Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

2

ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite Observation CAS Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer CCN Cloud Condensation Nuclei CIP Cloud Imaging Probe CPC Condensation Particle Counter CSPHOT Cimel sunphotometer CVI...

3

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

Sheridan, Jennifer

4

Cloud Properties and Precipitation Formation Processes Observed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of spring time precipitation that develops in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. · What are the cloud properties for developing cloud in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. Research Objective #12;#12;Quality is based on calibration conducted by Kelly bosch and Dennis Afseth at Weather Modification Inc. (WMI) on 22

Delene, David J.

5

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington Rob Wood, University of Washington AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager CAP-MBL Proposal Team Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Cli t F db k

6

Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA NOAA/NESDIS Satellite for each precipitation type, as well as light, moderate and heavy snow and rain. The light the cloud microphysics in producing precipitation. For example, ice will only nucleate from the vapor phase

Schultz, David

7

Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better View of Tropical Rain Clouds For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

8

Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Trade Wind Boundary Layer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX,… (more)

Jung, Eunsil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lagrangian investigation of the precipitation efficiency of convective clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The precipitation efficiency of cumulus-congestus clouds is investigated with a new Lagrangian particle framework for large-eddy simulations. The framework is designed to track particles representative of individual water molecules. A Monte-Carlo ...

Wolfgang Langhans; Kyongmin Yeo; David M. Romps

10

Aerosol-Cloud interactions : a new perspective in precipitation enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased industrialization and human activity modified the atmospheric aerosol composition and size-distribution during the last several decades. This has affected the structure and evolution of clouds, and precipitation ...

Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Using Doppler spectra to separate hydrometeor populations and analyze ice precipitation in multilayered mixed-phase clouds  

SciTech Connect

Multimodality of cloud radar Doppler spectra is used to partition cloud particle phases and to separate distinct ice populations in the radar sample volume, thereby facilitating analysis of individual ice showers in multilayered mixed-phase clouds. A 35-GHz cloud radar located at Barrow, Alaska, during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment collected the Doppler spectra. Data from a pair of collocated depolarization lidars confirmed the presence of two liquid cloud layers reported in this study. Surprisingly, both of these cloud layers were embedded in ice precipitation yet maintained their liquid. Our spectral separation of the ice precipitation yielded two distinct ice populations: ice initiated within the two liquid cloud layers and ice precipitation formed in higher cloud layers. Comparisons of ice fall velocity versus radar reflectivity relationships derived for distinct showers reveal that a single relationship might not properly represent the ice showers during this period.

Rambukkange, Mahlon P.; Verlinde, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Flynn, Connor J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cloud and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin and Precipitation Fields Around Darwin in the Transition Season P. T. May Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, 3001, Victoria, Australia Introduction An interesting, and very relevant question, for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is how cloud characteristics and their seasonal and diurnal variation changes across the tropics. In particular, how does he cloud field around the new SRCS site compare with nearby regions. Thus, the aim of this study is to look at the characteristics of clouds and precipitation in the area around Darwin and to compare the cloud statistics estimated from geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) satellite data with other nearby regions. Towards this end, GMS satellite imagery and radar data from

13

Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data  

SciTech Connect

The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities December 6, 2012 - 4:01am Addthis PROBLEM: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple...

15

A Study of Aerosol Impacts on Clouds and Precipitation Development in a Large Winter Cyclone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosols influence cloud and precipitation development in complex ways due to myriad feedbacks at a variety of scales from individual clouds through entire storm systems. This paper describes the implementation, testing, and results of a newly ...

Gregory Thompson; Trude Eidhammer

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

On the Feasibility of Precisely Measuring the Properties of a Precipitating Cloud with a Weather Radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the results of an investigation are presented that are concerned with the feasibility of employing a weather radar to make precise measurements of the properties of a precipitating cloud. A schematic cloud is proposed as a model...

Runnels, R.C.

17

Intensification of precipitation extremes with warming in a cloud resolving model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the effect of warming on high percentiles of precipitation (precipitation extremes) in the idealized setting of radiative-convective equilibrium. While this idealized setting ...

Muller, Caroline

18

Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation in the Tropics Simulated in a Global Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes the diurnal cycle of precipitation simulated in a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM) named the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM). A 30-day integration of NICAM successfully simulates the precipitation ...

Tomonori Sato; Hiroaki Miura; Masaki Satoh; Yukari N. Takayabu; Yuqing Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cloud top microphysics as a tool for precipitation measurements Daniel Rosenfeld, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud top microphysics as a tool for precipitation measurements Daniel Rosenfeld, Hebrew University of the electromagnetic radiation that is scattered and emitted from the clouds, precipitation and the underlying surface with the cloud and precipitation particles strongly depends on their composition and size distribution

Daniel, Rosenfeld

20

Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models  

SciTech Connect

We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

O'Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Numerical simulation of frontal rainbands over Ukraine under different mechanisms of cloud and precipitation formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimension diagnostic and prognostic models were used for numerical simulation of cloud system accompanied the passage of a cyclone over Ukraine. The response of time and space distribution of cloud particle spectra integral features and precipitation on changing of cloud and precipitation formation mechanisms (condensation sublimation collection by large drop and ice particles for droplets etc) was investigated. The nested and stretched grid was used to simulate the narrow band of heavy rainfall that frequently appeared ahead a cold front. The numerical experiments for different values of cloud condensation nucleus concentration were carried out for the above rainband. Comparison between spectra for different conditions was performed.

A. M. Pirnach; S. V. Krakovskaia; A. V. Belokobylski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

ARM's efforts to address the need for 3D cloud and precipitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pavlos Kollias ARM's efforts to address the need for 3D cloud and precipitation measurements ARM will get into 3D measurements, stop explaining why The ARRA arrived at the doorstep...

23

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of...

24

Capacitance studies of cobalt oxide films formed via electrochemical precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prepared by electrochemically precipitating the hydroxide and heating it in air to form Co3O4 the need to identify more suitable materials. One promising route is the use of transi- tion metal oxides to batteries, are referred to as Faradaic or pseudocapacitors. However, the high cost of these materials has

Weidner, John W.

25

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Evaluating the present-day simulation of clouds, precipitation, and radiation in climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] This paper describes a set of metrics for evaluating the simulation of clouds, radiation, and precipitation in the present-day climate. As with the skill scores used to measure the accuracy of short-term weather forecasts, these metrics are low-order statistical measures of agreement with relevant, well-observed physical quantities

Robert, Pincus

27

Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll  

SciTech Connect

To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

Impact of aerosols on convective clouds and precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E19-411 Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA) Location to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current

29

A numerical study of the effect of different aerosol types on East Asian summer clouds and precipitation  

SciTech Connect

The impact of anthropogenic aerosol on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is investigated with NCAR CAM5, a state-of-the-art climate model with aerosol’s direct and indirect effects. Results indicate that anthropogenic aerosol tends to cause a weakened EASM with a southward shift of precipitation in East Asia mostly by its radiative effect. Anthropogenic aerosol induced surface cooling stabilizes the boundary layer, suppresses the convection and latent heat release in northern China, and reduces the tropospheric temperature over land and land-sea thermal contrast, thus leading to a weakened EASM. Meanwhile, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), anthropogenic aerosol can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration but decrease the cloud droplet effective radius over Indochina and Indian Peninsulas as well as over southwestern and northern China, inhibiting the precipitation in these regions. Thus, anthropogenic aerosol tends to reduce Southeast and South Asian summer monsoon precipitation by its indirect effect.

Jiang, Yiquan; Liu, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuqun; Wang, Minghuai

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation during pre-monsoon and monsoon period over a tropical Indian station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of clouds and precipitation during the pre-monsoon (PM) and monsoon months (MM) have been examined in the present study over the tropical station Kolkata (22.65°N, 88.45°E), which is located in the eastern part of India. Satellite data of clouds for the years 2005–2007 and raindrop size distributions (DSD) derived from ground-based Disdrometer for the years 2005 and 2006 for PM and MM has been considered here. Results shows that lower and middle level clouds dominate in the pre-monsoon season and the higher-level clouds are predominant in the monsoon season over the mentioned region. Correspondingly the cloud effective radius value also increases from the pre-monsoon to the monsoon months. The impact of aerosols and moisture plays a vital role in such changes. The characteristics of raindrop size distribution for the two seasons also showed that larger drops are more prevalent during pre-monsoon season whereas the smaller drops are present in larger number in the monsoon months. This is mainly due to the convective nature of rainfall in the pre-monsoon months, where intense convection, accompanied by strong updrafts modifies the raindrops. Thus pre-monsoon (monsoon) season over Kolkata region is characterized by lower/middle level (higher level) clouds, smaller (larger) cloud drop size and larger (smaller) raindrop size at the surface.

Kaustav Chakravarty; P. Ernest Raj; Aniruddha Bhattacharya; Animesh Maitra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates V. Mattioli and P. Basili Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction In recent years the Global Positioning System (GPS) has proved to be a reliable instrument for measuring precipitable water vapor (PWV) (Bevis et al. 1992), offering an independent source of information on water vapor when compared with microwave radiometers (MWRs), and/or radiosonde

32

Meson cloud contributions to baryon axial form factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The axial form factor as well as the axial charge of octet baryons are studied in the perturbative chiral quark model (PCQM) with the quark wave functions predetermined by fitting the theoretical results of the proton charge form factor to experimental data. The theoretical results are found, based on the predetermined quark wave functions, in good agreement with experimental data and lattice values. This may indicate that the electric charge and axial charge distributions of the constituent quarks are the same. The study reveals that the meson cloud plays an important role in the axial charge of octet baryons, contributing 30%-40% to the total values, and strange sea quarks have a considerable contribution to the axial charge of the $\\Sigma$ and $\\Xi$.

X. Y. Liu; K. Khosonthongkee; A. Limphirat; P. Suebka; Y. Yan

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts  

SciTech Connect

These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation.

Wu, X.; Diak, G.R.; Hayden, C.M.; Young, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust  

SciTech Connect

Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for assessing aerosol effects on cold season precipitation in California.

Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

35

Characteristics of Precipitation, Cloud, and Latent Heating Associated with the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the evolution of cloud and rainfall structures associated with Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. Two complementary indices are used to define MJO phases. Joint ...

K-M. Lau; H-T. Wu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Segregation gettering by implantation-formed cavities and B-Si precipitates in silicon  

SciTech Connect

The authors show that Fe, Co, Cu, and Au in Si undergo strong segregation gettering to cavities and B-Si precipitates formed by He or B ion implantation and annealing. The respective mechanisms are argued to be chemisorption on the cavity walls and occupation of solution sites within the disordered, B-rich, B-Si phase. The strengths of the reactions are evaluated, enabling prediction of gettering performance.

Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.; Follstaedt, D.M. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment V. Mattioli Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado V. Morris Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are widely used to measure atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid path (CLP). Comparisons of PWV derived from MWRs with water vapor retrievals from instruments like radiosondes, Global Positioning System (GPS) and Raman

38

The dependence of cloud particle size and precipitation probability on non-aerosol-loading related variables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explaining and reducing the uncertainties in the first aerosol i Explaining and reducing the uncertainties in the first aerosol i Explaining and reducing the uncertainties in the first aerosol indirect effect ndirect effect Hongfei Shao and Guosheng Liu Meteorology Department, Florida State University INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic aerosols enhance cloud reflectance of solar radiation by increasing the cloud droplet number concentrations. This so-called first Aerosol Indirect Effect (AIE) has a potentially large cooling tendency on our planet. However, discrepancies of more than a factor of 2 have been reported among observations 1 as well as model simulations 2 of the AIE. Our recent study 3 shows that the discrepancies will be reduced greatly if the entrainment-mixing evaporation of cloud drops is taken into account.

39

Nucleon Form Factor Experiments and the Pion Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental and theoretical status of elastic electron scattering from the nucleon is reviewed. A wealth of new data of unprecedented precision, especially at small values of the momentum transfer, in parallel to new theoretical insights, has allowed sensitive tests of the influence of the pionic cloud surrounding the nucleon.

Kees de Jager

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)  

SciTech Connect

The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP?MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

Wood, Robert [University of Washington, Dept of Atmos Sci

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The frequency and rate of precipitation as a function of in-the-cloud temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are numbers of 6-hr periods. A. Of'futt AFB B. Barksdale AFB C. Pease AFB 0 a 0 a o al rain 5 2 7 rain 57 31 no rain 63 92 155 no rain 37 85 122 no rain 64 55 119 Total 121 121 242 Total 94. 116 210 Total 139 62 201 It can be seen f'rom the marginal totals... T The number of clouds that did not 0 temperature zone T The number of rain cases for T or 0 A. Offutt, AFB ic ess N reach the T T 0 or & 30000 27001-30000 24001-27000 21001-24000 18000-21000 15001-18000 12001-15000 9001 -12000 6001 ? 9000 3001...

King, Henry Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1: precipitation scavenging  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented under the headings: cloud studies, precipitation chemistry, plume studies, gas scavenging, microphysics and models.

Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions  

SciTech Connect

The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Case Study of Radar Observations and WRF LES Simulations of the Impact of Ground-Based Glaciogenic Seeding on Orographic Clouds and Precipitation. Part I: Observations and Model Validations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Profiling airborne radar data and accompanying large-eddy-simulation (LES) modeling are used to examine the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on cloud and precipitation in a shallow stratiform orographic winter storm. This storm occurred ...

Xia Chu; Lulin Xue; Bart Geerts; Roy Rasmussen; Daniel Breed

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Precipitation Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

credits: Marty Bahamonde/FEMA, Darin Leach/USDA, Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA, Matt and Kim Rudge This graphic and condenses to form clouds, and falls again to the surface as precipitation. About 75 percent of the energy condenses into clouds latent heat is released--warming the atmosphere. Conversely, when liquid water

Waliser, Duane E.

46

First Observations of Tracking Clouds Using Scanning ARM Cloud Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large-drop formation (weather radar “first echo”). These measurements also complement cloud and precipitation tracking using ...

Paloma Borque; Pavlos Kollias; Scott Giangrande

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Abundances and Isotope Ratios in the Magellanic Clouds: The Star Forming Environment of N113  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the goal of deriving the physical and chemical conditions of star forming regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a spectral line survey of the prominent star forming region N113 is presented. The observations cover parts of the frequency range from 85 GHz to 357 GHz and include 63 molecular transitions from a total of 16 species, among them spectra of rare isotopologues. Maps of selected molecular lines as well as the 1.2 mm continuum distribution are also presented. Molecular abundances in the core of the complex are found to be consistent with a photon dominated region (PDR) that is nitrogen deficient, with the potential exception of N2H+. Densities range from 5x10^3 cm-3 for CO to almost 10^6 for CS and HCN, indicating that only the densest regions provide sufficient shielding even for some of the most common species. An ortho- to para-H_2CO ratio of ~3 hints at H_2CO formation in a warm (>=40 K) environment. Isotope ratios are 12C/13C ~ 49+-5, 16O/18O ~ 2000+-250, 18O/17O ~ 1.7+-0.2 and 32S/34S ~ 15. Agreement with data from other star forming clouds shows that the gas is well mixed in the LMC . The isotope ratios do not only differ from those seen in the Galaxy. They also do not form a continuation of the trends observed with decreasing metallicity from the inner to the outer Galaxy. This implies that the outer Galaxy, is not providing a transition zone between the inner Galaxy and the metal poor environment of the Magellanic Clouds. A part of this discrepancy is likely caused by differences in the age of the stellar populations in the outer Galaxy and the LMC.

M. Wang; Y. -N. Chin; C. Henkel; J. B. Whiteoak; M. Cunningham

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Artificial Neural Network Model to Reduce False Alarms in Satellite Precipitation Products Using MODIS and CloudSat Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua and Terra platform with 36 spectral bands provides valuable information about cloud microphysical characteristics and therefore ...

Nasrin Nasrollahi; Kuolin Hsu; Soroosh Sorooshian

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assimilation of Satellite Cloud and Precipitation Observations in Numerical Weather Prediction Models: Introduction to the JAS Special Collection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To date, the assimilation of satellite measurements in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models has focused on the clear atmosphere. But satellite observations in the visible, infrared, and microwave provide a great deal of information on clouds ...

Ronald M. Errico; George Ohring; Fuzhong Weng; Peter Bauer; Brad Ferrier; Jean-François Mahfouf; Joe Turk

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................ 90 a. Reanalysis Datasets .................................................................. 90 b. ISCCP Cloud Regimes ............................................................. 92 c. Model Setup... FIGURE Page A-1 Annual average, zonal mean meridional mass streamfunction values for each reanalysis dataset during the 1979-2008 period ............ 144 A-2 Same as Fig. A-1, but for JJA...

Stachnik, Justin Paul

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Strong segregation gettering of transition metals by implantation-formed cavities and boron-silicide precipitates in silicon  

SciTech Connect

We have mechanistically and quantitatively characterized the binding of transition-metal impurities in Si to cavities formed by He implantation and to B-Si precipitates resulting from B implantation. Both sinks are inferred to act by the segregation of metal atoms to pre-existing low-energy sites, namely surface chemisorption sites in the case of cavities and bulk solution sites in the case of the B-Si phase. These gettering processes exhibit large binding energies, and they are predicted to remain active for arbitrarily small initial impurity concentrations as a result of the segregation mechanisms. Both appear promising for gettering in Si devices.

Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Headley, T.J. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION OF STAR-FORMING CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD  

SciTech Connect

We have performed a pointed survey of N{sub 2}D{sup +} 2-1 and N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 emission toward 64 N{sub 2}H{sup +}-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N{sub 2}H{sup +}, R{sub D} = N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}), of 0.08, with a maximum R{sub D} = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N{sub 2}H{sup +} with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H{sub 2} column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between R{sub D} and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H{sub 2} ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

Friesen, R. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Kirk, H. M. [Origins Institute, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [Origins Institute, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Shirley, Y. L., E-mail: friesen@di.utoronto.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and a new method of accretion on to star-forming cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and a new method of accretion on to star-forming cores D gravitationally unstable and collapse to form stars. Key words: accretion, accretion discs ­ MHD ­ stars on to a well- defined pre-main-sequence track on the HR diagram (Stahler, Shu & Taam 1980), and hence

Ward-Thompson, Derek

54

Thesis for the Degree of Master of Science Magnetic Field Structure in the Star Forming Cloud L1641  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thesis for the Degree of Master of Science Magnetic Field Structure in the Star Forming Cloud L1641 of Astronomy and Space Science Graduate School Kyung Hee University Seoul, Korea February, 2009 #12;Magnetic Jungmi Kwon Department of Astronomy and Space Science Graduate School Kyung Hee University Seoul, Korea

Pak, Soojong

55

Intensification of Precipitation Extremes with Warming in a Cloud-Resolving Model CAROLINE J. MULLER AND PAUL A. O'GORMAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on high percentiles of precipitation (precipitation extremes) in the idealized setting of radiative, and precipitation efficiency. To first order, the changes in pre- cipitation extremes are captured by changes in the upper troposphere. The influence of changes in condensate trans- ports on precipitation extremes

O'Gorman, Paul

56

Valence quark and meson cloud contributions to the $?^\\ast N \\to N^\\ast(1520)$ form factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The covariant spectator quark model is applied to the $\\gamma^\\ast N \\to N^\\ast(1520)$ reaction. The valence quark contributions to the electromagnetic form factors and helicity transition amplitudes are estimated from the covariant structure of the $N^\\ast(1520)$ wave function calibrated by the experimental data for large squared momentum transfer $Q^2$. The difference between the model results and the experimental data is then used to parameterize the low $Q^2$ behavior, where meson cloud effects are assumed to dominate. This parametrization can be very useful for future studies of the reaction, as well as for the extension of the transition form factors to the timelike region.

G. Ramalho; M. T. Peńa

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cloud Services Cloud Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

58

Superlattice Structure and Precipitates in O+ and Zr+ Ion Coimplanted SrTiO3: a Model Waste Form for 90Sr  

SciTech Connect

We investigate strontium titanate as a model waste form for 90Sr. Implantation with O+ and Zr+ ions, followed by annealing at 1423 K, was performed to simulate 90Sr to 90Zr decays. At low Zr concentrations, we observe formation of a ZrO-Sr superlattice structure. Ab initio calculations indicate that this atomic configuration is energetically favorable. At higher Zr concentrations, we observe precipitates of ZrO2 with a coherently strained interface, or a monolayer of disordered interfacial structure. Potential candidacy of 90SrTiO3 as a waste form for permanent disposal of 90Sr is discussed.

Jiang, Weilin; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Kovarik, Libor; Jaffe, John E.; Arey, Bruce W.

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

Atmospheric Rivers Coming to a Cloud Near You  

SciTech Connect

Learn about the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign in this short video. Ruby Leung, PNNL's lead scientist on this campaign's observational strategy to monitor precipitation.

Leung, Ruby

2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Climate Feedbacks Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) 12 slab ocean models 2xCO 2 - control Correlation of global mean CRF with local values Mark Webb, Hadley Center 90 N 45 N 0 45 S 90S 0 90 E 180 90 W 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Contribution of Microbial Activity to Carbon Chemistry in Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of their atmospheric transport that atmospheric particles...undergo several condensation-evaporation...in cloud water. Clouds...of cloud water, precipitation...Microbiology and atmospheric processes...resource recovery. IWA Publishing...

Mickaël Vaïtilingom; Pierre Amato; Martine Sancelme; Paolo Laj; Maud Leriche; Anne-Marie Delort

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and a new method of accretion on to star-forming cores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Papers A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and...accretion, accretion discs|MHD|stars: formation|ISM: clouds...pre-main-sequence track on the HR diagram (Stahler, Shu Taam 1980...self-gravitating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid undergoing turbulence......

D. Balsara; D. Ward-Thompson; R.M. Crutcher

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Influence of Liquid Water Content and Temperature on the Form and Growth of Branched Planar Snow Crystals in a Cloud  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How liquid water content (LWC) and temperature affect the growth of branched planar snow crystals is poorly understood. To address this issue, a vertical supercooled cloud tunnel was used to grow 167 individual snow crystals for 10 min under ...

Tsuneya Takahashi

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are in .pdf format) After Hours Access Policy After Hours Request Form Cleanroom Access Procedures for New Users Deposition Request Form Exit Form Flycutting Request Form Hot...

