions during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) over the central United States. This period exhibited a range of convective conditions from those driven strongly by large-scale synoptic regimes to more locally driven convection. The study focuses on the precipitation behavior at 32 km grid spacing to better anticipate how the physics will behave in the global model when used at similar grid spacing in the coming years. Importantly, one change to the Zhang-McFarlane deep convective parameterization when implemented in WRF was to make the convective timescale parameter an explicit function of grid spacing. This study examines the sensitivity of the precipitation to the default value of the convective timescale in WRF, which is 600 seconds for 32 km grid spacing, to the value of 3600 seconds used for 2 degree grid spacing in CAM5. For comparison, an infinite convective timescale is also used. The results show that the 600 second timescale gives the most accurate precipitation over the central United States in terms of rain amount. However, this setting has the worst precipitation diurnal cycle, with the convection too tightly linked to the daytime surface heating. Longer timescales greatly improve the diurnal cycle but result in less precipitation and produce a low bias. An analysis of rain rates shows the accurate precipitation amount with the shorter timescale is assembled from an over abundance of drizzle combined with too little heavy rain events. With longer timescales one can improve the distribution, particularly for the extreme rain rates. Ultimately, without changing other aspects of the physics, one must choose between accurate diurnal timing and rain amount when choosing an appropriate convective timescale.

  6. Precipitation characteristics of CAM5 physics at mesoscale resolution during MC3E and the impact of convective timescale choice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafson, William I.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-12-17

    The physics suite of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) has recently been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the behavior of the parameterization suite at high resolution and in the more controlled setting of a limited area model. The initial paper documenting this capability characterized the behavior for northern high latitude conditions. This present paper characterizes the precipitation characteristics for continental, mid-latitude, springtime conditions during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) over the central United States. This period exhibited a range of convective conditions from those driven strongly by large-scale synoptic regimes to more locally driven convection. The study focuses on the precipitation behavior at 32 km grid spacing to better anticipate how the physics will behave in the global model when used at similar grid spacing in the coming years. Importantly, one change to the Zhang-McFarlane deep convective parameterization when implemented in WRF was to make the convective timescale parameter an explicit function of grid spacing. This study examines the sensitivity of the precipitation to the default value of the convective timescale in WRF, which is 600 seconds for 32 km grid spacing, to the value of 3600 seconds used for 2 degree grid spacing in CAM5. For comparison, an infinite convective timescale is also used. The results show that the 600 second timescale gives the most accurate precipitation over the central United States in terms of rain amount. However, this setting has the worst precipitation diurnal cycle, with the convection too tightly linked to the daytime surface heating. Longer timescales greatly improve the diurnal cycle but result in less precipitation and produce a low bias. An analysis of rain rates shows the accurate precipitation amount with the shorter timescale is assembled from an over abundance of drizzle combined with too little heavy rain events. With longer timescales one can improve the distribution, particularly for the extreme rain rates. Ultimately, without changing other aspects of the physics, one must choose between accurate diurnal timing and rain amount when choosing an appropriate convective timescale.

  7. Precipitation characteristics of CAM5 physics at mesoscale resolution during MC3E and the impact of convective timescale choice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gustafson, William I.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-12-17

    The physics suite of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) has recently been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to explore the behavior of the parameterization suite at high resolution and in the more controlled setting of a limited area model. The initial paper documenting this capability characterized the behavior for northern high latitude conditions. This present paper characterizes the precipitation characteristics for continental, mid-latitude, springtime conditions during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) over the central United States. This period exhibited a range of convective conditions from those driven strongly by large-scale synoptic regimesmore »to more locally driven convection. The study focuses on the precipitation behavior at 32 km grid spacing to better anticipate how the physics will behave in the global model when used at similar grid spacing in the coming years. Importantly, one change to the Zhang-McFarlane deep convective parameterization when implemented in WRF was to make the convective timescale parameter an explicit function of grid spacing. This study examines the sensitivity of the precipitation to the default value of the convective timescale in WRF, which is 600 seconds for 32 km grid spacing, to the value of 3600 seconds used for 2 degree grid spacing in CAM5. For comparison, an infinite convective timescale is also used. The results show that the 600 second timescale gives the most accurate precipitation over the central United States in terms of rain amount. However, this setting has the worst precipitation diurnal cycle, with the convection too tightly linked to the daytime surface heating. Longer timescales greatly improve the diurnal cycle but result in less precipitation and produce a low bias. An analysis of rain rates shows the accurate precipitation amount with the shorter timescale is assembled from an over abundance of drizzle combined with too little heavy rain events. With longer timescales one can improve the distribution, particularly for the extreme rain rates. Ultimately, without changing other aspects of the physics, one must choose between accurate diurnal timing and rain amount when choosing an appropriate convective timescale.« less

