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1

Integrated analysis of production potential and profitability of a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) awarded a contract in 1991 to Prime Energy Corporation (PEC) to demonstrate the benefit of using horizontal wells to recover gas from low permeability formations. The project area was located in the Chittim field of Maverick County, Texas. The Lower Glen Rose Formation in the Chittim field was a promising horizontal well candidate based on the heterogenous nature of the reservoir (suggested by large well-to-well variances in reserves) and the low percentage of economical vertical wells. Since there was substantial evidence of reservoir heterogeneity, it was unknown whether the selected, wellsite would penetrate a reservoir with the desired properties for a horizontal well. Thus, an integrated team was formed to combine geologic analysis, seismic interpretation, reservoir engineering, reservoir simulation, and economic assessment to analyze the production potential and profitability of completing a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose formation.

Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.; Zammerilli, A.M.; Yost, A.B. II [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Muncey, J.G.; Hegeman, P.S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ambipolar potential formation in TMX  

SciTech Connect

TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed.

Correl, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

1981-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

4

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the...

5

Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

Resource Constraints in Petroleum Production Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the assumption of 2% consumption growth and the low scenario, OPEC would achieve 50% ofworld production in 1998. OPEC's highest crude oil production was 32 mmbbl per day in 1973 and 1979. About 10% ofthe liquid petroleum produced outside...

C. D. MASTERS; D. H. ROOT; E. D. ATTANASI

1991-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

8

Agroecological zones and the assessment of crop production potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and the assessment of crop production potential M. V. K. Sivakumar...and sustainable agricultural production systems to feed the growing...Agroecological ones and crop production potential Table 3. Land use...perennial tree crops (palm oil, rubber, cocoa, coffee) AEZ4 cool...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Nepheline Formation Potential in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)  

SciTech Connect

The effect of crystallization on glass durability is complex and depends on several interrelated factors including the change in residual glass composition, the formation of internal stress or microcracks, and the preferential attack at the glass-crystal interface. Perhaps one of the most significant effects is the type and extent (or fraction) of crystallization and the resulting change to the residual glass composition. A strong increase in glass dissolution (or decrease in durability) has been observed in previous studies in glasses that formed aluminum-containing crystals, such as NaAlSiO{sub 4} (nepheline) and LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and crystalline SiO{sub 2}. Although the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na{sup +}-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}). Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based glass (as a result of the use of a high Na{sub 2}O frit and/or a less washed sludge) to improve melt rate, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems is being assessed. Li et al. (2003) indicate that sodium alumino-borosilicate glasses are prone to nepheline crystallization if their compositions projected on the Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} ternary fall within the nepheline primary phase field. In particular, durable glasses with SiO{sub 2}/(SiO{sub 2}+Na{sub 2}O+ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) > 0.62, where the oxides are expressed as mass fractions in the glass, do not precipitate nepheline as their primary phase. Twelve SB4-based glasses have been identified or classified as ''prone to nepheline formation'' using a ''less conservative'' discriminator value of 0.65. Ten of the 12 glasses are Frit 320 based, and 8 of these 10 target a 40% WL-independent of the SB4 blending scenario used. This is not unexpected due to the higher alkali content of Frit 320 (12% Na{sub 2}O) relative to Frit 418 (8% Na{sub 2}O) and the fact that as WLs increase, the Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations increase and the SiO{sub 2} concentrations decrease in this series of glasses. Using the ''less conservative'' value as a guide will not only increase the probability of forming nepheline but will also allow the assessment of several different blending scenarios, both frits, and different WLs which will provide valuable insight into the frit selection process for SB4. More specifically, blending strategies, frit compositions, and WLs that avoid nepheline formation could be used to guide the frit selection process or to make compositional adjustments to the frit. The durability of these 12 glasses (of both quenched and centerline canister cooled versions) will be measured with the results being documented in a subsequent report.

PEELER, D

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Evaluation of Hulless Barley for Potential Ethanol Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of this study was to evaluate potential of winter hulless barley as a local feedstock for ethanol production in Oklahoma. Two hulless… (more)

Septiano, Wanda Pradjanata

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of...

12

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Final Project Report September 15, 2013 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Award...

13

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent...

14

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

Johansen, Tor Arne

15

Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash properties deer12kamp.pdf More Documents...

16

Examination of the Potential for Formation of Energetic Compounds in Dry Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report details initial results from an investigation of the potential formation and fate of energetic compounds in Savannah River Site sludge.

Barnes, M.J.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

18

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

19

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and expert riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and export riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Clinical Trials Methods for Evaluation of Potential Reduced Exposure Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...potential for consumer uptake and abuse of the product. This article...toxicants and biological effect, abuse potential, and consumer perception...recruitment through newspaper and internet; inclusion criteria: healthy...pregnant, current alcohol or drug abuse Smoking behavior (time to smoke...

Dorothy K. Hatsukami; Karen Hanson; Anna Briggs; Mark Parascandola; Jeanine M. Genkinger; Richard O'Connor; and Peter G. Shields

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ambipolar potential formation and axial confinement in TMX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. In the radial core of the central cell, measurements of electrostatic potentials of 150 V which augment axial ion confinement are in agreement with predictions using the Maxwell-Boltzmann result. Central-cell ion confinement was observed to scale according to electrostatic potential theory up to average enhancement factors of eight times over mirror confinement alone.

D.L. Correll; S.L. Allen; T.A. Capser; J.F. Clauser; P. Coakley; F.H. Coensgen; W. Condit; W.F. Cummins; J.C. Davis; R.P. Drake; J.H. Foote; A.H. Futch; R.K. Goodman; D.P. Grubb; G.A. Hallock; E.B. Hooper; R.S. Hornady; A.L. Hunt; C.V. Karmendy; A.W. Molvik; W.E. Nexsen; W.L. Pickles; P. Poulsen; T.C. Simonen; B.W. Stallard; O.T. Strand

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hydrocarbon potential of Spearfish Formation in eastern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

More than 36 million bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic traps in sandstones of the Triassic-Jurassic Spearfish Formation in the eastern part of the Williston basin. Newburg field has produced 32 million bbl of oil and Waskada field, discovered in 1980, is estimated to have over 10 million bbl of oil in reserves. A binocular microscopic and petrographic examination of cores from each of the fields has revealed considerable differences in the characteristics of producing sandstones. Cores and sample cuttings from 30 wells in the US and Canada form the basis for this comparison of the two fields. The Spearfish Formation consists of porous, permeable, well-sorted, very fine-grained sandstones with a sucrosic dolomite matrix that are interbedded with impermeable sandstones, siltstones, and shale. The environment of deposition is believed to be the intertidal zone (tidal flat). Sediments of the Spearfish Formation were deposited by a transgressive sea on an eroded Mississippian carbonate section. Oil found in the Spearfish sandstones is derived from the Mississippian.

Dodge C.J.N.; Reid, F.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geologic setting and natural gas potential of Niobrara formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Chalk units in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) have potential for generation and accumulation of shallow, biogenic gas in the central and eastern Williston basin. Similar to area of Niobrara gas production in the eastern Denver basin, Niobrara chalks in South and North Dakota were deposited on carbonate ramps sloping westward off the stable eastern platform of the Western Interior seaway. Within the Williston basin, the Niobrara of the western Dakotas, eastern North Dakota, and central South Dakota has different stratigraphic relationships. These three areas can be further subdivided and ranked into six areas that have different exploration potential. The south margin of the Williston basin in central South Dakota is the most attractive exploration area. Niobrara chalk reservoirs, source rocks, and structural traps in the southern Williston basin are similar to those in the eastern Denver basin. Chalk porosities are probably adequate for gas production, although porosity is controlled by burial depth. Organic carbon content of the chalk is high and shows of biogenic gas are reported. Large, low-relief structural features, which could serve as traps, are present.

Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The potential of hydrocarbons generation in the Chia Gara Formation at Amadia area, north of Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sixteen rock samples of outcrop of Chia Gara Formations from the type locality area, south of Amadia, North Iraq showed evidences for hydrocarbon generation potential by...1986) which contain brazinophyte algae,

Sahar Y. Jasim

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential  

SciTech Connect

The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul; Prasert Pavasant [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand). Department of Chemical Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Coalbed methane production potential in U. S. basins  

SciTech Connect

The major emphasis of the U.S. DOE's coalbed methane research has been on estimating the magnitude of the resource and developing systems for recovery. Methane resource estimates for 16 basins show that the greatest potential is in the Piceance, Northern Appalachian, Central Appalachian, Powder River, and Greater Green River coal basins. Small, high-potential target areas have been selected for in-depth analysis of the resource. Industry interest is greatest in the Warrior, San Juan, Piceance, Raton Mesa, and Northern and Central Appalachian basins. Production curves for several coalbed methane wells in these basins are included.

Byer, C.W.; Mroz, T.H.; Covatch, G.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

UAV Formation Flight using 3D Potential Field Tobias Paul Thomas R. Krogstad Jan Tommy Gravdahl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UAV Formation Flight using 3D Potential Field Tobias Paul Thomas R. Krogstad Jan Tommy Gravdahl ESG aerial vehicles (UAVs). Based on a virtual leader approach, combined with an extended local potential a group of UAVs based on a simplified small-scale helicopter, which is simulated in MATLABTM /Simulink

Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

29

Estimating the Carbon Sequestration Capacity of Shale Formations Using Methane Production Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimating the Carbon Sequestration Capacity of Shale Formations Using Methane Production Rates ... Even though both of these strategies have some potential to sequester CO2, the magnitude is much smaller than current or projected CO2 emissions. ... This distribution is combined with stochastic estimates for (4) the ratio of CH4 volume to CO2 volume that can sorb to the fracture surface and (5) the ratio of the gas diffusivities at the fracture surface to estimate the volume of CO2 that could be sequestered in these wells. ...

Zhiyuan Tao; Andres Clarens

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

Simulating Potential Switchgrass Production in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Using results from field trials of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) in the United States, the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) process-level agroecosystem model was calibrated, validated, and applied to simulate potential productivity of switchgrass for use as a biofuel feedstock. The model was calibrated with a regional study of 10-yr switchgrass field trials and subsequently tested against a separate compiled dataset of field trials from across the eastern half of the country. An application of the model in a national database using 8-digit watersheds as the primary modeling unit produces 30-yr average switchgrass yield estimates that can be aggregated to 18 major watersheds. The model projects average annual switchgrass productivity of greater than 7 Mg ha-1 in the Upper Mississippi, Lower Mississippi, and Ohio watersheds. The major factors limiting simulated production vary by region; low precipitation is the primary limiting factor across the western half of the country, while moderately acidic soils limit yields on lands east of the Mississippi River. Average projected switchgrass production on all crop land in the continental US is 5.6 Mg ha-1. At this level of productivity, 28.6 million hectares of crop land would be required to produce the 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol called for by 2022 in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. The model described here can be applied as a tool to inform the land-use and environmental consequences of switchgrass production.

Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, T. O.; Parrish, David J.; Tyler, Donald D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Potential Formation in a High-Speed Plasma Flow along Converging Magnetic Field Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The formation of a potential is experimentally investigated in a high-speed collisionless plasma flow injected into a region of converging magnetic field lines. When the plasma passes through this region, a large increase in potential occurs there, resulting in electron acceleration along the magnetic field. A drastic end-plate effect on the generated potential is observed when the plasma comes in contact with the end plate.

N. Sato; Y. Watanabe; R. Hatakeyama; T. Mieno

1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

32

Central Appalachia: Production potential of low-sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect

The vast preponderance of eastern US low sulfur and 1.2-lbs SO{sub 2}/MMBtu compliance coal comes from a relatively small area composed of 14 counties located in eastern Kentucky, southern West Virginia and western Virginia. These 14 counties accounted for 68% of all Central Appalachian coal production in 1989 as well as 85% of all compliance coal shipped to electric utilities from this region. A property-by-property analysis of total production potential in 10 of the 14 counties (Floyd, Knott, Letcher, Harlan, Martin and Pike in Kentucky and Boone, Kanawha, Logan and Mingo in West Virginia) resulted in the following estimates of active and yet to be developed properties: (1) total salable reserves for all sulfur levels were 5.9 billion tons and (2) 1.2-lbs. SO{sub 2}/MMBtu compliance'' reserves totaled 2.38 billion tons. This potential supply of compliance coal is adequate to meet the expanded utility demand expected under acid rain for the next 20 years. Beyond 2010, compliance supplies will begin to reach depletion levels in some areas of the study region. A review of the cost structure for all active mines was used to categorize the cost structure for developing potential supplies. FOB cash costs for all active mines in the ten counties ranged from $15 per ton to $35 per ton and the median mine cost was about $22 per ton. A total of 47 companies with the ability to produce and ship coal from owned or leased reserves are active in the ten-county region. Identified development and expansion projects controlled by active companies are capable of expanding the region's current production level by over 30 million tons per year over the next twenty years. Beyond this period the issue of reserve depletion for coal of all sulfur levels in the ten county region will become a pressing issue. 11 figs., 12 tabs.

Watkins, J. (Hill and Associates, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8254 8254 Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India Michael McNeil, Maithili Iyer, Stephen Meyers, Virginie Letschert, James E. McMahon Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA December 2005 This work was supported by the International Copper Association through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. 2 ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These

34

Potential feedstock supply and costs for biodiesel production  

SciTech Connect

Without considering technology constraints, tallows and waste greases have definite potential as feedstocks for the production of biodiesel in the United States. These materials are less expensive than most oils produced from oilseed crops such as soybeans, sunflowers, canola and rapeseed. At current crude petroleum prices, biodiesel derived from any of these materials will be more expensive than diesel derived from petroleum. However, when compared to other clean burning alternate fuels, recent data suggest biodiesel blends produced from any of these feedstocks may be the lowest total cost alternative fuel in certain areas of the United States. Economic feasibility analyses were performed to investigate the cost of producing biodiesel ($/gallon) subject to variances in feedstock cost, by-product credit (glycerol and meal) and capital costs. Cost of production per gallon of esterified biodiesel from soybean, sunflower, tallow and yellow grease ranged from $0.96 to $3.39 subject to feedstock and chemical costs, by-product credit and system capital cost.

Nelson, R.G. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Howell, S.A. [MARC-IV, Bucyrus, KS (United States); Weber, J.A. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Brazil Eucalyptus Potential Productivity Project: Influence of water, nutrients and stand uniformity on wood production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brazil Eucalyptus Potential Productivity Project: Influence of water, nutrients and stand, Brazil f Veracel Celulose, Eunapolis, Bahia, Brazil g International Paper do Brasil, Mogi Guacu, Sao Paulo, Brazil h Suzano Papel e Celulose, Teixeira de Freitas, Bahia, Brazil i CENIBRA, Ipatinga, Minas

Binkley, Dan

36

Geothermal source potential and utilization for alcohol production  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of using a potential geothermal source to drive a fuel grade alcohol plant. Test data from the well at the site indicated that the water temperature at approximately 8500 feet should approach 275/sup 0/F. However, no flow data was available, and so the volume of hot water that can be expected from a well at this site is unknown. Using the available data, numerous fuel alcohol production processes and various heat utilization schemes were investigated to determine the most cost effective system for using the geothermal resource. The study found the direct application of hot water for alcohol production based on atmospheric processes using low pressure steam to be most cost effective. The geothermal flow rates were determined for various sizes of alcohol production facility using 275/sup 0/F water, 235/sup 0/F maximum processing temperature, 31,000 and 53,000 Btu per gallon energy requirements, and appropriate process approach temperatures. It was determined that a 3 million gpy alcohol plant is the largest facility that can practically be powered by the flow from one large geothermal well. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared, operating costs were calculated, the economic feasibility of the propsed project was examined, and a sensitivity analysis was performed.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Plasma potential formation and measurement in TMX-U and MFTF-B  

SciTech Connect

Tandem mirrors control the axial variation of the plasma potential to create electrostatic plugs that improve the axial confinement of central cell ions and, in a thermal barrier tandem mirror, control the electron axial heat flow. Measurements of the spatial and temporal variations of the plasma potential are, therefore, important to the understanding of confinement in a tandem mirror. In this paper we discuss potential formation in a thermal barrier tandem mirror and examine the diagnostics and data obtained on the TMX-U device, including measurements of the thermal barrier potential profile using a diagnostic neutral beam and charged particle energy-spectroscopy. We then describe the heavy ion beam probe and other new plasma potential diagnostics that are under development for TMX-U and MFTF-B and examine problem areas where additional diagnostic development is desirable.