66

Augmenting Satellite Precipitation Estimation with Lightning Information  

SciTech Connect

We have used lightning information to augment the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). Co-located lightning data are used to segregate cloud patches, segmented from GOES-12 infrared data, into either electrified (EL) or non-electrified (NEL) patches. A set of features is extracted separately for the EL and NEL cloud patches. The features for the EL cloud patches include new features based on the lightning information. The cloud patches are classified and clustered using self-organizing maps (SOM). Then brightness temperature and rain rate (T-R) relationships are derived for the different clusters. Rain rates are estimated for the cloud patches based on their representative T-R relationship. The Equitable Threat Score (ETS) for daily precipitation estimates is improved by almost 12% for the winter season. In the summer, no significant improvements in ETS are noted.

Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Petersen, Walter A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; Hsu, Kuo-Lin [University of California, Irvine; Behrangi, Ali [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

On the Dependence of Winter Precipitation Types on Temperature, Precipitation Rate, and Associated Features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase of precipitation formed within the atmosphere is highly dependent on the vertical temperature profile through which it falls. In particular, several precipitation types can form in an environment with a melting layer aloft and a ...

Julie M. Thériault; Ronald E. Stewart; William Henson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Cloud Microphysics Spring 2013 **odd years?**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS724 Cloud Microphysics (2-0-0) Spring 2013 **odd years?** Prerequisites: ATS620, ATS621; Ph, as the class will involve designing and building a simple cloud microphysical model. Course Description: **Sue and observations of nucleation, mechanisms of cloud droplet-spectra broadening, precipitation particle growth

69

CHASER: An Innovative Satellite Mission Concept to Measure the Effects of Aerosols on Clouds and Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. ...

Rosenfeld, Daniel

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - agua precipitable pwv Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics 3 An Analysis of Cloud Cover and Water Vapor for the ALMA Project Summary: that a verification (validation) of the satellite-derived precipitable water vapor (PWV)...

71

THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. III. CHARACTERIZING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE GEMINI OB1 MOLECULAR CLOUD  

SciTech Connect

We present the 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) observations of the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud complex, and targeted NH{sub 3} observations of the BGPS sources. When paired with molecular spectroscopy of a dense gas tracer, millimeter observations yield physical properties such as masses, radii, mean densities, kinetic temperatures, and line widths. We detect 34 distinct BGPS sources above 5{sigma} = 0.37 Jy beam{sup -1} with corresponding 5{sigma} detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) transition. Eight of the objects show water maser emission (20%). We find a mean millimeter source FWHM of 1.12 pc and a mean gas kinetic temperature of 20 K for the sample of 34 BGPS sources with detections in the NH{sub 3}(1,1) line. The observed NH{sub 3} line widths are dominated by non-thermal motions, typically found to be a few times the thermal sound speed expected for the derived kinetic temperature. We calculate the mass for each source from the millimeter flux assuming the sources are isothermal and find a mean isothermal mass within a 120'' aperture of 230 {+-} 180 M{sub sun}. We find a total mass of 8400 M{sub sun} for all BGPS sources in the Gemini OB1 molecular cloud, representing 6.5% of the cloud mass. By comparing the millimeter isothermal mass to the virial mass calculated from the NH{sub 3} line widths within a radius equal to the millimeter source size, we find a mean virial parameter (M{sub vir}/M {sub iso}) of 1.0 {+-} 0.9 for the sample. We find mean values for the distributions of column densities of 1.0 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} for H{sub 2}, and 3.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for NH{sub 3}, giving a mean NH{sub 3} abundance of 3.0 x 10{sup -8} relative to H{sub 2}. We find volume-averaged densities on the order of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. The sizes and densities suggest that in the Gem OB1 region the BGPS is detecting the clumps from which stellar clusters form, rather than smaller, higher density cores where single stars or small multiple systems form.

Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul; Merello, Manuel [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Aguirre, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Ginsburg, Adam; Glenn, Jason; Stringfellow, Guy S. [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bradley, Eric Todd [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Dowell, Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Drosback, Meredith [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Walawender, Josh [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Williams, Jonathan P., E-mail: nordhaus@astro.as.utexas.ed [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect

Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

73

Flood or Drought: How Do Aerosols Affect Precipitation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphere occurs by release of latent heat...clouds (7). The fraction of radiation...smoke from forest fires was observed to suppress rainfall...precipitation particles that release the latent heat...The additional release of latent heat...the cloud droplets airborne when strong updrafts thrust them...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Ulrike Lohmann; Graciela B. Raga; Colin D. O'Dowd; Markku Kulmala; Sandro Fuzzi; Anni Reissell; Meinrat O. Andreae

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Satellite-Based Parameter to Monitor the Aerosol Impact on Convective Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method to monitor the aerosol impact on convective clouds using satellite data is presented. The impacts of forest fires and highly polluting megacities on cloud precipitation formation processes are quantified by the vertical extent above ...

Itamar M. Lensky; Ron Drori

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect

Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY-dimensional morphology and life cycle of clouds. Detailing key cloud processes as they transit from the formation stage to precipitation onset and cloud dissipation is critical towards establishing uncertainties in climate models

77

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

78

Cloud Computing at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home R & D Archive Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud computing is gaining a foothold in the business world, but can clouds meet the specialized needs of scientists?...

79

Cloud Computing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing has been given a great deal of attention during recent years. Almost all the technology market leaders and leading hosting service providers… (more)

Siddiqui, Muhammad Anas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

ARM - Evaluation Product - Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsQuantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) ProductsQuantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from the CSAPR Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from the CSAPR Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Precipitation rates from cloud systems can give a fundamental insight into the processes occurring in-cloud. While rain gauges and disdrometers can give information at a single point, remote sensors such as radars can provide rainfall information over a defined area. The QPE value-added product (VAP) takes the Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates VAP and maps the Rain_rate_A field onto a Cartesian grid at the surface. This field is the rain rate as determined using the specific attenuation (A, dBZ/km) due to two-way liquid attenuation after Ryzhkov et

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Enhancement of satellite precipitation estimation via unsupervised dimensionality reduction  

SciTech Connect

A methodology to enhance Satellite Precipitation Estimation (SPE) using unsupervised dimensionality reduction (UDR) techniques is developed. This enhanced technique is an extension to the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network (PERSIANN) and Cloud Classification System (CCS) method (PERSIANN-CCS) enriched using wavelet features combined with dimensionality reduction. Cloud-top brightness temperature measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) are used for precipitation estimation at 4 km 4 km spatial resolutions every 30 min. The study area in the continental United States covers parts of Louisiana, Arkansas, Kansas, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama. Based on quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and Heidke skill score (HSS), the results show that the UDR techniques can improve the precipitation estimation accuracy. In addition, ICA is shown to have better performance than other UDR techniques; and in some cases, it achieves 10% improvement in the HSS.

Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cloud Computing Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the introductory chapter we define the concept of cloud computing and cloud services, and we introduce layers and types of cloud computing. We discuss the differences between cloud computing and cloud servi...

Borko Furht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Stratiform and Convective Precipitation Observed by Multiple Radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, methods of convective/stratiform precipitation classification and surface rain-rate estimation based on the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) cloud radar measurements were developed and evaluated. Simultaneous and ...

Min Deng; Pavlos Kollias; Zhe Feng; Chidong Zhang; Charles N. Long; Heike Kalesse; Arunchandra Chandra; Vickal V. Kumar; Alain Protat

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

RETRIEVING THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE USING A TOMOGRAPHY METHOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wiscombe January 2008 To be presented at the 15th Conference on Clouds and Precipitation Cancun, Mexico the cloud models were mature enough to make much headway. Now, the time is ripe for a renewed push. We have with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges

86

The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open cells. Additional analyses of the same simulations show that the suppression of rain is well described in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12-14 um. Cloud water starts to get depleted when column-maximum rain intensity (Rmax) exceeds 0.1 mm h-1. This happens when cloud-top re reaches 14 um. Rmax is mostly less than 0.1 mm h-1 at re<14 um, regardless of the cloud water path, but increases rapidly when re exceeds 14 um. This is in agreement with recent aircraft observations and theoretical observations in convective clouds so that the mechanism is not limited to describing marine stratocumulus. These results support the hypothesis that the onset of significant precipitation is determined by the number of nucleated cloud drops and the height (H) above cloud base within the cloud that is required for cloud drops to reach re of 14 um. In turn, this can explain the conditions for initiation of significant drizzle and opening of closed cells providing the basis for a simple parameterization for GCMs that unifies the representation of both precipitating and non-precipitating clouds as well as the transition between them. Furthermore, satellite global observations of cloud depth (from base to top), and cloud top re can be used to derive and validate this parameterization.

Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

87

Precipitate stability in Zircaloy-2  

SciTech Connect

As a follow-up to previous work on Zircaloy-4, irradiated Zircaloy-2 was studied both with and without post-irradiation annealing. The Zircaloy-2 samples were taken from a BWR water-rod at locations with fluences of 2.9 {times} 10{sup 21}, 7.7 {times} 10{sup 21}, and 12.0 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV), all having irradiation temperatures of 288{degree}C. Material from these samples demonstrated irradiation induced phenomena quite similar to Zircaloy-4, including the gradual amorphization and dissolution of Zr(Cr, FE){sub 2} precipitates and the development of {bar c}-component dislocations. Zr{sub 2} (Fe,Ni) precipitates in the Zircaloy-2 did not show signs of amorphization, but show a small degree of Fe depletion with increasing fluence. The depletion of iron was reversed upon post-irradiation annealing at 575 to 750{degree}C in both types of precipitates. Post-irradiation annealing caused intergranular precipitates to form. At 575{degree}C, both intergranular Zr{sub 2} (Fe,Ni) and Zr(Cr,Fe){sub 2} were found, while at 625 and 6675{degree}C, only the latter appeared. This is probably a consequence of the faster ripening of Zr{sub 2} (Fe,Ni). No intergranular precipitates were found after 1 hour at 750{degree}C, which is probably due to their dissolution during ripening. 29 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

Kruger, R.M. (General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the evolution of the simulated mixed-phase ASC layer are studied. Cloud layers either collapse through rapid glaciation and ice precipitation from the cloud layer or maintain a quasi-steady state. Sensitivity studies show that the stability of the mixed-phase cloud layer is dependent upon the temperature, ice

Harrington, Jerry Y.

89

Dynamic Cloud Infrastructure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis will explore and investigate the possibility of implementing nested clouds to increase flexibility. A nested cloud is a private cloud running inside another… (more)

Gundersen, Espen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Securing Cloud Storage Service.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing brought flexibility, scalability, and capital cost savings to the IT industry. As more companies turn to cloud solutions, securing cloud based services… (more)

Zapolskas, Vytautas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

precipitation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

precipitation precipitation Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), presents summer and winter precipitation for England and Wales, and the percent change from the baseline (1961 - 1990 average). The original source of the data is the Hadley Centre. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change precipitation UK Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Precipitation, 1874 - 2009 (xls, 68.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment (Does not have "National Statistics" status) Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1874 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

92

Impact of Convective Organization on the Response of Tropical Precipitation Extremes to Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Convective Organization on the Response of Tropical Precipitation Extremes to Warming extremes to warming in organized convection is ex- amined using a cloud-resolving model. Vertical shear, the fractional increase of precipitation extremes is similar to that of surface water vapor, which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Multi Cloud Architecture to Provide Data Security And Integrity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- Cloud servers are being used to store data and application but its security is a major issue in current context. To solve the data security problems in public environment we propose an effective model for security and integrity of data stored in a cloud, through data segmentation followed by data encryption programs in a multiple cloud architecture. This architecture forms a multi cloud system where primary cloud is available for multiple users for data storage offering lesser load on client systems thereby using the cloud computing architecture. This architecture introduces a secondary cloud controlled by a single administrator which provides the data backup for primary cloud after undergoing specific segmentation and encryption algorithms to ensure security and integrity of data. The proposed system also offers protection against virus attacks by using linux as the base OS. Keywords-- Encryption, Linux, Multi cloud system, Primary cloud, Secondary cloud, Segmentation.

Nikhil Dutta; Himanshu Bakshi; Mujammill Mulla; Viraj Shinde

94

6, 43414373, 2006 Cloud-borne aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., par- ticle nucleation, coagulation, gravitational settling, dry deposition); some involve AP attached to a single type of cloud/precipitation particle (e.g., aqueous and heteroge-25 neous chemistry), and some, transformation, and removal processes on the attachment state, one might expect that model simulations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

Atmospheric chemistry: Thwarting the seeds of clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The ephemeral cloud of tiny drops that you see above the spout of your teapot forms in the same way as clouds in the sky — by the condensation of ... the number of nanometre-sized particles formed through nucleation, similar to what happens above the teapot, except that organic molecules rather than water molecules are involved. ...

Paul J. Ziemann

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications  

SciTech Connect

Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

Hales, J.M.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications  

SciTech Connect

``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

Hales, J.M.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect

A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cloud Computing Adam Barker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

St Andrews, University of

100

CDIAC Precipitation Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precipitation Precipitation CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Precipitation Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Stations data; monthly totals Varies by station; through 1990 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Station data; monthly totals Varies by station; some through most recent month A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (CDIAC DB-1003) R.S. Bradley et al. Monthly, seasonal, and annual anomaly maps of precipitation 1851 - 1989 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Posters A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models S. J. Ghan and L. R. Leung Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, Washington C. C. Chuang and J. E. Penner Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California J. McCaa University of Washington Seattle, Washington The crude treatment of clouds in general circulation models (GCMs) is widely recognized as a major limitation in applying these models to predictions of global climate change. The purpose of this project is to develop a parameterization for stratiform clouds in GCMs that expresses stratiform clouds in terms of bulk microphysical properties and their subgrid variability. In this parameterization, precipitating cloud species are distinguished from non-precipitating species, and the liquid

102

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

103

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

Plant, Robert

104

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

105

Cloud Computing: Rain-Clouds System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Cloud Computing is the on demand service can be provided to the users at any time. It delivers the software, data access, computing as a service rather than the product. The Cloud application simplifies the computing technology by providing pay-per-use customer relationship. It is the theory that familiar to cheaper devices with low processing power, lower storage capacities, great flexibility and many more things. The security of cloud computing is a major factor as users store sensitive and confidential information with cloud storage providers. The range of these providers may be un trusted and harmful. The purpose of adopting cloud computing in an organization is to decide between a „public cloud ? and „private cloud ? by means of privacy. Public clouds often known as provider clouds are administrated by third parties and services are offered on pay-per-use basis. Private clouds or internal clouds are owned by the single firm but it has some metrics such as lacking of availability of services (such as memory, server) and network resources which leads it to down. Due to this, technology moves toward the concept of “Multi clouds ” or “Rain Clouds”. This paper displays the use of multi-clouds or rain clouds due to its ability to handle the huge amount of data traffic that affect the cloud computing user.

Harinder Kaur

106

Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect

Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) begins its inaugural deployment November 2010 in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment, or STORMVEX. For six months, the comprehensive suite of AMF2 instruments will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties at various sites below the heavily instrumented Storm Peak Lab, located on Mount Werner at an elevation of 3220 meters. The correlative data sets that will be created from AMF2 and Storm Peak Lab will equate to between 200 and 300 in situ aircraft flight hours in liquid, mixed phase, and precipitating

108

Cloud Security by Max Garvey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

Tolmach, Andrew

109

ARM - Measurement - Precipitation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPrecipitation govMeasurementsPrecipitation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Precipitation All liquid or solid phase aqueous particles that originate in the atmosphere and fall to the earth's surface. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer MWRHF : Microwave Radiometer - High Frequency

110

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics #12;Cloud Computing: what is it? · Cloud Computing is a distributed infrastructure where resources, software, and data are provided in an on-demand fashion. · Cloud Computing abstracts infrastructure from application. · Cloud Computing should save you time the way software

Ferrara, Katherine W.

111

Single-Column Modeling A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models S. J. Ghan and L. R. Leung Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 C. C. Chuang and J. E. Penner Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory : Livermore. CA 94550 J. McCaa University of Washington Seattle, Washington The crude treatment of clouds in general circulation models (GCMs) is widely recognized as a major limitation in applying these models to predictions of global climate change. The purpose of this project is to develop in GCMs a stratiform cloud parameterization that expresses clouds in terms of bulk microphysical properties and their subgrid variability. Figure 1 summarizes the various cloud variables and their interactions. Precipitating cloud species are distinguished from non-precipitating species, and the liquid phase is

112

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

ARM - Field Campaign - Azores: Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiometers on Stand for Upwelling Radiation Browse Data Browse Plots IRT Infrared Thermometer Browse Data MET Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Browse Data Browse Plots...

114

Cloud Computing og availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pÄlidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 SÞren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

Christensen, Henrik BĂŠrbak

115

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers offers an in-depth look at topics surrounding federal cloud computing within the federal government, including the Federal Cloud Computing Strategy, Cloud Computing Standards, ...

Matthew Metheny

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

H I Self Absorption Toward Molecular Clouds: Theoretical Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information and available data, visit the GRS web page at www.bu.eduwww.bu.edu/G/GRSRS References chemistry deep inside the molecular clouds. We study H I self- absorption toward molecular clouds is dominated by cold atomic hydrogen formed by cosmic ray chemistry deep in the interiors of clouds. If all

117

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parmaterizations in Large-Scale Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parameterizations in Large-Scale Models S. A. Klein National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton, New Jersey R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. -M. Xu National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Abstract Cloud parameterizations in large-scale models struggle to address the significant non-linear effects of radiation and precipitation that arise from horizontal inhomogeneity in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid box size of the large-scale models. Statistical cloud schemes provide an attractive

118

GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentary—a property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regions—wherein n{sub thresh} ? 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}—is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ?}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCs—the first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Tasker, Elizabeth J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Mixed-phase clouds, thin cirrus clouds, and OLR over the tropics: observations, retrievals, and radiative impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of clouds are formed by deep convection and convergence of water vapor. Thus, it is very important to understand the radiative energy balance of the tropics and the effect of clouds on the radiation field. For mixed-phase clouds, error analyses pertaining...

Lee, Joonsuk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precipitation affects many aspects of our everyday life. It is the primary source of freshwater and has significant socioeconomic impacts resulting from natural hazards such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. Fundamentally, precipitation is ...

Arthur Y. Hou; Ramesh K. Kakar; Steven Neeck; Ardeshir A. Azarbarzin; Christian D. Kummerow; Masahiro Kojima; Riko Oki; Kenji Nakamura; Toshio Iguchi

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Precipitation of petroleum sulfonates by magnesium ions  

SciTech Connect

The precipitation of petroleum sulfonates was accomplished by the addition of magnesium ions. The magnesium tolerance, defined as the total magnesium concentration at which 5% of the total sulfonate was precipitated, was determined in aqueous solution for 20 commercial petroleum sulfonates. The magnesium tolerances ranged from essentially zero up to 2300 ppM of magnesium. The level of magnesium tolerated increases as the average equivalent weight of the sulfonate decreases. The precipitate formed during the reaction includes a high percentage of sodium sulfonate as well as magnesium sulfonate. All of the samples were prepared to contain 3% active sulfonate, and the reaction temperature was 30/sup 0/C. The precipitate was removed by centrifuging and filtering. The amount of unreacted sulfonate remaining in the filtrate was determined indirectly by measuring the magnesium and sodium remaining in the filtrate. The viscosities of the filtrates were found to change as the amount of magnesium added was increased. The viscosity goes through at least one maximum before rapid precipitation of sulfonate occurs. 5 figures, 2 tables.

French, T.R.; Collins, A.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

Weng, Jui-Ting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrated sulphuric acid in dense molecular clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......anthropogenically from combustion of fuels. Oxidized...forms readily in hydrocarbon combustion where sulphur is...dense clouds. From heat of vaporization...3 Observational Data Absorption spectra...peak absorption data in mum (cm1) for......

Flavio Scappini; Cesare Cecchi-Pestellini; Harvey Smith; William Klemperer; Alexander Dalgarno

2003-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

124

Precipitation Processes During ARM (1997), TOGA COARE (1992), GATE (1974), SCSMEX (1998), and KWAJEX (1999): Con...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precipitation Processes During ARM (1997), TOGA Precipitation Processes During ARM (1997), TOGA COARE (1992), GATE (1974), SCSMEX (1998), and KWAJEX (1999): Consistent 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations W.-K Tao, C.-L. Shie, J. Simpson, D. Starr, D. Johnson, and Y. Sud Mesoscale Atmospheric Process Branch (Code 912) Laboratory for Atmospheres National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction A basic characteristic of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) is that their governing equations are non- hydrostatic since the vertical and horizontal scales of convection are similar. Such models are also necessary in order to allow gravity waves, such as those triggered by clouds, to be resolved explicitly. CRMs use sophisticated and physically realistic parameterizations of cloud microphysical processes

125

Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part I: Operational Sampling Strategies  

SciTech Connect

Probing clouds in three-dimensions has never been done with scanning millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radars in a continuous operating environment. The acquisition of scanning cloud radars by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and research institutions around the world generate the need for developing operational scan strategies for cloud radars. Here, the first generation of sampling strategies for the Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) is discussed. These scan strategies are designed to address the scientific objectives of the ARM program, however, they introduce an initial framework for operational scanning cloud radars. While the weather community uses scan strategies that are based on a sequence of scans at constant elevations, the SACRs scan strategies are based on a sequence of scans at constant azimuth. This is attributed to the cloud properties that are vastly different for rain and snow shafts that are the primary target of precipitation radars. A “cloud surveillance” scan strategy is introduced (HS-RHI) based on a sequence of horizon-to-horizon Range Height Indicator (RHI) scans that sample the hemispherical sky (HS). The HS-RHI scan strategy is repeated every 30 min to provide a static view of the cloud conditions around the SACR location. Between HS-RHI scan strategies other scan strategies are introduced depending on the cloud conditions. The SACRs are pointing vertically in the case of measurable precipitation at the ground. The radar reflectivities are corrected for water vapor attenuation and non-meteorological detection are removed. A hydrometeor detection mask is introduced based on the difference of cloud and noise statistics is discussed.

Kollias, Pavlos; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Jo, Ieng; Johnson, Karen

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics EC2 and AMIs #12;Quick-starting an EC2 instance (let's get our feet wet!) Cloud Computing #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance Quick Start · On EC2 console, we can click on Launch Instance · This will let us get up and going quickly #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance

Ferrara, Katherine W.

127

METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday of the physical states and processes of clouds and precipitation as well as atmospheric electricity and optics and results Radar observation and estimation Atmospheric electricity: Electrostatics Electromagnetic wave

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

128

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2005), 131, pp. 26392663 doi: 10.1256/qj.04.62 Aerosol impact on the dynamics and microphysics of deep convective clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud dynamics Microphysics of cumulus clouds Precipitation efficiency 1. INTRODUCTION High in the concentration of small cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) leads to the formation of a large number of small of the diffusion droplet growth stage, increasing latent heat release by condensation. The additional water

Daniel, Rosenfeld

129

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

130

Pion Cloud and the Sea of the Nucleon  

SciTech Connect

I review recent progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon sea and the role of the nucleon's pion cloud. In particular, I discuss the consequences of the pion cloud for the d-bar - u-bar asymmetry in the proton, the neutron's electric form factor, and the proton's electric to magnetic form factor ratio.