  8. QUANTITATIVELY ASSESSING THE ROLE OF CLOUDS IN THE TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF GJ 1214b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Vissher, Channon

    2013-09-20

    Recent observations of the super-Earth GJ 1214b show that it has a relatively featureless transmission spectrum. One suggestion is that these observations indicate that the planet's atmosphere is vertically compact, perhaps due to a water-rich composition that yields a large mean molecular weight. Another suggestion is that the atmosphere is hydrogen/helium-rich with clouds that obscure predicted absorption features. Previous models that incorporate clouds have included their effect without a strong physical motivation for their existence. Here, we present model atmospheres of GJ 1214b that include physically motivated clouds of two types. We model the clouds that are present in chemical equilibrium, as has been suggested to occur on brown dwarfs, which include KCl and ZnS for this planet. We also include clouds that form as a result of photochemistry, forming a hydrocarbon haze layer. We use a photochemical kinetics model to understand the vertical distribution and available mass of haze-forming molecules. We model both solar and enhanced-metallicity cloudy models and determine the cloud properties necessary to match observations. In enhanced-metallicity atmospheres, we find that the equilibrium clouds can match the observations of GJ 1214b if they are lofted high into the atmosphere and have a low sedimentation efficiency (f{sub sed} = 0.1). We find that models with a variety of hydrocarbon haze properties can match the observations. Particle sizes from 0.01 to 0.25 ?m can match the transmission spectrum with haze-forming efficiencies as low as 1%-5%.

  9. Asphaltene Precipitation in Crude Oils: Theory and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianzhong

    Asphaltene Precipitation in Crude Oils: Theory and Experiments Eduardo Buenrostro.interscience.wiley.com). The precipitation of asphaltenes in two Mexican crude oils was measured using a combination of high- and tank-oil type of samples of the same crude oils. For the oils investigated, compositional data

  10. Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ in contaminated soils plays a crucial role in determining the long term fate of toxic metal pollutants speciation in laboratory contaminated soils with thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of precipitate stability

  11. The Physical Conditions in a Pre Super Star Cluster Molecular Cloud in the Antennae Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, K E; Indebetouw, R; Brogan, C L; Whitmore, B C; Hibbard, J; Sheth, K; Evans, A

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the physical conditions in an extreme molecular cloud in the Antennae merging galaxies. This cloud has properties consistant with those required to form a globular cluster. We have obtained ALMA CO and 870$\\mu$m observations of the Antennae galaxy system with $\\sim 0".5$ resolution. This cloud stands out in the data with a radius of $\\lesssim 24$~pc and mass of $>5\\times 10^6$~M$_\\odot$. The cloud appears capable of forming a globular cluster, but the lack of associated thermal radio emission indicates that star formation has not yet altered the environment. The lack of thermal radio emission places the cloud in an early stage of evolution, which we expect to be short-lived ($\\lesssim 1$~Myr) and thus rare. Given its mass and kinetic energy, for the cloud to be confined (as its appearance strongly suggests) it must be subject to an external pressure of P/$k_B \\gtrsim 10^8$~K~cm$^{-3}$ -- 10,000 times higher than typical interstellar pressure. This would support theories that high pre...