Grubb, D.P.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Total Mercury, Methylmercury, Methylmercury Production Potential, and Ancillary Streambed-Sediment and Pore-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Mercury, Methylmercury, Methylmercury Production Potential, and Ancillary Streambed Oak Creek, Wisconsin (center). (All photographs by the authors.) #12;Total Mercury, Methylmercury.E., 2008, Total mercury, methylmercury, methylmercury production potential, and ancillary streambed

39

Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations  

SciTech Connect

Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

R.L. Billingsley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

Blandford, J.W.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production for Lignocellulosic Ethanol  

SciTech Connect

In response to concerns about oil dependency and the contributions of fossil fuel use to climatic change, the U.S. Department of Energy has begun a research initiative to make 20% of motor fuels biofuel based in 10 years, and make 30% of fuels bio-based by 2030. Fundamental to this objective is developing an understanding of feedstock dynamics of crops suitable for cellulosic ethanol production. This report focuses on switchgrass, reviewing the existing literature from field trials across the United States, and compiling it for the first time into a single database. Data available from the literature included cultivar and crop management information, and location of the field trial. For each location we determined latitude and longitude, and used this information to add temperature and precipitation records from the nearest weather station. Within this broad database we were able to identify the major sources of variation in biomass yield, and to characterize yield as a function of some of the more influential factors, e.g., stand age, ecotype, precipitation and temperature in the year of harvest, site latitude, and fertilization regime. We then used a modeling approach, based chiefly on climatic factors and ecotype, to predict potential yields for a given temperature and weather pattern (based on 95th percentile response curves), assuming the choice of optimal cultivars and harvest schedules. For upland ecotype varieties, potential yields were as high as 18 to 20 Mg/ha, given ideal growing conditions, whereas yields in lowland ecotype varieties could reach 23 to 27 Mg/ha. The predictive equations were used to produce maps of potential yield across the continental United States, based on precipitation and temperature in the long term climate record, using the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Potential yields calculated via this characterization were subsequently compared to the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County Level data base (ORECCL), which was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Graham et al. 1996) to predict biofuel crop yields at the county level within a limited geographic area. Mapped output using the model was relatively consistent with known switchgrass distribution. It correctly showed higher yields for lowland switchgrass when compared with upland varieties at most locations. Projections for the most northern parts of the range suggest comparable yields for the two ecotypes, but inadequate data for lowland ecotypes grown at high latitudes make it difficult to fully assess this projection. The final model is a predictor of optimal yields for a given climate scenario, but does not attempt to identify or account for other limiting or interacting factors. The statistical model is nevertheless an improvement over historical efforts, in that it is based on quantifiable climatic differences, and it can be used to extrapolate beyond the historic range of switchgrass. Additional refinement of the current statistical model, or the use of different empirical or process-based models, might improve the prediction of switchgrass yields with respect to climate and interactions with cultivar and management practices, assisting growers in choosing high-yielding cultivars within the context of local environmental growing conditions.

Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Davis, Ethan [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Volatile liquid hydrocarbon characterization of underwater hydrocarbon vents and formation waters from offshore production operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile liquid hydrocarbon characterization of underwater hydrocarbon vents and formation waters from offshore production operations ... The environmental implications of offshore oil and gas activities ... The environmental implications of offshore oil and gas activities ...

Theodor C. Sauer

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modern Software Product Support Processes and the Usage of Multimedia Formats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern Software Product Support Processes and the Usage of Multimedia Formats Parmit K. Chilana1 for communicating and troubleshooting, such as using screen sharing tools or attaching images and videos to requests

Toronto, University of

45

ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product  

SciTech Connect

ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

Jensen, Michael

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

Jensen, Michael

47

Production Economics of Potential Perennial and Annual Biomass Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The first essay determines the lowest cost lignocellulosic biomass feedstock production system for western Oklahoma from among seven alternatives at each of two locations. Field… (more)

Griffith, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

49

Modelling China’s potential maize production at regional scale under climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the continuing warming due to greenhouse gases concentration, it is important to examine the potential impacts on regional crop production spatially and temporally. We assessed China’s potential maize pro...

Wei Xiong; Robin Matthews; Ian Holman; Erda Lin; Yinglong Xu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion...

52

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

53

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

54

Assessment of the potential for karst in the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site.  

SciTech Connect

This report is an independent assessment of the potential for karst dissolution in evaporitic strata of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Review of the available data suggests that the Rustler strata thicken and thin across the area in depositional patterns related to lateral variations in sedimentary accommodation space and normal facies changes. Most of the evidence that has been offered for the presence of karst in the subsurface has been used out of context, and the different pieces are not mutually supporting. Outside of Nash Draw, definitive evidence for the development of karst in the Rustler Formation near the WIPP site is limited to the horizon of the Magenta Member in drillhole WIPP-33. Most of the other evidence cited by the proponents of karst is more easily interpreted as primary sedimentary structures and the localized dissolution of evaporitic strata adjacent to the Magenta and Culebra water-bearing units. Some of the cited evidence is invalid, an inherited baggage from studies made prior to the widespread knowledge of modern evaporite depositional environments and prior to the existence of definitive exposures of the Rustler Formation in the WIPP shafts. Some of the evidence is spurious, has been taken out of context, or is misquoted. Lateral lithologic variations from halite to mudstone within the Rustler Formation under the WIPP site have been taken as evidence for the dissolution of halite such as that seen in Nash Draw, but are more rationally explained as sedimentary facies changes. Extrapolation of the known karst features in Nash Draw eastward to the WIPP site, where conditions are and have been significantly different for half a million years, is unwarranted. The volumes of insoluble material that would remain after dissolution of halite would be significantly less than the observed bed thicknesses, thus dissolution is an unlikely explanation for the lateral variations from halite to mudstone and siltstone. Several surficial depressions at WIPP, suggested to be sinkholes, do not have enough catchment area to form a sinkhole, and holes drilled to investigate the subsurface strata do not support a sinkhole interpretation. Surface drainage across the WIPP site is poorly developed because it has been disrupted by migrating sand dunes and because precipitation is not focused by defined catchment areas in this region of low precipitation and low-dip bedding, not because it has been captured by sinkholes. There are no known points of discharge from the Rustler Formation at WIPP that would indicate the presence of a subsurface karst drainage system. The existing drillholes across the WIPP site, though small in diameter, are sufficient to assess the probability of karst development along the horizontal fractures that are common in the Rustler Formation, and the area of investigation has been augmented significantly by the mapping of four large-diameter shafts excavated into the WIPP repository. The general absence of dissolution, karsting, and related conduits is corroborated by the pumping tests which have interrogated large volumes of the Rustler Formation between drillholes. Diffusion calculations suggest that separate isotopic signatures for the water found in the fractures and the water found in the pores of the matrix rock between fractures are unlikely, thus the isotopic evidence for ancient Rustler formation waters is valid. Geophysical techniques show a number of anomalies, but the anomalies do not overlap to portray consistent and mutually supporting patterns that can be definitively related to karst void space at any given location. The coincidence of the Culebra and Magenta potentiometric heads between Nash Draw and the WIPP site is the inevitable intersection of two non-parallel surfaces rather than an indication of karst-related hydraulic communication between the two units. The proponents of karst in the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site tend to mix data, to take data out of context, and to offer theory as fact. They do not analyze the data or synthesize

Lorenz, John Clay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 ?M of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu2 +-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?)/liver-X receptor ? (LXR?)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPAR?/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPAR? siRNA or PPAR? expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent.

Jing-Hsien Chen; Chia-Wen Tsai; Chi-Ping Wang; Hui-Hsuan Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Permian Dollarhide formation, southern Smoky Mountains, south-central Idaho: depositional environment and petroleum potential  

SciTech Connect

The Permian Dollarhide formation occurs as an allochthon west of the Big Wood River in the Smoky Mountains of south-central Idaho. It is part of the Idaho Black Shale belt described during pioneering studies by W.E. Hall. The formation contains carbonaceous limestones, fine-grained calcareous sandstones, and carbonaceous, siliceous, or calcareous siltites. The rocks contain high amounts of carbonaceous matter and local concentrations of syngenetic silver, zinc, and lead. The Dollarhide has been contact-metamorphosed by the Cretaceous Idaho batholith. The carbonaceous matter occurs as graphite. However, the possibility exists that unmetamorphosed Dollarhide with petroleum source rock potential occurs outside the Smoky Mountains. It is also possible that other allochthons within the Black Shale belt, if unmetamorphosed, could have petroleum source rock material. Near Willow Creek, SW 1/4 Buttercup Mountain Quadrangle, Blaine and Camas Counties, Idaho, the Dollarhide is 2100 m thick and was deposited in a submarine slope environment. Sandy graded beds with convolute bedding, cross-bedding, synsedimentary folds, and load casts are evidence of turbidite and debris flow deposition. Interbedded laminated and massive siltites, which are more abundant upward, represent pelagic deposition between times of turbidite activity. Stratigraphic marker horizons with anomalously high amounts of carbonaceous material and trace metals represent more euxinic conditions in the basin. These markers serve as valuable correlation lines in the dominantly unfossiliferous strata.

Geslin, J.K.; Link, P.K.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ORNL/TM-2007/183 Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORNL/TM-2007/183 Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production for Lignocellulosic Ethanol August of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

Pennycook, Steve

58

Potential of Using Poultry Litter as a Feedstock for Energy Production Rangika Perera, Graduate Research Assistant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Using Poultry Litter as a Feedstock for Energy Production Rangika Perera, Graduate................................................................................................... 9 5. Environmental and Social Issues of Energy Production using Poultry Litter ....................................... 10 5.1 Issues on the anaerobic digestion of poultry litter for energy production

59

Wood production potential in poplar plantations in Sweden  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shortage of oil, large variations in exports from Russia of wood to Europe, plenty of abandoned agriculture land, new ideas about a more intensive silviculture; these circumstances are driving forces in Sweden for planting fast-growing poplar and hybrid aspen clones on suitable land. The advantage of such trees is that the wood can be used for both energy (heat, biofuels, electricity), paper and for construction. Poplar clones bred in the USA and Belgium, and older hybrid aspen clones from Sweden, together with new poplar clones collected and selected for Swedish conditions from British Columbia, Canada, were planted during the 1990s in south and central Sweden. The stem diameters and heights of the trees have been measured during the last 10 years and the woody biomass production above ground has been calculated. MAI for all the plantations is 10–31 m3 or 3–10 ton DM per hectare with the highest annual woody production of 45 m3 or 15 ton DM per hectare in some years in a very dense plantation in the most southern part of Sweden. All the plantations have been fenced for at least the first ten years. The damage has been caused by stem canker, insects, leaf rust and by moose after removal of the fences. The possibilities for the use of poplar plantations as energy forest and vegetation filters are discussed.

Lars Christersson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Coke deposits formation and products selectivities for the MTG process in a fluidized bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out in a demonstrative scale fluidized bed reactor for methanol conversion to gasoline (MTG). We investigated the kinetics of the coke deposits formation and their influence on the products selectivities. New reaction indexes were advanced for on line monitoring of the catalyst activity.

Grigore Pop; Gavril Musca; Eleonora Chirila; Rodica Boeru; Gheorghe Niculae; Natalia Natu; Gheorghe Ignatescu; Sorin Straja

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands bioenergy crops grown on marginal lands in the United States. Two broadly tested cellulosic crops June 2014 Introduction Bioenergy, an important renewable energy produced from biological materials

Zhuang, Qianlai

62

Ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria: metabolic control of end product formation in Thermoanaerobium brockii.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects of exogenous hydrogen on glucose fermentation...direct consequence of hydrogen consumption by the methanogen...phosphoroclastic activity of cell extracts in that H2...presence of exogenous hydrogen was associated with inhibition...bacteria for chemical and fuel production neces- sitates...

A Ben-Bassat; R Lamed; J G Zeikus

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Supporting Information for: A Global Comparison of National Biodiesel Production Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and climate change United States Soybean, Algae Yes No 6 Schöpe 2002 Grey study Biodiesel from rapeseedSupporting Information for: A Global Comparison of National Biodiesel Production Potentials Matt Biodiesel Potential · Table S.2: Variables Used in Calculating Biodiesel Volumes and Prices · Figure S.3: U

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

65

Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population in vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrolysed palladium has the potential to increase methane production by a mixed rumen population the proportion of protozoa with attached methanogens decreased, however no estimate of CH4 production under were re-filled with H2:CO2, sealed with butyl rubber stoppers and incubated at 39�C with shaking

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

SciTech Connect

Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral agency, EIA’s standard analysis of the potential of the Alaska North Slope (ANS) has focused on the areas without exploration and development restrictions. EIA received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report "with plausible scenarios for ANWR supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments." This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA’s 1987 ANWR assessment.

68

Abuse Liability Assessment of Tobacco Products Including Potential Reduced Exposure Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...are often less than complete. The Internet is also increasingly used in post-marketing...surveillance of drugs for potential abuse (176, 177). Although quantitative...abuse are not readily assessed by Internet monitoring, the Internet provides...

Lawrence P. Carter; Maxine L. Stitzer; Jack E. Henningfield; Rich J. O'Connor; K. Michael Cummings; and Dorothy K. Hatsukami

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. Northeast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Final Integrated Activity Plan / Environmental Impact Statement, (Anchorage , Alaska, August, 1998).

70

Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential for Hydrogen Production Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States A. Milbrandt and M. Mann Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41134 February 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States A. Milbrandt and M. Mann Prepared under Task No. H278.2100 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41134 February 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

71

Study sizes up Iraq`s reserves, exploration status, production potential  

SciTech Connect

Iraq has a volatile exploration and production history, but unlike more stable OAPEC countries it was National Oil Co. (INOC) rather than foreign oil companies that discovered most of the country`s proved oil reserves. Proved reserves are in Paleozoic, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary reservoirs charged by Silurian and Jurassic and/or Cretaceous source rocks. The pre-gulf war production capacity was 3.5 million b/d, but the country`s current damaged production capacity is about 2.5 million b/d. New discoveries have elevated Iraq`s proved reserves to 120 billion bbl of oil. The paper discusses exploration history, proven reserves, exploration plays, exploration potential, and production potential.

Ibrahim, M.W. [Target Exploration Consultants, London (United Kingdom)

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Simulation of production and injection performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a simple yet comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of injection and production performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations. The model predicts the pressure and temperature of the gas in the cavern and at the wellhead for an arbitrary sequence of production and injection cycles. The model incorporates nonideal gas properties, thermodynamic heat effects associated with gas expansion and compression in the cavern and tubing, heat exchange with the surrounding salt formation, and non-uniform initial temperatures but does not include rock-mechanical effects. The model is based on a mass and energy balance for the gas-filled cavern and on the Bernoulli equation and energy balance for flow in the wellbore. Cavern equations are solved iteratively at successive timesteps, and wellbore equations are solved within an iteration cycle of the cavern equations. Gas properties are calculated internally with generally accepted correlations and basic thermodynamic relations. Example calculations show that the initial temperature distribution has a strong effect on production performance of a typical gas storage cavern. The primary application of the model is in the design, planning, and operation of gas storage projects.

Hagoort, J. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluation of supply potential of energy crops in Japan considering cases of improvement of crop productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy crops are not presently major energy resources as energy crops are more expensive than fossil fuels at present. However, energy crops may become important energy resources in the future. In this study, the authors discuss the availability of energy crops in Japan. The supply potential of energy crops produced on unused arable land is estimated at 0.12 EJ yr?1 and that of secondary crops for bioenergy is estimated at 0.12 EJ yr?1 in Japan. However, it is difficult to utilize the supply potential considering the low food-self-sufficiency ratio and the high costs of crops in Japan. In addition, the authors analyze the supply potential of energy crops produced on surplus arable land in Japan in cases of biomass productivity increment. The supply potential of energy crops is formulated into 0.12A (EJ yr?1), where A means the index of productivity increment ( A = 1.0 at present). On the other hand, in the case of every crop productivity increment, the supply potential of energy crops is formulated into 1.44A–1.32 (EJ yr?1). When it is assumed that the ratio is 2.0, the supply potential in the latter case is 1.44 EJ yr?1, which is equivalent to about 7% of the total primary energy supply in Japan. When it is assumed that the ratio is 2.0 in the latter case in the world, the supply potential of energy crops is 435 EJ yr?1, which exceeds the total primary energy supply in the world. It is difficult to improve the productivity of every crop. However, if the improvement is realized, energy crops will become one of the major energy resources in Japan and in the world.

Hiromi Yamamoto; Yukihiko Matsumura; Shigeki Sawayama

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Potential formation in a collisionless plasma produced in an open magnetic field in presence of volume negative ion source  

SciTech Connect

The electric potential near a wall for a multi-species plasma with volume produced negative ions in presence of axially varying magnetic field is studied following an analytical-numerical approach. A constant negative ion source is assumed throughout the plasma volume, along with finite temperature positive ions and Boltzmann electrons. The particles are assumed to be guided by an open magnetic field that has its maximum at the centre, and field strength decreasing towards the walls. The one dimensional (1D) Poisson equation is derived using an analytical approach, and then solved numerically to study the potential profiles. Effect of (a) negative ion production rate, (b) magnetic field profile, and (c) negative ion temperature on the potential profile has been investigated. A potential peak appears near the wall when the negative ion temperature and density are sufficiently high. Also, the presence of negative ions further decreases the potential in the plasma region for a finite Debye Length (?{sub D})

Phukan, Ananya, E-mail: ananya.phukan26@gmail.com; Goswami, K. S.; Bhuyan, P. J. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research Sonapur, Kamrup (M), Assam 782402 (India)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Biomass Characterization of Buddleja davidii: A Potential Feedstock for Biofuel Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass Characterization of Buddleja davidii: A Potential Feedstock for Biofuel Production ... A compositional analysis was performed on Buddleja davidii to determine its general biomass characteristics and provide detailed analysis of the chemical structures of its cellulose and lignin using NMR. ... The biomass composition of B. davidii is 30% lignin, 35% cellulose, and 34% hemicellulose. ...