Wally Melnitchouk

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud fraction Fraction of sky covered by clouds, observed directly or derived from SW...

132

ARM - Measurement - Cloud size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud size Information about the physical dimensions of a cloud, including such measurements...

133

North Australian Cloud Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A satellite classification and climatology of propagating mesoscale cloud fines in northern Australia is presented. These cloud fines range from long, narrow lines of shallow convection to extensive deep convective squall lines with mesoscale ...

W. Drosdowsky; G. J. Holland

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cloud point determination using a thickness shear mode resonator  

SciTech Connect

Crude oils and crude oil products contain substantial amounts of petroleum waxes, consisting of a distribution of high molecular weight hydrocarbons. These waxes or paraffins have limited solubility in oil and tend to precipitate out at a temperature determined by the concentration and constituents of the wax. Precipitation and deposition of wax results in narrowing of pipelines, making crude oil recovery difficult. A parameter of practical importance is the wax precipitation temperature, traditionally known as the cloudpoint, at which visible crystallization occurs. Deposition problems arise in oil field operations at or below this temperature. Several techniques can be used to determine the cloud point: (1) visual observation, (2) viscosity measurement, (3) differential thermal analysis, and (4) pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. This report describes a method for determination of cloud point with the use of a thickness shear mode resonator.

Spates, J.J. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Germer, J.W. [Petrolite Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Extreme changes in stable hydrogen isotopes and precipitation characteristics in a landfalling Pacific storm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred as precipitation generation transitioned from a shallow to a much deeper cloud layer, in accord masses, providing a natural tracer of atmospheric pro- cesses [Gedzelman and Lawrence, 1990; Scholl et al., 2007; Smith and Evans, 2007]. Organized ascent can often be found in atmospheric rivers (AR), which

136

Characteristics of Precipitating Convective Systems Accounting for the Summer Rainfall of Tropical and Subtropical South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Subtropical South America ULRIKE ROMATSCHKE AND ROBERT A. HOUZE JR. University of Washington, Seattle of the precipitating cloud systems that account for the summer rainfall of tropical and subtropical South America role in the meteorology, climatology, and hydrology of South America. They not only produce

Houze Jr., Robert A.

137

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

SciTech Connect

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Marine cloud brightening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will not be as effective in marine stratocumulus clouds that are...Engineering steps to implement marine cloud brightening (a) Introduction...brightening by increasing the CCN of marine stratus clouds (by way of...vessel and the optimum means of propulsion. In fact, both these aspects...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

Walter, M.Todd

140

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

Qian, Ning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

3 Carbide Precipitation Carbides are largely responsible for the commercial failure of many of the early  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1. Transition carbides, such as and the various orthorhombic forms listed in Table 3.1, only form because Precipitation 64 Table 3.1 Carbides in bainite or in tempered bainite. Fe, M/C is the ratio of metal to car- bon3 Carbide Precipitation Carbides are largely responsible for the commercial failure of many

Cambridge, University of

142

Simulations of cirrus clouds using an explicit cloud model: integrating ARM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulations of cirrus clouds using an explicit cloud model: integrating ARM Simulations of cirrus clouds using an explicit cloud model: integrating ARM water vapor and forcing data for analysis of cirrus formation and evolution Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Lin, Ruei-Fong NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Starr, David NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Yang, Ping Texas A&M Category: Modeling Understanding the atmospheric conditions required to initiate cirrus formation and produce observed microphysical properties is crucial to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. Ice formation in cirrus generally occurs at cold temperatures (below -30 C) and can take the form of either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. The ice supersaturation required for ice formation is smaller for

143

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid cloud combines aspects of public and private clouds: a company may build a compute cloud own its own infrastructure,

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Climatological Data For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations, For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations, 1982-1991: The Total Cloud Edition (1994) (NDP-026a) data Data Investigators C. J. Hahn, S. G. Warren, and J. London Routine, synoptic surface weather reports from ships and land stations over the entire globe, for the10-year period December 1981 through November 1991, were processed for total cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of clear sky, sky-obscured due to precipitation, and sky-obscured due to fog. Archived data, consisting of various annual, seasonal and monthly averages, are provided in grid boxes that are typically 2.5° × 2.5° for land and 5° × 5° for ocean. Day and nighttime averages are also given separately for each season. Several derived quantities, such as interannual variations and annual and diurnal

145

ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall Experiment Related Campaigns Biogenic Aerosols- Effects on Clouds and Climate 2014.02.01, PetÀjÀ, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall Experiment 2014.02.01 - 2014.04.30 Lead Scientist : Dmitri Moisseev Description The snowfall measurement campaign, which will take place during AMF2 deployment in Finland, will focus on understanding snowfall microphysics and characterizing performance of surface based snowfall measurement instruments. This will be achieved by combining triple frequency (X, Ka, W -band) radar observations of vertical structure of the precipitation,

146

PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS  

SciTech Connect

The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

Hay, M.; King, W.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Working Group Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Cadeddu Cadeddu ) ) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG)

148

MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Copper gettering by aluminum precipitates in aluminum-implanted silicon  

SciTech Connect

Copper in Si is shown to be strongly gettered by Al-rich precipitates formed by implanting Al to supersaturation and followed by annealing. At temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C a layer containing Al precipitates is found to getter Cu from Cu silicide located on the opposite side of a 0.25-mm Si wafer, indicating a substantially lower chemical potential for the Cu in the molten-A1 phase. Cu gettering proceeds rapidly until an atomic ratio of approximately 2 Cu atoms to 1 Al atom is reached in the precipitated Al region, after which the gettering process slows. Redistribution of Cu from one Al-rich layer to another at low Cu concentrations demonstrates that a segregation-type gettering mechanism is operating. Cu gettering occurs primarily in the region containing the precipitated Al rather than the region where the Al is entirely substitutional.

PETERSEN,GARY A.; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect

1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (S{sub pop}), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation ({lambda}), as both Spop and {lambda} strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. S{sub pop} in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF) over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of S{sub pop} and to examine S{sub pop} in high-resolution models.

Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ecuyer, Tristan L.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

153

SpatialIntensity Variations in Extreme Precipitation in the Contiguous United States and the MaddenJulian Oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(MJO) are investigated. Daily gridded precipitation is used to define two types of contiguous regionsSpatial­Intensity Variations in Extreme Precipitation in the Contiguous United States form 23 January 2012) ABSTRACT The spatial­intensity variability of extreme precipitation over

California at Santa Barbara, University of

154

Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with a Meson Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results for the elastic nucleon form factors and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes to the Delta(1232) resonance, obtained with the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with the inclusion of a meson cloud correction are briefly presented. The pion cloud effects are explicitly discussed.

D. Y. Chen; Y. B. Dong; M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

ARM - Field Campaign - Azores: Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa Island Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa Island Related Campaigns Azores: Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 2009.05.01, Wood, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Azores: Above-Cloud Radiation Budget near Graciosa Island 2010.04.15 - 2010.09.15 Lead Scientist : Mark Miller For data sets, see below. Description The scientific focus is to measure the cloud-top downwelling radiative fluxes in coincidence with trace gas measurements made at Pico Observatory, Pico Island Azores. To enhance measurement capabilities in the vicinity of Graciosa and to take advantage of a unique opportunity to measure cloud transmittance in the marine, instruments associated with the ARM Ancillary

157

Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations, and Indirect Aerosol Effects P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York...

159

ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud top height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the highest level of the atmosphere where...

160

Method of precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium is presented. The method includes precipitating uranium as a uranyl vanadate through mixing an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium and a solution comprising a monovalent or divalent cation to form the corresponding cation uranyl vanadate precipitate. The method also provides a pathway for extraction of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment.

Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Kim, Yongman; Wan, Jiamin

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cloud Computing: An Architectural Perspective .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud Computing is a term heavily used in today's world. Not even a day passes by without hearing the words "Cloud Computing". It has become… (more)

Pandya, Hetalben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inner life Subgrid modeling pinpoints cloud transformation to uncover true reflective power An accurate understanding of clouds over the ocean is important for climate change...

164

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1. Precipitation scavenging  

SciTech Connect

These two volumes contain papers prepared for and presented at the Fourth International Conference on Precipitation Scavenging, Dry Deposition, and Resuspension (the Chamberlain Meeting) held during 29 November to 3 December, 1982 in Santa Monica, California. Papers presented are abstracted separately.

Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extinction extinction ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption and/or scattering. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments CEP : Cloud Extinction Probe CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

167

Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect

Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

SciTech Connect

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

Affinity Purification of Plasmid DNA by Temperature-Triggered Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Affinity Purification of Plasmid DNA by Temperature-Triggered Precipitation Jan Kostal, Ashok purification method, which takes advantage of the DNA- binding affinity and specificity of the bacterial increasing the temper- ature, ELP undergoes a reversible phase transition from water-soluble forms

Chen, Wilfred

170

Artificial Bubble Cloud Targets for Underwater Acoustic Remote Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes a technique that uses polymer additives to suspend air bubbles to form stable artificial bubble clouds. The results presented include the range of polymer concentrations for an effective bubble suspension; the void fraction,...

Paul A. Hwang; Ronald A. Roy; Lawrence A. Crum

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at Azores: Preliminary 3D Cloud Products  

SciTech Connect

The deployment of the Scanning W-Band ARM Cloud Radar (SWACR) during the AMF campaign at Azores signals the first deployment of an ARM Facility-owned scanning cloud radar and offers a prelude for the type of 3D cloud observations that ARM will have the capability to provide at all the ARM Climate Research Facility sites by the end of 2010. The primary objective of the deployment of Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) at the ARM Facility sites is to map continuously (operationally) the 3D structure of clouds and shallow precipitation and to provide 3D microphysical and dynamical retrievals for cloud life cycle and cloud-scale process studies. This is a challenging task, never attempted before, and requires significant research and development efforts in order to understand the radar's capabilities and limitations. At the same time, we need to look beyond the radar meteorology aspects of the challenge and ensure that the hardware and software capabilities of the new systems are utilized for the development of 3D data products that address the scientific needs of the new Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program. The SWACR observations at Azores provide a first look at such observations and the challenges associated with their analysis and interpretation. The set of scan strategies applied during the SWACR deployment and their merit is discussed. The scan strategies were adjusted for the detection of marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus that were frequently observed at the Azores deployment. Quality control procedures for the radar reflectivity and Doppler products are presented. Finally, preliminary 3D-Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Locations (3D-ARSCL) products on a regular grid will be presented, and the challenges associated with their development discussed. In addition to data from the Azores deployment, limited data from the follow-up deployment of the SWACR at the ARM SGP site will be presented. This effort provides a blueprint for the effort required for the development of 3D cloud products from all new SACRs that the program will deploy at all fixed and mobile sites by the end of 2010.

Kollias, P.; Johnson, K.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Giangrande, S.; Widener, K.; Bharadwaj, N.; Mead, J.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Simple Multicloud Models for the Diurnal Cycle of Tropical Precipitation. Part I: Formulation and the Case of the Tropical Oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variation of tropical precipitation due to the diurnal cycle of solar heating is examined here in the context of two simple models for tropical convection. The models utilize three cloud types—congestus, deep, and stratiform—that are believed ...

Yevgeniy Frenkel; Boualem Khouider; Andrew J. Majda

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cloud Computing Synopsis and Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document reprises the NIST-established definition of cloud computing, describes cloud computing benefits and open issues, presents an overview of major classes of cloud technology, and provides guidelines and recommendations on how organizations ... Keywords: cloud computing, computer security, virtualization

Mark Lee Badger; Timothy Grance; Robert Patt-Corner; Jeffery M, Voas

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

Plant, Robert

175

3. New Cloud Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cloud Climatology New Cloud Climatology Computed for the summers (May-Au- gust) 2000 through 2004 (Berg and Kassianov 2008). Uses ARSCL VAP, Total Sky Imager, and radar wind profiler. * * Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry Berg, William Gustafson, and Evgueni Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1. Motivation Shallow clouds are poorly predicted by current global and regional scale models. A new parameterization has been devel- oped that links the boundary-layer turbu- lence and the shallow clouds. 2. The CuP Parameterization The Cumulus Potential (CuP) param- eterization uses Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of temperature and moisture to represent the subgrid scale

176

In Clouds We Trust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......can bring. Many have realised that giving a third party control of part of the IT infrastructure can help reduce capital expenditure and maximise asset utilisation to provide a quantitative return on investment (ROI). Cloud can also remove resource......

Jim Damoulakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Moving into the Cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing is the notion of abstracting and outsourcing hardware or software resources over the Internet, often to a third party on a pay-as-you-go basis.… (more)

Mikalsen, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Harrington, Jerry The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase stratus clouds are dominant in the Arctic during much of the year. These clouds typically have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Time scales for the complete glaciation of such clouds (the Bergeron process) are typically computed using the classical mass growth equations for crystals and liquid drops. However, mixed phase arctic stratus have significant infrared cooling and solar heating (during the warm season) rates that can affect the growth of water drops and ice crystals, and therefore the strength of the Bergeron process. To examine the influence of radiative heating and cooling on the Bergeron process, we incorporate a

179

Detecting Drizzle in Marine Warm Clouds Using Visible, Infrared, and Microwave Satellite Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drizzle in Marine Warm Clouds Drizzle in Marine Warm Clouds Using Visible, Infrared, and Microwave Satellite Data H. Shao and G. Liu Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction Determining the radiative effects of aerosols is one of the most important areas in climate research. There are observational evidences showing that aerosols can affect the radiative balance of the earth indirectly - as the number of aerosols increases, water in the cloud spreads over many more particles. Large concentrations of small droplets not only make the cloud more reflective, but also reduce the probability of rainfall and prolong cloud lifetime, because small droplets have less efficiency of coalescence (e.g., Albrecht 1989, Rosenfeld 2000). Since precipitation is a key component in

180

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans #12 diffusion into austenite Carbon diffusion into austenite and carbide precipitation in ferrite Carbide precipitation from austenite CASE 2: elimination of carbides #12;#12;#12;0.110.090.070.050.03 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Cambridge, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Modeling Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary goal of this study was to simulate the effects of asphaltene precipitation on miscible-gas flooding. ... We simulated three different cases to investigate the effect of asphaltene precipitation on oil production for different rock fabrics. ... (7) The simplified algorithm for asphaltene precipitation gives simulation results in agreement with simulations using the pseudo-multiphase algorithm and saves significant computational time. ...

Xiangjun Qin; Peng Wang; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Gary A. Pope

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Monosoonal precipitation responses of shrubs in a cold desert community on the Colorado Plateau  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

South-eastern Utah forms a northern border for the region currently influenced by the Arizona monosoonal system, which feeds moisture and summer precipitation into western North America. One major consequence pre...

Guanghui Lin; Susan L. Phillips; James R. Ehleringer

183

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

Pressure and composition effect on wax precipitation: Experimental data and model results  

SciTech Connect

Wax precipitation is often studied using the stock tank oil. However, precipitation may be very different in well tubing and production facilities due to the effects of pressure and composition. As an example, the cloudpoint temperature may decrease as much as 15 K from atmospheric pressure to the saturation pressure of 100 bar mostly due to the dissolution of light gases into the oil (i.e. due to composition changes). It is also often assumed that the addition of solvents such as C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} decreases the cloudpoint temperature. On the contrary, from our modeling results, we have found that the mixing of a crude with a solvent increases the cloudpoint temperature (i.e., enhances the wax precipitation). In this study, the cloudpoint temperature at live oil conditions and the amount of the precipitated wax at stock tank oil conditions are provided for three crudes. A modified multisolid wax precipitation model is used to study the effects of pressure and composition on wax precipitation. The modeling results reveal that an increase in methane and CO{sub 2} concentration decreases the cloudpoint temperature while an increase in C{sub 5} concentration increases the cloud point temperature.

Pan, H.; Firoozabadi, A.; Fotland, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Molecular Cloud Evolution. III. Accretion Versus Stellar Feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We numerically investigate the effect of feedback from the ionization heating from massive stars on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and their star formation efficiency (SFE), which we treat as an instantaneous, time-dependent quantity. We follow the GMCs' evolution from their formation to advanced star-forming stages. After an initial period of contraction, the collapsing clouds begin forming stars, whose feedback evaporates part of the clouds' mass, opposing the continuing accretion from the infalling gas. Our results are as follows: (1) in the presence of feedback, the clouds attain levels of the SFE that are consistent at all times with observational determinations for regions of comparable star formation rates. (2) However, the dense gas mass is larger in general in the presence of feedback, while the total mass (dense gas + stars) is nearly insensitive to the presence of feedback, suggesting that it is determined mainly by the accretion, while the feedback inhibits mainly the conversion of dense gas to stars, because it acts directly to reheat and disperse the gas that is directly on its way to forming stars. (3) The factor by which the SFE is reduced upon the inclusion of feedback is a decreasing function of the cloud's mass, for clouds of size ~10 pc. This naturally explains the larger observed SFEs of massive-star-forming regions. (4) The clouds may attain a pseudo-virialized state, with a value of the virial mass very similar to the actual cloud mass. However, this state differs from true virialization in that the clouds, rather than being equilibrium entities, are the centers of a larger-scale collapse, in which accretion replenishes the mass consumed by star formation. (5) The higher-density regions within the clouds are in a similar situation, accreting gas infalling from the less-dense, more extended regions of the clouds. (6) The density probability density functions of the regions containing the clouds in general exhibit a shape characteristic of thermally bistable flows, and extend down to densities corresponding to the warm atomic medium, because the warm gas interpenetrates the clouds. The general picture arising from our simulations is that the gas involved in the gravitational contraction leading to star formation extends to large scales and is not confined to the local environment of the final collapse, where the effect of the feedback is active, in agreement with recent proposals of a gravitationally driven mass cascade from large to small scales.

Enrique Vázquez-Semadeni; Pedro Colín; Gilberto C. Gómez; Javier Ballesteros-Paredes; Alan W. Watson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from GOES-WEST Inoue, Toshiro MRI/JMA Category: Field Campaigns Low-level cloud formed off the west coast of continents plays an important role in general circulation and climate. Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) was conducted at the ARM mobile site deployed at Pt Reyes, California during April to September. Here, we studied the relationship between meteorological parameters observed by GPS sonde and cloud properties observed from GOES-WEST during the MASRAD intensive operational period. Cloud properties are retrieved from VISST (Visible Infrared Solar-infrared Split window Technique). The vertical profile of stability, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed observed by GPS sonde are

189

Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

Solbrig, Jeremy E.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

190

The meteorology of negative cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with large charge moment changes: Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% negative CG lightning, though flash rates tended to be low near the stroke (1­2 min�1 on averageThe meteorology of negative cloud-to-ground lightning strokes with large charge moment changes). The results suggest that negative sprite-parent/class lightning typically occurs in precipitation systems

Rutledge, Steven

191

Satellite-based climatology of Mediterranean cloud systems and their association with large-scale circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typology reveals the presence of an upper-level anomaly for about 30% of the cloud systems in winter, 26 (NAO) phase when the north Atlantic storm track takes its southernmost position. Consistently, more to the Zonal and Blocking regimes. Finally, severe precipitation events over the Alpine region are associated

Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

192

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

193

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively...

194

Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

Brodt-Giles, D.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei condensation nuclei concentration (CCNC) at any supersaturation (SS) #12;Background Aerosols act as nuclei

Delene, David J.

196

HNCO in molecular clouds  

SciTech Connect

In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

Zhou, Chen

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Constrained water cloud generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fast generation of large cloudy volumes with imposed cloud cover fractions and ambient vertical profiles is very important for the realistic simulation of atmospheric scenes. The model proposed here is the second step of a two-step model composed on the one hand of a volume generator based on a Fourier filtering method and on the other hand of a physical generator filling the volume with physical parameters. After a description of the general generation scheme, this paper focuses on the simulation of vertical profiles of water content (liquid, vapour) coupled with other state parameters (temperature, pressure, vertical velocity) via thermodynamic and hydrodynamic equations by local forcing of ambient conditions. The method for solving these equations is explained and applied to practical cases. First, by assuming that the actual temperature at the cloud base is equal to the dew temperature and by imposing a moist pseudo-adiabatic temperature gradient between the cloud top and bottom, the temperature profile in the cloud is found. When conditional instability occurs, the initial temperature profile between the ground and the cloud base is iteratively shifted to lower values until absolute stability is reached. Then the liquid water content is calculated by integrating the equation of water conservation, and the water vapour content by assuming that the cloud is everywhere saturated. Eventually, the vertical velocity is estimated by integration of the momentum equation. This method gives results in good agreement with published measurements, analytical and numerical models. Eventually, further developments of the column model, including the effects of phase transitions, turbulence, horizontal motions and mixing with the surrounding medium, are proposed in the concluding section.