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

  13. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climateOverview of Arctic cloud and radiation characteristics. J.of Arctic low-level clouds observed during the FIRE Arctic

  14. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  15. National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Networks: Data on the chemistry of precipitation

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) is a nationwide network of sites collecting data on the chemistry of precipitation for monitoring of geographical and temporal long-term trends. The precipitation at each station is collected weekly according to strict clean-handling procedures. It is then sent to the Central Analytical Laboratory where it is analyzed for hydrogen (acidity as pH), sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, and base cations (such as calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium). The network is a cooperative effort between many different groups, including the State Agricultural Experiment Stations, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and numerous other governmental and private entities. DOE is one of these cooperating agencies, though it plays a smaller funding role than some of the other federal sources. Since 1978, the NADP/NTN has grown from 22 stations to over 250 sites spanning the continental United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program has also expanded its sampling to two additional networks: 1) the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN), currently with over 90 sites, was formed in 1995 to collect weekly samples of precipitation which are analyzed by Frontier Geosciences for total mercury, and 2) the Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN), formed for the purpose of studying precipitation chemistry trends with greater temporal resolution than the NTN. [taken from the NADP History and Overview page at http://nadp.sws.uiuc.edu/nadpoverview.asp] Data from these networks are freely available in via customized search interfaces linked to interactive maps of the stations in the three networks. Animated Isopleth maps in Flash and PowerPoint are also available to display concentrations and depositions various substances such as sulfate, nitrate, etc. (Specialized Interface)

  16. Average Interpolating Wavelets on Point Clouds and Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rustamov, Raif M

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new wavelet transform suitable for analyzing functions on point clouds and graphs. Our construction is based on a generalization of the average interpolating refinement scheme of Donoho. The most important ingredient of the original scheme that needs to be altered is the choice of the interpolant. Here, we define the interpolant as the minimizer of a smoothness functional, namely a generalization of the Laplacian energy, subject to the averaging constraints. In the continuous setting, we derive a formula for the optimal solution in terms of the poly-harmonic Green's function. The form of this solution is used to motivate our construction in the setting of graphs and point clouds. We highlight the empirical convergence of our refinement scheme and the potential applications of the resulting wavelet transform through experiments on a number of data stets.

  17. Alumina forming iron base superalloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

    2014-08-26

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  18. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-01

    Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

  19. Evidence for a Molecular Cloud Origin for Gamma-Ray Bursts: Implications for the Nature of Star Formation in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel E. Reichart; Paul A. Price

    2001-08-30

    It appears that the majority of rapidly-, well-localized gamma-ray bursts with undetected, or dark, optical afterglows, or `dark bursts' for short, occur in clouds of size R > 10L_{49}^{1/2} pc and mass M > 3x10^5L_{49} M_{sun}, where L is the isotropic-equivalent peak luminosity of the optical flash. We show that clouds of this size and mass cannot be modeled as a gas that is bound by pressure equilibrium with a warm or hot phase of the interstellar medium (i.e., a diffuse cloud): Such a cloud would be unstable to gravitational collapse, resulting in the collapse and fragmentation of the cloud until a burst of star formation re-establishes pressure equilibrium within the fragments, and the fragments are bound by self-gravity (i.e., a molecular cloud). Consequently, dark bursts probably occur in molecular clouds, in which case dark bursts are probably a byproduct of this burst of star formation if the molecular cloud formed recently, and/or the result of lingering or latter generation star formation if the molecular cloud formed some time ago. We then show that if bursts occur in Galactic-like molecular clouds, the column densities of which might be universal, the number of dark bursts can be comparable to the number of bursts with detected optical afterglows: This is what is observed, which suggests that the bursts with detected optical afterglows might also occur in molecular clouds. We confirm this by modeling and constraining the distribution of column densities, measured from absorption of the X-ray afterglow, of the bursts with detected optical afterglows: We find that this distribution is consistent with the expectation for bursts that occur in molecular clouds, and is not consistent with the expectation for bursts that occur in diffuse clouds. More...

  20. Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Aditya

    Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure Fang Hao, T.V. Lakshman, Sarit the rapid development in the field of cloud com- puting, security is still one of the major hurdles to cloud to users. At the other end of the spectrum, highly secured cloud services (e.g. Google "government cloud

  1. Fog Computing: Mitigating Insider Data Theft Attacks in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    approach for securing data in the cloud using offensive decoy technology. We monitor data access security in a Cloud environment. I. INTRODUCTION Businesses, especially startups, small and medium busi. This is considered as one of the top threats to cloud computing by the Cloud Security Alliance [1]. While most Cloud

  2. Page 1Securing the Microsoft Cloud Securing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Page 1Securing the Microsoft Cloud Securing the Microsoft Cloud #12;Page 2Securing the Microsoft to have confidence in Microsoft as their preferred cloud provider. Our security policies and practices their security and compliance related needs. Securing the Microsoft Cloud #12;Page 3Securing the Microsoft Cloud

  3. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  4. Organizational challenges in cloud adoption and enablers of cloud transition program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendran, Sneha

    2013-01-01

    With the proliferation of cloud computing, organizations have been able to get access to never seen before computing power and resources. Cloud computing has revolutionized the utilization of computing resources through ...