Bassem B. Hallac; Poulomi Sannigrahi; Yunqiao Pu; Michael Ray; Richard J. Murphy; Arthur J. Ragauskas

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

76

Potential and attainable food production and food security in different regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to the potential (YOA). (prices) or the physical environment...d) Closing yield gaps De Wit (1979) observed that once...non-food crops could fetch high prices, such as pharmaceutical products...Kluwer Academic Publishers. de Wit, C. T. 1979 Physiological...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from Sugar Wheat straw Variation Cultivar a b s t r a c t Optimizing cellulosic ethanol yield depends Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Decreasing the cost of producing cellulosic ethanol

California at Riverside, University of

78

Potential Role of Chlorination Pathways in PCDD/F Formation in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carolina 27711 The role of chlorination reactions in the formation of polychlorinateddibenzo-p-dioxins formed by chlorination of dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD) and dibenzofuran (DF). Agreement between predicted byproducts, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), naphthalenes (PCNs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs

Mulholland, James A.

79

Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida S12, a Potential Platform Strain for Industrial Production of Valuable Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...S12, a Potential Platform Strain for Industrial...Production of Valuable Chemicals Fei Tao a Yaling...is considered a platform strain for the production of many chemicals. Here, we present...S12, a potential platform strain for industrial...production of valuable chemicals. | Pseudomonas...

Fei Tao; Yaling Shen; Ziqi Fan; Hongzhi Tang; Ping Xu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Estimating Hydrogen Production Potential in Biorefineries Using Microbial Electrolysis Cell Technology  

SciTech Connect

Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are devices that use a hybrid biocatalysis-electrolysis process for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Future biofuel and bioproducts industries are expected to generate significant volumes of waste streams containing easily degradable organic matter. The emerging MEC technology has potential to derive added- value from these waste streams via production of hydrogen. Biorefinery process streams, particularly the stillage or distillation bottoms contain underutilized sugars as well as fermentation and pretreatment byproducts. In a lignocellulosic biorefinery designed for producing 70 million gallons of ethanol per year, up to 7200 m3/hr of hydrogen can be generated. The hydrogen can either be used as an energy source or a chemical reagent for upgrading and other reactions. The energy content of the hydrogen generated is sufficient to meet 57% of the distillation energy needs. We also report on the potential for hydrogen production in existing corn mills and sugar-based biorefineries. Removal of the organics from stillage has potential to facilitate water recycle. Pretreatment and fermentation byproducts generated in lignocellulosic biorefinery processes can accumulate to highly inhibitory levels in the process streams, if water is recycled. The byproducts of concern including sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furans and phenolics can also be converted to hydrogen in MECs. We evaluate hydrogen production from various inhibitory byproducts generated during pretreatment of various types of biomass. Finally, the research needs for development of the MEC technology and aspects particularly relevant to the biorefineries are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information Administration MBbls: thousand barrels MMBbls: million barrels NPR-A: National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Petroleum Play: A set of known or postulated petroleum accumulations sharing similar geologic, geographic, and temporal properties such as source rock, migration, pathway, timing, trapping mechanism, and hydrocarbon type

82

Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Published abstract: Calcium formate is a water-soluble salt of an essential mineral nutrient with potential for use as a dietary calcium supplement. Formate ion is a product of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism, but ...

Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, S. C.; Eells, J. T.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Financial potential of rubber plantations considering rubberwood production: Wood and crop production nexus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globalization and urbanization have significantly increased the food and non-food commodity demand for the last century, and it is vital to consider a business strategy with economical and ecological sustainability. The objective of this study was to project the contribution of wood to the financial performance of rubber plantations. We adopted cost and revenue data of rubber plantations in Cambodia and utilized land expectation value (LEV) as the criterion for profitability analysis. Among the top-ten rubber-producing countries in pan-tropics, the areas of rubber plantation were equivalent to from 1% to 90% of forest plantations and 0.3%–10.2% of total forest areas. Rubberwood revenue accounts for about 4%–10% of the 30th year LEV in rubber plantations at discount rates of 2% y?1–10% y?1, and this was sufficient to cover the cost of re-establishing the plantations. The proportion of the 30th year LEV contributed by wood revenue increased under conditions normally associated with a more difficult business environment, i.e., at higher wage costs, and lower latex revenue. We found that the wood revenue can improve the profitability of rubber plantations by up to 40% depending on the price of the rubberwood. We assert that timber from wood producing commodity plantations should be encouragingly utilized as industrial timber by linking the wood production in the management strategy of the plantations.

Akira Shigematsu; Nobuya Mizoue; Khun Kakada; Pheng Muthavy; Tsuyoshi Kajisa; Shigejiro Yoshida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mechanisms for formation of organic and inorganic by-products and their control in nonthermal plasma chemical processing of VOCs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the major by-products derived from Nonthermal Plasma (NTP) chemical processing of different types of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), mechanisms for their formation, effects of reactor types and additives such as water and gaseous oxygen on by-product distribution, and safe operations of NTP reactors for the removal of VOCs.

Shigeru Futamura; Masami Sugasawa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Transverse energy dependence of dilepton production in nuclear collisions as a signature of quark-gluon plasma formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of dilepton production on total transverse energy in nuclear collisions is proposed as a signature of quark- gluon plasma formation. In particular the ratio of dilepton production in central (large transverse energy) to that in peripheral (low transverse energy) gives information about the presence of hydrodynamical space-time evolution of the quark-gluon plasma or of a mixed phase.

J. Masarik; N. Pišútová; J. Pišút

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to develop plausible scenarios for Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessments. This report contains EIA projections of future daily production rates using recent USGS resource estimates. The Coastal Plain study area includes 1.5 million acres in the ANWR 1002 Area, 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands and State of Alaska offshore lands out to the 3-mile limit which are expected to be explored and developed if and when ANWR is developed. (Figure ES1) About 26 percent of the technically recoverable oil resources are in the Native and State lands.

87

Potential Game Theoretic Attitude Coordination on the Circle: Synchronization and Balanced Circular Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: "synchronization" and "balanced circular for- mation". We first show that both problems constitute potential games Technological innovations produce cheap and low power smart sensors, wireless communication devices and embed to spatially distributed control systems. For example, [6] uses a mobile sensor network for ocean sampling

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding by-product formation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

78 By-Products Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization ECONOMICAL SELF-CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE FOR THE WISCONSIN... production using by-product materials to...

89

Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reductions in Northeast Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets December 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy

90

GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61446 61446 GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN OCEANIC SEDIMENTS George J. Moridis Earth Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 E. Dendy Sloan Center for Hydrate Research and Chemical Engineering Department Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 August 2006 This work was partly supported by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory, under the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Gas Production Potential of Disperse Low-Saturation Hydrate Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and E. Dendy Sloan 2 1 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1166

91

SR/O&G/2000-02 Potential Oil Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0-02 0-02 Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment May 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U. S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment ii Energy Information Administration

92

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development of the 1002 Area is up to Congress and has not been approved to date. Also included in the Coastal Plain are State lands to the 3-mile offshore limit and Native Inupiat land near the village of Kaktovik. The USGS estimated: a 95 percent probability that at least 5.7 billion barrels of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain,

93

Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission reduction potentials in sugar production processes in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sugarcane is one of the most promising sources of green energy for a major sugar producing country like Thailand. Any efforts to improve energy efficiency in sugar industry would result for green energy production and more avoided GHG emissions. This paper assesses the potentials for energy saving and GHG emission reduction in sugar production in Thailand. It is found that there is a wide gap between the most efficient mills and the less efficient ones among the country’s 47 mills, with specific steam consumption ranging from 400 to 646 kg steam/ton cane. Thus significant potential exists for energy saving and GHG emission reduction in many mills, using some of the 17 commonly common technologies/measures identified. For the nine mills studied, which could have resulted in a combined saving savings of 23–32% of the total mill energy consumption, further savings of 5–14% could be achieved.

Sumate Sathitbun-anan; Bundit Fungtammasan; Mirko Barz; Boonrod Sajjakulnukit; Suthum Pathumsawad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products  

SciTech Connect

The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Global Potential for Biomethane Production with Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage up to 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass in combination with carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of few options that make a reduction of global CO2 concentration in the atmosphere possible. This option is likely to be required to meet climate targets. This study shows the global potential for combining bio-energy conversion with CCS (BE-CCS) up to 2050. The assessment focuses on two BE-CCS routes for the production of biomethane, based on gasification and anaerobic digestion. Routes for the production of power and liquid fuels have been addressed in an earlier study by IEAGHG. For the two routes the technical and economic potential was analysed. The results show that deployment of the global technical potential can result in negative greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) up to 3.5 Gt CO2-eq. on an annual basis in 2050. Including avoided emissions by replacing natural gas, the annual greenhouse gas emission savings could add up to almost 8 Gt of CO2-eq in 2050. The economic potential reaches up to 0.8 Gt of negative GHG emissions when assuming a CO2 price of 50 €/tonne.

Joris Koornneef; Pieter van Breevoort; Paul Noothout; Chris Hendriks; uchien Luning; Ameena Camps

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Enzymatic biodiesel production: An overview of potential feedstocks and process development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increased global demand for biofuels has prompted the search for alternatives to edible oils for biodiesel production. Given the abundance and cost, waste and nonedible oils have been investigated as potential feedstocks. A recent research interest is the conversion of such feedstocks into biodiesel via enzymatic processes, which have considerable advantages over conventional alkali-catalyzed processes. To expand the viability of enzymatic biodiesel production, considerable effort has been directed toward process development in terms of biodiesel productivity, application to wide ranges of contents of water and fatty acids, adding value to glycerol byproducts, and bioreactor design. A cost evaluation suggested that, with the current enzyme prices, the cost of catalysts alone is not competitive against that of alkalis. However, it can also be expected that further process optimization will lead to a reduced cost in enzyme preparation as well as in downstream processes.

Shinji Hama; Akihiko Kondo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

THE GALACTIC CENTER CLOUD G0.253+0.016: A MASSIVE DENSE CLOUD WITH LOW STAR FORMATION POTENTIAL  

SciTech Connect

We present the first interferometric molecular line and dust emission maps for the Galactic Center (GC) cloud G0.253+0.016, observed using CARMA and the SMA. This cloud is very dense, and concentrates a mass exceeding the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) into a radius of only 3 pc, but it is essentially starless. G0.253+0.016 therefore violates ''star formation laws'' presently used to explain trends in galactic and extragalactic star formation by a factor {approx}45. Our observations show a lack of dense cores of significant mass and density, thus explaining the low star formation activity. Instead, cores with low densities and line widths {approx}< 1 km s{sup -1}-probably the narrowest lines reported for the GC region to date-are found. Evolution over several 10{sup 5} yr is needed before more massive cores, and possibly an Arches-like stellar cluster, could form. Given the disruptive dynamics of the GC region, and the potentially unbound nature of G0.253+0.016, it is not clear that this evolution will happen.

Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zhang Qizhou, E-mail: jens.kauffmann@astro.caltech.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Depositional systems and petroleum potential, Mesaverde Formation southeastern Wind River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Depositional environments and systems of the Wind River basin Mesaverde Formation were interpreted from an analysis of outcrops along the Casper arch and Rattlesnake Hills anticline and cores and wireline logs from the adjacent subsurface. The Fales Sandstone and Parkman Sandstone/unnamed middle member are deposits of eastward progradational, wave-dominated strand-plain and deltaic complexes. Basal portions of the Fales Sandstone and the Parkman Sandstone are composed of a thickening- and coarsening-upward sandstone sequence whose facies represent storm-dominated inner-shelf and wave-dominated shore-zone environments. Facies sequences in the upper Fales Sandstone interval and the unnamed middle member are interpreted as deposits of lower coastal plain (marshes, bay fills, distributary channels, and crevasse splays) and upper coastal plain (alluvial channels, crevasse splays and fine-grained flood basin) sequences. The Teapot Sandstone is interpreted as an alluvial deposit. Analysis of facies sequences in the Teapot suggests a change in fluvial style, from braided-belt deposits along the southwest flank to meander-belt deposits along the northeast flank of the basin. These fluvial systems fed the Teapot deltas to the east. Stratigraphic plays for oil and gas include alluvial valley fills and point-bar deposits in the Teapot Sandstone, storm-dominated shelf sands in the upper Cody Shale and the Fales and Parkman Sandstones, and a transgressive barrier-bar sequence in the upper Fales Sandstone. Laterally continuous shore-zone sandstones may form combination traps where pinch-outs occur on structure.

Hippe, D.J.; Needham, D.W.; Ethridge, F.G.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

3D slicing of radiogenic heat production in Bahariya Formation, Tut oil field, North-Western Desert, Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 3D block of radiogenic heat production was constructed from the subsurface total gamma ray logs of Bahariya Formation, Western Desert, Egypt. The studied rocks possess a range of radiogenic heat production varying from 0.21 ?Wm?3 to 2.2 ?Wm?3. Sandstone rocks of Bahariya Formation have higher radiogenic heat production than the average for crustal sedimentary rocks. The high values of density log of Bahariya Formation indicate the presence of iron oxides which contribute the uranium radioactive ores that increase the radiogenic heat production of these rocks. The average radiogenic heat production produced from the study area is calculated as 6.3 kW. The histogram and cumulative frequency analyses illustrate that the range from 0.8 to 1.2 ?Wm?3 is about 45.3% of radiogenic heat production values. The 3D slicing of the reservoir shows that the southeastern and northeastern parts of the study area have higher radiogenic heat production than other parts.

I.M. Al-Alfy; M.A. Nabih

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

SciTech Connect

As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

102

A density-functional theory investigation of cluster formation in an effective-potential model of dendrimers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a system of particles interacting via a purely repulsive, soft-core potential recently introduced to model effective pair interactions between dendrimers, which is expected to lead to the formation of crystals with multiple occupancy of the lattice sites. The phase diagram is investigated by density-functional theory (DFT) without making any a priori assumption on the functional form of the density profile or on the type of crystal lattice. As the average density $\\rho$ is increased, the system displays first a transition from a fluid to a bcc phase, and subsequently to hcp and fcc phases. In the inhomogeneous region, the behavior is that found in previous investigations of this class of cluster-forming potentials. Specifically, the particles arrange into clusters strongly localized at the lattice sites, and the lattice constant depends very weakly on $\\rho$, leading to an occupancy number of the sites which is a nearly linear function of $\\rho$. These results are compared to those predicted by the more widespread approach, in which the DFT minimization is carried out by representing the density profile by a given functional form depending on few variational parameters. We find that for the model potential studied here, the latter approach recovers most of the predictions of the unconstrained minimization.

Davide Pini

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cultivar Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw J. Lindedam a, *, S.B. Andersen b , J. DeMartini c , S. Bruun b , H. Jørgensen a , C. Felby a , J. Magid b , B. Yang d , C.E. Wyman c a Forestry and Wood Products, Forest & Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark b Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark c Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, USA d Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University, 2710 University Drive, Richland, WA 99354, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history:

104

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries … Past Changes and Future Potential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Potential U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Department of Energy Office of Policy and International Affairs October 2010 Summary World consumption growth for middle distillate fuels (diesel fuel, heating oil, kerosene, and jet fuel) has exceeded the consumption growth for gasoline for some time, and the United States is no exception. Although the decrease in the ratio of total gasoline consumption to consumption for middle distillate fuels has been small in the United States, recent legislation requiring increased use of renewable fuels has resulted in forecasts that project a decline in consumption for petroleum-based gasoline from refineries, which would accelerate the decline in the

105

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS. Information from recent offset drilling, offsetting discoveries, and new geologic and geophysical data were used to update the oil and gas resource potential. An evaluation was made of each of 10 petroleum plays (similar geologic settings). For each play, USGS constructed statistical distributions of the number and size of potential accumulations based on a probabilistic range of geologic attributes. Minimum accumulation size was 500 million barrels. The resulting distributions were subjected to three risk parameters. Risk was assigned for the occurrence of adequate generation and migration of petroleum to meet the minimum size requirements, for the occurrence of reservoir rock to contain the minimum volume, and for the occurrence of a trapping mechanism to seal the petroleum in the reservoir. USGS analysts applied an appropriate recovery factor to the estimated oil in place that was calculated for each play to obtain an estimate of technically recoverable petroleum resources. The combined recovery factor for the entire study area averages approximately 37 percent of the initial oil in place. It is likely that the actual recovery factor of potential large fields would exceed 37 percent, because the nearby giant Prudhoe Bay field recovery factor will exceed 50 percent.