Roland P.H. Berton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Statistical representation of clouds in climate models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

novel approach for representing novel approach for representing ice microphysics in bin and bulk schemes: Application to TWP-ICE deep convection Hugh Morrison and Wojciech Grabowski National Center for Atmospheric Research ARM STM, Monday, April 1, 2009 -1) Uncertainty of ice initiation processes -2) Wide range of ice particle characteristics (e.g., shape, effective density) -3) No clear separation of physical processes for small and large crystals The treatment of ice microphysics has a large impact on model simulations, e.g., precipitation, interactions with dynamics, radiation, etc. However, it is complicated by: Pristine ice crystals, grown by diffusion of water vapor Snowflakes, grown by aggregation Pruppacher and Klett Rimed ice crystals (accretion of supercooled cloud water) Graupel (heavily

200

Opaque cloud detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium-Containing Secondary Precipitates in Hanford Site Subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Significantly enhanced immobilization of radionuclides (such as 90Sr and 137Cs) due to adsorption and coprecipitation with neo-formed colloid-sized secondary precipitates has been reported at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. However, the stability of these secondary precipitates containing radionuclides in the subsurface under changeable field conditions is not clear. Here, the authors tested the remobilization possibility of Sr containing secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite) in the subsurface using saturated column experiments under different geochemical and flow conditions. The columns were packed with quartz sand that contained secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite containing Sr), and leached using colloid-free solutions under different flow rates, varying pH, and ionic strength conditions. The results indicate remobilization of the neo-formed secondary precipitates could be possible given a change of background conditions. The remobility of the neo formed precipitates increased with the rise in the leaching solution flow rate and pH (in a range of pH 4 to 11), as well as with decreasing solution ionic strength. The increased mobility of Sr-containing secondary precipitates with changing background conditions can be a potential source for additional radionuclide transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

5, 60136039, 2005 FRESCO cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY O2 A-band N. Fournier 1 , P. Stammes 1 , M. de Graaf 1 , R, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

203

3, 33013333, 2003 Cirrus cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity J. Str and Physics Discussions Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparisonšom (johan@itm.su.se) 3301 #12;ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

8, 96979729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval algorithm P. Wang et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9697 #12;ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

206

pCloud: A Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment  

SciTech Connect

This research conducted by the Newton Energy Group, LLC (NEG) is dedicated to the development of pCloud: a Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment. pCloud is offering power industry stakeholders the capability to model electricity markets and is organized around the Software as a Service (SaaS) concept -- a software application delivery model in which software is centrally hosted and provided to many users via the internet. During the Phase I of this project NEG developed a prototype design for pCloud as a SaaS-based commercial service offering, system architecture supporting that design, ensured feasibility of key architecture's elements, formed technological partnerships and negotiated commercial agreements with partners, conducted market research and other related activities and secured funding for continue development of pCloud between the end of Phase I and beginning of Phase II, if awarded. Based on the results of Phase I activities, NEG has established that the development of a cloud-based power market simulation environment within the Windows Azure platform is technologically feasible, can be accomplished within the budget and timeframe available through the Phase II SBIR award with additional external funding. NEG believes that pCloud has the potential to become a game-changing technology for the modeling and analysis of electricity markets. This potential is due to the following critical advantages of pCloud over its competition: - Standardized access to advanced and proven power market simulators offered by third parties. - Automated parallelization of simulations and dynamic provisioning of computing resources on the cloud. This combination of automation and scalability dramatically reduces turn-around time while offering the capability to increase the number of analyzed scenarios by a factor of 10, 100 or even 1000. - Access to ready-to-use data and to cloud-based resources leading to a reduction in software, hardware, and IT costs. - Competitive pricing structure, which will make high-volume usage of simulation services affordable. - Availability and affordability of high quality power simulators, which presently only large corporate clients can afford, will level the playing field in developing regional energy policies, determining prudent cost recovery mechanisms and assuring just and reasonable rates to consumers. - Users that presently do not have the resources to internally maintain modeling capabilities will now be able to run simulations. This will invite more players into the industry, ultimately leading to more transparent and liquid power markets.

Rudkevich, Aleksandr; Goldis, Evgeniy

2012-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Simultaneous radar and lidar cloud measurements at Geesthacht (53.5°N, 10.5°E)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparisons have been made of the cloud profiles obtained from the backscatter signals of a 95-GHz radar and a 720-nm lidar system between 23 May and 4 November 1997 at Geesthacht (53°24? N, 10°26? E). Although the wavelengths of the two systems differ by a factor of 4 000, remarkably similar data have been obtained in many cases. There are differences, though. Small droplets do not interact significantly with the radar pulses, and hence can only be seen by the lidar due to their strong scattering in the UV/VIS. On the other hand, attenuation of the lidar pulses by underlying clouds and gas absorbers makes upper cloud regions and especially cloud top heights better detectable for the radar. Rain and snow falling out of a cloud and evaporating on the way down cannot be distinguished from the cloud region by the radar, but a fast downward component in the Doppler spectrum is indicative of precipitation in or under a cloud. For quantitative cloud studies collocated radar-lidar systems considerably add to the experimental capabilities of each of the two systems alone.

C. Weitkamp; H. Flint; W. Lahmann; F.A. Theopold; O. Danne; M. Quante; E. Raschke

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Who is this cloud?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WHO IS THIS CLOUD? is a generative artwork in progress. It is a piece of art dedicated to the memory of a loved one and the idea of existence and transformation. The computer "Beings" will be animated according to their inner program, to weather sensors ... Keywords: Turing pattern, artificial life art, cellular automata, generative art, transhumanism

Lola B. Deswarte; Alain Lioret; Barbara Tannery

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Complex, quiescent kinematics in a highly filamentary infrared dark cloud  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contrast to low-mass star forming regions...clouds where low-mass stars are forming...in the extinction map and in N2H+) has...moving with relative velocities of 1. The accumulation...the properties (masses, densities, temperatures...outflows, stellar winds or ultraviolet radiation......

J. D. Henshaw; P. Caselli; F. Fontani; I. Jiménez-Serra; J. C. Tan; A. K. Hernandez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evaluating regional cloud-permitting simulations of the WRF model for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE, Darwin 2006)  

SciTech Connect

Data from the Tropical Warm Pool I5 nternational Cloud Experiment (TWPICE) were used to evaluate two suites of high-resolution (4-7 km, convection-resolving) simulations of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with a focus on the performance of different cloud microphysics (MP) schemes. The major difference between these two suites of simulations is with and without the reinitializing process. Whenreinitialized every three days, the four cloud MP schemes evaluated can capture the general profiles of cloud fraction, temperature, water vapor, winds, and cloud liquid and ice water content (LWC and IWC, respectively). However, compared with surface measurements of radiative and moisture fluxes and satellite retrieval of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, disagreements do exist. Large discrepancies with observed LWC and IWC and derived radiative heating profiles can be attributed to both the limitations of the cloud property retrievals and model performance. The simulated precipitation also shows a wide range of uncertainty as compared with observations, which could be caused by the cloud MP schemes, complexity of land-sea configuration, and the high temporal and spatial variability. In general, our result indicates the importance of large-scale initial and lateral boundary conditions in re-producing basic features of cloudiness and its vertical structures. Based on our case study, we find overall the six-hydrometer single-moment MP scheme(WSM6) [Hong and Lim, 2006] in the WRF model si25 mulates the best agree- ment with the TWPICE observational analysis.

Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dudhia, Jimy; McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaodong

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect

The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 September 1933 research-article Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Precipitation Forecasting with Gamma Distribution Models for Gridded Precipitation Events in Eastern Oklahoma and Northwest Arkansas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An elegant and easy to implement probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasting model that can be used to estimate the probability of exceedance (POE) is presented. The model was built using precipitation data collected across eastern ...

Steven A. Amburn; Andrew S.I.D. Lang; Michael A. Buonaiuto

214

Solution and precipitation hardening in carbon-doped two-phase {gamma}-titanium aluminides  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase titanium aluminide alloy was systematically doped with carbon to improve its high temperature strength. Solid solutions and precipitates of carbon were formed by different thermal treatments. A fine dispersion of perovskite precipitates was found to be very effective for improving the high temperature strength and creep resistance of the material. The strengthening mechanisms were characterized by flow stresses and activation parameters. The investigations were accompanied by electron microscope observation of the defect structure which was generated during deformation. Special attention was paid on the interaction mechanisms of perfect and twinning dislocations with the carbide precipitates.

Appel, F.; Christoph, U.; Wagner, R. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or sonication, has been shown to successfully remove or prevent the formation of 50–90% of the precipitates in biofuels. Precipitates can plug filters as biodiesel is transported from one location to another, and often cannot be detected by visual inspection....

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Dissolution of ordered precipitates under ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect

The stability of the ordered {gamma}{prime} precipitates under 300-keV Ni{sup +} irradiation was investigated between room temperature and 623 K. The two competing mechanisms of destabilization by cascade producing irradiation, i.e. disordering and dissolution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitates in Nimonic PE16 alloy, has been studied separately by electron microscopy and field-ion microscopy with atom probe. At high temperatures, the precipitates are stable. At intermediate temperatures, the precipitates dissolve by ballistic mixing into the matrix, but the interface is restored by the radiation-enhanced atomic jumps. The order in the precipitates remains stable. At low temperatures, the precipitates are dissolved by atomic mixing. The dissolution proceeds in a diffusional manner with a diffusion coefficient normalized by the displacement rate D/K = 0.75 nm{sup 2}dpa{sup {minus}1}. The precipitates become disordered by a fluence of 0.1 dpa, whereas precipitate dissolution needs much higher fluences.

Camus, E.; Bourdeau, F.; Abromeit, C.; Wanderka, N.; Wollenberger, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum only recently have attempts been made to develop a thermodynamic description. Published methods

Firoozabadi, Abbas

218

Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, the thermal instability is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field's theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one and two-dimensional (1-D/2-D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1-D simulations demonstrate that the thermal instability can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to ...

Proga, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) 2011.04.22, Jensen, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Lead Scientist : Christopher Williams For data sets, see below. Description The scientific focus was to study the vertical structure of precipitation in a vertical column over the SGP Central Facility. These multi-frequency profiler observations enabled directly measuring the vertical air motion and retrieving the raindrop size distributions from near the surface to just under the freezing level. These profilers were deployed during MC3E

220

Research Input Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HighlightsSubmit HighlightsSubmit Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlight Submittal Form Tell us about your research! This form is designed to collect summary information about working group research results. If you have any questions or comments, please contact the administrators. Journal or Book Reference(s) (if applicable): Look Up Your reference from the Publications Database. Limit two references. If you have not submitted the references, please Add it now. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Surface Properties General Circulation and Single Column

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Size of Cloud from Shadow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Size of Cloud from Shadow Size of Cloud from Shadow Name: mike Status: other Grade: other Location: N/A Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: I see a cloud and I see its shadow in a field - knowing high sun angles - is there a way of telling how far away the cloud is or how big? - I am thinking if the shadow is 30' wide and the sun is at 2:00 pm- ? Replies: Hi Mike, Try this, draw a small circle representing the Sun. Somewhere below this circle and maybe to the right, draw an oblong, make this oblong bigger than the circle. Now connect the leftmost edge of the circle with the leftmost edge of the oblong with a straight line. Do the same for the rightmost edges. The oblong now represent the shadow of a cloud on the ground, and the lines represent the rays of the sun passing along the edges of the cloud.

222

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

223

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

droplet size droplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park Engineering Company - Cloud particle imager

224

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

225

Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations  

SciTech Connect

The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

Wu, Xiaoqing

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

226

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Title Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1998 Authors Kong, Fanping, Robert Kostecki, Frank R. McLarnon, and Rolf H. Muller Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 313-314 Pagination 775-780 Keywords effective medium approximation, electrochemical precipitation, inhomogeneous films, nickel hydroxide, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to investigate the electrochemical precipitation of nickel hydroxide films. By use of optical models for inhomogeneous films it was found that a specific precipitation current density produced the most compact and homogeneous film structures. The density of nickel hydroxide films was derived to be 1.25-1.50 g/cm3. The redox behavior of precipitated nickel hydroxide films was studied with an effective-medium optical model. Incomplete conversion to nickel oxyhydroxide and a reduction in film thickness were found during the oxidation cycle.

229

Climate zones for maritime clouds  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we use a commercially available lidar ceilometer to investigate how the basic structure of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and oceanographic field programs conducted in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. For comparison, we show the results obtained at a mid-latitude continental location and at an ice camp on the Arctic ice shelf. For each analyzed case, we use an extended time series to generate meaningful cloud base and cloud fraction statistics. The Vaisala CT 12K ceilometer uses a GaAs diode laser to produce short (150 ns), high-intensity pulses of infrared radiation (904 nm wavelength). The return signals from a large number of consecutive pulses are coherently summed to boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Each resulting 30-s profile of backscattered power (15-m resolution) is analyzed to detect cloud layers using a specified cloud detection limit. In addition to measurements of cloud base, the ceilometer can also provide information on cloud fraction using a time series of the {open_quotes}cloud{close_quotes} or {open_quotes} no cloud{close_quotes} status reported in the 30-s data.

White, A.B.; Ruffieux, D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical cloud properties as a function of regime Regimes? Monsoon versus Break * Different synoptic vertical velocity profiles - Changes convective inhibition, corresponding...

231

Declarative Automated Cloud Resource Orchestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orchestration · Cloud resource orchestration constraint optimization problems 4 Provider operational] · Orchestration procedures Transactions · Either commit or abort Distributed communication and optimization

Plotkin, Joshua B.

232

Anvil characteristics as seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the month-long field campaign. The morphology, evolution, and longevity of the anvil were analyzed as well as the relationship of the anvil to the rest of the precipitating system. In addition, idealized in-cloud radiative heating profiles were created based...

Frederick, Kaycee Loretta

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation in Regional Spectral Model Simulations over West Africa: Sensitivities to Resolution and Cumulus Schemes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a basic form of climate patterns, the diurnal cycle of precipitation (DCP) can provide a key test bed for model reliability and development. In this study, DCP over West Africa was simulated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (...

Xiaogang He; Hyungjun Kim; Pierre-Emmanuel Kirstetter; Kei Yoshimura; Eun-Chul Chang; Craig R. Ferguson; Jessica M. Erlingis; Yang Hong; Taikan Oki

234

Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

LaCurts, Katrina

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

236

Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena,” Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud,” Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

Furman, M.A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

City of Red Cloud, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cloud, Nebraska (Utility Company) Cloud, Nebraska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Red Cloud Place Nebraska Utility Id 15773 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Commercial Large General Service Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1080/kWh Commercial: $0.0745/kWh Industrial: $0.0604/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

239

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 {mu}m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 {mu}m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. [City Coll. of New York, NY (US); Porch, W.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Hudson, J.G. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (US); Durkee, P.A. [Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 [mu]m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 [mu]m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. (City Coll. of New York, NY (United States)); Porch, W.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hudson, J.G. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States)); Durkee, P.A. (Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Precipitation Banding in Idealized Baroclinic Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moist idealized baroclinic-wave simulations show the development of precipitation bands from a zonally uniform initial midlatitude jet. For a frictionless lower boundary, and with no latent-heat release or surface heat and moisture fluxes, warm ...

Jesse Norris; Geraint Vaughan; David M. Schultz

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Testing Competing High-Resolution Precipitation Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing Competing High-Resolution Precipitation Forecasts Eric Gilleland Research Prediction Comparison Test D1 D2 D = D1 ­ D2 copyright NCAR 2013 Loss Differential Field #12;Spatial Prediction Comparison Test Introduced by Hering and Genton

Gilleland, Eric

243

The Environment of Precipitating Shallow Cumulus Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative estimates of precipitation in a typical undisturbed trade wind region are derived from 2 months of radar reflectivity data and compared to the meteorological environment determined from soundings, surface flux, and airborne-lidar ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens; A. Pier Siebesma

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Advanced Concepts on Remote Sensing of Precipitation at Multiple Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of satellite-based global precipitation data in weather andvarious satellite series have provided valuable weathersatellite precipitation research community, instru- ment development teams, military weather

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An analysis of winter precipitation in the northeast and a winter weather precipitation type forecasting tool for New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are produced. The hourly precipitation-type climatologist present the probabilities for particular precipitation types (frozen, freezing, rain, and mixed) for 2F? temperature intervals from 8F? to 44F?. The synoptic precipitation-type climatologist provide...

Gordon, Christopher James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

A TRUSTED STORAGE SYSTEM FOR THE CLOUD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Data stored in third party storage systems like the cloud might not be secure since confidentiality and integrity of data are not guaranteed. Though cloud… (more)

Karumanchi, Sushama

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;© Fraunhofer ISST Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster »Cloud Computing for Logistics« Budget 3 * 3 Mio© Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS FOR LOGISTICS Jakob Rehof Professor, Chair of Software Engineering, Technical University of Dortmund Director, Fraunhofer-ISST Dortmund and Berlin First

Rajamani, Sriram K.

249

Ship-Track Clouds, Aerosol, and Ship Dynamic Effects; A Climate Perspective from Ship-Based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Ship-track clouds are marine boundary layer clouds that form behind ocean ships and are observed from satellites in the visible and near infrared. Ship-track clouds provide a rare opportunity to connect aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) emissions and observable changes in marine stratiform clouds. A very small change in the reflectivity of these eastern Pacific and Atlantic clouds (about 4%) provides a climate feedback of similar magnitude to doubling CO{sub 2} (increasing cloud reflectivity corresponds to global cooling). The Department of Energy sponsored research from 1991 to 1995 to study ship-track clouds including two ocean-based experiments in the summers of 1991 and 1994. These experiments showed that ship-track cloud properties were often more complex those related to a reduction of droplet size with an increase in number associated with increasing CCN from the ship's plume. The clouds showed evidence of morphological changes more likely to be associated with cloud dynamic effects either initiated by the increased CCN or directly by the ship's heat output or turbulent air wake. The fact that marine stratiform clouds, that are susceptible to ship track formation, are starved for both CCN and convective turbulence complicates the separation of the two effects.

Porch, W.M.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

250

THE MAGELLANIC INTER-CLOUD PROJECT (MAGIC). I. EVIDENCE FOR INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN BETWEEN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

The origin of the gas in between the Magellanic Clouds (MCs)-known as the ''Magellanic Bridge'' (MB)-is puzzling. Numerical simulations suggest that the MB formed from tidally stripped gas and stars in a recent interaction between the MCs. However, the apparent lack of stripped intermediate- or old-age stars associated with the MB is at odds with this picture. In this paper, we present the first results from the MAGellanic Inter-Cloud program (MAGIC) aimed at probing the stellar populations in the inter-Cloud region. We present observations of the stellar populations in two large fields located in between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC/SMC), secured using the WFI camera on the 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. Using a synthetic color-magnitude diagram technique, we present the first quantitative evidence for the presence of intermediate-age and old stars in the inter-Cloud region. The intermediate-age stars-which make up {approx}28% of all stars in the region-are not present in fields at a similar distance from the SMC in a direction pointing away from the LMC. This provides potential evidence that these intermediate-age stars could have been tidally stripped from the SMC. However, spectroscopic studies will be needed to confirm or rule out the tidal origin for the inter-Cloud gas and stars.

Noeel, N. E. D.; Read, J. I. [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Conn, B. C.; Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Carrera, R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Dolphin, A., E-mail: noelia@phys.ethz.ch [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734-1337 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead...

Dedes, L; Kalberla, P W M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead to some preliminary conclusions. A common feature of those conclusions is the presence of a gravitational potential well, which is required to account for the rotation of the trapped HI gas. This potential well could be associated with a dark galaxy or some other exotic object.

L. Dedes; C. Dedes; P. W. M Kalberla

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

Earth Forms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Earth Forms narrates and explains the Masters Project Exhibition by the same name. The sculptures included in the exhibition, Earth Forms, use a variety of… (more)

Mock, Janelle Marie Tullis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

255

TWP Island Cloud Trail Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies W. M. Porch Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico S. Winiecki University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois Introduction Images and surface temperature measurements from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Multi- spectral Thermal Imaging (MTI) satellite are combined with geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) images during 2000 and 2001 to better understand cloud trail formation characteristics from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site. Figure 1 shows a comparison on two consecutive days in December 2000. The day for which a cloud trail developed was more moist and cooler at the altitude the cloud developed (about 600 m) and there was very little

256

ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

condensation nuclei condensation nuclei ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud condensation nuclei Small particles (typically 0.0002 mm, or 1/100 th the size of a cloud droplet) about which cloud droplets coalesce. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

257

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

258

Documenting the Life and Death of Clouds | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documenting Documenting the Life and Death of Clouds News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.08.11 Documenting the Life and Death of Clouds Office of Science presents results from the world's biggest radar laboratory. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo A crane positions the topmost portion of the X-band scanning ARM precipitation radar (X-SAPR). ARM Climate Research Facility A crane positions the topmost portion of the X-band scanning ARM precipitation radar (X-SAPR). Today, researchers at the Office of Science's Energy's Atmospheric

259

Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

retrievals of cloud properties retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Preliminary retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC The cloud optical properties of interest are: The cloud optical properties of interest are: * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff τ = 3 2 LWP r eff r eff in ÎŒm, LWP in g/m 2 The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer (2NFOV) The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer

260

How long does it take to form a molecular cloud?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cosmic ray heating, and the energy transfer between the gas and...2011, AA, 536, A19. Audit E. , Hennebelle P., 2005...359, 1124. Hennebelle P. , Audit E., Miville-Deschenes M...Vazquez-Semadeni E., lessen R. S., Audit E., 2008, AA, 486, L43......

Paul C. Clark; Simon C. O. Glover; Ralf S. Klessen; Ian A. Bonnell

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Temperature of Interstellar Clouds from Turbulent Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To evaluate the effect of turbulent heating in the thermal balance of interstellar clouds, we develop an extension of the log-Poisson intermittency model to supersonic turbulence. The model depends on a parameter, d, interpreted as the dimension of the most dissipative structures. By comparing the model with the probability distribution of the turbulent dissipation rate in a simulation of supersonic and super-Alfvenic turbulence, we find a best-fit value of d=1.64. We apply this intermittency model to the computation of the mass-weighted probability distribution of the gas temperature of molecular clouds, high-mass star-forming cores, and cold diffuse HI clouds. Our main results are: i) The mean gas temperature in molecular clouds can be explained as the effect of turbulent heating alone, while cosmic ray heating may dominate only in regions where the turbulent heating is low; ii) The mean gas temperature in high-mass star-forming cores with typical FWHM of ~6 km/s (corresponding to a 1D rms velocity of 2.5 km/s) may be completely controlled by turbulent heating, which predicts a mean value of approximately 36 K, two to three times larger than the mean gas temperature in the absence of turbulent heating; iii) The intermittency of the turbulent heating can generate enough hot regions in cold diffuse HI clouds to explain the observed CH+ abundance, if the rms velocity on a scale of 1 pc is at least 3 km/s, in agreement with previous results based on incompressible turbulence. Because of its importance in the thermal balance of molecular clouds and high-mass star-forming cores, the process of turbulent heating may be central in setting the characteristic stellar mass and in regulating molecular chemical reactions.