  5. Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axisa, Duncan

    2011-02-22

    This research focuses on aircraft observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in cumulus clouds. The data were collected in the summer of 2004, the spring of 2007 and the mid-winter and spring of 2008 in Texas, ...

  6. 663 900 1000 1100 1200 3514 Annual precipitation (mm)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckage, Brian

    663 900 1000 1100 1200 3514 Annual precipitation (mm) -72.6 -71.5 -70.3 -69.2 -68.1 42 precipitation (mm) -72.6 -71.5 -70.3 -69.2 -68.1 42.143.144.245.346.4 Longitude (degree) Latitude(degree) (b) Baseline (1961-1990) 663 900 1000 1100 1200 3514 Annual precipitation (mm) -72.6 -71.5 -70.3 -69.2 -68.1 42

  7. Effects of Irrigation on Great Plains and Midwest Precipitation Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, David Benjamin

    2010-11-18

    B. Huber, David B. Mechem, and Nathaniel A. Brunsell Outline •Historical and Conceptual Review •Description of Modeling Approach l•Resu ts •Conclusion Historical Changes in Precipitation Climatological Precipitation Differences (1971 – 2000 minus 1901 – 1930) Source: PRISM Climate Group Irrigation... moisture in the lower atmosphere increases Th id i ddhdb h l llj• e evapotranspirated water s advected northward y t e ow level et •Humid air is lifted over higher sensible heat areas by deep convective updrafts •Precipitation events become more intense •Moisture...

  8. Assessing Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and Biofuels BiomassAssembly of aCloud Spatial and

  9. Fragmentation in rotating isothermal protostellar clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodenheimer, P.; Tohline, J.E.; Black, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an extensive set of 3-D hydrodynamic calculations that have been performed to investigate the susceptibility of rotating clouds to gravitational fragmentation are presented. (GHT)

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  11. Modeling microwave/electron-cloud interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattes, M; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the separate codes BI-RME and ECLOUD or PyECLOUD, we are developing a novel joint simulation tool, which models the combined effect of a charged particle beam and of microwaves on an electron cloud. Possible applications include the degradation of microwave transmission in tele-communication satellites by electron clouds; the microwave-transmission tecchniques being used in particle accelerators for the purpose of electroncloud diagnostics; the microwave emission by the electron cloud itself in the presence of a magnetic field; and the possible suppression of electron-cloud formation in an accelerator by injecting microwaves of suitable amplitude and frequency. A few early simulation results are presented.

  12. Characterization of precipitation product errors across the United States using multiplicative triple collocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, A.

    Validation of precipitation estimates from various products is a challenging problem, since the true precipitation is unknown. However, with the increased availability of precipitation estimates from a wide range of ...

  13. Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport process for atmospheric water soluble carbonyls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsunaga, SN; Guenther, AB; Izawa, Y; Wiedinmyer, C; Greenberg, JP; Kawamura, K

    2007-01-01

    et al. , 2001). Wet precipitation samples contain almost alldeposition rate due to the precipitation Yield mg C m 2 h 1Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport

  14. SPATIALLY PENALIZED REGRESSION FOR DEPENDENCE ANALYSIS OF RARE EVENTS: A STUDY IN PRECIPITATION EXTREMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    SPATIALLY PENALIZED REGRESSION FOR DEPENDENCE ANALYSIS OF RARE EVENTS: A STUDY IN PRECIPITATION, USA ABSTRACT Discovery of dependence structure between precipitation extremes and other climate can be different for different locations. Secondly, the dependence structure between the precipitation