106

Product Volatilization as a Probe of the Physics and Chemistry of Latent Image Formation in Chemically Amplified Resists,  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Product Volatilization as a Probe of the Physics and Chemistry of Latent Image Formation in Chemically Amplified Resists†,‡ ... The products pass through an all-glass line that uses a high-flow gas stream to extract a small fraction of the product gases through a capillary for analysis. ... Because the rates of each of the sequential steps leading to thickness lossdeprotection, volatilization, and densificationcan be no slower than the overall observed rate of densification, the data in Table 3 provide a lower limit for the rates of volatilization and film densification at 100 °C. ...

W. D. Hinsberg; F. A. Houle; G. M. Poliskie; D. Pearson; M. I. Sanchez; H. Ito

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

108

CO{sub 2} reduction potential in power production and its cost efficiency  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} reduction potential and the economy of it in power production are handled in this presentation. The main focus is on combined heat and power production, CHP. The reference case has been the conventional coal fired condensing power plant and district heating with heavy fuel oil. Various CHP concepts are handled as substitutive technology for the reference case. Considered fuels are coal and biomass. CO{sub 2} produced in biomass firing processes is not regarded to increase the net CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere. Reference case can be substituted by a more efficient coal-fired power plant, so called USC plant or by natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant. Both changes lead to very limited reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions. On the other hand the shifting is profitable. CO{sub 2} reduction potential differs in various CHP concepts according to the fuel used. With biomass the reduction is 100% and in the smallest considered coal-fired industrial power plant it is only 6%. Looking at CO{sub 2} reduction costs, ECU/t CO{sub 2}, the best alternative seems to be the changing to coal-fired CHP in industrial power plants. Due to different reduction potentials of different methods the reduction cost illustrates poorly the quality of the method. For example, in a case where the profitability is good but reduction potential is small the reduction cost is strongly negative and the case seems to be cost-effective. To avoid the previous effects the profitability of the changes has to be studied with and without CO{sub 2} emission fees. Biomass-CHP will be cost-effective compared to coal-CHP with the prices 2.5--5 ECU/t CO{sub 2} saved. The industrial CHP plant will be cost-effective despite of the fuel used and without CO{sub 2} emission fees. The district heating CHP plant will be cost-effective, if the plant size is large. The small district heating CHP plants are cost-effective, if the saved CO{sub 2} ton has a price.

Aijala, M.; Salokoski, P.; Alin, J.; Siikavirta, H.; Nykaenen, J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel for terrestrial carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production. For P. strobus, above- ground plant carbon harvest for biofuel would result in no net carbon sequestration as declines in soil carbon offset plant

Weiblen, George D

110

Nepheline Formation Potential in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) and Its Impact on Durability: Selecting Glasses for a Phase 2 Study  

SciTech Connect

The likelihood for the formation of nepheline in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glass systems and the potential impact of nepheline on the durability of these systems is part of the frit development efforts for SB4. The effect of crystallization on glass durability is complex and depends on several interrelated factors including the change in residual glass composition, the formation of internal stress or microcracks, and the preferential attack at the glass-crystal interface. Perhaps one of the most significant effects is the type and extent (or fraction) of crystallization and the change to the residual glass composition. A strong increase in glass dissolution (or decrease in durability) has been observed in previous studies in glasses that formed aluminum-containing crystals, such as NaAlSiO{sub 4} (nepheline) and LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and crystalline SiO{sub 2}. Although it is well known that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na{sup +}-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}). Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based frit to improve melt rate and a high Na{sub 2}O sludge due to settling problems, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems continues to be assessed. The most recent compositional projections from the Closure Business Unit (CBU) for SB4 may be framed around three decision areas: the sodium molarity of the sludge (at values of 1M Na and 1.6M Na), the SB3 heel that will be included in the batch (expressed in inches of SB3 sludge with values of 0, 40, and 127''), and the introduction of an ARP stream into the sludge (which is represented by six options: no ARP, ARPa, ARPe, ARPk, ARPm, and ARPv). Candidate frits are being identified for these options via a paper study approach with the intent of downselecting to a set of key frits whose operating windows (i.e., waste loading intervals that meet Product Composition Control System (PCCS) Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) criteria) are robust to and/or selectively optimal for these sludge options. The primary or key frits that appear attractive on paper (i.e., down selected via the paper study) will be transferred into SRNL's experimental studies supporting SB4; specifically, the melt-rate studies, chemical process cell flowsheet runs and, if needed, a glass variability study.

Peeler, D

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Potential of bioenergy production from industrial kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) based on Malaysian perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays, the energy requirement of increasing population is creating energy crisis, and it’s become a serious and alarming thread for sustainability of natural resources. Moreover, upcoming demand of energy requirement is growing faster in developing countries as compared to developed ones. Malaysia is one of the fastest growing, developing countries, which is experiencing drastic and regular growth in population and economy in the recent years. It is an urgent requirement for the government and policy makers to explore alternative energy sources to accomplish upcoming demands of a growing population in the form of energy sufficiency. Malaysia is blessed with tropical and sub-tropical climates, which are suitable for exploring the green agriculture and forest potential. Most of the available energy resources in the form of fossil fuels have already been explored, and it is expected that energy demand will grow continuously by two to three fold in the next decades. Biomass resource is abundant in Malaysia. This can be considered as an alternative source of renewable and sustainable energy, with a promising future to fulfil continuous and uninterrupted supply of energy. Agricultural biomass such as Industrial Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) has been successfully investigated as a great potential to be used as a renewable and sustainable feedstock for the production of bio-energy. Kenaf regarded as a traditional crop of Malaysia. Kenaf biomass would appear as a potential material for great sustainable energy (bioethanol, biohydrogen, bioenergy) supplier in the coming future. In this review, we have provided an insight of kenaf biomass, its morphology, structure, chemical compositions, storage and sowing, cultivation, harvesting, yield and different sustainable energy possible to get from it. We also discuss the feasibility of kenaf biomass as a sustainable energy source supplier in Malaysian prospective.

N. Saba; M. Jawaid; K.R. Hakeem; M.T. Paridah; A. Khalina; O.Y. Alothman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential Means to Control the Impact on DPF Performance and Engine Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Results illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash properties

113

The Formation of Highly Oxidized Multifunctional Products in the Ozonolysis of Cyclohexene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prompt formation of highly oxidized organic compounds in the ozonolysis of cyclohexene (C6H10) was investigated by means of laboratory experiments together with quantum chemical calculations. The experiments were performed in borosilicate glass flow ...

Matti P. Rissanen; Theo Kurtén; Mikko Sipilä; Joel A. Thornton; Juha Kangasluoma; Nina Sarnela; Heikki Junninen; Solvejg Jørgensen; Simon Schallhart; Maija K. Kajos; Risto Taipale; Monika Springer; Thomas F. Mentel; Taina Ruuskanen; Tuukka Petäjä; Douglas R. Worsnop; Henrik G. Kjaergaard; Mikael Ehn

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

114

Factors Affecting Carbohydrate Production and the Formation of Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) by Diatoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diatoms exude large amounts of exopolymers (EPS), which are predominantly composed of carbohydrates. EPS may coagulate into transparent exopolymer particles (TEP). Sticky TEP affects the formation of aggregates and marine snow, and consequently...

Chen, Jie

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation on Production from Shale Formations: Application to New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE 125893 Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation production. Economic analyses are performed to identify and rank the impact of the above parameters. (3) The lack of dense natural fractures does not eliminate the potential for an economic fracture

Mohaghegh, Shahab

116

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

key to unlocking low-cost cellulosic ethanol. 2(1):26-40.1995 19941216. Commercial ethanol production process.facility and commercial ethanol production process.

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LCC accounts for the electricity costs paid by the consumerProduct Additional Electricity Cost NPV Product Coststhe annual operating cost (electricity bill), and DR is the

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Formation of Chloroform and Other Chlorinated Byproducts by the Chlorination of Antibacterial Products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Triclosan is a widely used antibacterial agent found in many personal hygiene products. While it has been established that pure triclosan and free chlorine readily… (more)

Fiss, Edward Matthew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Optimizing the distribution network of perishable products to Small Format Stores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FoodCo is a leading foods company that has reputed brands and global operations with revenues in excess of USD 5Bn. Although FoodCo's sales to Small Format Stores (SFS) customers are a small part of the overall sales, it ...

Khandekar, Sachin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II  

SciTech Connect

Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

The relationship between technology-based and product-based knowledge and alliance formation in new firms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Firms are typically viewed as seeking alliances to achieve certain outcomes, advantages they perceive will result from these relationships. Our research investigates whether certain inputs, specifically knowledge, can explain differential alliance formation. Our empirical analysis of 67 new computer and telecommunications firms reveals that firms with more extensive technology-based and product-based knowledge are more likely to form alliances at a higher rate than those with less extensive knowledge. The implications for these findings are that alliances are more attractive to firms with a foundation of knowledge that can be leveraged, and firms with this knowledge have something of value to attract alliance partners.

Donna J. Kelley; Mark P. Rice; Lois S. Peters

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility of Potential Gulf of Mexico Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility of Potential Gulf their demand characteristics. Results in- dicate that opportunities for entry exist, especiallyfor products was packed in soy oil. The major sources for imported sar- dines are Norway, Peru, Portugal, Japan

124

Shades of green : spatial and temporal variability of potentials, costs and environmental impacts of bioenergy production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bioenergy is expected to play an important role in future energy supply. However, increased implementation of large scale bioenergy production could have significant adverse effects.… (more)

Hilst, F. van der

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Influence of prepulse plasma formation on neutron production from the laser-target interaction  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of an intense ultrashort pulse laser with a planar uniform target was studied with a two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell method to determine the acceleration of deuterons and production of neutrons. A Au-CD{sub 2} double-layer planar target with thickness of {approx}1 {mu}m and a preplasma of variable length was used to generate high-energy deuterons as a precursor for neutron production. The deuteron energy and angular distributions and the neutron production from D(d,n)-{sup 3}He nuclear fusion reactions were studied as a function of the preplasma scale length and target thickness. For very thin (submicron) targets the preplasma increases the neutron yield only marginally, but for realistic targets with thickness of a few microns the preplasma enhances the neutron yield by two orders of magnitude. Both the average deuteron energy and neutron yield peak at an optimum preplasma scale length L{sub p}{sup opt}{approx_equal}1/k{sub 0} (k{sub 0} laser wave vector), which is of the order of one inverse laser wave vector.

Davis, J.; Petrov, G. M. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energetic particle production, cavition formation, and nonlinear development at a plasma density maximum  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated several phenomena of importance to laser-plasma interactions. In our studies, these are modeled by microwave and rf-plasma interactions. Our focus has been on resonant absorption of intense electromagnetic radiation at the plasma critical layer. Electron plasma wave (EPW) growth and caviton formation have been shown to be most efficient for shallow density gradients at the critical layer, where EPW convection losses are minimized. EPW electric field energies of 5000 times the plasma thermal energy, and energetic electron tails out to 5000T{sub e}, have been observed at the top of an inverse parabolic density profile. Ions receive delta-function-like impulses from localized electron plasma waves and wave-breaking electron ejection; the disruption of the ion fluid can only partially be described by the ponderomotive force. Our attempt is to test and illuminate some of the fundamental concepts of strong turbulence and EM wave-plasma interaction. 7 refs.

Wong, A.Y.; Bauer, B.S. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wang, L.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Observation of a plateau electron distribution function due to electron cyclotron heating for an efficient plug potential formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A plateau-shaped electron distribution function is observed when an electrostatic electron-trapping potential is formed by the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in the plug region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. Also, a remarkable thermal isolation effect due to a kV-range thermal barrier is observed along with the difference between distribution functions in thermally separated regions. These new findings as well as the relation between ion-confining potentials and thermal-barrier potentials in the kV range consistently support the validity of Cohen’s strong ECH theory.

T. Cho; M. Hirata; K. Ogura; E. Takahashi; T. Kondoh; N. Yamaguchi; K. Masai; K. Hayashi; I. Katanuma; K. Ishii; T. Saito; Y. Kiwamoto; K. Yatsu; S. Miyoshi

1990-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

130

Regional Differences in Corn Ethanol Production: Profitability and Potential Water Demands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the use of a stochastic simulation model this project analyzes both the impacts of the expanding biofuels sector on water demand in selected regions of the United States and variations in the profitability of ethanol production due...

Higgins, Lindsey M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

The potential for increasing rubber production by matching tapping intensity to leaf area index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding resource capture can help design appropriate species combinations, planting designs and management. Leaf area index (LAI) and its longevity are the most important factors defining dry matter production

Ciro Abbud Righi; Marcos Silveira Bernardes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Biomass gasification: Influence of torrefaction on syngas production and tar formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper contains results of comparative gasification of standard wood biomass pellets, torrefied pellets and sawdust in a robust industrial fixed-bed gasifier. Parameters such as process stability, operating difficulties, gas parameters and tar content in syngas were analysed. The operating conditions were optimised to maximise production of liquid hydrocarbons, which can be both a problematic by-product and a valuable component. In order to collect the data concerning quantity and composition of the tars, the experimental set-up was equipped with a syngas cooler. The test runs conducted with sawdust and ordinary pellets did not cause any operational problems. The most complicated part of the experiment was maintaining process stability during gasification of torrefied pellets. The stabilisation effect of grinding of torrefied pellets and blending these pellets with wet sawdust were tested. It was concluded that effective and stable gasification of torrefied pellets in the tested type of fixed-bed gasifier is possible, but this type of fuel is much more suitable for co-gasification. The cleaned syngas from standard pellets had a relatively stable composition and calorific values in the range of 4.8–5.6 MJ/Nm3. Cold gas efficiencies of the process were in the range of 0.72–0.77 MJ/Nm3. Using torrefied pellets as a feedstock led to a higher calorific value of syngas, but the cold gas efficiency remained similar (0.75). For sawdust both the calorific value of syngas (LHV = 3.0 MJ/Nm3) and cold gas efficiency (0.57) were significantly lower than for pellets. The collected condensates contained a water fraction with dissolved organic compounds and thick viscous organic substances tar. It was observed that tar production from torrefied pellets is slower, characterised by lower yield, and technically more difficult in comparison to untreated biomass. The effectiveness of liquid hydrocarbon collection (tar to fuel ratio) varied between 0.0138 [kg tar/kg fuel] for torrefied pellets and 0.0213 [kg/kg] for sawdust. The main component of water fractions were organic acids. The content of organic acids in these fractions was as follows: 79.5% from South African pellets, 67% from Polish pellets, 64% from Polish sawdust and 59% from torrefied pellets respectively. The main organic species in tar from torrefied biomass remained acids, whereas in other cases tars were composed of alkylophenols, linear and cyclic aliphatic oxygenates and polyfunctional aromatic oxygenates.

Marek Dudy?ski; Johan C. van Dyk; Kamil Kwiatkowski; Marta Sosnowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Organic geochemistry of Mississippian shales (Bowland Shale Formation) in central Britain: Implications for depositional environment, source rock and gas shale potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Marine Carboniferous shales are proven hydrocarbon source rocks in central Britain. In this contribution the depositional environment and shale gas/liquid potential of the lower Namurian part of the Bowland Shale Formation is studied using 77 thermally immature samples from the Duffield borehole. The Bowland Shale Formation comprises mudstone and turibidite lithofacies reflecting a pronounced sea level controlled cyclicity. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the mudstones lithofacies (including marine bands) and of fine-grained rocks within the turibidite lithofacies varies between 1.3 and 9.1%. Hydrogen index (HI) values imply the presence of kerogen type III-II. According to biomarker ratios and bulk geochemical parameters, marine bands (maximum flooding surfaces, mfs) were deposited in deep water with slightly enhanced, normal, or slightly reduced salinity. Mudstones of the highstand systems tract (HST) were deposited in environments with normal to reduced salinity, whereas photic zone anoxia favoured the preservation of marine organic matter during deposition of the mfs and the HST. The supply of landplant debris increased during the HST. Turbidites and their non-calcareous mudstone equivalents represent lowstand systems tracts deposited in low salinity environments. Terrestrial organic matter dominates in turbiditic sediments, marine organisms prevail in time-equivalent mudstones. Mudstone beneath marine bands represents transgressive systems tracts when normal marine conditions and photic zone anoxia were re-established. The mudstone lithofacies exhibits a very good to excellent potential to generate conventional mixed oil and gas. TOC content of fine-grained rocks in the turbidite lithofacies depends on the amount of detrital minerals supplied from the south. Moreover, their organic matter is gas-prone. High TOC contents and large thicknesses of the mudstone lithofacies show that the Bowland Shale Formation holds a significant shale gas/liquid potential in areas with appropriate maturity. A relatively low average HI and high clay contents may have negative effects on the shale gas potential.