Liubin Pan; Paolo Padoan

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data  

SciTech Connect

The representation of clouds in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a major source of uncertainty in climate change simulations. Cloud climatologies have been widely used to either evaluate climate model cloud fields or examine, in combination with other data sets, climate-scale relationships between cloud properties and dynamical or microphysical parameters. Major cloud climatologies have been based either on satellite observations of cloud properties or on surface observers views of cloud type and amount. Such data sets provide either the top-down view of column-integrated cloud properties (satellites) or the bottom-up view of the cloud field morphology (surface observers). Both satellite-based and surface cloud climatologies have been successfully used to examine cloud properties, to support process studies, and to evaluate climate and weather models. However, they also present certain limitations, since the satellite cloud types are defined using radiative cloud boundaries and surface observations are based on cloud boundaries visible to human observers. As a result, these data sets do not resolve the vertical distribution of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydrologic effects of the cloud field. Ground-based cloud radar observations, on the other hand, resolve with good accuracy the vertical distribution of cloud layers and could be used to produce cloud type climatologies with vertical layering information. However, these observations provide point measurements only and it is not immediately clear to what extent they are representative of larger regimes. There are different methods that can be applied to minimize this problem and to produce cloud layering climatologies useful for both cloud process and model evaluation studies. If a radar system is run continuously over a number of years, it eventually samples a large number of dynamical and microphysical regimes. If additional data sets are used to put the cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution varies with dynamic and thermodynamic regime and how these variations would affect cloud climate fe

George Tselioudis

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

263

ATLAS Cloud R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Love, P; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Observed scaling in clouds and precipitation and scale incognizance in regional to global atmospheric models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10.1175/2008JCLI2116.1. Hack, J. , J. Caron, G. Danabasoglu,Lin, C. S. Bretherton, J. J. Hack, and Rauscher, S. A. , T.balance) match observations (Hack et al. , 2006). It is

O'Brien, T.A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Regional climate model sensitivities to parametrizations of convection and non-precipitating subgrid-scale clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Geesthacht, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany B. Bookhagen Department

Bookhagen, Bodo

266

Observational Analysis of Cloud and Precipitation in Midlatitude Cyclones: Northern versus Southern Hemisphere Warm Fronts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but disagree on future changes in their intensity (Lambert and Fyfe 2006; Bengtsson et al. 2009). Examination and are key contributors to the meridional transport of energy between the equator and the poles. Though interaction between a projected poleward shift in the storm track, increased atmospheric water vapor content

267

Cloud-to-ground lightning-precipitation relationships in the South Central United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) from the states of Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and Louisiana are examined. The parameters are examined on daily and/or monthly time scales. This study uses CG lightning data which were recorded by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN...

Sheridan, Scott Christopher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effects of Externally-Through-Internally-Mixed Soot Inclusions within Clouds and Precipitation on Global Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The model used and modified for this study was GATOR-GCMOM, a parallelized and one-way-nested global-through-urban scale gas, aerosol, transport, radiation, general circulation, mesoscale, and ocean model. ... The GATOR-GCMOM model was modified to treat absorption and scattering of aerosol inclusions within individual hydrometeor particles. ... GATOR-GCMOM = gas, aerosol, transport, radiation, general circulation, mesoscale, and ocean model ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Millimeter-Wavelength Dual-Polarization Doppler Radar for Cloud and Precipitation Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pulse Doppler radar system operating at 35 GHz and having full polarization (linear and circular) diversity capability is described. Separate antennas are used for the transmitter and the receiver because this design approach allows better ...

F. Pasqualucci; B. W. Bartram; R. A. Kropfli; W. R. Moninger

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

271

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM A six-week in-depth program in the architectures, infrastructure, and operations of Cloud Computing DePaul University's Cloud Computing Infrastructure and Operations Program provides specialized knowledge in Cloud infrastructure with emphasis

Schaefer, Marcus

272

Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud? There's an App for That David McConaughy Locus Technologies 1997-2014 4 #12;Cloud-based EMIS 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 5 #12; Cloud Synch data back to EIM cloud for analysis 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 9 #12;Mobile Apps for Data

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

273

7, 1711717146, 2007 Dependence of cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17117­17146, 2007 Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud height on temperature T. Wagner et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud top height on surface temperature derived from spectrally resolved UV/vis satellite observations T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

274

Cloud Computing An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing ­ An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian Infosys Technologies Limited #12;2Infosys Confidential Overview of cloud computing? Cloud computing* Computing in which dynamically scalable of cloud computing 1. On-demand self-service 2. Ubiquitous network access 3. Location independent resource

Rajamani, Sriram K.

275

Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

Iosup, Alexandru

276

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES Jasmine at the Azores provided a unique, long-term record (May 2009 to December 2010) of cloud observations in a regime dominated by low-level stratiform clouds. First, a comprehensive cloud classification scheme that utilizes

277

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

278

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

Zhong, Lin

279

VO{sub 2} precipitates for self-protected optical surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming crystallographically coherent precipitates of vanadium dioxide in the near-surface region of sapphire and the resulting product is disclosed. Ions of vanadium and oxygen are stoichiometrically implanted into a sapphire substrate (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and subsequently annealed to form vanadium dioxide precipitates in the substrate. The embedded VO{sub 2} precipitates, which are three-dimensionally oriented with respect to the crystal axes of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} host lattice, undergo a first-order monoclinic-to-tetragonal (and also semiconducting-to-metallic) phase transition at ca. 77 C. This transformation is accompanied by a significant variation in the optical transmission of the implanted region and results in the formation of an optically active, thermally ``switchable`` surface region on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 5 figs.

Gea, L.A.; Boatner, L.A.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

ARM - Evaluation Product - MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor 2005.02.01 - 2011.04.25 Site(s) FKB GRW HFE NIM PYE SBS General Description A new algorithm is being developed for the ARM Program to derive liquid water path (LWP) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the 2-channel (23.8 and 31.4 GHz) microwave radiometers (MWRs) deployed at ARM climate research facilities. This algorithm utilizes the "monoRTM" radiative transfer model (http://rtweb.aer.com), a combination of both an advanced statistical and physical-iterative retrieval, and brightness temperature offsets applied before the retrieval is performed. This allows perhaps the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sensitivity of the simulated climate to a diagnostic formulation for cloud liquid water  

SciTech Connect

The accurate treatment of clouds and their radiative properties is widely regarded to be among the most important problems facing global climate modeling. A number of the more serious systematic simulation biases in the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) appear to be related to deficiencies in the treatment of cloud optical properties. In this paper, a simple diagnostic parameterization for cloud liquid water is presented. The sensitivity of the simulated climate to this alternative formulation, both in terms of mean climate metrics and measures of the climate system response, is illustrated. Resulting simulations show significant reductions in CCM2 systematic biases, particularly with respect to surface temperature, precipitation, and extratropical geopotential height-field anomalies. Many aspects of the simulated response to ENSO forcing are also substantially improved.

Hack, J.J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 11/11/2013 | NR-13-11-04 Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that observed changes in global precipitation are directly affected by human activities. LLNL scientists find precipitation, global warming link Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LIVERMORE, Calif. -- The rain in Spain may lie mainly on the plain, but the location and intensity of that rain is changing not only in Spain but around the globe. A new study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists shows that observed changes in global (ocean and land) precipitation are directly affected by human activities and cannot be explained by natural variability alone. The research appears in the Nov. 11 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

283

Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

KB Widener; K Johnson

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Waves on the surface of the Orion molecular cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massive stars influence their parental molecular cloud, and it has long been suspected that the development of hydrodynamical instabilities can compress or fragment the cloud. Identifying such instabilities has proved difficult. It has been suggested that elongated structures (such as the `pillars of creation') and other shapes arise because of instabilities, but alternative explanations are available. One key signature of an instability is a wave-like structure in the gas, which has hitherto not been seen. Here we report the presence of `waves' at the surface of the Orion molecular cloud near where massive stars are forming. The waves seem to be a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that arises during the expansion of the nebula as gas heated and ionized by massive stars is blown over pre-existing molecular gas.

Olivier Berné; Núria Marcelino; José Cernicharo

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cloud Computing for Telecom Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Context: Cloud computing is reshaping the service-delivery and business-models in Information and Communications Technology (ICT). The Information Technology (IT) sector has benefited from it in… (more)

Sapkota, Sagar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Centre & IT Equipment Energy Use. Proc. Digital Power...2007. pp. 1323. ACM, New York. [7] Energy Star, http://www...pp. 164177. ACM, New York. [32] Pratt, I...Vol. 53 No. 7, 2010 Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing......

Andreas Berl; Erol Gelenbe; Marco Di Girolamo; Giovanni Giuliani; Hermann De Meer; Minh Quan Dang; Kostas Pentikousis

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model  

SciTech Connect

As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of the temperature range. Although such treatment contributes to uncertainty in model outputs, the model validation test cases indicate that the model, with its associated uncertainty, is valid for its intended use. The intended use of this model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period.

P. Mariner

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

Short Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with uranium from mining and milling operations, radioactive wastes, and from nuclear accidents is a majorShort Communication Bioreduction and precipitation of uranium in ionic liquid aqueous solution t s Uranium forms various complexes with ionic liquids. Uranium bioreduction was affected by the type

Ohta, Shigemi

290

Experiments on Electron Cloud Mitigation at PEP-II  

SciTech Connect

The electron cloud effect has been observed at many accelerator facilities. It has been the subject of many workshops and reviews. An electron cloud is formed when low energy photoelectrons released from the vacuum chamber surfaces and ionized residual gas molecules, driven by the beam fields of passing positively charged bunches, impinge on the chamber walls and create secondary emission. It is an important issue for many currently operating facilities and the damping rings of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) because beam-cloud interaction can severely impact the machines performance. Systematic studies on the electron cloud effect, and its possible remedies, have been carried out in many laboratories. At SLAC, the effort has been concentrated on theoretical understanding with the aid of computer simulations, and experimental measurements with high intensity positron beams at PEP-II. Computer simulation results have been presented at ECLOUD07 and in an earlier article in this journal. In this article, we present recent results from electron cloud experiments at the positron storage ring of PEP-II. In particular, we discuss the performance of various mitigation techniques.

Ng, Johnny S.T.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.; /SLAC

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

291

Cloud condensation nuclei in Western Colorado : observations and model predictions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Variations in the warm cloud?active portion of atmospheric aerosols, or cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), have been shown to impact cloud droplet number concentration and subsequently… (more)

Ward, Daniel Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lamppa, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Voigt, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diurnal variations of the global tropical precipitation are documented by using two complementary Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) datasets (3B42 and 3G68) for 1998–2006 in an attempt to provide a unified view of the diurnal cycle and a ...

Kazuyoshi Kikuchi; Bin Wang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Annual Cycle of East African Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

East African precipitation is characterized by a dry annual mean climatology compared to other deep tropical land areas and a bimodal annual cycle with the major rainy season during March–May (MAM, often called the “long rains”) and the second ...

Wenchang Yang; Richard Seager; Mark A. Cane; Bradfield Lyon

295

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

296

On the Formation of Binary Stars and Small Stellar Groups in Magnetically Subcritical Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the standard scenario of isolated low-mass star formation, strongly magnetized molecular clouds are envisioned to condense gradually into cores, driven by ambipolar diffusion. Once the cores become magnetically supercritical, they collapse to form stars. Most previous studies based on this scenario are limited to axisymmetric calculations leading to single supercritical core formation. The assumption of axisymmetry has precluded a detailed investigation of cloud fragmentation, generally thought to be a necessary step in the formation of binary and multiple stars. In this contribution, we describe the non-axisymmetric evolution of initially magnetically subcritical clouds using a newly-developed MHD code. It is shown that non-axisymmetric perturbations of modest fractional amplitude ($\\sim 5%$) can grow nonlinearly in such clouds during the supercritical phase of cloud evolution, leading to the production of either a highly elongated bar or a set of multiple dense cores.

Fumitaka Nakamura; Zhi-Yun Li

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hypersonic Molecular Shocks in Star Forming Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much emission from star forming regions is from shock-excited gas. Shocks in molecular clouds are still not fully understood, as magnetic fields, dust and chemistry all play significant roles. I review the history, physics and current work in understanding these shocks, and in their possible use as diagnostics of local conditions.

Brand, P W J L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hypersonic Molecular Shocks in Star Forming Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much emission from star forming regions is from shock-excited gas. Shocks in molecular clouds are still not fully understood, as magnetic fields, dust and chemistry all play significant roles. I review the history, physics and current work in understanding these shocks, and in their possible use as diagnostics of local conditions.

Peter W. J. L. Brand

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

Contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for contact formation and gettering of precipitated impurities by multiple firing during semiconductor device fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical semiconductor device comprises: a first step that includes gettering of impurities from a semiconductor wafer and forming a backsurface field; and a second step that includes forming a front contact for the semiconductor wafer, wherein the second step is performed after completion of the first step.

Sopori, Bhushan

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

300

Domain walls with non-Abelian clouds  

SciTech Connect

Domain walls in U(N) gauge theories, coupled to Higgs scalar fields with degenerate masses, are shown to possess normalizable non-Abelian Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes, which we call non-Abelian clouds. We construct the moduli space metric and its Kaehler potential of the effective field theory on the domain walls by focusing on two models: a U(1) gauge theory with several charged Higgs fields, and a U(N) gauge theory with 2N Higgs fields in the fundamental representation. We find that non-Abelian clouds spread between two domain walls and that their rotation induces a long-range repulsive force, in contrast to a U(1) mode in models with fully nondegenerate masses which gives a short-range force. We also construct a bound state of dyonic domain walls by introducing the imaginary part of the Higgs masses. In the latter model we find that when all walls coincide, SU(N){sub L}xSU(N){sub R}xU(1) symmetry is broken down to SU(N){sub V}, and U(N){sub A} NG modes and the same number of quasi-NG modes are localized on the wall. When n walls separate, off-diagonal elements of U(n) NG modes have wave functions spreading between two separated walls (non-Abelian clouds), whereas some quasi-NG modes turn to NG bosons as a result of further symmetry breaking U(n){sub V}{yields}U(1){sub V}{sup n}. In the case of 4+1-dimensional bulk, we can dualize the effective theory to the supersymmetric Freedman-Townsend model of non-Abelian 2-form fields.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Method for the preparation of thallium-containing superconducting materials by precipitation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides improved methods for the preparation of precursor powders that are used in the preparation of superconducting ceramic materials that contain thallium. A first solution that contains the hydrogen peroxide and metal cations, other than thallium, that will be part of the ceramic is quickly mixed with a second solution that contains precipitating anions and thallium (I) to form a precipitate which is dried to yield precursor powders. The precursor powders are calcined an sintered to produce superconducting materials that contain thallium.

Bunker, Bruce C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lamppa, Diana L. (Albuquerque, NM); Voigt, James A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

Behavior of nanoparticle clouds around a magnetized microsphere under magnetic and flow fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a micron-sized magnetizable particle is introduced into a suspension of nanosized magnetic particles, the nanoparticles accumulate around the microparticle and form thick anisotropic clouds extended in the direction of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon promotes colloidal stabilization of bimodal magnetic suspensions and allows efficient magnetic separation of nanoparticles used in bioanalysis and water purification. In the present work, size and shape of nanoparticle clouds under the simultaneous action of an external uniform magnetic field and the flow have been studied in details. In experiments, dilute suspension of iron oxide nanoclusters (of a mean diameter of 60 nm) was pushed through a thin slit channel with the nickel microspheres (of a mean diameter of 50$\\mu$m) attached to the channel wall. The behavior of nanocluster clouds was observed in the steady state using an optical microscope. In the presence of strong enough flow, the size of the clouds monotonically decreases with increasing flow speed in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This is qualitatively explained by enhancement of hydrodynamic forces washing the nanoclusters away from the clouds. In the longitudinal field, the flow induces asymmetry of the front and the back clouds. To explain the flow and the field effects on the clouds, we have developed a simple model based on the balance of the stresses and particle fluxes on the cloud surface. This model, applied to the case of the magnetic field parallel to the flow, captures reasonably well the flow effect on the size and shape of the cloud and reveals that the only dimensionless parameter governing the cloud size is the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces - the Mason number. At strong magnetic interactions considered in the present work (dipolar coupling parameter $\\alpha \\geq 2$), the Brownian motion seems not to affect the cloud behavior.

Cécilia Magnet; Pavel Kuzhir; Georges Bossis; Alain Meunier; Sebastien Nave; Andrey Zubarev; Claire Lomenech; Victor Bashtovoi

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Paper presented at the WMO Workshop on Measurement of Cloud Properties for Forcasts of Weather, Air Quality and Climate. June 2327, 1997. Mexico City, Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cloud composition in terms of the phase, size and shape of the hydrometeors, these interpretations to be severely limited by two factors: insuffi- cient sampling rates of the in situ probes, and the complexities presented at the workshop "Theoretical and Practical Aspects of a Regional Precipitation Enhancement Program

Vali, Gabor

306

Arsenite sorption and co-precipitation with calcite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of As(III) by calcite was investigated as a function of As(III) concentration, time and pH. The sorption isotherm, i.e. the log As(III) vs. log [As(OH)3 degrees / Assat] plot is S-shaped and has been modelled on an extended version of the surface precipitation model. At low concentrations, As(OH)3 degrees is adsorbed by complexation to surface Ca surface sites, as previously described by the X-ray standing wave technique. The inflexion point of the isotherm, where As(OH)3 degrees is limited by the amount of surface sites (ST), yields 6 sites nm-2 in good agreement with crystallographic data. Beyond this value, the amount of sorbed arsenic increases linearly with solution concentration, up to the saturation of arsenic with respect to the precipitation of CaHAsO3(s). The solid solutions formed in this concentration range were examined by X-ray and neutron diffraction. The doped calcite lattice parameters increase with arsenic content while c/a ratio remains constant. Our results made on bulk calcite on...

Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Turrillas, Xavier; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Charlet, Laurent

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Influence of the grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750  

SciTech Connect

In the present work, the effect of grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in a superduplex stainless steel was investigated. The materials studied were heat treated isothermally at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C for times up to 120 min. Hardness tests, light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were carried out to detect sigma and other harmful precipitate phases. The ferritic and austenitic grain sizes in the solution treated condition of the two steels analyzed were measured by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Cyclic polarization corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance. The results presented show that the precipitation of deleterious phases such as {chi}, {sigma} and {gamma}{sub 2}, which can occur during welding and forming operations, is retarded by grain growth.

Pardal, J.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Rua Passo da Patria, 156-CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/Brazil (Brazil); Tavares, S.S.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Rua Passo da Patria, 156-CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/Brazil (Brazil)], E-mail: ssmtavares@terra.com.br; Fonseca, M. Cindra; Souza, J.A. de; Corte, R.R.A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Rua Passo da Patria, 156-CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/Brazil (Brazil); Abreu, H.F.G. de [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Engenharia Metalugica e de Materiais, Campus do Pici Bl. 702, Fortaleza, CE, CEP 60.455-760 (Brazil)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does stellar feedback result in cloud death?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar feedback, star formation and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localised thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localised thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the low...

Tasker, Elizabeth J; Pudritz, Ralph

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Error Analysis of Satellite Precipitation Products in Mountainous Basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards such as flash floods, shallow landslides, and debris flows, triggered by heavy precipitation events (HPEs). In ...

Yiwen Mei; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou; Efthymios I. Nikolopoulos; Marco Borga

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The precipitation sequence in Al-Mg-Si alloys  

SciTech Connect

Fine-scale precipitation that occurs during age hardening of Al alloy 6061 has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the precipitation sequence is: independent clusters of Mg and Si atoms {yields} co-clusters that contain Mg and Si atoms {yields} small precipitates of unknown structure {yields} {beta}{double_prime} needle-shaped precipitates {yields} B{prime} lath-shaped precipitates and {beta}{prime} rod-shaped precipitates. A new structure is proposed for the {beta}{double_prime} precipitate. It was found that the Mg:Si ratio in the intermediate precipitates and co-clusters was close to 1:1.

Edwards, G.A.; Dunlop, G.L. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)] [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Stiller, K. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Couper, M.J. [Comalco Research Centre, Thomastown, Victoria (Australia)] [Comalco Research Centre, Thomastown, Victoria (Australia)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Diurnal Precipitation Variations in South-Central New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Orographic forcing of diurnal precipitation variations in south-central New Mexico is examined. Harmonic analysis reveals a strong diurnal cycle in precipitation frequency at all stations studied. In addition, relatively high amplitudes in the ...

Donna F. Tucker

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Diurnal Variations of Warm-Season Precipitation over Northern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the diurnal variations of the warm-season precipitation over northern China using the high-resolution precipitation products obtained from the Climate Prediction Center’s morphing technique (CMORPH) during May–August of 2003–...

Huizhong He; Fuqing Zhang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and the interior of grains. The dual precipitate structure of finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix and coarse M23C6 at grain boundaries provides combined...

316

Diurnal variation of tropical precipitation using five years TRMM data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) data are used in this study to reveal diurnal variations of precipitation over the Tropics (30?S ? 30?N) from January, 1998...

Wu, Qiaoyan

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tropical rainforests are known to exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability compared with oceanic areas with similar mean precipitation in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of ...

Lee, Jung-Eun

319

Performance of Quality Assurance Procedures on Daily Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The search for precipitation quality control (QC) methods has proven difficult. The high spatial and temporal variability associated with precipitation data causes high uncertainty and edge creep when regression-based approaches are applied. ...

Jinsheng You; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Saralees Nadarajah; Kenneth E. Kunkel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sensitivity of tropical precipitation extremes to climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precipitation extremes increase in intensity over many regions of the globe in simulations of a warming climate1, 2, 3. The rate of increase of precipitation extremes in the extratropics is consistent across global climate ...

O'Gorman, Paul Ambrose

322

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2SiO2Si Interfaces . Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at...

323

EEOC FORM  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Management Directive-715 Fiscal Year 2012 DOE NNSA February 4, 2013 i National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy ANNUAL EEO PROGRAM STATUS REPORT EEO PLAN TO ATTAIN THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A MODEL EEO PROGRAM Table of Contents Page FORM 715-01 Part A Department or Agency Identifying Information......................1 FORM 715-01 Part B Total Employment....................................................................1 FORM 715-01 Part C Agency Official(s) Responsible for oversight of EEO Program(s)................................................................................................................1

324

order form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Order Form Customer Order Form Fermilab Education Office - Customer Order Form PO BOX 500, MS 777, Batavia, IL 60510 * ph. 630-840-8258 * fax 630-840-2500 * avarry@fnal.gov Date: This order be: SHIPPED PICKED UP? Bill to: Ship to: Contact/Institution name: Email: Phone: Fax: Payment method (please circle): Visa/MasterCard - Check - Purchase Order  Visa/MasterCard # P.O. # Exp Date: Quantity Ordered Item Name Item Description (color, size, etc.) Price Each Total Amount  For purchases over $200 only *IL residents ONLY: Add 7.5% sales tax to your order.

325

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

326

Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

328

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Cloud Tomography Microwave Cloud Tomography Experiment, SGP, May 15-June 15, 2009 Lead Scientist Dong Huang, BNL Co-Investigators Al Gasiewski, UC Boulder Maria Cadeddu, ANL Warren Wiscombe, BNL Radiation Processes Working Group March 30, 2009 multiple radiometers All good cloud radiation modelers should close their airplane window shades so as not to be corrupted by the spectacle of real 3D clouds. - Roger Davies In case you forget to do this, you see 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 2 Effects of cloud structure on radiation 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 3 Typical climate model - Cloud fraction & mean water content - Horizontally uniform clouds, no side radiation - Assumption on overlap Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe &

329

Widget:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Widget Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Widget:LogoCloud Jump to: navigation, search This widget adds css selectors and javascript for the Template:LogoCloud. For...