  15. Modelling precipitation sequences in power plant steels Part 2 -Application of kinetic theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling precipitation sequences in power plant steels Part 2 - Application of kinetic theory J. D to predictthevastdifferencesin precipitation kineticsreportedin thepublishedliteraturefor powerplant steels.By implication, the precipitate phases usually present are metastable. Indeed,it is well establishedthat thereis

  16. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yuxin

    2009-01-01

    S. , 1998. Reductive precipitation of uranium(VI) by zero-W. , 2003. Predicting the precipitation of mineral phases inT.M. , 1999. Mineral precipitation and porosity losses in

  17. DIRECT SOLID-STATE PRECIPITATION PROCESSED A-15 (Nb3Al) SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, M.

    2010-01-01

    Letters DIRECT SOLID-STATE PRECIPITATION PROCESSED A-15 (Nb48 DIRECT SOLID-STATE PRECIPITATION PROCESSED A-IS (Nb Al)ABSTRACT A "solid~state precipitation" process was used to

  18. Population variation affects interactions between two California salt marsh plant species more than precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noto, AE; Shurin, JB

    2015-01-01

    significant effect of precipitation and interaction betweenpresence but not by precipitation. J. carnosa plantsS) Competition (C) Precipitation (P) S × P S × C C  × P S × 

  19. Precipitation climatology over India: validation with observations and reanalysis datasets and spatial trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    long-term daily gridded precipitation dataset for asia based10.1007/s00382-015-2597-y Precipitation climatology over DP (2012) Urban precipitation extremes: how reliable are

  20. Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics* KAZUYOSHI KIKUCHI AND BIN WANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bin

    Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics* KAZUYOSHI KIKUCHI AND BIN WANG Department tropical precipitation are documented by using two complementary Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, and phase propagation characteristics of the diurnal precipitation. The oceanic regime is characterized

  1. April 12, 2014: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming Headline: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    April 12, 2014: The Era of Cloud Computing is coming #12;Headline: The Era of Cloud Computing of Cloud Computing at a seminar in MANIT and RGPV on Saturday. Inset headline: This is the right time to build a career in Cloud Computing Article: Prof. Rajkumar Buyya gave guidance to students about Cloud

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky: Formation Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosu, Daniel

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CLOUD COMPUTING, VOL. XX, NO. X, XXXX 1 Cloud Federations in the Sky for cloud resources. The cloud providers' available resources may not be sufficient enough to cope with such demands. Therefore, the cloud providers need to reshape their business structures and seek to improve

  3. RETRIEVALS OF CLOUD OPTICAL DEPTH AND EFFECTIVE RADIUS FROM A THIN-CLOUD ROTATING SHADOWBAND RADIOMETER (TC-RSR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETRIEVALS OF CLOUD OPTICAL DEPTH AND EFFECTIVE RADIUS FROM A THIN-CLOUD ROTATING SHADOWBAND Division Brookhaven National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT A thin cloud cloud. We applied Min and Duan's retrieval algorithm to the field measurements of TC-RSR to derive cloud

  4. Combined effects of precipitation and nitrogen deposition on native and invasive winter annual production in California deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Leela E.; Allen, Edith B.

    2010-01-01

    E R Combined eVects of precipitation and nitrogen depositionN deposition and precipitation regimes altered as aby November–December precipitation. Biomass exceeded the

  5. Precipitation over eastern South America and the South AtlanticSea surface temperature during neutral ENSO periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles

    2015-01-01

    2003) GPCP pentad precipitation analyses: an experimentalconvec- tion and increase precipitation over eastern SouthAmerica. Keywords SST Precipitation South Atlantic Dipole

  6. Precipitation and soil impacts on partitioning of subsurface moisture in Avena barbata: Observations from a greenhouse experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salve, R.