D. Gross; R.F. Sachsenhofer; A. Bechtel; L. Pytlak; B. Rupprecht; E. Wegerer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Production-ecological modelling explains the difference between potential soil N mineralisation and actual herbage N uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We studied two different grassland fertiliser management regimes on sand and peat soils: above-ground application of a combination of organic N-rich slurry manure and solid cattle manure (SCM) vs. slit-injected, mineral N-rich slurry manure, whether or not supplemented with chemical fertiliser (non-SCM). Measurements of field N mineralisation as estimated from herbage N uptake in unfertilised plots were compared with (i) potential N mineralisation as determined from a standard laboratory soil incubation, (ii) the contribution of groups of soil organisms to N mineralisation based on production-ecological model calculations, and (iii) N mineralisation calculated according to the Dutch fertilisation recommendation for grasslands. Density and biomass of soil biota (bacteria, fungi, enchytraeids, microarthropods and earthworms) as well as net plant N-uptake were higher in the SCM input grasslands compared to the non-SCM input grasslands. The currently used method in Dutch fertilisation recommendations underestimated actual soil N supply capacity by, on average, 102 kg N ha?1 (202 vs. 304 kg ha?1 = 34%). The summed production-ecological model estimate for N mineralisation by bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and enchytraeids was 87–120% of the measured potential soil N mineralisation. Adding the modelled N mineralisation by earthworms to potential soil N mineralisation explained 98–107% of the measured herbage N uptake from soil. For all grasslands and soil biota groups together, the model estimated 105% of the measured net herbage N uptake from soil. Soil biota production-ecological modelling is a powerful tool to understand and predict N uptake in grassland, reflecting the effects of previous manure management and soil type. The results show that combining production ecological modelling to predict N supply with existing soil N tests using aerobic incubation methods, can add to a scientifically based improvement of the N fertilisation recommendations for production grasslands.

Muhammad Imtiaz Rashid; Ron G.M. de Goede; Lijbert Brussaard; Jaap Bloem; Egbert A. Lantinga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Tritium production potential of beam research and magnetic fusion program technologies  

SciTech Connect

Regular replenishment of tritium in the nuclear weapons stockpile is essential to maintain our nuclear deterrent. Nuclear reactor facilities presently used for the production of tritium are aging, and their operation is being curtailed awaiting the repairs and upgrades needed to meet modern standards of safety and environment. To provide improved capability in the future, DOE plans to construct a new production reactor. Alternatives to nuclear reactor methods for the production of tritium, mainly electrically-driven accelerator or fusion systems, have been proposed many times in the past. Given the critical national security implications of maintaining adequate tritium production facilities, it is clearly worthwhile for political decision-makers to have a clear and accurate picture of the technical options that could be made available at various points in the future. The goal of this white paper is to summarize available technical information on a set of non-nuclear-reactor options for tritium production with a minimum of advocacy for any one system of implicit assumptions about politically desirable attributes. Indeed, these various options differ considerably in aspects such as the maturity of the technology, the development cost and timescales required, and the capital and operating costs of a typical ''optimized'' facility.

Lee, J.D. (comp.)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

SciTech Connect

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

138

Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cosmological production of H_2 before the formation of the first galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous calculations of the pregalactic chemistry have found that a small amount of H_2, x[H_2]=n[H_2]/n[H] = 2.6e-6, is produced catalytically through the H^-, H_2^+, and HeH^+ mechanisms. We revisit this standard calculation taking into account the effects of the nonthermal radiation background produced by cosmic hydrogen recombination, which is particularly effective at destroying H^- via photodetachment. We also take into consideration the non-equilibrium level populations of H_2^+, which occur since transitions among the rotational-vibrational levels are slow compared to photodissociation. The new calculation predicts a final H_2 abundance of x[H_2] = 6e-7 for the standard cosmology. This production is due almost entirely to the H^- mechanism, with ~1 per cent coming from HeH^+ and ~0.004 per cent from H_2^+. We evaluate the heating of the diffuse pregalactic gas from the chemical reactions that produce H_2 and from rotational transitions in H_2, and find them to be negligible.

Christopher M. Hirata; Nikhil Padmanabhan

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

Potential and attainable food production and food security in different regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fruits, and 4% from oil crops. We computed that...potential (YOA). (prices) or the physical environment...crops could fetch high prices, such as pharmaceutical...equal to 0.4 tonnes of oil equivalents (TOE...countries (or five TOE for heating, transport, and manufacturing...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Potential medical applications of the plasma focus in the radioisotope production for PET imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Devices other than the accelerators are desired to be investigated for generating high energy particles to induce nuclear reaction and positron emission tomography (PET) producing radioisotopes. The experimental data of plasma focus devices (PF) are studied and the activity scaling law for External Solid Target (EST) activation is established. Based on the scaling law and the techniques to enhance the radioisotopes production, the feasibility of generating the required activity for PET imaging is studied.

M.V. Roshan; S. Razaghi; F. Asghari; R.S. Rawat; S.V. Springham; P. Lee; S. Lee; T.L. Tan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Combining empirical and theory-based land-use modelling approaches to assess economic potential of biofuel production avoiding iLUC: Argentina as a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a land-use modelling framework is presented combining empirical and theory-based modelling approaches to determine economic potential of biofuel production avoiding indirect land-use changes (iLUC) resulting from land competition with other functions. The empirical approach explores future developments in food and feed production to determine land availability and technical potential of biofuel production. The theory-based approach assesses the economic performance of biofuel crops on the surplus land in comparison with other production systems and determines the economic potential of biofuel production. The framework is demonstrated for a case study in Argentina to determine the development of biofuel potential from soy and switchgrass up to 2030. Two scenarios were considered regarding future developments of productivity in agriculture and livestock production. It was found that under a scenario reflecting a continuation of current trends, no surplus land is expected to become available. Nevertheless, the potential for soybean biodiesel is expected to keep increasing up to 103 PJ in 2030, due to the existence of a developed agro-industrial sector jointly producing feed and biodiesel. In case large technological developments occur, 32 Mha could become available in 2030, which would allow for a technical potential of 472 PJ soybean biodiesel and 1445 PJ switchgrass bioethanol. According to the economic assessment, an economic potential of 368 PJ of soy biodiesel and 1.1 EJ switchgrass bioethanol could be attained, at a feedstock production cost of 100–155 US$/ton and 20–45 US$/ton, respectively. The region of southwest Buenos Aires and La Pampa provinces appeared to be particularly promising for switchgrass. The ability of jointly assessing future developments in land availability, technical and economic potential of biofuel production avoiding iLUC and spatial distribution of viable locations for growing biofuel crops means that the proposed framework is a step forward in assessing the potential for biofuel production that is both economically viable and sustainably produced.

V. Diogo; F. van der Hilst; J. van Eijck; J.A. Verstegen; J. Hilbert; S. Carballo; J. Volante; A. Faaij

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Potential use of geothermal energy sources for the production of lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lithium-ion battery is one of the most promising technologies for energy storage in many recent and emerging applications. However, the cost of lithium-ion batteries limits their penetration in the public market. Energy input is a significant cost driver for lithium batteries due to both the electrical and thermal energy required in the production process. The drying process requires 45–57% of the energy consumption of the production process according to a model presented in this paper. The model is used as a base for quantifying the energy and temperatures at each step, as replacing electric energy with thermal energy is considered. In Iceland, it is possible to use geothermal steam as a thermal resource in the drying process. The most feasible type of dryer and heating method for lithium batteries would be a tray dryer (batch) using a conduction heating method under vacuum operation. Replacing conventional heat sources with heat from geothermal steam in Iceland, we can lower the energy cost to 0.008USD/Ah from 0.13USD/Ah based on average European energy prices. The energy expenditure after 15 years operation could be close to 2% of total expenditure using this renewable resource, down from 12 to 15% in other European countries. According to our profitability model, the internal rate of return of this project will increase from 11% to 23% by replacing the energy source. The impact on carbon emissions amounts to 393.4–215.1 g/Ah lower releases of CO2 per year, which is only 2–5% of carbon emissions related to battery production using traditional energy sources.

Gudrun Saevarsdottir; Pai-chun Tao; Hlynur Stefansson; William Harvey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A methodology to assess open pond, phototrophic, algae production potential: A Hawaii case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Geographic information system (GIS) analysis was used to identify lands suitable for open pond production of phototrophic microalgae in the state of Hawaii where rainfall is less than 1.0 m y?1, solar insolation is at least 4.65 kWh m?2 d?1, slope is ?5%, zoning is non-residential, and contiguous area is at least 0.2 km2 (Base Case). Eight sensitivity analyses were performed that varied these criteria and considered an added criterion stipulating a maximum distance from power plants that could serve as CO2 sources. Results were overlaid with GIS layers for agricultural lands of importance to the State of Hawaii and land serviced by freshwater irrigation infrastructure. Base Case conditions were identified on 476 km2, 2.9% of State land area. 60% of Base Case lands are important agricultural lands and of these, half are serviced by irrigation infrastructure. Assumed algae oil productivity of 1.87 dm3 m?2 y?1 would yield 0.9 hm3 y?1, equivalent to 30% of the combined total consumption of distillate and jet fuel in the State in 2011.

Mele C. Bennett; Scott Q. Turn; Wai Ying Chan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of pion potential and nuclear symmetry energy on the $\\pi^{-}/\\pi^{+}$ ratio in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies around the pion production threshold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the framework of an isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck(IBUU) transport model, we studied the effects of the pion potential and the symmetry energy on the pion production in the central $^{197}Au+^{197}Au$ collisions around the pion production threshold. It is found that the pion potential affects the value of $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio around the Coulomb peak and also in the high energy region of pion mesons. The effect of the pion potential on the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio becomes large in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies below the pion production threshold. And at beam energies below the pion production threshold, with the pion potential, the effect of the symmetry energy on the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio becomes quite small compared with that above the pion production threshold.

Guo, Wen-Mei; Liu, Hang; Zuo, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Potential for future development of salt cavern storage in the upper Silurian Syracuse Formation of south-central New York  

SciTech Connect

Although depleted reservoirs remain the dominant structures used for storage fulfilling the demand for base load gas supply during the heating season, the current general surge in storage projects, nationwide, takes advantage of opportunities in Order 636, and makes greater use of salt caverns for gas storage. This reflects the increasing need by gas users, local distribution companies in particular, to quickly cycle a storage facility`s gas supply for services such as peak shaving, emergency supply, and system balancing to meet hourly swings. Occurrence of thick deposits of bedded salt deposits provides New York the capability to develop high deliverability salt cavern storage facilities. Furthermore, New York is uniquely positioned at the gateway to major northeastern markets to provide peak load storage services of natural gas supply. The thickest units of bedded salt in New York occur in the {open_quotes}F{close_quotes} horizon of the Upper Silurian Syracuse Formation. Three bedded salt cavern storage facilities have been recently proposed in New York. Two of these projects is much larger (with 5 Bcfg ultimate capacity), is under construction, and will provide valuable storage service to the Ellisburg-Leidy market center hub in Pennsylvania. Identification of possible sites for future salt cavern storage projects has been achieved chiefly by defining areas of thick beds of salt at sufficient depths close to gas transmission lines, with access to a freshwater supply for leaching, and possessing an acceptable method of brine disposal.

Bass, J.P.; Sarwar, G.; Guo, B. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ. of New York, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Coal-bed methane production in eastern Kansas: Its potential and restraints  

SciTech Connect

In 1921 and again in 1988, workers demonstrated that the high volatile A and B coals of the Pennsylvanian Cherokee Group can be produced economically from vertically drilled holes, and that some of these coals have a gas content as high as 200 ft{sup 3}/ton. Detailed subsurface mapping on a county-by-county basis using geophysical logs shows the Weir coal seam to be the thickest (up to 6 ft thick) and to exist in numerous amoeba-shaped pockets covering several thousand acres. Lateral pinch-out into deltaic sands offers a conventional gas source. New attention to geophysical logging shows most coals have a negative SP response, high resistivities, and densities of 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. Highly permeable coals cause lost circulation during drilling and thief zones during cementing, and they are the source of abundant unwanted salt water. Low-permeability coals can be recognized by their high fracture gradients, which are difficult to explain but are documented to exceed 2.2. Current successful completions use both limited-entry, small-volume nitrogen stimulations or an open hole below production casing. Subsurface coals are at normal Mid-Continent pressures and may be free of water. Initially, some wells flow naturally without pumping. Saltwater disposal is often helped by the need for water in nearby waterflood projects and the easy availability of state-approved saltwater disposal wells in Mississippi and Arbuckle carbonates. Recent attempts to recomplete coal zones in slim-hole completions are having mixed results. The major restraints to coal-bed methane production are restricted to low permeability of the coals and engineering problems, not to the availability or gas content of the coals.

Stoeckinger, B.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effects of oxyanions, natural organic matter, and bacterial cell numbers on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH) and the formation of secondary mineralization products.  

SciTech Connect

Microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides results in the production of Fe(II) and may lead to the subsequent formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products including magnetite, siderite, vivianite, chukanovite (ferrous hydroxy carbonate (FHC)), and green rust; however, the factors controlling the formation of specific Fe(II) phases are often not well-defined. This study examined effects of (i) a range of inorganic oxyanions (arsenate, borate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, and tungstate), (ii) natural organic matter (citrate, oxalate, microbial extracellular polymeric substances [EPS], and humic substances), and (iii) the type and number of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite and formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products. The bioreduction kinetics clustered into two distinct Fe(II) production profiles. 'Fast' Fe(II) production kinetics [19-24 mM Fe(II) d-1] were accompanied by formation of magnetite and FHC in the unamended control and in systems amended with borate, oxalate, gellan EPS, or Pony Lake fulvic acid or having 'low' cell numbers. Systems amended with arsenate, citrate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, tungstate, EPS from Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, or humic substances derived from terrestrial plant material or with 'high' cell numbers exhibited comparatively slow Fe(II) production kinetics [1.8-4.0 mM Fe(II) d-1] and the formation of green rust. The results are consistent with a conceptual model whereby competitive sorption of more strongly bound anions blocks access of bacterial cells and reduced electron-shuttling compounds to sites on the iron oxide surface, thereby limiting the rate of bioreduction.

O'Loughlin, E. J.; Gorski, C. A.; Scherer, M. M.; Boyanov, M. I.; Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Iowa

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Conducting oxide formation and mechanical endurance of potential solid-oxide fuel cell interconnects in coal syngas environment  

SciTech Connect

The oxidation properties of potential SOFCs materials Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230 exposed in coal syngas at 800 °C for 100 h were studied. The phases and surface morphology of the oxide scales were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The mechanical endurance and electrical resistance of the conducting oxides were characterized by indentation and electrical impedance, respectively. It was found that the syngas exposure caused the alloys to form porous oxide scales, which increased the electrical resistant and decreased the mechanical stability. As for short-term exposure in syngas, neither carbide nor metal dusting was found in the scales of all samples.

Liu, Kejia; Luo, Junhang; Johnson, Christopher; Liu, Xingbo; Lang, J.; Mao, S.X.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Production of potentially hazardous respirable silica airborne particulate from the burning of sugarcane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In some areas of the world where agricultural burning is practised, the airborne particles produced have been linked to respiratory disease in humans. Here, we investigate the abundance and form of silica (SiO2) minerals found within ash and aerosol produced by the experimental burning of sugarcane. Samples of sugarcane leaf were incinerated over a range of temperatures, time scales and airflow conditions, the latter to investigate the effects of wind and updrafts during natural fires. The silica content of the residual ash (from still air simulations) was measured using an improved wet chemical methodology, described here. This indicated that the release of silica from the plant material into the atmosphere increases with increasing temperature of combustion. Airborne particulate, sampled using air-pump-filter apparatus, was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with automated image and elemental analysis. For airborne particulate formed at 1100 °C (with airflow), 17% of the particles are in the respirable size fraction (release of cristobalite to the atmosphere (as sampled on filters). This pilot study shows that potentially toxic particles could be released during sugarcane burning and reinforces the need for further study into the emissions and re-suspension of ash from the burning of biomass.

Jennifer S. Le Blond; Ben J. Williamson; Claire J. Horwell; Alex K. Monro; Caroline A. Kirk; Clive Oppenheimer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis of the potential for enhanced oil recovery in the Shannon Formation at Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

Three EOR processes were evaluated for potential application in the Shannon reservoir at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, in the Teapot Dome Oilfield near Casper, Wyoming. This reservoir is estimated to have originally held 180 million barrels of oil, of which only 8 million barrels are recoverable by primary means. Simplified computer models were used to predict the performance of in-situ combustion, polymer flooding, and steam flooding. Economic analyses were done on the results of these predictions and sensitivity studies were performed for various physical and economic parameters. This report provides a foundation of information, offers a template for economic decisions, and makes preliminary recommendations based on performance predictions. Before field-wide application of any project is undertaken, a better characterization of the reservoir must be accomplished and pilot projects evaluated. However, this analysis suggest that the most favorable application in the Shannon Sandstone is polymer flooding operated on 2.5-acre spacing. This technique is predicted to give a net present value of $5.43 million per 10-acre unit with a present value ration of 9.4 for its four year economic life.