330

Multiscale Models for Cumulus Cloud Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cumulus clouds involve processes on a vast range of scales—including cloud droplets, turbulent mixing, and updrafts and downdrafts—and it is often difficult to determine how processes on different scales interact with each other. In this article, ...

Samuel N. Stechmann; Bjorn Stevens

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Template:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Would be nice if logos could be vertically centered within each line of the cloud TODO: Provide a way to toggle the mouse-over behavior Usage For rendering a cloud of logos....

332

IBM research division cloud computing initiative  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud computing represents the latest phase in the evolution of Internet-based computing. In this paper, we describe the fundamental building blocks of cloud computing and the initiative undertaken by the IBM Research Division in this area, which includes ...

M. Naghshineh; R. Ratnaparkhi; D. Dillenberger; J. R. Doran; C. Dorai; L. Anderson; G. Pacifici; J. L. Snowdon; A. Azagury; M. VanderWiele; Y. Wolfsthal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

Krikos, Alexis Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermodynamic modeling for organic solid precipitation  

SciTech Connect

A generalized predictive model which is based on thermodynamic principle for solid-liquid phase equilibrium has been developed for organic solid precipitation. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, composition, and activity coefficient on the solubility of wax and asphaltenes in organic solutions. The solid-liquid equilibrium K-value is expressed as a function of the heat of melting, melting point temperature, solubility parameter, and the molar volume of each component in the solution. All these parameters have been correlated with molecular weight. Thus, the model can be applied to crude oil systems. The model has been tested with experimental data for wax formation and asphaltene precipitation. The predicted wax appearance temperature is very close to the measured temperature. The model not only can match the measured asphaltene solubility data but also can be used to predict the solubility of asphaltene in organic solvents or crude oils. The model assumes that asphaltenes are dissolved in oil in a true liquid state, not in colloidal suspension, and the precipitation-dissolution process is reversible by changing thermodynamic conditions. The model is thermodynamically consistent and has no ambiguous assumptions.

Chung, T.H.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Metal gettering by boron-silicide precipitates in boron-implanted silicon  

SciTech Connect

We show that Fe, Co, Cu, and Au impurities in Si are strongly gettered to boron-silicide precipitates formed by supersaturation B implantation and annealing. Effective binding free energies relative to interstitial solution range form somewhat above 1 to more than 2 eV. The B-Si precipitates formed at temperatures {le}1100{degrees}C lack long range structural order but closely resemble and icosahedral B{sub 3}Si phase in composition, local bonding, and chemical potential. Evidence indicates that the metal atoms go into solution in the B-Si phase, and this is interpreted in terms of the novel bonding and structural characteristics of B-rich icosahedral compounds.

Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.; Headley, T.J.; Michael, J.R.; Aselage, T.A.; Seager, C.H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Form Approved  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION: The items RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION Company Name and OTHER PARTY NAME (Item 1.A.), and SELLER'S NAME (Item 3.B.) on Form EIA-858 are DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION: The items RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION Company Name and OTHER PARTY NAME (Item 1.A.), and SELLER'S NAME (Item 3.B.) on Form EIA-858 are NOT considered confidential and may be publicly released in identifiable form. All other information you provide will be used for statistical purposes only. In accordance with the Confidential Information Protection provisions of Title V, Subtitle A of Public Law 107-347 and other applicable Federal laws, your responses will be kept confidential and will not be disclosed in identifiable form to anyone other than employees or agents without your consent. By law, every EIA employee, as well as every agent, is subject to a jail term, a fine of up to $250,000, or both if he or she discloses ANY identifiable information about you.

337

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

Miami, University of

338

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire 1. What Cloud service will you be providing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire Exhibit G 1. What Cloud service will you) as Low/Moderate/High? If so, which? 4. Has your cloud service been audited by any eternal agencies for security and quality control? If so, please provide evidence. 5. Has your cloud service been industry

339

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

Plant, Robert

340

HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agenda HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building 09:30h Registration 10:00h Opening Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel, HPI Potsdam 10:30h Cloud-RAID: Eine Methode zur Bereitstellung zuverlÀssiger Speicherressourcen in �ffentlichen Clouds Maxim Schnajkin, HPI

Weske, Mathias

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

Sommerville, Ian

342

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

Jaeger, Trent

343

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

344

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger University of Maryland Jimmy Lin University of Maryland Justin M. Grimes University of Maryland #12;CLOUD

Lin, Jimmy

345

Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editorial Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact attention has been devoted to system aspects of Cloud computing. More recently, however, the focus is shifting towards Cloud net- working and communications with evolutionary and revo- lutionary propositions

Boutaba, Raouf

346

Securely Managing Cryptographic Keys used within a Cloud Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to rapidly develop/host cloud applications Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) - Networked access to processing power, storage Cloud Deployment Models Public Cloud Private Cloud Community Cloud Hybrid administers the Cloud Infrastructure? Who has access to my data? My activity history? Key Management Where

347

Winter Precipitation Microphysics Characterized by Polarimetric Radar and Video Disdrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are dependent on the type of precipitation that reaches the surface. Winter storms such as freezing rain precipitation not having the mixed phase. There are also some studies that focus on various winter precipitation types. Trapp et al (2001) used a polarimetric radar to observe a winter storm event with snow and mixed-phase

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

348

Octet Baryon Electromagnetic Form Factors in a Relativistic Quark Model  

SciTech Connect

We study the octet baryon electromagnetic properties by applying the covariant spectator quark model, and provide covariant parametrization that can be used to study baryon electromagnetic reactions. While we use the lattice QCD data in the large pion mass regime (small pion cloud effects) to determine the parameters of the model in the valence quark sector, we use the nucleon physical and octet baryon magnetic moment data to parameterize the pion cloud contributions. The valence quark contributions for the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors are estimated by extrapolating the lattice parametrization in the large pion mass regime to the physical regime. As for the pion cloud contributions, we parameterize them in a covariant, phenomenological manner, combined with SU(3) symmetry. We also discuss the impact of the pion cloud effects on the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and their radii.

Gilberto Ramalho, Kazuo Tsushima

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

Duncan, James S.

351

Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

Samarati, Pierangela

352

Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty Primavera De Filippi, Smari McCarthy Abstract: Cloud computing can be defined as the provision of computing resources on-demand over and elasticity of costs, problems arise concerning the collection of personal information in the Cloud

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Simulation of polar stratospheric clouds in the specified dynamics version of the whole atmosphere community climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the simulation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model for the Antarctic winter 2005. In this model, PSCs are assumed to form ...

Wegner, T.

354

Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud  

SciTech Connect

A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform well in the considered case. The explicitly predicted water partitioning indicates that the mean mass of droplets participating in the models aqueous chemistry calculations is proportional to the dry CCN size.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

355

Registration Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNAP COLLABORATION MEETING JUNE 1 - 3, 2006 REGISTRATION FORM To register, please fill out the registration form below and click on the "SEND" button. Your registration will allow us to make security access and hospitality arrangements for you. Deadline: Please register NLT Wednesday, May 24, 2006. 1. Your Name (Last, First): 2. Your Institution: 3. Email address: 4. Citizenship (for non-DOE employees/guests): 5. Arrival date: 6. Departure Date: 7. Will you be attending the working dinner on Thursday, June 1? Yes No 8. Any dietary restrictions? Please click on the "Send" button below to email this form automatically to snap@lbl.gov. An automatic email reply receipt confirmation will be sent back to your email address. Send Reset Thank you!

356

Electron cloud observations : a retrospective.  

SciTech Connect

A growing number of observations of electron cloud effects (ECEs) have been reported in positron and proton rings. Low-energy, background electrons ubiquitous in high-intensity particle accelerators. Amplification of electron cloud (EC) can occur under certain operating conditions, potentially giving rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade accelerator performance. EC observations and diagnostics have contributed to a better understanding of ECEs, in particular, details of beam-induced multipacting and cloud saturation effects. Such experimental results can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters for modeling efforts and analytical calculations to improve prediction capability. Electron cloud effects are increasingly important phenomena in high luminosity, high brightness, or high intensity machines - Colliders, Storage rings, Damping rings, Heavy ion beams. EC generation and instability modeling increasingly complex and benchmarked against in situ data: {delta}, {delta}{sub 0}, photon reflectivity, and SE energy distributions important. Surface conditioning and use of solenoidal windings in field-free regions are successful cures: will they be enough? What are new observations and how do they contribute to body of work and understanding physics of EC?

Harkay, K.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fragmentation of Magnetically Subcritical Clouds into Multiple Supercritical Cores and the Formation of Small Stellar Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isolated low-mass stars are formed in dense cores of molecular clouds. In the standard picture, the cores are envisioned to condense out of strongly magnetized clouds through ambipolar diffusion. Most previous calculations based on this scenario are limited to axisymmetric cloud evolution leading to a single core, which collapses to form an isolated star or stellar system at the center. These calculations are here extended to the nonaxisymmetric case under thin-disk approximation, which allows for a detailed investigation into the process of fragmentation, fundamental to binary, multiple system, and cluster formation. We have shown previously that initially axisymmetric, magnetically subcritical clouds with an $m=2$ density perturbation of modest fractional amplitude ($\\sim 5%$) can develop highly elongated bars, which facilitate binary and multiple system formation. In this paper, we show that in the presence of higher order ($m\\ge 3$) perturbations of similar amplitude such clouds are capable of breaking up into a set of discrete dense cores. These multiple cores are magnetically supercritical. They are expected to collapse into single stars or stellar systems individually and, collectively, to form a small stellar group. Our calculations demonstrate that the standard scenario for single star formation involving magnetically subcritical clouds and ambipolar diffusion can readily produce more than one star, provided that the cloud mass is well above the Jeans limit and relatively uniformly distributed. The fragments develop in the central part of the cloud, after the region has become magnetically supercritical but before rapid collapse sets in. It is enhanced by the flattening of mass distribution along the field lines and by the magnetic tension force.

Zhi-Yun Li; Fumitaka Nakamura

2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen  

SciTech Connect

We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

Toward a Diurnal Climatology of Cold-Season Turbulence Statistics in Continental Stratocumulus as Observed by the Atmospheric Radiation Millimeter- Wavelength Cloud Radars  

SciTech Connect

Numerous observational studies of marine stratocumulus have demonstrated a pronounced diurnal cycle. At night, longwave flux divergence at the top of the cloud drives negatively buoyant eddies that tend to keep the boundary layer well mixed. During the day, solar absorption by the cloud tends to reduce the turbulent intensity and often decouples the planetary boundary layer (PBL) into cloud- and sub-cloud circulations. The delicate balance between turbulent intensity, entrainment, and fluxes dictates cloud geometry and persistence, which can significantly impact the shortwave radiation budget. Millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) have been used to study the turbulent structure of boundary layer stratocumulus (e.g. Frisch et al. 1995; Kollias and Albrecht 2000). Analysis is confined to nondrizzling or lightly drizzling cloud systems for which precipitation contamination is negligible. Under such assumptions the Doppler velocity field becomes a proxy for vertical velocity. Prior research has mainly consisted of a few case studies of specific cloud systems using radar scan strategies optimized for this particular cloud type. The MMCR operating at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility is broadly configured to be able to detect many different cloud types over a broad range of reflectivities and altitudes, so it is not specifically optimized for PBL clouds. Being in more-or-less continuous operation since the end of 1996, it does, however, have the advantage of long data coverage, which suggests that statistically significant measures of the diurnal cycle of turbulence should be attainable. This abstract summarizes the first few steps toward this goal, using 7 months of cold season MMCR data.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.; Childers, M.E.; Donner, K.M.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

360

Methods for predicting wax precipitation and deposition  

SciTech Connect

Removal of wax from wells and flowlines can account for significant additional operating costs. To evaluate these potential costs, the operating conditions that allow waxes to precipitate in the wellbore must be identified, and deposition rates must be estimated to determine the costs associated with removal of wax deposits. Presented in this paper are laboratory and analytic methods that can be used to estimate both the critical operating conditions and the deposition rates. The laboratory tests and analysis presented may be used to characterize any type of oil.

Weingarten, J.S.; Euchner, J.A.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Exploiting Virtualization and Cloud Computing in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing; since the start of data-taking, this model has proven very successful in the federated operation of more than one hundred Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) sites for offline data distribution, storage, processing and analysis. However, new paradigms in computing, namely virtualization and cloud computing, present improved strategies for managing and provisioning IT resources that could allow ATLAS to more flexibly adapt and scale its storage and processing workloads on varied underlying resources. In particular, ATLAS is developing a "grid-of-clouds" infrastructure in order to utilize WLCG sites that make resources available via a cloud API. This work will present the current status of the Virtualization and Cloud Computing R&D project in ATLAS Distributed Computing. First, strategies for deploying PanDA queues on cloud sites will be discussed, including the introduction of a "cloud factory" for managing cloud VM instances. Nex...

Barreiro Megino, FH; The ATLAS collaboration; De, K; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Panitkin, S; Paterson, M; De Silva, A; van der Ster, D; Taylor, R; Vitillo, RA; Walker, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A cloud detection algorithm for AATSR data, optimized for daytime observations in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To extract information about the Earth's surface from Earth Observation data, a key processing step is the separation of pixels representing clear-sky observations of land or water surfaces from observations substantially influenced by clouds. This paper presents an algorithm used for this purpose specifically for data from the AATSR sensor on ENVISAT. The algorithm is based on the structure of the SPARC cloud detection scheme developed at CCRS for AVHRR data, then modified, calibrated and validated for AATSR data. It uses a series of weighted tests to calculate per-pixel cloud presence probability, and also produces an estimate of cloud top height and a cloud shadow flag. Algorithm parameters have been optimized for daytime use in Canada, and evaluation shows good performance with a mean daytime kappa coefficient of 0.76 for the ‘cloud’/‘clear’ classification when compared to independent validation data. Performance is independent of season, and is a dramatic improvement over the existing AATSR L1B cloud flag for Canada. The algorithm will be used at CCRS for processing AATSR data, and will form the basis of similar processing for data from the SLSTR sensors on Sentinel-3.

Anders Knudby; Rasim Latifovic; Darren Pouliot

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud 2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of federal funds by Cloud County Community College (CCCC) for a wind energy project. CCCC has installed three wind turbines and proposes to install a fourth turbine on their campus in Concordia, Kansas, for use in their wind energy training curriculum and to provide electricity for their campus. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download January 10, 2011 EA-1852: Notice of Scoping Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Technology Project, Cloud

364

Form1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FORM 3304.2, B. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FORM 3304.2, APPROVAL OF EXPERT OR CONSULTANT EMPLOYMENT REQUEST U.S.DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVAL OF EXPERT OR CONSULTANT EMPLOYMENT REQUEST (Continued on Reverse) DOE F 3304.2 (01-07) 1. Name of Expert or Consultant: 2. Organization: 9. Current Employment (position, company, and location): 10. Home Address (city, state, and zip code): 11. Official Worksite (where services are to be performed): 12. APPROVALS 3. Action Requested: 4. Hourly Rate of Pay: 5. Nature of Appointment: 6. Period for Which Services Are Desired: 7. Estimated Number of Days to Be Worked: 8. Number of Days Worked Under Present Appointment: (Extension Only) 13. Description of Services Required: 14. Justification for this Expert/Consultant Action and Qualifications of Candidate Related to Need for Appointment:

365

Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling â?? Application to the wavelet variability model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

Chafetz, H.S.

1990-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Simple Empirical Equation to Calculate Cloud Optical Thickness from Shortwave Broadband Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simple Empirical Equation to Calculate Cloud Optical Simple Empirical Equation to Calculate Cloud Optical Thickness from Shortwave Broadband Measurements J. C. Barnard and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Observational studies of shortwave cloud optical thickness, c , play an important role in determining how clouds affect climate. Accordingly, considerable effort has been, and continues to be expended to characterize the spatial and temporal distribution of c over the globe. This effort involves satellite and ground-based measurements that infer c from measurements of the reflection or transmission of solar radiation. Transmitted solar radiation forms the basis of several important algorithms designed to calculate c ; these algorithms use either spectral irradiances (Min and Harrison 1996; henceforth referred

368

The Effect of Precipitation on Variability of Low Stratiform...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

areal averages of cloud radiative and microphysical properties such as over numerical weather prediction (NWP) or Global Climate Model grid cells. Neglecting this variability...

369

NONIDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENT DECAY IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects are important in the dynamics of molecular clouds: both ambipolar diffusion and possibly the Hall effect have been identified as significant. We present the results of a suite of simulations with a resolution of 512{sup 3} of turbulent decay in molecular clouds, incorporating a simplified form of both ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect simultaneously. The initial velocity field in the turbulence is varied from being super-Alfvenic and hypersonic, through to trans-Alfvenic but still supersonic. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence increasing the decay from t {sup -1.25} to t {sup -1.4}. The Hall effect has virtually no impact in this regard. The power spectra of density, velocity, and the magnetic field are all affected by the nonideal terms, being steepened significantly when compared with ideal MHD turbulence with exponents. The density power-spectra components change from {approx}1.4 to {approx}2.1 for the ideal and nonideal simulations respectively, and power spectra of the other variables all show similar modifications when nonideal effects are considered. Again, the dominant source of these changes is ambipolar diffusion rather than the Hall effect. There is also a decoupling between the velocity field and the magnetic field at short length scales. The Hall effect leads to enhanced magnetic reconnection, and hence less power, at short length scales. The dependence of the velocity dispersion on the characteristic length scale is studied and found not to be power law in nature.

Downes, T. P. [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); O'Sullivan, S. [National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)], E-mail: turlough.downes@dcu.ie

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Flying into the hurricane: law, policy and practice implications of cloud computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 1960s was the era of mainframe computing and the 1970s the era of mini-computing and business logic applications. The 1980s ushered in client/server computing and the 1990s desktop computing. In the early 2000s, we are experiencing the age of cloud computing. This article defines and outlines the advantages and models of cloud computing in its various forms. It surveys the legal risks inherent in this form of computing and suggests ways in which these risks can best be managed. Finally, the article suggests avenues for future investigation and reform so that the storms may be avoided and the promised silver linings achieved.

Eugene Clark; Ian M. Sims

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Carbide precipitation in gamma-TiAl alloys  

SciTech Connect

Carbide precipitation in gamma-TiAl is observed and found to involve the formation of coherent, rod-shaped perovskite precipitates as a metastable transition phase. At temperatures above 750 deg C, the formation of plate-shaped H-phase particles on dislocations and grain boundaries is accompanied by dissolution of the perovskite precipitate dispersions. This temperature regime includes possible service temperatures for gamma-TiAl-based alloys. 10 refs.

Chen, S.; Beaven, P.A.; Wagner, R. (GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, (Germany))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud Changbin Liu, Yun Mao*, Xu Chen ­ InfrastructureasaService (IaaS) Cloud · Provide cloud infrastructure services: virtual machines (VMs), virtual block devices, VPNs · Widely adopted, e.g. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) ­ Cloud resource

Plotkin, Joshua B.

373

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009 Impact of broken and inhomogeneous clouds on satellite cloud-phase retrieval Erwin Wolters ­ KNMI Hartwig Deneke ­ KNMI/University of Bonn;Contents Introduction CM-SAF cloud-phase retrieval method The problem ­ research question Broken clouds

Haak, Hein

374

Interconnecting Federated Clouds by Using Publish-Subscribe Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud Federation is an emerging computing model where multiple resources from independent Cloud providers are leveraged to create large-scale distributed virtual computing clusters, operating as into a single Cloud organization. This model enables the ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Cloud Federation, Denial of Service, Intercommunication, Publish/Subscribe Service, Reliability

Christian Esposito; Massimo Ficco; Francesco Palmieri; Aniello Castiglione

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle size distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

size distribution size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle size distribution The number of cloud particles present in any given volume of air within a specified size range, including liquid and ice. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments WSACR : Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, tuned to W-Band (95GHz) Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties

376

Organizational challenges in cloud adoption and enablers of cloud transition program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the proliferation of cloud computing, organizations have been able to get access to never seen before computing power and resources. Cloud computing has revolutionized the utilization of computing resources through ...

Rajendran, Sneha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Global Climatology of Outgoing Longwave Spectral Cloud Radiative Effect and Associated Effective Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Longwave (LW) spectral flux and cloud radiative effect (CRE) are important for understanding the earth’s radiation budget and cloud–radiation interaction. Here, the authors extend their previous algorithms to collocated Atmospheric Infrared ...

Xianglei Huang; Xiuhong Chen; Gerald L. Potter; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Jason N. S. Cole; Dongmin Lee; Norman G. Loeb

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CloudML : A DSL for model-based realization of applications in the cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud Computing offers a vast amount of resources, available for end users on a pay-as-you-go basis. The opportunity to choose between several cloud providers is… (more)

Brandtzæg, Eirik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions . Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and...

380

Changes in concurrent monthly precipitation and temperature extremes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes in daily climate extremes of temperature J. Geophys.Bayesian spatial modeling of extreme precipitation returnand Mearns L 2000 Climate extremes: observations, modeling,

Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Phillips, Thomas J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Joint probability analysis of precipitation and streamflow extremes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on evaluation of joint occurrence of extreme precipitation and streamflow events at several hydrologic structures in South Florida. An analysis of twelve… (more)

Lin, Chia-hung.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Role of Modified Chaplygin Gas as a Dark Energy Model in Collapsing Spherically Symmetric Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, gravitational collapse of a spherical cloud, consists of both dark matter and dark energy in the form of modified Chaplygin gas is studied. It is found that dark energy alone in the form of modified Chaplygin gas forms black hole. Also when both components of the fluid are present then the collapse favors the formation of black hole in cases the dark energy dominates over dark matter. The conclusion is totally opposite to the usually known results.

Ujjal Debnath; Subenoy Chakraborty

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

Form Approv  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'JOE I' ':0 'JOE I' ':0 ) e " Flee/romc Form Approv ed by CGIR· 01120195 (8 ./1" United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administra ion memorandum DATE : uC l J !:' ZD y REPLY TO ATTN OF : KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO ; Rob Ochs Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Lane-Wendson No.1 Structure 10/5 Access Road Improvement and Pole Replacement Project Budget Information: Work Order # 224549 PP&A Project No.: 1117 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Sub part 0,10 C.F.R. Part) 021): B 1.3, Routine maintenance activities ... for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective ... .are required to maintain

384

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel† ... Despite the lack of accurate data for the cloud points of biodiesel, the results obtained here allow for an adequate evaluation of the model proposed, showing that it can produce good predictions of the cloud points of mixtures of fatty acid esters. ... Because of its environmental benefits, resulting from a decrease in CO2 emissions, its origin from renewable resources, and the increase in crude oil costs, biodiesel is become increasingly attractive. ...