    2011-01-01

    responsiveness to variation in precipitation and nitrogen is2007, , Intra-seasonal precipitation patterns and above-to Potential Changes in Precipitation, BioScience, 53: 941-

  7. Orogenic Propagating Precipitation Systems over the United States in a Global Climate Model with Embedded Explicit Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael S; Moncrieff, Mitchell W; Somerville, Richard C. J

    2011-01-01

    with warm season precipitation epi- sodes. J. Atmos. Sci. ,2007: Con- vective precipitation variability as a tool forof the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the United States

  8. Seasonality of westerly moisture transport in the East Asian summer monsoon and its implications for interpreting precipitation ?18O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    origin of continental precipitation, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,Network of Isotopes in Precipitation, The GNIP Database.gauge-corrected, global precipitation, Int. J. Climatol. ,

  9. Aircraft Microphysical Documentation from Cloud Base to Anvils of Hailstorm Feeder Clouds in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    in Argentina DANIEL ROSENFELD The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel WILLIAM L. WOODLEY Woodley, Argentina, with a cloud-physics jet aircraft penetrating the major feeder clouds from cloud base to the 45°C. Introduction The province of Mendoza in western Argentina (32°S, 68°W), which is known worldwide for its wine

  10. CloudBridge: A Cloud-Powered System Enabling Mobile Devices to Control Peripherals Without Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    , CloudBridge. CloudBridge user ap- plication running on a smart device works as a TCP bridge relaying on the other. Through the bridge, it is possible to issue operations from a smart device without having network Figure 1: The smart device in the middle works as a bridge connecting a cloud server

  11. Cloud K-SVD: Computing data-adaptive representations in the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajwa, Waheed U.

    Cloud K-SVD: Computing data-adaptive representations in the cloud Haroon Raja and Waheed U. Bajwa Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 Emails: haroon a distributed algorithm, termed as cloud K-SVD, for learning a UoS structure underlying distributed data

  12. A Study of Entropy Sources in Cloud Random Number Generation on Cloud Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    A Study of Entropy Sources in Cloud Computers: Random Number Generation on Cloud Hosts Brendan Kerrigan and Yu Chen Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, SUNY - Binghamton Abstract. Cloud security practices are based on assumptions that hold true for physical machines, but don't translate

  13. JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    JP2.3 CLOUD RADIATIVE HEATING RATE FORCING FROM PROFILES OF RETRIEVED ARCTIC CLOUD MICROPHYSICS). This data allows for observationally-based calculations ofradiative heating rate profiles within the Arctic atmosphere. In this paper we define cloud radiative heating rate forcing (CRHF) as the difference between

  14. ENTRAINMENT AND MIXING AND THEIR EFFECTS ON CLOUD DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS OBSERVED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENTRAINMENT AND MIXING AND THEIR EFFECTS ON CLOUD DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE STRATOCUMULUS clouds due to entrainment and mixing of the clear air, which then affect the cloud droplet size distribution. How the entrained clear air mixes with cloudy air has been of great interest for the last several

  15. A 3D STOCHASTIC CLOUD MODEL FOR INVESTIGATING THE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF INHOMOGENEOUS CIRRUS CLOUDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    A 3D STOCHASTIC CLOUD MODEL FOR INVESTIGATING THE RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF INHOMOGENEOUS CIRRUS CLOUDS Robin J. Hogan and Sarah F. Kew ¡ Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom 1 INTRODUCTION The importance of ice clouds on the earth's radiation budget

  16. Tidal networks 3. Landscape-forming discharges and studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Tidal networks 3. Landscape-forming discharges and studies in empirical geomorphic relationships peak ebb and flood discharges throughout a tidal network and use this model to investigate scaling flows are driven by spring (astronomical) tidal fluctuations (rather than precipitation- induced runoff

  17. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

  18. Consistent cloud computing storage as the basis for distributed applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James William

    2011-01-01

    Messaging in Cloud Computing . . . . . . . . . .7 1.4Eucalyptus Open—Source Cloud—Computing System. In C'C&#http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Cloud-Computing/Amazons—Head—Start—

  19. A Framework for Secure Cloud-Empowered Mobile Biometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valenti, Matthew C.

    1 A Framework for Secure Cloud-Empowered Mobile Biometrics A. A framework for secure cloud biometrics 4. System analysis 5. Conclusion #12;3 3 for secure cloud biometrics 4. System analysis 5. Conclusion #12;4 4 Introduc

  20. ISMS for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure 1 Information Security Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    ISMS for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure 1 Information Security Management System for Microsoft's Cloud Infrastructure Online Services Security and Compliance Executive summary This paper describes the Microsoft Cloud Infrastructure and Operations (MCIO) Information Security Management System (ISMS) program