Chappelle, H.H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of the Potential Environmental Impacts from Large-Scale Use and Production of Hydrogen in Energy and Transportation Applications  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ab Initio/RRKM Study of the Potential Energy Surface of Triplet Ethylene and Product Branching Ratios of the C(3P) + CH4 Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ab Initio/RRKM Study of the Potential Energy Surface of Triplet Ethylene and Product Branching originating from the collision energy (12.2 kcal/mol), the sole reaction products are C2H3 + H, where 90 potential energy surface for the C(3P) + CH4 reaction have been performed using the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p

Nguyen, Minh Tho

156

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline  

SciTech Connect

Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States. This project created a national database of ocean current energy resources to help advance awareness and market penetration in ocean current energy resource assessment. The database, consisting of joint velocity magnitude and direction probability histograms, was created from data created by seven years of numerical model simulations. The accuracy of the database was evaluated by ORNL?s independent validation effort documented in a separate report. Estimates of the total theoretical power resource contained in the ocean currents were calculated utilizing two separate approaches. Firstly, the theoretical energy balance in the Gulf Stream system was examined using the two-dimensional ocean circulation equations based on the assumptions of the Stommel model for subtropical gyres with the quasi-geostrophic balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis force, wind stress and friction driving the circulation. Parameters including water depth, natural dissipation rate and wind stress are calibrated in the model so that the model can reproduce reasonable flow properties including volume flux and energy flux. To represent flow dissipation due to turbines additional turbine drag coefficient is formulated and included in the model. Secondly, to determine the reasonableness of the total power estimates from the Stommel model and to help determine the size and capacity of arrays necessary to extract the maximum theoretical power, further estimates of the available power based on the distribution of the kinetic power density in the undisturbed flow was completed. This used estimates of the device spacing and scaling to sum up the total power that the devices would produce. The analysis has shown that considering extraction over a region comprised of the Florida Current portion of the Gulf Stream system, the average power dissipated ranges between 4-6 GW with a mean around 5.1 GW. This corresponds to an average of approximately 45 TWh/yr. However, if the extraction area comprises the entire portion of the Gulf Stream within 200 miles of the US coastline from Florida to North Carolina, the average power dissipated becomes 18.6 GW or 163 TWh/yr. A web based GIS interface, http://www.oceancurrentpower.gatech.edu/, was developed for dissemination of the data. The website includes GIS layers of monthly and yearly mean ocean current velocity and power density for ocean currents along the entire coastline of the United States, as well as joint and marginal probability histograms for current velocities at a horizontal resolution of 4-7 km with 10-25 bins over depth. Various tools are provided for viewing, identifying, filtering and downloading the data.

Haas, Kevin

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Spatially resolved physical conditions of molecular gas and potential star formation tracers in M83, revealed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory, our understanding about the photo-dissociation regions (PDR) has taken a step forward. In the bandwidth of the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) on board Herschel, ten CO rotational transitions, including J=4-3 to J=13-12, and three fine structure lines, including [CI] 609, [CI] 370, and [NII] 250 micron, are covered. In this paper, I present our findings from the FTS observations at the nuclear region of M83, based on the spatially resolved physical parameters derived from the CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) map and the comparisons with the dust properties and star-formation tracers. I will discuss (1) the potential of using [NII] 250 and [CI] 370 micron as star-formation tracers; (2) the reliability of tracing molecular gas with CO; (3) the excitation mechanisms of warm CO; (4) the possibility of studying stellar feedback by tracing the thermal pressure of molecular gas in the nuclear ...

Wu, Ronin; Galliano, Frédéric; Wilson, Christine D; Kamenetzky, Julia; Lee, Min-Young; Schirm, Maximilien; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Spinoglio, Luigi; Cormier, Diane; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip R; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Baes, Martin; Boselli, Alexandro; Bournaud, Frédéric; De Looze, Ilse; Hughes, Thomas M; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Rangwala, Naseem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency and thus reduce greenhouse gas emissions, however current market penetration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Combined heat and power has the potential to significantly increase energy production efficiency that California will not reach the targets for combined heat and power set for it by the Air Resources Board (ARB of combined heat and power into the new ARB Emissions Cap and Trade scheme. This potential failure would

Kammen, Daniel M.

160

Biochar production from waste rubber-wood-sawdust and its potential use in C sequestration: Chemical and physical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biochars have received increasing attention because of their potential environmental applications such as soil amending and atmospheric C sequestration. In this study, biochar was produced from waste rubber-wood-sawdust. The produced biochars were characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) gas porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Pyrolysis temperature was shown to have a strong influence on both thermal and chemical characteristic of biochar samples. The experimental data shows that the biochar samples can absorb around 5% water by mass (hydrophilic) at lower temperatures (650 °C), biochar samples were thermally stable and became hydrophobic due to the presence of aromatic compounds. Carbon content (over 85%) increased with increasing temperature, and showed an inverse effect to the elemental ratios of H/C and O/C. The very low H/C and O/C ratios obtained for the biochar indicated that carbon in this material is predominantly unsaturated. BET results showed that the sawdust derived biochars have surface areas between 10 and 200 m2 g?1 and FTIR indicated an aromatic functional group about 866 cm?1 in most of the samples. The rate of CO2 adsorption on sawdust derived biochar generally increased with increasing temperature from 450 to 650 °C but then decreased with increase in the production temperature. Derived biochar represents a potential alternative adsorbent for C sequestration.

Wan Azlina Wan Abdul Karim Ghani; Ayaz Mohd; Gabriel da Silva; Robert T. Bachmann; Yun H. Taufiq-Yap; Umer Rashid; Ala’a H. Al-Muhtaseb

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effects of in-medium cross sections and optical potential on thermal-source formation in p+{sup 197}Au reactions at 6.2-14.6 GeV/c  

SciTech Connect

Effects of in-medium cross sections and of optical potential on preequilibrium emission and on formation of a thermal source are investigated by comparing the results of transport simulations with experimental results from the p+{sup 197}Au reaction at 6.2-14.6 GeV/c. The employed transport model includes light-composite-particle production and allows for inclusion of in-medium particle-particle cross-section reduction and of momentum dependence in the particle optical potentials. Compared to the past, the model incorporates improved parametrizations of elementary high-energy processes. The simulations indicate that the majority of energy deposition occurs during the first 25 fm/c of a reaction. This is followed by a preequilibrium emission and readjustment of system density and momentum distribution toward an equilibrated system. Within different variants of calculations, the best agreement with data, on the d/p and t/p yield ratios and on the residue mass and charge numbers, is obtained at the time of about 65 fm/c from the start of a reaction, for simulations employing reduced in-medium cross sections and momentum-dependent optical potentials. By that time, the preequilibrium nucleon and cluster emission, as well as mean field readjustments, drive the system to a state of depleted average density, {rho}/{rho}{sub 0}{approx}1/4-1/3 for central collisions, and low-to-moderate excitation, i.e., the region of nuclear liquid-gas phase transition.

Turbide, S. [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Beaulieu, L.; Roy, R. [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Danielewicz, P.; Huang, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H. [Department of Physics and NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Hsi, W.-C.; Wang, G.; Lefort, T.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S. [Department of Chemistry and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Breuer, H. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D. [Department of Chemistry and Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [and others

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Mechanistic and kinetic evaluation of organic disinfection by-product and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) formation during the ozonation of drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozonation of drinking water results in the formation of low molecular weight (LMW) organic by-products. These compounds are easily utilisable by microorganisms and can result in biological instability of the water. In this study, we have combined a novel bioassay for assessment of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) with the detection of selected organic acids, aldehydes and ketones to study organic by-product formation during ozonation. We have investigated the kinetic evolution of LMW compounds as a function of ozone exposure. A substantial fraction of the organic compounds formed immediately upon exposure to ozone and organic acids comprised 60–80% of the newly formed AOC. Based on experiments performed with and without hydroxyl radical scavengers, we concluded that direct ozone reactions were mainly responsible for the formation of small organic compounds. It was also demonstrated that the laboratory-scale experiments are adequate models to describe the formation of LMW organic compounds during ozonation in full-scale treatment of surface water. Thus, the kinetic and mechanistic information gained during the laboratory-scale experiments can be utilised for upscaling to full-scale water treatment plants.

Frederik Hammes; Elisabeth Salhi; Oliver Köster; Hans-Peter Kaiser; Thomas Egli; Urs von Gunten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production is obtained from proved reserves but the determinants of the scale of production in the industry and country components of the world total are many and complex with some unique to the individual com...

D. C. Ion

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effects of momentum-dependent nuclear potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model, we study the effects due to the momentum dependence of isoscalar nuclear potential as well as that of symmetry potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions induced by neutron-rich nuclei. It is found that both observables are affected significantly by the momentum dependence of nuclear potential, leading to a reduction of their sensitivity to the stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy. However, the t/$^{3}$He ratio remains a sensitive probe of the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy.

Lie-Wen Chen; C. M. Ko; Bao-An Li

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

173

Molecular basis for defective secretion of the Z variant of human alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor: secretion of variants having altered potential for salt bridge formation between amino acids 290 and 342.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the 290-342 salt bridge, is the critical...S. Gov't, P.H.S. | R01 HL 37128-01...culture medium 72 h posttransfection...Potential for salt bridge formation between...transfected with the salt bridge-competent Z-type...was collected at 72 h posttransfection...

A A McCracken; K B Kruse; J L Brown

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Formation of chlorinated dioxins during production of bleached kraft pulp from sawmill chips contaminated with polychlorinated phenols  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, sawmills used polychlorinated phenol (polyCP) formulations to prevent sap-staining of undried lumber. Bleached kraft pulp mills that used chips from polyCP-treated lumber were found to have elevated levels of hexachlorinated dioxins (hexaCDD) in their pulps, effluents, and sludges. This report presents the results of an investigation to elucidate the mechanism of hexaCDD formation during kraft pulping of polyCP-contaminated sawmill chips. The major constituents of the polyCP formulations- tetraCP and pentaCP-play a negligible role in hexaCDD formation. Polychlorinated phenoxyphenol (polyCPP) contaminants in the polyCP formulations are the key contributing factors, with hexaCDD contamination occurring as a consequence of digester-mediated condensation of polyCPP (i.e., predioxin) contaminants.

Luthe, C.E.; Berry, R.M.; Voss, R.H. (Paprican, Pointe Claire, Quebec (Canada))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Dissociation as a New Route for Syngas Production: A Comparative Review and Potential of Plasma-Based Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Dissociation as a New Route for Syngas Production: A Comparative Review and Potential of Plasma-Based Technologies ... high alloy tubular reactor; furnace equipped with burners ... adiabatic refractory reactor; combustion chamber equipped with a burner and catalytic bed ...

Alexandre Lebouvier; Samuel A. Iwarere; Philippe d’Argenlieu; Deresh Ramjugernath; Laurent Fulcheri

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

176

In Vitro Metabolic Formation of Perfluoroalkyl Sulfonamides from Copolymer Surfactants of Pre- and Post-2002 Scotchgard Fabric Protector Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This result is consistent with reports of high concentrations of PFASs detected in the plasma of persons in households where Scotchgard products are heavily used. ... In a very recent study, exceptionally high concentrations of PFOS and PFHxS have been reported in the serum samples in persons in a household environment where Scotchgard carpet products were heavily used. ... (13, 35) There are also reports of liver concentrations of PFOS that are lower than FOSA concentrations including arctic beluga whales from Alaska,(36) and melon-headed whales from Japan. ...

Shaogang Chu; Robert J. Letcher

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Production  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

178

Exploring Business Strategy and Assessing the Potential for Sustainable Seafood Products in San Francisco Bay Area Seafood Restaurants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The environmental costs associated with seafood production are of major concern. Major capture fisheries have been so depleted that recovery is uncertain. Despite this, seafood… (more)

Brookhart, Ty

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

Zhou, Yaoqi

180

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost-effective) techniques to remotely detect hydrate deposits, and to monitor their changes in the course of gas production.production of gas from hydrates occurring in the Gulf of Mexico because, despite of the substantially increased complexity and cost

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.E. ; Lobell, D.B. Biomass energy: The scale of theS. Marginal Land-based Biomass Energy Production in China.crops none none none biomass energy none none none none none

Lewis, Sarah M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Comparison of energy potentials from combined ethanol and methane production using steam-pretreated corn stover impregnated with acetic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Acetic acid was investigated as a catalyst in steam pretreatment of corn stover. The purpose was to study ethanol production using either baker's yeast or a genetically modified pentose-fermenting version of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KE6-12. Biogas production was investigated as an alternative for utilization of xylose. The high levels of acetic acid was found to be toxic using KE6-12. Some pentose fermentation was achieved, but the ethanol end concentration was almost the same as using baker's yeast (28 g L?1 compared to 27 g L?1). Using xylose for biogas production resulted in a high total energy recovery. The highest total energy recovery in the products, i.e. ethanol, methane and solids, obtained was 88% compared with the energy in ingoing raw material. This result was achieved when the solids and the liquid was separated after pretreatment.

Pia-Maria Bondesson; Mats Galbe; Guido Zacchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The potential utilization of nuclear hydrogen for synthetic fuels production at a coal–to–liquid facility / Steven Chiuta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of synthetic fuels (synfuels) in coal–to–liquids (CTL) facilities has contributed to global warming due to the huge CO2 emissions of the process. This… (more)

Chiuta, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Regional Algal Biofuel Production Potential in the Coterminous United States as Affected by Resource Availability Trade-offs  

SciTech Connect

The warm sunny climate and unoccupied arid lands in the American southwest are favorable factors for algae cultivation. However, additional resources affect the overall viability of specific sites and regions. We investigated the tradeoffs between growth rate, water, and CO2 availability and costs for two strains: N. salina and Chlorella sp. We conducted site selection exercises (~88,000 US sites) to produce 21 billion gallons yr-1 (BGY) of renewable diesel (RD). Experimental trials from the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products (NAABB) team informed the growth model of our Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT). We simulated RD production by both lipid extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction. Sites were prioritized by the net value of biofuel minus water and flue gas costs. Water cost models for N. salina were based on seawater and high salinity groundwater and for Chlorella, fresh and brackish groundwater. CO2 costs were based on a flue gas delivery model. Selections constrained by production and water were concentrated along the Gulf of Mexico and southeast Atlantic coasts due to high growth rates and low water costs. Adding flue gas constraints increased the spatial distribution, but the majority of sites remained in the southeast. The 21 BGY target required ~3.8 million hectares of mainly forest (41.3%) and pasture (35.7%). Exclusion in favor of barren and scrub lands forced most production to the southwestern US, but with increased water consumption (5.7 times) and decreased economic efficiency (-38%).

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy  

SciTech Connect

Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

potential function derived from the original weak membrane energy function that promotes formation of discontinuities, through the variation of a control parameter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

131 potential function derived from the original weak membrane energy function that promotes function is approached rather than being approximated, the original intent of the objective function a sequence of objective functions that more closely approximate the original objective function

Duncan, James S.

187

Unusual behavior of propane as a co-guest during hydrate formation in silica sand: Potential application to seawater desalination and carbon dioxide capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We report an unusual behavior of hydrate formation in silica sand with gas mixtures containing propane as a co-guest. Based on morphology study we observed that propane as a co-guest has the ability to draw water dispersed in silica sand to the hydrate formation region and showed a tendency to result in drastic hydrate growth due to the migration of water molecules to the gas phase region. Hydrate nucleation occurred in the interstitial pore space between the silica sand particles and hydrate growth occurred in the gas phase above the silica sand bed and to sustain the hydrate growth, dispersed water was drawn towards the hydrate growth front. In addition, we elucidated the effect of sand bed height to maximize the growth rates utilizing this behavior that results in enhanced kinetics. We propose conceptual designs for utilizing this behavior of propane as a co-guest in sand for seawater desalination and an innovative approach to simultaneously capture carbon dioxide and desalinate seawater.

Ponnivalavan Babu; Rajnish Kumar; Praveen Linga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Influence of reservoir heterogeneity on gas resource potential for geologically based infill drilling, Brooks and I-92 reservoirs, Frio Formation, south Texas  

SciTech Connect

Gas resource potential for strategic infill drilling or recompletion in a reservoir can be calculated by subtracting gas volumes derived using the material balance (pressure decline) method from volumes derived using a volumetric method. This resource potential represents remaining gas that is not in communication with existing wells. Frio reservoirs in mature, nonassociated gas plays located downdip from the Vicksburg fault zone are characterized by multiple, vertically stacked sandstones. The Brooks reservoir, in La Gloria field, lies in a fluvial-dominated system that contains dip-elongate channel sandstone belts 1-2 mi wide. Within these belts are six or more vertically stacked channel-fill, point-bar and splay deposits. Depositional environments were interpreted from SP logs. Individual sandstones are separated vertically by thin mudstone layers and pinch out laterally into flood-plain deposits.