J. C. A. Lopes; L. Boros; M. A. Krähenbühl; A. J. A. Meirelles; J. L. Daridon; J. Pauly; I. M. Marrucho; J. A. P. Coutinho

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud to analyze cloud vertical structure over this area by taking advantage of the first direct measurements of cloud vertical layers from the 95 GHz radar. Singlelayer, twolayer, and threelayer clouds account for 28

Li, Zhanqing

386

Technical Sessions Parameterization of Convective Clouds, Mesoscale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Convective-Generated Clouds W. R. Cotton Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 This presentation is a summary of research...

387

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association Over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool X. Wu National Center for Atmospheric Research (a) Boulder, Colorado...

388

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supported images and site security policies. A cloud systemcertain implications on site security policies. Our securityactivities—both in terms of site security policy as well as

Coghlan, Susan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

An Analysis of Cloud Absorption During  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Absorption During ARESE II (Spring 2000) D. M. Powell, R. T. Marchand, and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction...

390

Automated Security Compliance Tool for the Cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Security, especially security compliance, is a major concern that is slowing down the large scale adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise environment. Business… (more)

Ullah, Kazi Wali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cloud Computing and Sustainability: Energy Efficiency Aspects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing promises a new era of service delivery and deployment in such a way that every person can access any kind of services… (more)

Gholamhosseinian, Ashkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

393

Cloud Computing Organizational Benefits: A Managerial concern.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Context: Software industry is looking for new methods and opportunities to reduce the project management problems and operational costs. Cloud Computing concept is providing answers… (more)

Mandala, Venkata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cloud Computing - Trends and Performance Issues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Context: Cloud Computing is a very fascinating concept these days, it is attracting so many organiza-tions to move their utilities and applications into a dedicated… (more)

Al-Refai, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing has emerged as a model for hosting computing infrastructure and outsourcing management of that infrastructure. It offers the promise of simplified provisioning and… (more)

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A COMPARISON OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL QUANTITIES WITH FORECASTS FROM CLOUD PREDICTION MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program, Bethesda, MD March 15-19, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content

397

Testing a cloud application: IBM SmartCloud inotes: methodologies and tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IBM SmartCloud is a branded collection of Cloud products and solutions from IBM. It includes Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offered through public, private and hybrid cloud delivery ... Keywords: Software testing, methodology, tool

Michael Lynch; Thomas Cerqueus; Christina Thorpe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

AirCloud: a cloud-based air-quality monitoring system for everyone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of AirCloud -- a novel client-cloud system for pervasive and personal air-quality monitoring at low cost. At the frontend, we create two types of Internet-connected particulate matter (PM2:5) ... Keywords: PM2.5, air quality, client-cloud calibration system

Yun Cheng, Xiucheng Li, Zhijun Li, Shouxu Jiang, Yilong Li, Ji Jia, Xiaofan Jiang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column returned to aerobic conditions, but the concentration later returned to below the clean-up level. Speciation analysis was conducted on soil collected from the treated column after rebound testing. The experimental results show that: (a) The mass of uranium resolubilized in more than four months of column testing was much lower than the amount precipitated. (b) The majority of the uranium was precipitated in the first few inches of the treated column. The majority of the uranium precipitated was associated with iron oxides or in other immobile/sequestered phases. It is important to contrast this result with the results reported by Bryan (2003) who shows that most of the uranium associated with contaminated aquifer solids at Fernald under the existing natural attenuation/pump and treat with reinjection conditions is carbonate bound. Carbonate bound forms are traditionally seen as fairly mobile, but may not be under a calcite/dolomite saturated condition. Fernald is currently conducting further studies to investigate the mobility of the carbonate bound forms. (c) Though reoxidation concentrations from the bench-scale column exceeded 30 {micro}g/L for a time, they later returned to below this value. Effluent concentrations from the treated column are expected to over predict full-scale concentrations for reasons discussed in depth in the text. Finally, these results must be viewed in light of the site's ongoing pump-and-treat with reinjection system. There is reason to believe that although the pump-and-treat technology is currently effectively controlling the uranium plume and reducing the groundwater concentration, it may not be able to reach the treatment standard of 30 {micro}g/L within an economical operating lifetime and then maintain that concentration without rebound. This study suggests that Enhanced Anaerobic Reductive Precipitation can change the speciation and thus reduce the mobility of uranium at the site and expedite closure.

Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM  

SciTech Connect

We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M., E-mail: biqing.for@uwa.edu.au [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation  

SciTech Connect

Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Building mobile multimedia services: a hybrid cloud computing approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Second, we use a hybrid cloud computing...strategy. That means the i5Cloud takes advantage of in-house commodity hardware infrastructure which is usually available in most organizations, ... , i5Cloud can automat...

Dejan Kovachev; Yiwei Cao; Ralf Klamma

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and F. Zimmermann, ”LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN”, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini † LBNL,

Venturini, Marco

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A cloud-assisted design for autonomous driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents Carcel, a cloud-assisted system for autonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastructure. The cloud assists autonomous ...

Suresh Kumar, Swarun

406

Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. , 2011. US20110060475. Cloud tracking. U.S. Patent Bedka,technique for obtaining cloud motion from geosynchronouson advection of a frozen cloud field (Chow et al. (2011);

Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

Furman, M.A.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

An Improved Gridded Historical Daily Precipitation Analysis for Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A gauge-only precipitation data quality control and analysis system has been developed for monitoring precipitation at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC). Over the past 10 yr the system has been used to develop and deliver many different ...

Viviane B. S. Silva; Vernon E. Kousky; Wei Shi; R. Wayne Higgins

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity, and coarsening N. Fujita and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia The growth of niobium carbide in austenite involves for the overall transformation kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in austenite that takes into account

Cambridge, University of

410

Nano-precipitation in hot-pressed silicon carbide  

SciTech Connect

Heat treatments at 1300 degrees C, 1400 degrees C, 1500 degrees C, and 1600 degrees C in Ar were found to produce nanoscale precipitates in hot-pressed silicon carbide containing aluminum, boron, and carbon sintering additives (ABC-SiC). The precipitates were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nano-probe energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (nEDS). The precipitates were plate-like in shape, with a thickness, length and separation of only a few nanometers, and their size coarsened with increasing annealing temperature, accompanied by reduced number density. The distribution of the precipitates was uniform inside the SiC grains, but depleted zones were observed in the vicinity of the SiC grain boundaries. A coherent orientation relationship between the precipitates and the SiC matrix was found. Combined high-resolution electron microscopy, computer simulation, and nEDS identified an Al4C3-based structure and composition for the nano-precipitates. Most Al ions in SiC lattice exsolved as precipitates during the annealing at 1400 to 1500 degrees C. Formation mechanism and possible influences of the nanoscale precipitates on mechanical properties are discussed.

Zhang, Xiao Feng; Sixta, Mark E.; Chen, Da; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Methods for verifying satellite precipitation estimates Elizabeth E. Ebert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Methods for verifying satellite precipitation estimates Elizabeth E. Ebert Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Australia Introduction Satellite precipitation estimates are widely used to measure global rainfall on monthly timescales for climate studies (e.g., Huffman et al., 1997). Near real time satellite

Ebert, Beth

412

An analysis of radar estimated precipitation to rain gauge measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the surface. These levels included 1.0 1.5@ 2.0 @ 2.5 km, and 3.0 km. Radar precipitation estimates were calculated at each 1.4 2 level using Z = 30ORand Z = 25OR" . The precipitation amounts, as measured by both the gauges and the radar,were used...

Gleason, Byron Edward

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The NCE recovery boiler precipitator: Mill experience and design implications  

SciTech Connect

Operating and design experiences are discussed. Topics covered include: test results of the flue gas parameters of volume, temperature losses, and inlet dust loadings; summary of main precipitator design data; operator experiences with various precipitator systems, such as wet bottom, dry bottom, and performance results; and findings of a corrosion study.

Henderson, J.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe Matthew J. Swann;Abstract Flood and wind damage to property and livelihoods resulting from extreme precipitation events variability of these extreme events can be closely related to the large-scale atmospheric circulation

Feigon, Brooke

415

Recommendation for Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Instability in the ILC  

SciTech Connect

Electron cloud has been identified as one of the highest priority issues for the international Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Rings (DR). An electron cloud Working Group (WG) has evaluated the electron cloud effect and instability, and mitigation solutions for the electron cloud formation. Working group deliverables include recommendations for the baseline and alternate solutions to the electron cloud formation in various regions of the ILC Positron DR, which is presently assumed to be the 3.2 km design. Detailed studies of a range of mitigation options including coatings, clearing electrodes, grooves and novel concepts, were carried out over the previous several years by nearly 50 researchers, and the results of the studies form the basis for the recommendation. The recommendations are the result of the working group discussions held at numerous meetings and during a dedicated workshop. In addition, a number of items requiring further investigation were identified during the discussions at the Cornell meeting and studies will be carried out at CesrTA, a test accelerator dedicated to electron cloud studies, and other institutions.

Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Demma, T.; Guiducci, S.; Suetsugu, Y.; Shibata, K.; Ohmi, K.; Dugan, G.; Palmer, M.; Crittenden, J. A.; Harkay, K.; Boon, L.; Furman, M. A.; Yin Vallgren, A. C.

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

416

Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics  

SciTech Connect

Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Physical Properties of High-Level Cloud over Land and Ocean from CloudSat–CALIPSO Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike other cloud types, high-level clouds play an important role, often imposing a warming effect, in the earth–atmosphere radiative energy budget. In this paper, macro- and microphysical characteristics of cirrus clouds, such as their ...

Juan Huo; Daren Lu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Network Performance of a Video Application in the Cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing is a technology that uses the internet and central remote servers to maintain data and applications. There are different cloud services of which… (more)

NARISETTY, SHRAVAN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Detecting Cirrus-Overlapping-Water Clouds and Retrieving their...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

channel (0.6 m) to retrieve cloud optical depth. Both channels are common to all weather satellite sensors. Because cirrus clouds are mostly semitransparent at infrared...

420

Overview of the COPS Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics (ACM) Subgroup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

properties of orographically induced clouds and how do these depend on dynamics, thermodynamics, and aerosol microphysics? * What is the role of aerosols and changing cloud...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the center of the bubble cloud. Credit: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...

422

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion ... In this investigation, electrostatic precipitator fractional collection efficiency and trace metal emissions were determined experimentally at a 66 MW biomass-fueled bubbling fluidized-bed combustion plant. ... The solid fuel combustion-generated particle emissions typically consist of two types of particles:? fine particles approximately 0.1?1 ?m in diameter that are formed from the ash-forming species that are volatilized during combustion and residual ash particles larger than 1 ?m in diameter that are formed from mineral impurities in the fuels (4). ...

Terttaliisa Lind; Jouni Hokkinen; Jorma K. Jokiniemi; Sanna Saarikoski; Risto Hillamo

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

Star formation triggered by SNR impact into magnetized neutral clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considering the physical conditions that are relevant for triggering star formation in interactions involving SN shocks and neutral clouds, we have built diagrams of the SNR radius versus the cloud density in which these conditions constrain a shaded zone where star formation is allowed. The diagrams are also tested with fully 3-D MHD radiative cooling simulations involving a SNR and a self-gravitating cloud and we find that the numerical analysis is consistent with the results predicted by the diagrams. While the inclusion of a homogeneous magnetic field approximately perpendicular to the impact velocity of the SNR with an intensity ~1 $mu$G results only a small shrinking of the star formation zone in the diagrams, a larger magnetic field (~10 $\\mu$G) causes a significant shrinking, as expected. Applications of our results to real star formation regions in our own galaxy have revealed that their formation could have been triggered by a SN shock wave. Finally, we have evaluated the effective global star formation efficiency of this sort of interactions and found that it is smaller than the observed values in our Galaxy (SFE ~0.01-0.3). This result is consistent with previous work in the literature and also suggests that the mechanism presently investigated, though very powerful to drive structure formation, supersonic turbulence and eventually, local star formation, does not seem to be sufficient to drive global star formation in normal star forming galaxies.

M. R. M. Leao; E. M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; D. Falceta-Goncalves; C. Melioli; F. G. Geraissate

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cloud-Based Model Calibration Using OpenStudio: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

OpenStudio is a free, open source Software Development Kit (SDK) and application suite for performing building energy modeling and analysis. The OpenStudio Parametric Analysis Tool has been extended to allow cloud-based simulation of multiple OpenStudio models parametrically related to a baseline model. This paper describes the new cloud-based simulation functionality and presents a model cali-bration case study. Calibration is initiated by entering actual monthly utility bill data into the baseline model. Multiple parameters are then varied over multiple iterations to reduce the difference between actual energy consumption and model simulation results, as calculated and visualized by billing period and by fuel type. Simulations are per-formed in parallel using the Amazon Elastic Cloud service. This paper highlights model parameterizations (measures) used for calibration, but the same multi-nodal computing architecture is available for other purposes, for example, recommending combinations of retrofit energy saving measures using the calibrated model as the new baseline.

Hale, E.; Lisell, L.; Goldwasser, D.; Macumber, D.; Dean, J.; Metzger, I.; Parker, A.; Long, N.; Ball, B.; Schott, M.; Weaver, E.; Brackney, L.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Multi-Phase Galaxy Formation: High Velocity Clouds and the Missing Baryon Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard treatment of cooling in Cold Dark Matter halos assumes that all of the gas within a ``cooling radius'' cools and contracts monolithically to fuel galaxy formation. Here we take into account the expectation that the hot gas in galactic halos is thermally unstable and prone to fragmentation during cooling and show that the implications are more far-reaching than previously expected: allowing multi-phase cooling fundamentally alters expectations about gas infall in halos and naturally explains the bright-end cutoff in the galaxy luminosity function. We argue that cooling should proceed via the formation of high-density, 10^4 K clouds, pressure-confined within a hot gas background. The background medium has a low density, and can survive as a stable corona with a long cooling time. The fraction of baryons contained in the residual hot core grows with halo mass because the cooling density increases, and this leads to an upper-mass limit in quiescent, non-merged galaxies of ~10^11 Msun. In this scenario, galaxy formation is fueled by the infall of pressure-supported clouds. For Milky-Way-size systems, clouds of mass ~ 5x10^6 Msun that formed or merged within the last several Gyrs should still exist as a residual population in the halo, with a total mass in clouds of ~ 2 x 10^10 Msun. The mass of the Milky Way galaxy is explained naturally in this model, and is a factor of two smaller than would result in the standard treatment without feedback. We expect clouds in galactic halos to be ~ 1 kpc in size and to extend ~150 kpc from galactic centers. The predicted properties of clouds match well the observed radial velocities, angular sizes, column densities, and velocity widths of High Velocity Clouds around our Galaxy. The clouds also explain high-ion absorption systems at z<1.

Ariyeh H. Maller; James S. Bullock

2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

427

Smoking Rain Clouds over the Amazon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...processes affect the water cycle, the pollution...the dynamics of atmospheric circulation. Several...concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the...transport cloud water in deep convection...concentrations result in recovery of drop size. However...background. Stronger atmospheric instability and a...

M. O. Andreae; D. Rosenfeld; P. Artaxo; A. A. Costa; G. P. Frank; K. M. Longo; M. A. F. Silva-Dias

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

2, 20952131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). In addition, the understanding of wet removal processes remains crucial in local and regional pollutionACPD 2, 2095­2131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol removal C. Andronache Title Page Abstract Introduction-cloud aerosol removal by rainfall for observed aerosol size distributions C. Andronache Boston College, Chestnut

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

Public Cloud B CarbonEmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensors, Demand Prediction Power Capping, Green Software Services such as energy-efficient scientific) Request a Cloud service 4) Allocate service 5) Request service allocation 3) Request energy efficiency information Green Offer Directory 2) Request any `Green Offer' Routers Internet Green Broker #12;Cloud

Buyya, Rajkumar

430

The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nets Network Virtualization Architecture Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de 05. Februar, 2014 Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12;..... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12

Schmid, Stefan

431

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

432

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight A research team led by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory identified specific strengths and weaknesses of four different ice cloud retrieval algorithms. Their comparisons tested the ability of the algorithms to obtain cloud properties from radar and lidar observational measurements. The team noted the sometimes large variances in heating/cooling measurements compared to the observed data. Identifying specific weaknesses will help scientists improve our understanding of cloud properties in the atmosphere, which can be used for climate model development and evaluation. "Measuring the effective size and mass of ice crystals impacts our understanding

433

Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.  

SciTech Connect

Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

THE GALACTIC CENTER CLOUD G0.253+0.016: A MASSIVE DENSE CLOUD WITH LOW STAR FORMATION POTENTIAL  

SciTech Connect

We present the first interferometric molecular line and dust emission maps for the Galactic Center (GC) cloud G0.253+0.016, observed using CARMA and the SMA. This cloud is very dense, and concentrates a mass exceeding the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) into a radius of only 3 pc, but it is essentially starless. G0.253+0.016 therefore violates ''star formation laws'' presently used to explain trends in galactic and extragalactic star formation by a factor {approx}45. Our observations show a lack of dense cores of significant mass and density, thus explaining the low star formation activity. Instead, cores with low densities and line widths {approx}< 1 km s{sup -1}-probably the narrowest lines reported for the GC region to date-are found. Evolution over several 10{sup 5} yr is needed before more massive cores, and possibly an Arches-like stellar cluster, could form. Given the disruptive dynamics of the GC region, and the potentially unbound nature of G0.253+0.016, it is not clear that this evolution will happen.

Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zhang Qizhou, E-mail: jens.kauffmann@astro.caltech.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric cloud formation  

SciTech Connect

Before the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was generally assumed that gas-phase chemical reactions controlled the abundance of stratospheric ozone. However, the massive springtime ozone losses over Antarctica first reported by Farman et al in 1985 could not be explained on the basis of gas-phase chemistry alone. In 1986, Solomon et al suggested that chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) could be important for the observed ozone losses. Since that time, an explosion of laboratory, field, and theoretical research in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry has occurred. Recent work has indicated that the most important heterogeneous reaction on PSCs is ClONO[sub 2] + HCl [yields] Cl[sub 2] + HNO[sub 3]. This reaction converts inert chlorine into photochemically active Cl[sub 2]. Photolysis of Cl[sub 2] then leads to chlorine radicals capable of destroying ozone through very efficient catalytic chain reactions. New observations during the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition found stoichiometric loss of ClONO[sub 2] and HCl in air processed by PSCs in accordance with reaction 1. Attention is turning toward understanding what kinds of aerosols form in the stratospheric, their formation mechanism, surface area, and specific chemical reactivity. Some of the latest findings, which underline the importance of aerosols, were presented at a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

Tolbert, M.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Star Formation History of the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the spatially-resolved star formation and chemical enrichment history of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) across the entire central $4-degree x 4.5-degree area of the main body, based on UBVI photometry from our Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey. We find that 1) approximately 50% of the stars that ever formed in the SMC formed prior to 8.4 Gyr ago (z >1.2 for WMAP cosmology), 2) the SMC formed relatively few stars between 8.4 and 3 Gyr ago, 3) there was a rise in the mean star formation rate during the most recent 3 Gyr punctuated by "bursts" at ages of 2.5, 0.4, and 0.06 Gyr, 4) the bursts at 2.5 and 0.4 Gyr are temporally coincident with past perigalactic passages of the SMC with the Milky Way, 5) there is preliminary evidence for a large-scale annular structure in the 2.5 Gyr burst, and 6) the chemical enrichment history derived from our analysis is in agreement with the age-metallicity relation of the SMC's star clusters. Consistent interpretation of the data required an ad hoc correction of 0.1-0.2 mag to the B-V colors of 25% of the stars; the cause of this anomaly is unknown, but we show that it does not strongly influence our results.

J. Harris; D. Zaritsky

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

The arc cloud complex: a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the updraft and downdraft air, precipitation structure, surface weather changes, upper air changes, changes in the satellite imagery, divergence field changes, equivalent potential temperature (Se) field changes, and significant weather events... of the updraft and downdraft air, precipitation structure, surface weather changes, upper air changes, changes in the satellite imagery, divergence field changes, equivalent potential temperature (Se) field changes, and significant weather events...

Miller, Robert Loren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

Caldwell, P M

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O'STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alumina forming iron base superalloy  

SciTech Connect

An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework  

SciTech Connect

The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called ‘‘superparameterization’’, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

442

ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

445

Testing AGCM-Predicted Cloud and Radiation Properties with ARM Data: The Super-Parameterization Approach  

SciTech Connect

The goal of our study is to directly evaluate treatment of clouds and radiation in an atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) using long-term observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. In this presentation, we will present a comparison of observations from two ARM sites, one in north central Oklahoma and one at Nauru island in the Tropical Western Pacific region, with the model output from corresponding grid points. Traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with observed time series at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called super parameterization has shown promise to bridge the gap. Super parameterization consists of a two-dimensional cloud system resolving model (CSRM) embedded into each grid of the NCAR Community Climate System Model thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. Because the approach is computationally expensive only limited simulations have been carried out. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with super-parameterization (SP) as well as an AGCM run with traditional or standard (STD) cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. Nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from SP run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from STD model run. Different temporal and spatial averaging in the simulations and observations imposes limitations on the comparisons and these scale effects will be discussed. Output from the STD run represents statistics for the AGCM grid, which, in our case, is roughly 300 km x 300 km. In contrast, the CSRM domain is 4 km x 256 km and consists of a row of 64 columns, 4 km x 4 km each. One of the benefits of the SP approach is that statistics can be collected for domain-averaged as well as column cloud and radiation properties. The column statistics are representative of scales that are closer to the scales of observations and therefore allow for more direct comparisons.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Developmental of a Vapor Cloud Explosion Risk Analysis Tool Using Exceedance Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cloud explosions [4]. Lenoir and Davenport [5] have presented a review of many major incidents involving vapor cloud explosions worldwide from 1921 to 1991. Hydrocarbon materials such as ethane, ethylene, propane, and butane, which have been involved... are typically either in the form of gas, liquid, or two-phase. Examples of hydrocarbon gas releases are methane through butane, while liquid releases could be crude oil, diesel, jet fuel, or others. An example of a two-phase leak is condensate since it is a...

Alghamdi, Salem

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

ARM - PI Product - MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govDataPI Data ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water govDataPI Data ProductsMWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : MWR Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water and Water Vapor 2005.02.01 - 2011.04.25 Site(s) FKB GRW HFE NIM PYE SBS General Description A new algorithm is being developed for the ARM Program to derive liquid water path (LWP) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the 2-channel (23.8 and 31.4 GHz) microwave radiometers (MWRs) deployed at ARM climate research facilities. This algorithm utilizes the "monoRTM" radiative transfer model (http://rtweb.aer.com), a combination of both an advanced statistical and physical-iterative retrieval, and brightness temperature offsets applied before the retrieval is performed. This allows perhaps the

448

Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE’s cloud based transportation management system (ATLAS) offers dramatically enhanced capabilities and modernization.

449

Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik Research Team OASIS INRIA Sophia.huet@inria.fr Abstract--With the advent in cloud computing technologies, use of cloud computing infrastructure to the cloud infrastructure. Over a small period of time, it has substantiated to be an attractive choice

Boyer, Edmond

450

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds Ilan Koren,1 * Guy Dagan,1 Orit Altaratz1 Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base

Napp, Nils

451

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ Environmental in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentratiol1S of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effecls are thought to be significant in the context of changes

452

Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud Computing Services and Open and maintain. #12;Cloud Computing · Distributed or Cloud computing allows for the use of virtual computers Web Services (AWS) · EC2 ­ Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud "a web service that provides resizable compute

453

Cloud Computing Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Computing ECE7650 Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu Outline What is cloud computing CharacteristicsCharacteristics (word processing and spreadsheets) Google video for business Google sites (intranet sites and wikis) "It/2010 Autonomic Cloud Management 6 #12;4 Essential Characteristics C. Xu @ Wayne State Cloud Computing 7 Essential

Xu, Cheng-Zhong

454

Depolarisation cooling of an atomic cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a cooling scheme based on depolarisation of a polarised cloud of trapped atoms. Similar to adiabatic demagnetisation, we suggest to use the coupling between the internal spin reservoir of the cloud and the external kinetic reservoir via dipolar relaxation to reduce the temperature of the cloud. By optical pumping one can cool the spin reservoir and force the cooling process. In case of a trapped gas of dipolar chromium atoms, we show that this cooling technique can be performed continuously and used to approach the critical phase space density for BEC

S. Hensler; A. Greiner; J. Stuhler; T. Pfau

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

APPENDIX A: Forms and Instructions Form Form R93D-44 Form R93D-03  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A: Forms and Instructions APPENDIX A: Forms and Instructions Form Form R93D-44 Form R93D-03 Form R93D-59 Instructions Form RT94-02 Form RT94-04 Form RT94-0! Form RT94-03 Form RT94-05 Form RT94-06 Instructions Form RT94-09 Instructions Form RT94-10 Form RT94-07 Form RT94-08 Form RT94-17 Form RT94-19 Form RT94-24 Form RT94-15 Form RT94-13 Form RT94-22 Form RT94-26 Form RT94-18 Form RT94-20 FormRT94-16 Form RT94-14 Form RT94-21 Form RT94-25 FormRT94-ll Form RT94-12 Form RT94-23 Form RT94-27 Section N (Vehicles) of 1993 RECS Questionnaire ............. Cover Letter for VIN Follow-up ........................... Vehicle Information Card (yellow, front only) ................. 1993 RECS Mail Questionnaire, Pages 4-5 (vehicle pages only) .... Instructions for Assembling RTECS Mid-Year Mailings ..........

456

Global distribution of total cloud cover and cloud type amounts over the ocean  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourth of a series of atlases to result from a study of the global cloud distribution from ground-based observations. The first two atlases (NCAR/TN-201+STR and NCAR/TN-241+STR) described the frequency of occurrence of each cloud type and the co-occurrence of different types, but included no information about cloud amounts. The third atlas (NCAR/TN-273+STR) described, for the land areas of the earth, the average total cloud cover and the amounts of each cloud type, and their geographical, diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations, as well as the average base heights of the low clouds. The present atlas does the same for the ocean areas of the earth.

Warren, S.G.; Hahn, C.J.; London, J.; Chervin, R.M.; Jenne, R.L. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (USA))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling  

SciTech Connect

A unified approach to evaluation of asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach uses an organic deposition cell (ODC) for measuring asphaltene-dropout onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure,m temperature, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully compositional vapor/liquid/solid (V/L/S) mathematical model completed by analysis by matching the experimental results. The authors then used the model to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios, including response to gas-lift operations,and to evaluate the possible location of a tar mat.

MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Precipitation Recycling in the Indian Subcontinent during Summer Monsoon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Indian summer monsoon rainfall is dominated by oceanic sources of moisture. However, land surface processes also have a significant role in the generation of precipitation within the Indian subcontinent. Evapotranspiration over a region ...

Amey Pathak; Subimal Ghosh; Praveen Kumar

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Variability of the Australian Monsoon and Precipitation Trends at Darwin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric classification for northwestern Australia is used to define periods of monsoon activity and investigate the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the Australian monsoon, as well as long-term precipitation trends at Darwin. ...

Stuart Evans; Roger Marchand; Thomas Ackerman

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interannual and intraseasonal variability of the North American monsoon is of great interest because a large proportion of the annual precipitation for Arizona and New Mexico arrives during the summer monsoon. Forty-one years of daily monsoon ...

Anne W. Nolin; Eileen A. Hall-McKim

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Modifying cellulose fibers by adsorption/precipitation of xylan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Xylan was precipitated on bleached and unbleached softwood ... more detailed information of the distribution of adsorbed xylan on cellulosic surfaces. The adsorption step was carried out at ... the beating degree...

Albrecht Miletzky; Manuel Punz; Armin Zankel; Sandra Schlader…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ensemble typhoon quantitative precipitation forecasts model in Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, an ensemble typhoon quantitative precipitation forecast (ETQPF) model was developed to provide typhoon rainfall forecasts for Taiwan. The ETQPF rainfall forecast is obtained by averaging the pick-out cases, which are screened at a ...

Jing-Shan Hong; Chin-Tzu Fong; Ling-Feng Hsiao; Yi-Chiang Yu; Chian-You Tzeng

463

Precipitation processes in the Middle East , R. Smitha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the north, the Mediterranean in the west and the Red Sea and Persian Gulf in the south, experience a reduced upslope seasonal precipitation. The Red Sea and Persian Gulf, while acting as powerful sources of water

Evans, Jason

464

Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier."Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 28(3):56-64. doi:10.1111j.1745-6592.2008.00203.x Authors:...

465

Stochastic Simulation Methods for Precipitation and Streamflow Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One major acknowledged challenge in daily precipitation is the inability to model extreme events in the spectrum of events. These extreme events are rare but may cause large losses. How to realistically simulate extreme behavior of daily...

Li, Chao

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

Observed Global Precipitation Variability During the 20th Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of warming and other regional-scale features, including changes in wind patterns, precipitation and some aspects of extremes and of ice. n The models used in AR4 were judged to have improved representation

Anisimov, Mikhail

467

Inhibition Effect of Secondary Phosphate Mineral Precipitation on Uranium Release from Contaminated Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The inhibitory effect of phosphate mineral precipitation on uranium release was evaluated using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment collected from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The sediment contained U(VI) that was associated with diffusion-limited intragrain regions within its mm-size granitic lithic fragments. The sediment was first treated to promote phosphate mineral precipitation in batch suspensions spiked with 1 and 50 mM aqueous phosphate, and calcium in a stoichiometric ratio of mineral hydroxyapatite. The phosphate-treated sediment was then leached to solubilize contaminant U(VI) in a column system using a synthetic groundwater that contained chemical components representative of Hanford groundwater. Phosphate treatment significantly decreased the extent of U(VI) release from the sediment. Within the experimental duration of about 200 pore volumes, the effluent U(VI) concentrations were consistently lower by over one and two orders of magnitude after the sediment was treated with 1 and 50 mM of phosphate, respectively. Measurements of solid phase U(VI) using various spectroscopes and chemical extraction of the sediment collectively indicated that the inhibition of U(VI) release from the sediment was caused by: 1) U(VI) adsorption to the secondary phosphate precipitates and 2) the transformation of initially present U(VI) mineral phases to less soluble forms.

Shi, Zhenqing; Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Deng, Baolin

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tin clustering and precipitation in the oxide during autoclave corrosion of Zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atom probe tomography has been used to study the evolution of tin distribution during the corrosion process in Zircaloy-2. From being completely soluble in the Zr metal matrix, some clustering is evident already in the newly formed oxide close to the metal-oxide interface. Analysis of thicker oxides a few hundred nanometers away from the interface reveals fully developed precipitates of metallic Sn particles of up to 20 nm in size. Although the precipitates contain significant amounts of Zr, it is concluded that they are in the process of being depleted in Zr, which is limited only by the slow diffusion in the oxide scale. The findings are interpreted as being a result of the nobility of the Sn yielding a strong driving force to remain in a metallic state after incorporation in the barrier oxide layer. As Sn occupies substitutional sites in the ZrO2 lattice it is oxidized to a 4+ state when incorporated into the oxide, and in order to remain metallic it must nucleate into precipitates within the inner part of the oxide scale before being re-oxidized to 2+ and eventually to 4+ when the oxygen activity is sufficiently high in the outer parts of the oxide.

G. Sundell; M. Thuvander; H.-O. Andrén

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic, where the delicate balance of phases in these clouds can have a profound impact on the surface radiation balance and various cloud-atmosphere-radiation-surface feedback processes. A better understanding of these clouds is clearly important and has been a recent objective of the ARM program. To this end, multiple sensors including radar, lidar, and temperature soundings, have been utilized in an automated cloud type classification scheme for clouds observed at the North Slope of Alaska site. The performance of this new algorithm at identifying mixed-phase cloud conditions is compared with an

470

Application of cellular automata approach for cloud simulation and rendering  

SciTech Connect

Current techniques for creating clouds in games and other real time applications produce static, homogenous clouds. These clouds, while viable for real time applications, do not exhibit an organic feel that clouds in nature exhibit. These clouds, when viewed over a time period, were able to deform their initial shape and move in a more organic and dynamic way. With cloud shape technology we should be able in the future to extend to create even more cloud shapes in real time with more forces. Clouds are an essential part of any computer model of a landscape or an animation of an outdoor scene. A realistic animation of clouds is also important for creating scenes for flight simulators, movies, games, and other. Our goal was to create a realistic animation of clouds.

Christopher Immanuel, W. [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India)] [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India); Paul Mary Deborrah, S. [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India); Samuel Selvaraj, R. [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Impurity Precipitation, Dissolution, Gettering and Passivation in PV Silicon: Final Technical Report, 30 January 1998--29 August 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the major progress in understanding the physics of transition metals in silicon and their possible impact on the efficiency of solar cells that was achieved during the three-year span of this subcontract. We found that metal-silicide precipitates and dissolved 3d transition metals can be relatively easily gettered. Gettering and passivating treatments must take into account the individuality of each transition metal. Our studies demonstrated how significant is the difference between defect reactions of copper and iron. Copper does not significantly affect the minority-carrier diffusion length in p-type silicon, at least as long as its concentration is low, but readily precipitates in n-type silicon. Therefore, copper precipitates may form in the area of p-n junctions and cause shunts in solar cells. Fortunately, copper precipitates are present mostly in the chemical state of copper-silicide and can relatively easily be dissolved. In contrast, iron was found to form clusters of iron-oxides and iron-silicates in the wafers. These clusters are thermodynamically stable even in high temperatures and are extremely difficult to remove. The formation of iron-silicates was observed at temperatures over 900C.

Weber, E. R.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects regional precipitation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: of precipitation trends over the two regions, as they are also directly affected by the South Asian monsoon... Regional summer precipitation events in Asia and their...

473

Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud of United States Government (USG) secure and effective adoption of the Cloud Computing2 model to reduce costs and improve services. The working document describes the NIST Cloud Computing program efforts

475

Cloud Service Analysis - Choosing between an on-premise resource and a cloud computing service.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing is a concept that has become increasingly popular in recent years through an increase in Internet connection capabilities, virtualization possibilities, and commercial successes.… (more)

Augustsson, Keith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Extracellular iron-sulfur precipitates from growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans  

SciTech Connect

The authors have examined extracellular iron-bearing precipitates resulting from the growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in a basal medium with lactate as the carbon source and ferrous sulfate. Black precipitates were obtained when D. desulfuricans was grown with an excess of FeSO{sub 4}. When D. desulfuricans was grown under conditions with low amounts of FeSO{sub 4}, brown precipitates were obtained. The precipitates were characterized by iron K-edge XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. Both were noncrystalline and nonmagnetic (at room temperature) solids containing high-spin Fe(III). The spectroscopic data for the black precipitates indicate the formation of an iron-sulfur phase with 6 nearest S neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 2.24(1) {angstrom}, whereas the brown precipitates are an iron-oxygen-sulfur phase with 6 nearest O neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 1.95(1) {angstrom}.

Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Witzcak, D.

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

477

Precipitation in 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu maraging steels  

SciTech Connect

Two maraging steels with the compositions 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu-4Mo (wt%) and 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu and with small additions of Al and Ti were investigated using atom probe field ion microscopy. Tomographic atom probe investigations were performed to clarify the spatial distribution of elements in and close to the precipitates. Materials heat treated at 475 C for 5, 25 min, 1, 2, 4 and 400 h were analyzed. Precipitates in the Mo-rich material were observed already after 5 min of aging, while in the material without MO, precipitation started later. In both materials precipitation begins with the formation of Cu-rich particles which work as nucleation sites for a Ni-rich phase of type Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al). A Mo-rich phase was detected in the Mo-rich steel after 2 h of aging. The distribution of alloying elements in the precipitates, their role in the precipitation process, and the mechanism of hardening in the two materials are discussed.

Stiller, K.; Haettestrand, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Danoix, F. [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique] [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to discuss the findings of the Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration carried out at TNX during December 1995. This demonstration consisted of two steps: oxalate precipitation and precipitate washing. The first step reacted Am/Cm stimulant solution with oxalic acid resulting in the formation of insoluble lanthanide oxalates and soluble metal oxalates. The second step consisted of washing the precipitate with equal volumes of a nitric acid/oxalic acid solution to remove unwanted cations (miscellaneous metals) from the slurry. Quantitative results consist of: the solubility of the metallic impurities and lanthanide oxalates under process conditions, the settling rate of the oxalates, the specific volume of the oxalate precipitate, and the minimum distance the solution transfer jet can be place from the oxalate solids to prevent entrainment. Finally, discussion of how to decrease lanthanide losses is presented in terms of transfer jet location, initial nitric acid concentration, and wash nitric acid concentration. Solubilizing the precipitate and adjusting the nitric acid concentration prior to vitrification were not performed in this demonstration.

Beck, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

479

Pre-Cloud Aerosol, Cloud Droplet Concentration, and Cloud Condensation Nuclei from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere Land Study (VOCALS) Field Campaign First Quarter 2010 ASR Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect

In this, the first of a series of Program Metric Reports, we (1) describe archived data from the DOE G-1 aircraft, (2) illustrate several relations between sub-cloud aerosol, CCN, and cloud droplets pertinent to determining the effects of pollutant sources on cloud properties, and (3) post to the data archive an Excel spreadsheet that contains cloud and corresponding sub-cloud data.

Kleinman, LI; Springston, SR; Daum, PH; Lee, Y-N; Sedlacek, AJ; Senum, G; Wang, J

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

ICE AND DUST IN THE PRESTELLAR DARK CLOUD LYNDS 183: PREPLANETARY MATTER AT THE LOWEST TEMPERATURES  

SciTech Connect

Dust grains are nucleation centers and catalysts for the growth of icy mantles in quiescent interstellar clouds, the products of which may accumulate into preplanetary matter when new stars and solar systems form within the clouds. In this paper, we present the first spectroscopic detections of silicate dust and the molecular ices H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} in the vicinity of the prestellar core L183 (L134N). An infrared photometric survey of the cloud was used to identify reddened background stars, and we present spectra covering solid-state absorption features in the wavelength range 2-20 {mu}m for nine of them. The mean composition of the ices in the best-studied line of sight (toward J15542044-0254073) is H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2} Almost-Equal-To 100:40:24. The ices are amorphous in structure, indicating that they have been maintained at low temperature ({approx}< 15 K) since formation. The ice column density N(H{sub 2}O) correlates with reddening by dust, exhibiting a threshold effect that corresponds to the transition from unmantled grains in the outer layers of the cloud to ice-mantled grains within, analogous to that observed in other dark clouds. A comparison of results for L183 and the Taurus and IC 5146 dark clouds suggests common behavior, with mantles first appearing in each case at a dust column corresponding to a peak optical depth {tau}{sub 9.7} = 0.15 {+-} 0.03 in the silicate feature. Our results support a previous conclusion that the color excess E{sub J-K} does not obey a simple linear correlation with the total dust column in lines of sight that intercept dense clouds. The most likely explanation is a systematic change in the optical properties of the dust as the density increases.

Whittet, D. C. B.; Poteet, C. A.; Bajaj, V. M.; Horne, D. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy and New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Chiar, J. E. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Pagani, L. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Shenoy, S. S. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Adamson, A. J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forms clouds precipitates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterizaton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization in NCAR CCM3 D. Zurovac-Jevtic, G. J. Zhang, and V. Ramanathan Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institute of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cirrus cloud cover and ice water content (IWC) are the two most important properties of cirrus clouds. However, in general circulation models (GCMs), their treatment is very crude. For example, in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3), IWC is prescribed as a function of column-integrated water vapor and height (Hack 1998). The in situ observations in the tropics indicate that the cirrus IWC is an order of magnitude larger than what is prescribed in the model (McFarquhar and Heymsfield 1996). The comparison with the International

482

Flying Cloud Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flying Cloud Wind Farm Flying Cloud Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Flying Cloud Wind Farm Facility Flying Cloud Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer Clipper Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location West of Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.416975°, -95.422282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.416975,"lon":-95.422282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

483

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

484

NASA's Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plans for NASA’s Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission is described. Recommended by Earth Science Decadal Survey in 2007, ACE is nominally planned for a 2021 launch. ACE is...

Starr, David O'C

485

EVENT CLOUDS : lighter than air architectural structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVENT CLOUD is a versatile covering system that allows events to happen independently to weather conditions. It consists of a lighter than air pneumatic structure, filled either with helium or hot air, that covers spaces ...

Peydro Duclos, Ignacio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

ARM Cloud Properties Working Group: Meeting Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties WG Breakout Session 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting Mar. 10, 2008, Norfolk, VA Monday March 10, 2008 1500 to 1515: R. Hogan - A Proposal for ARM support of Cloudnet...

487

Interactive physically-based cloud simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computational fluid solver. This allows us to simulate the complex air motion that contributes to cloud formation in our atmosphere. Among the natural processes that we simulate are buoyancy, relative humidity, and condensation. Because we have built...

Overby, Derek Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

488

Cloud Platform Support for API Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more cloud-like model, digital assets (code, data and software environments) increasingly require curation as web-accessible services. “Service-izing ” digital assets consists of encapsulating assets in software that exposes them to web and mobile applications via well-defined yet flexible, network accessible, application programming interfaces (APIs). In this paper, we postulate that recent advances in cloud computing make cloud platforms as-aservice (PaaS) ideal for deployment, lifecycle management, and policy-based control – i.e. API governance – for extant and future digital assets. Toward this end, we overview API governance as a PaaS technology and outline some early results generated by our investigation of a prototype we are developing, called EAGER, for implementing API governance at scale. Index Terms—API Governance; PaaS; cloud platforms; API similarity;

Ra Krintz; Hiranya Jayathilaka; Stratos Dimopoulos; Er Pucher; Rich Wolski; Tevfik Bultan

489

A Quest for Effective Hygroscopic Cloud Seeding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown here that hygroscopic seeding requires two orders of magnitude more hygroscopic agent than can be delivered by flare technology for producing raindrop embryos in concentrations to detect by cloud physics aircraft the microphysical ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Duncan Axisa; William L. Woodley; Ronen Lahav

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Marine Stratocumulus Clouds: Turbulence-Raidation- Thermodynamics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Highlight Vast sheets of stratocumulus clouds are present over the eastern Pacific Ocean, off the coast of California to the north and off the coast of Chile and...

491

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

492

Cloud chamber visualization of primary cosmic rays  

SciTech Connect

From 1948 until 1963, cloud chambers were carried to the top of the atmosphere by balloons. From these flights, which were begun by Edward P. Ney at the University of Minnesota, came the following results: discovery of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, development of scintillation and cherenkov detectors, discovery of cosmic ray electrons, and studies of solar proton events. The history of that era is illustrated here by cloud chamber photographs of primary cosmic rays.

Earl, James A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park MD (United States)

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

493

Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1979 Major Subject: Meteorology CLOUD STRUCTURES FRON DEFENSE &IETEOROLOGICAL SAT"LLIT DATA A Thesis by JOHN FREDERICK PHILLIPS Approved as to style and content by. (Cha an of Committee) (Head of Department (Me er) (Hencber) August 1975...-gray-level density wedge, provided by the Air Weather Service, enabled determinations of ap- proximate cloud heights A comparison was made between the DMSP imagery and the concurrent digital radar from the National Severe Storms Laboratory at Norman...

Phillips, John Frederick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

494

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print Wednesday, 30 January 2013 00:00 A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

495

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.

496

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print New Species of Cyanobacteria Forms Intracellular Carbonates Print A new species of cyanobacteria-photosynthetic bacteria that occupy a wide array of habitats-was discovered in the Mexican Lake of Alchichica where massive carbonate rocks form. Cyanobacteria have been impacting the global carbon cycle of the Earth for more than 2.3 billion years by assimilating CO2 into organic compounds and triggering calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. Despite the importance of this cyanobacteria-mediated CaCO3 biomineralization, the mechanistic details of this process are still poorly understood. Scientists agree that calcification in cyanobacteria is an extracellular process: Photosynthesizing cells commonly export the photosynthesis byproduct CO32- outside their cells where it bonds with an alkaline earth metal like Ca2+. The cyanobacteria recently found in Lake Alchichica, however, forms amorphous Ca-, Mg-, Sr- and Ba-rich carbonates intracellularly. This discovery significantly modifies the traditional view of how bacteria induce CaCO3 precipitation and may improve understanding of the fossil record by hinting at ancient traces of life in rocks, or designing new routes for sequestering CO2 or 90Sr in minerals.