Jackson, M.L.W.; Ambrose, W.A. (Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Studies in the Respiratory and Carbohydrate Metabolism of Plant Tissues. I. Experimental Studies of the Formation of Carbon Dioxide, Lactic Acid and other Products in Potato Tubers Under Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Formation of Carbon Dioxide, Lactic Acid and other Products in Potato Tubers Under Anaerobic Conditions J. Barker A. F. El Saifi Using mature potatoes of low sugar content, held at 10 degrees C both in air and in nitrogen, the following metabolic changes...

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

192

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Quantum mechanical calculations on the potential energy surface for the formation of xenon dichloride and the nature of the (n5-cyclopentadienyl) dicarbonyliron-arene bond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy surface for the reaction Xe + Clz XeClz, and approximate molecular orbital calculations are used to explore the nature of the iron-arene bond in 1, 4-C6H4Fpz where Fp = (q5-C5H5)Fe(CO)z. Previous extended Hiickel calculations on the reaction Xe... molecule shows the reliability of our final method, multi-reference (seven) configuration-interaction calculation with the Davidson size- consistency correction. This method is then used to calculate the potential energy surface of XeC12 from which we...

Richardson, Nancy Arline

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Formate as an Auxiliary Substrate for Glucose-Limited Cultivation of Penicillium chrysogenum: Impact on Penicillin G Production and Biomass Yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4.5 mol1, the residual formate concentrations...25C in 3-liter turbine-stirred bioreactors...type A/E; Pall Life Sciences). The...and 6 mM H3PO4. Gas analysis. The exhaust...Analytical). Off-gas flow rates were determined...up to 200 mM, the residual formate concentrations...

Diana M. Harris; Zita A. van der Krogt; Walter M. van Gulik; Johannes P. van Dijken; Jack T. Pronk

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Data Formats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter provides a taxonomy of existing data formats for power power system analysis. These include most commonly used formats of free and proprietary software packages as well as the IEC common informati...

Federico Milano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Potential for travertine formation: Fossil Creek, Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to changes in stream discharge caused by diversion for hydroelectric power generation. During dams currently occur predominantly below the Irving hydroelectric powerplant with partial return

199

Effects of UV-dechloramination of swimming pool water on the formation of disinfection by-products: A lab-scale study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Effects of UV-dechloramination of swimming pool water on the formation of disinfection by process for reducing the concentration of chloramines in public swimming pool water. As the effects hypochlorite are the most common chemicals used for the disinfection of swimming pool water. According

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

Utility Formation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

amounts See detailed discussion of these standards. For more information regarding tribal utility formation, contact the Power Service Line Account Executives: Eastern Power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hierarchical galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as the cooling of gas in haloes, the formation...effects on interstellar gas of energy released by young stars, the production of heavy elements, the...dynamics of the cooling gas are calculated in full...relatively small computational cost. The major disadvantage......

Shaun Cole; Cedric G. Lacey; Carlton M. Baugh; Carlos S. Frenk

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg… (more)

Garnetti, David J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy Resource Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Potential Resource Potential of Methane Hydrate Energy Resource Potential An introduction to the science and energy potential of a unique resource Disclaimer Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

204

Marine Diatom, Navicula sp. Strain JPCC DA0580 and Marine Green Alga, Chlorella sp. Strain NKG400014 as Potential Sources for Biodiesel Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine diatom, strain JPCC DA0580, and marine green microalga strain NKG400014 were selected as high neutral lipid-producers from marine microalgal culture collection toward biodiesel production. These strains...

Mitsufumi Matsumoto; Hiroshi Sugiyama…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Social trends of the people of the region of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace-Greece: about the potential of using biofuels from forest products residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the framework of enquiry of biomass usage possibilities in our country, a research was made through the whole Eastern Macedonia region, related to disposal possibilities from the production conveyors and usage...

Antonios N. Papadopoulos; Anthi Gkaraveli; Theodora Merou

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Potential Role of a Novel Psychrotolerant Member of the Family Geobacteraceae, Geopsychrobacter electrodiphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., in Electricity Production by a Marine Sediment Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Family Geobacteraceae, Geopsychrobacter electrodiphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., in Electricity Production by a Marine Sediment Fuel Cell Dawn E. Holmes Julie S. Nicoll Daniel R. Bond Derek R. Lovley Department of Microbiology, University of...

Dawn E. Holmes; Julie S. Nicoll; Daniel R. Bond; Derek R. Lovley

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

From coal to wood thermoelectric energy production: a review and discussion of potential socio-economic impacts with implications for Northwestern Ontario, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The province of Ontario in Canada is the first North American jurisdiction with legislation in place to eliminate coal-fired thermoelectric production by the end of 2014. Ontario Power Generation (OPG) operates coal

Jason Ernest Elvin Dampier; Chander Shahi…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Potential Role of a Novel Psychrotolerant Member of the Family Geobacteraceae, Geopsychrobacter electrodiphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., in Electricity Production by a Marine Sediment Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Electricity Production by a Marine Sediment Fuel Cell Dawn E. Holmes Julie...from the anode surface of a marine sediment fuel cell were enriched and isolated...METHODS Source of organisms. A marine sediment fuel cell was constructed in the...

Dawn E. Holmes; Julie S. Nicoll; Daniel R. Bond; Derek R. Lovley

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Environmental Impact Evaluation of Conventional Fossil Fuel Production (Oil and Natural Gas) and Enhanced Resource Recovery with Potential CO2 Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first set of results presented were the inventory of air emissions (CO, CO2, CH4, SOx, NOx, NH3, Pb, Hg, etc.), wastewater-containing acids and sulfides, and solid wastes released because of both fossil fuel production and energy usage from the power plant. ... Gases of SO2 and NOx are reported to pollute the air because of conventional oil production activities,16 but these contributions, as displayed by cases I and II, are less compared to the accumulated impacts coming from the CO2 sequestration chain. ... (1)?McKee, B. Solutions for the 21st Century:? Zero Emissions Technology for Fossil Fuels; Technology Status Report, International Energy Agency, Committee for Energy Research Technology, OECD/IEA:? France, 2002. ...

Hsien H. Khoo; Reginald B. H. Tan

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

211

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

212

Development of gas-bearing reservoirs in the Trenton Llimestone Formation of New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Authority completed a study of the natural gas-bearing potential of New York State's Trenton Limestone Formation. The report includes an analysis of existing gas-well information and geological maps covering 33 counties in western and central New York State. The Trenton Limestone Formation is a limestone sequence with zones of shale interbeds that, when jointed and fractured, form reservoirs for natural gas. These reservoirs appear to be large and capable of sustained production, providing the production rates are carefully monitored to maintain reservoir pressure. Test wells have shown evidence of natural gas in all areas where the formation is present. The areas with the greatest reservoir potential trend from northeast to southwest beginning near the Adirondack foothills in Oneida County. When reservoir volumes are matched with a high success rate of discovery and minimum drilling costs, the northeastern part of central New York State appears to be the most likely region for both local use and commercial exploration. The Trenton formation in this area of the State generally contains gas at above-normal hydrostatic pressure. This indicates that the gas reservoirs are extensive and reach considerable depths. Due to the geophysical conditions of the reservoirs, however, it is important to carefully manage production and maintain pre-production pressure for optimum gas recovery.

Robinson, J.E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Economic appraisal of oil potential of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

An economic appraisal was made of the potential of more than 80 producing fields in the Williston basin of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The major oil producing formations investigated were in the Mississippian, Devonian, Silurian and Ordovician. Data for the study came from field production and drilling statistics. An extrapolated oil production decline curve for a theoretical average producing well first was made for each field. The value of the total extrapolated amount of producible oil for the average well was then calculated, discounted for royalty, taxes, etc., and divided by the estimated cost for a completed producing well. This gave an estimate of the return per dollar invested. No considerations were given for exploration and land acquisition costs. The estimated return per dollar values, after posting on Williston basin geologic maps, show relative economic comparisons of producing formations and where within the basin the best economic returns can be expected.

Jennings, A.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Examining potential benefits of combining a chimney with a salinity gradient solar pond for production of power in salt affected areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of combining a salinity gradient solar pond with a chimney to produce power in salt affected areas is examined. Firstly the causes of salinity in salt affected areas of northern Victoria, Australia are discussed. Existing salinity mitigation schemes are introduced and the integration of solar ponds with those schemes is discussed. Later it is shown how a solar pond can be combined with a chimney incorporating an air turbine for the production of power. Following the introduction of this concept the preliminary design is presented for a demonstration power plant incorporating a solar pond of area 6 hectares and depth 3 m with a 200 m tall chimney of 10 m diameter. The performance, including output power and efficiency of the proposed plant operating in northern Victoria is analysed and the results are discussed. The paper also discusses the overall advantages of using a solar pond with a chimney for production of power including the use of the large thermal mass of a solar pond as a practical and efficient method of storing collected solar energy.

Aliakbar Akbarzadeh; Peter Johnson; Randeep Singh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Polonium-210 and lead-210 in food and tobacco products: a review of parameters and an estimate of potential exposure and dose  

SciTech Connect

Food-chain transport of Pb-210 and Po-210 from soil to edible plant parts and from animal feed to meat and milk were evaluated from a review of literature. The degree of transfer was characterized by estimating concentration factors (unweighted arithmetic means) as well as the transfer coefficients B/sub v/, B/sub r/ (unweighted geometric means, f/sub m/ and f/sub f/ (unweighted arithmetic means). Global dietary intake of Pb-210 and Po-210 was also summarized, and 50-year dose estimates to target organs calculated. The greatest estimated ingestion doses were those to populations with large dietary complements of animal protein in the form of seafood (Japan) or caribou/reindeer muscle and organ meats (Arctic Eskimos and Lapps). The magnitude of this latter source illustrates the importance of simple food chains in generating significant exposures to populations dependent upon them. The origin and magnitude of inhalation exposure and dose from tobacco products was also assessed. For the majority of internal organs evaluated, the dose resulting from smoking commercially available tobacco products is comparable to or greater than the dose estimates for ingestion of naturally occurring dietary Pb-210 and Po-210.

Watson, A.P.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bakken Shale Oil Production Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) database and in the format of monthly production for oil, water and gas. Additional 95 well data including daily production rate, completion, Pressure Volume Temperature (PVT), pressure data are given from companies who sponsor for this research study...

Tran, Tan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Water production in enhanced coalbed methane operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) formations provides a considerable amount of the US natural gas production and have the potential of storing significant amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) through enhanced gas recovery operations. Enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery by injection of CO2 or a mixture of CO2 and nitrogen (N2) has been proven to recover additional natural gas resources. However, since coalbeds are normally saturated with water and can be in communication with an aquifer, a large amount of water is often co-produced during the natural gas extraction. The conventional approach for CBM production relies on the reduction of the gas partial pressure in the coal seam. This can be accomplished by either pumping the formation water to the surface and/or by injecting gases such as N2 and CO2. Disposal of the produced water is an environmental challenge as harmful impurities must be removed by appropriate purification techniques. Consequently, a reduction of water production in CBM operations is desirable. In this paper we present a numerical investigation of the potential reduction in water production during ECBM operations that are commonly used to increase methane (CH4) recovery. We use a three-dimensional coalbed model with an aquifer located at the bottom to investigate the amounts of gas and water produced in ECBM operations per volume of coal seam as a function of aquifer strength and sorption characteristics including sorption induced strain. The amount of gas/water that is produced varies significantly depending on the aquifer strength and injection gas composition. We demonstrate that injection of CO2 and/or N2 in some settings reduces the water handling problem substantially. CBM is an important worldwide energy source with a large number of formations being excellent candidates for ECBM recovery processes. Our analysis of the interplay between coal characteristics, aquifer support and the resultant behavior in terms of gas/water production provides valuable input for optimization of future planning and operations.

M. Jamshidi; K. Jessen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect

The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

THE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Energy and the Costs of Production.............................................................5 2 and Local Energy Benefits of PV.......................................15 5. CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSIONTHE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC APPLICATIONS FOR DELAWARE'S POULTRY FARMS FINAL REPORT

Delaware, University of

223

Using Numerical Techniques to Accelerate Delayed Ettringnite Formation Test Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) in concrete can cause significant damage to structures. Finding the severity of the DEF is beneficial. Currently to measure the potential… (more)

Robertson, John Bret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Biomedical device potential for robust, implantable product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraViolet Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraViolet Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraviolet A team of scientists has developed a process for creating glass-based, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce light in the ultraviolet range. February 24, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

225

Sugar Beets in Southwest Texas: Production Potentials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

che. PeZlusterts, PaZeustolls, Paleorthids. Approximate acreage: 957,000 (40% Monteola; 20% Go1 iad; 10% Zapata; 30% Other). Oark colored to reddish brown, shallow and moderately deep, calcareous and noncalcareous clayey soi 1s with varying degrees... inches. Paleustalfs, Haplustalfs. Approximate acreage: 230,000 (30% Eufaula; 30% Poth5; 20% Sarita; 20% Other). Reddish brown, deep, slightly acid loamy soils with less acid reddish heavy loamy to clayey subsoi 1 s , becoming calcareous below about 36...

Whiteley, E. L.; Cowley, W. R.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Energy Efficient Catalytic Reaction and Production of Cumene  

SciTech Connect

Alkylation reactions of benzene with propylene using zeolites were studied for their affinity for cumene production. The current process for the production of cumene involves heating corrosive acid catalysts, cooling, transporting, and distillation. This study focused on the reaction of products in a static one-pot vessel using non-corrosive zeolite catalysts, working towards a more efficient one-step process with a potentially large energy savings. A series of experiments were conducted to find the best reaction conditions yielding the highest production of cumene. The experiments looked at cumene formation amounts in two different reaction vessels that had different physical traits. Different zeolites, temperatures, mixing speeds, and amounts of reactants were also investigated to find their affects on the amount of cumene produced. Quantitative analysis of product mixture was performed by gas chromatography. Mass spectroscopy was also utilized to observe the gas phase components during the alkylation process.

JAREK, RUSSELL L.; THORNBERG, STEVEN M.; BARROW, STACIA; TRUDELL, DANIEL E.; NENOFF, TINA M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

Mahajan, Devinder (Selden, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reservoir Characterization and Enhanced Oil Recovery Potential in Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone Reservoirs, Michigan Basin, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Middle Devonian Rogers City and subjacent Dundee Limestone formations have combined oil production in excess of 375 MMBO. In general, hydrocarbon production occurs in… (more)

Abduslam, Abrahim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

230

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

231

A SOLID CATALYST METHOD FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodiesel has considerable production potential as a renewable source of energy. The conventional processes use soluble alkali catalysts that contaminate the biodiesel and glycerol products,… (more)

Kannan, Dheeban Chakrvarthi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Multiphoton ionization and ion-pair formation in molecular hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated both photoionization and ion-pair formation in molecular hydrogen by using double-resonance excitation via the E,F {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, v=6 level. The energetic threshold for ion-pair formation occurs just below the H{sub 2}{sup +} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, v{sup +}=9 ionization. threshold. The spectrum in this region was studied by using both conventional and constant-ionic-state photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as by monitoring the H{sup {minus}} production. The decay dynamics in this region are extremely rich, because excited levels may decay by rotational and vibrational autoionization, by predissociation to neutral H + H* (n=2,3,4), by predissociation to the ion pair H{sup +} + H{sup {minus}}, and by fluorescence. In addition, the dissociative potential curve of the 2p{sigma}{sub u}3s{sigma}{sub g} {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} doubly excited electronic state crosses the H{sub 2}{sup +} X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} potential curve in the same energy region, and the electronic autoionization of this state is found to significantly influence these decay processes.

Pratt, S.T.; McCormack, E.F.; Dehmer, J.L.; Dehmer, P.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Horizontal drilling the Bakken Formation, Williston basin: A new approach  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal drilling is an attractive new approach to exploration and development of the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken Formation in the southwestern part of North Dakota. This drilling technique increases the probability of success, the profit potential, the effective drainage area maximizing recoverable reserves, and the productivity by encountering more natural occurring fractures. The target formation, the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken, consists of three members in an overlapping relationship, a lower organic-rich black shale, a middle siltstone/limestone, and an upper organic-rich black shale. It attains a maximum thickness of 145 ft and thins to a feather edge along its depositional limit. Considered to be a major source rock for the Williston basin, the Bakken is usually overpressured where productive. Overpressuring is attributed to intense hydrocarbon generation. Reservoir properties are poor with core fluid porosities being generally 5% or less and permeabilities ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 md. The presence of natural fractures in the shale are necessary for production. Two types of fractures are associated with Bakken reservoirs: large vertical fractures (of tectonic origin) and microfractures (probably related to hydrocarbon generation). An economic comparison between horizontal and vertical wells show that well completion costs are approximately two times higher (average costs; $1,500,000 for a horizontal to $850,000 for a vertical) with average payout for horizontal wells projected to occur in half the time (1.5 yr instead of 3.4 yr). Projected production and reserves are considered to be 2 to 4 times greater from a horizontal well.

Lefever, J.A. (North Dakota Geological Survey, Grand Forks (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrogen Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As hydrogen appears to be a potential solution for a carbon-free society, its production plays a critical role in showing how well it fulfills the criteria of being environmentally benign and sustainable. Of c...

Ibrahim Dincer; Anand S. Joshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect

As predicted, from an evolving coalbed methane producibility model, prolific coalbed methane production is precluded in the Piceance Basin by the absence of coal bed reservoir continuity and dynamic ground-water flow. The best potential for production may lie at the transition zone from hydropressure to hydrocarbon overpressure and/or in conventional traps basinward of where outcrop and subsurface coals are in good reservoir and hydraulic communication. Geologic and hydrologic synergy among tectonic and structural setting, depositional systems and coal distribution, coal rank, gas content, permeability and hydrodynamics are the controls that determine the coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin. Within the coal-bearing Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation, the prime coalbed methane target, reservoir heterogeneity and thrust faults cause coal beds along the Grand Hogback and in the subsurface to be in modest to poor reservoir and hydraulic communication, restricting meteoric ground water recharge and basinward flow. Total subsurface coalbed methane resources are still estimated to be approximately 99 Tcf (3.09 Tm{sup 3}), although coalbed methane resource estimates range between 80 (2.49 Tm{sup 3}) and 136 Tcf (4.24 Tm{sup 3}), depending on the calculation method used. To explore for high gas contents or fully gas-saturated coals and consequent high productivity in the Piceance Basin, improved geologic and completion technologies including exploration and development for migrated conventionally and hydrodynamically trapped gases, in-situ generated secondary biogenic gases, and solution gases will be required.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

surface pores and forms a cake layer * P plot shows accumulation mode * Lubrication chemistry shows and effect on P 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45...

237

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability  

SciTech Connect

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board The Shale Gas Subcommittee of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board is charged with identifying measures that can be taken to reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of shale gas production. Natural gas is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, providing a quarter of the country's total energy. Owing to breakthroughs in technology, production from shale formations has gone from a negligible amount just a few years ago to being almost 30 percent of total U.S. natural gas production. This has brought lower prices, domestic jobs, and the prospect of enhanced national security due to the potential of substantial

239

Electrochemical formation of field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The dynamics of fragment formation  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac`s BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to {sup 4}He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy.

Keane, D. [Kent State Univ., OH (United States); EOS Collaboration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

In situ oxidation of subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nanobubbles [3,4,11,14]. 2. A decrease in surface tension from 72 to 68 dyn/cm [11]. 3. Increase nanobubble network is the out come of a self organization process due to the collective effect of bubble-bubble term stability of water structure is resulted from the formation of dense array of stable gas

Jacob, Eshel Ben

243

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

Mohan Kelkar

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

An empirical examination of the role of characteristics of the format, standard setting alliance and alliance partners in the market acceptance of formats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New product introductions rely on technologies that are often subject to strongly contested standards wars. In an attempt to ensure that the technical formats that their products are built upon, are the ones that gain widespread market acceptance...

Dan, Sujan Mathew

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Polymorphism control and the formation of organic molecular nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of organic molecular nanocrystals is a topic of great interest in the pharmaceutical industry because of the potential increase in dissolution rate and solubility of organic crystals below 1 ptm and their ...

Yang, Xiaochuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sulfated Mesoporous Niobium Oxide Catalyzed 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural Formation from Sugars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sulfated Mesoporous Niobium Oxide Catalyzed 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural Formation from Sugars ... The effectiveness of sulfated mesoporous niobium oxide (MNO-S) as a catalyst for the production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) from sugar was studied and is reported herein. ...

Ernest Lau Sze Ngee; Yongjun Gao; Xi Chen; Timothy Misso Lee; Zhigang Hu; Dan Zhao; Ning Yan

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

New look for gas in Forbes formation, Sacramento Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The Forbes formation of upper Cretaceous age consists of marine shale, siltstone, and interbedded sandstone, and lies stratigraphically between the younger Kione Deltaic sandstone facies and the older Dobbins shale. On the west side of the Sacramento Valley, the Kione formation is truncated and the Forbes formation is overlain by the Capay (Eocene) and/or Tehama (post-Eocene) formations. In the Sacramento to Red Bluff area, the Forbes formation attains a thickness of up to 5000 ft (1524 m). The importance of the Forbes formation as a source of gas production in the Sacramento Valley is well established. Gas was first produced from the Forbes formation near the south edge of the Marysville Buttes in 1953. The formation is now productive in over 20 fields in the Sacramento Valley with cumulative production to January 1, 1980, of 1.23 billion MCF of gas. As a result of new CDP seismic reflection profiling, drilling for gas from the Forbes formation has increased dramatically since 1978.

Lindblom, R.G.; Mosier, W.C.; Jacobson, J.B.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

250

Comparative Environmental Impact Evaluation of Hydrogen Production Methods from Renewable and Nonrenewable Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, a comparative environmental impact study of possible hydrogen production methods from renewable and nonrenewable sources is undertaken ... potential, GWP and acidification potential, AP), production

Canan Acar; Ibrahim Dincer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to further characterize the three areas selected as potential CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Well-log data are critical for defining depth, thickness, number, and grouping of coal seams at the proposed sequestration sites. Thus, we purchased 12 hardcopy well logs (in addition to 15 well logs obtained during previous quarter) from a commercial source and digitized them to make coal-occurrence maps and cross sections. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Thus, we correlated and mapped Wilcox Group subdivisions--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations, as well as the coal-bearing intervals of the Yegua and Jackson formations in well logs. To assess cleat properties and describe coal characteristics, we made field trips to Big Brown and Martin Lake coal mines. This quarter we also received CO{sub 2} and methane sorption analyses of the Sandow Mine samples, and we are assessing the results. GEM, a compositional simulator developed by the Computer Modeling Group (CMG), was selected for performing the CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CBM modeling tasks for this project. This software was used to conduct preliminary CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production simulations in a 5-spot injection pattern. We are continuing to pursue a cooperative agreement with Anadarko Petroleum, which has already acquired significant relevant data near one of our potential sequestration sites.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

253

Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Piceance Basin of Colorado for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented gas/produced water separation process  

SciTech Connect

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Piceance Basin through literature surveys. Jack McIntyre`s tool separates produced water from gas and disposes of the water downhole into aquifers unused because of poor water quality, uneconomic lifting costs or poor aquifer deliverability. The beneficial aspects of this technology are two fold. The process increases the potential for recovering previously uneconomic gas resources by reducing produced water lifting, treatment and disposal costs. Of greater importance is the advantage of lessening the environmental impact of produced water by downhole disposal. Results from the survey indicate that research in the Piceance Basin includes studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, conventional and unconventional recovery oil and gas technologies. Available information is mostly found centered upon the geology and hydrology for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Lesser information is available on production technology because of the limited number of wells currently producing in the basin. Limited information is available on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand formation waters and that of the potential disposal zones. No determination was made of the compatibility of these waters. The study also indicates that water is often produced in variable quantities with gas from several gas productive formations which would indicate that there are potential applications for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool in the Piceance Basin.

Kieffer, F.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electrochemical formation of field emitters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

Bernhardt, A.F.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

258

Stochastic Bayesian inversion of borehole self-potential measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reservoirs and the estimation of petrophysical properties of clay-rock formations potentially suited for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. In general, this theory can be implemented in any problem related to the characterization of in situ......

W. F. Woodruff; A. Revil; A. Jardani; D. Nummedal; S. Cumella

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to work on Tasks 1 and 2, which consisted of the following subtasks: review literature on CO{sub 2} sequestration and the effect of CO{sub 2} injection on methane production from coalbeds; acquire information on power plant flue gas emissions; acquire data on Texas coal occurrences and properties and formation water quality; construct a digital base map; and select geographic areas and geologic formations for study. Flue gas information, including volumes and compositions, were obtained for major Texas power plants and other industrial sources, such as cement plants. We evaluated and obtained computer mapping software and began building a digital base map that will be used to depict industrial emissions, coal occurrence, and water quality information. Digital data sets allow us to superpose data for visualization and for assessment of CO{sub 2}sequestration issues.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

SciTech Connect

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

Reed, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods  

SciTech Connect

Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Consumers’ responses to price presentation formats in rebate advertisements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although rebates offer an important and popular promotion tool in retailing, little research has investigated whether their presentation format can influence consumers’ evaluations of and purchase intentions toward products featured in rebate ads. Retailers generally use two different rebate ad formats: one that transparently shows both before- and after-rebate prices and the other that displays the after-rebate price in relatively large print and the before-rebate price in small print. Three experimental studies attempt to determine which format is more effective for eliciting favorable consumers’ responses, and the results show that the format emphasizing only after-rebate prices generally leads to lower purchase intentions because of the negative affect it elicits. Furthermore, the effect of a rebate presentation format is moderated by the rebate amount, consumers’ price knowledge, and rebate processing time. The results show that consumers’ responses to different rebate presentation formats entail both emotional responses and rational evaluations.

Hyeong Min Kim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oil history, potential converge in Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect

Azerbaijan, the oldest known oil producing region in the world, still holds great potential for new discoveries and increased production. A multi-billion dollar production sharing agreement was recently signed with a consortium of primarily western oil companies to develop three oil fields in the Caspian Sea. Soon, Azerbaijan will offer new exploration acreage both offshore and onshore. This paper describes the history of oil production in Azerbaijan, offshore developments, tectonics, stratigraphy, petroleum traps, mud volcanoes, and short summaries of several oil producing areas. Current production is about 9 million tons/yr of oil and 7 billion cu m/yr of natural gas.

Narimanov, A.A. [State Oil Co. of Azerbaijan, Baku (Azerbaijan); Palaz, I. [Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

265

Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

Monnier, Stefan

266

Hydrogen Production from Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy is potentially the most abundant renewable energy resource available to us and hydrogen production from solar energy is considered to be ... ultimate solution for sustainable energy. The various methods

Engin Ture

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to establish a production capability for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) and related medical isotopes.

268

CO2/EOR and Geological Carbon Storage Resource Potential in the Niagaran Pinnacle Reef Trend, Lower Michigan, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Early Silurian age, Niagaran pinnacle reef trend (NPRT) oil fields in the Guelph Formation in Northern Lower Michigan (NNPRT) comprise a giant oil province with nearly 63.6 million cubic meters (Mm3) of cumulative petroleum and 680 billion cubic meters (Bm3) of natural gas production (through 2010) from over 700 discrete reservoirs at depths of 800-2100 m. Several NNPRT fields are the main target of a proposed, DOE-NETL funded, large scale carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization and sequestration project. The NNPRT comprises closely-spaced, but highly geologically compartmentalized and laterally discontinuous oil and gas fields many of which have either reached or are nearing their economic limit in primary production mode. Total oil production from the largest 207 oil fields in the NNPRT, each with more than 80,000 m3 of cumulative oil production per field, constitutes 86% or 54.6 Mm3 of trend oil production totals and are considered most likely targets for CO2/EOR activities in the future. We have evaluated regional CO2/Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) potential in these NNPRT fields from historic production data in addition to recovery efficiencies observed in seven, on-going, commercial CO2/EOR projects and determined that incremental CO2/EOR potential in these fields ranges from 22-33 Mm3. We have also evaluated trend-wide Geological Storage Resource (GSR) potential using 2 different approaches: 1) a produced fluid volumes approach, and 2) a gross storage capacity approach using petrophysical well log estimates of net, effective porosity in NNPRT field wells and estimates of reservoir acreage from GIS data. These approaches provide robust low and high estimates of more than 200 Mmt but less than 500 Mmt (respectively) for Geological Storage Resource (GSR) potential in the NNPRT.

David Barnes; Bill Harrison; G. Michael Grammer; Jason Asmus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Next-generation biomass feedstocks for biofuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of the potential for biofuel production in the United States from timber and non-grain crops.

Blake A Simmons; Dominique Loque; Harvey W Blanch

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

271

Experimental production characteristics of anticlinal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Gas Relative Viscosities 17 18 7. Oil Formation Volume Factor and Gas Solubility Curves . 19 9. Recovery Curves for Fluid 9 . Recovery Curves for Fluid 10 . 23 10. Recovery Curves for Fluid 11 24 11. Effect of Production Rate on Oil Recovery-- Fluid 9... . ze Effect of. Production Rate on. G11, Recovery-- Fluid 10. . . . . . ~ ~ 28 13. . Effect of Production Rate on Oil Recovery-- Fluld 11 e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ + ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 29 14. . Effect of Production Rate on Oil Recovery- Center Welk Prqducing...

Williams, Charles David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

RMOTC - Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

273

PRODUCTS & MATERIALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1995-96 Spectrum Chemical and Safety Prod-ucts Catalog features products for molecular and life science laboratories and cleanroom environments. Spectrum Chemical Manu-facturing. Circle 150. SCIENCE * VOL. 268 * 23 JUNE 1995

1995-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of... the nation’s power o Currently 1% of national power supply o Carbon neutral? combustion of biomass is part of the natural carbon cycle o Improved crop residue management has potential to benefit environment, producers, and economy Biomass Btu...

Schaetzel, Michael

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

EIA - Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In three  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Data Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 6 complete) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Oil Production Capacity by Region and Country, Reference Case Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

276

Biological processing in oscillatory baffled reactors: operation, advantages and potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2 Chemical Engineering and Advanced...pharmaceuticals, fuel, health products...scale-up| 1. Introduction Bioprocessing...e.g. biodiesel formation...displace fossil fuels. J. Ind...base-catalysed biodiesel production...reactors. Fuel Processing...Chemical reaction engineering, 3rd edn...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Solar Power Potential in SE New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

278

Definition: Self-Potential (SP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self-Potential (SP) Self-Potential (SP) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Self-Potential (SP) The self-potential (SP) technique is a passive electrical geophysical method based upon the measurement of spontaneous or natural electrical potential developed in the earth due to: 1) electrochemical interactions between minerals and subsurface fluids; 2) electrokinetic processes resulting from the flow of ionic fluids; or 3) thermoelectric mechanisms from temperature gradients in the subsurface.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Spontaneous potential (SP), also called self potential, is a naturally occurring electric potential difference in the Earth, measured by an electrode relative to a fixed reference electrode. Spontaneous potentials are often measured down boreholes for formation evaluation in

279

Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

282

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

284

Practical exploration model for Smackover Formation  

SciTech Connect

The Smackover Formation has been an important exploration target for many years, with production coming from a variety of structural, stratigraphic, diagenetic, and combination traps. The Smackover is also one of the most studied of Gulf Coast formations. The resulting exploration models have either been rigid in their applications, or have been based on core and thin-section analysis not readily available to the prospect-generating geologist. A proposed model looks at the Smackover as a lithology rather than a time unit. The model uses primarily subsurface logs, and can be applied either to wildcat or exploitation drilling. The Smackover is a mature exploration target, but with enhanced understanding it is still an economically attractive objective.

Lieber, R.B. (First Energy Corp., Houston, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Pistons modeled by potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we consider a piston modelled by a potential in the presence of extra dimensions. We analyze the functional determinant and the Casimir effect for this configuration. In order to compute the determinant and Casimir force we employ the zeta function scheme. Essentially, the computation reduces to the analysis of the zeta function associated with a scalar field living on an interval $[0,L]$ in a background potential. Although, as a model for a piston, it seems reasonable to assume a potential having compact support within $[0,L]$, we provide a formalism that can be applied to any sufficiently smooth potential.

Guglielmo Fucci; Klaus Kirsten; Pedro Morales

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

286

potential wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

potential wave energy ? potentielle Wellenenergie f [Der für die Auslenkung des Wasserspiegels zum Ruhewasserspiegel erforderliche Teil der Wellenenergie, die mit der Wellengeschwindigkeit fortbewegt...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Removing of Formation Damage and Enhancement of Formation Productivity Using Environmentally Friendly Chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(GLDA) a newly developed environmentally friendly chelate was examined as stand-alone stimulation fluid in deep oil and gas wells. In this study we used GLDA to stimulate carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite). GLDA was also used to stimulate and remove...

Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Nasr Eldin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Potential applications of high temperature helium  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the DOE MHTGR-SC program`s recent activity to improve the economics of the MHTGR without sacrificing safety performance and two potential applications of high temperature helium, the MHTGR gas turbine plant and a process heat application for methanol production from coal.

Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Kennedy, A.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Potential applications of high temperature helium  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the DOE MHTGR-SC program's recent activity to improve the economics of the MHTGR without sacrificing safety performance and two potential applications of high temperature helium, the MHTGR gas turbine plant and a process heat application for methanol production from coal.

Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Kennedy, A.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Small HVAC Problems and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Small HVAC Problems and Potential Savings Reports Summary of Problems of the Integrated Design of Small Commercial HVAC Systems research project. The reports are a result of funding: Productivity and Interior Environments Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design

291

Global potential for wind-generated electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...monthly averages of wind power production...negative. Very large wind power penetration...forms. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles...excesses in electricity system, while energy-rich...storage. Potential wind-generated electricity...only wind but also solar. The additional...

Xi Lu; Michael B. McElroy; Juha Kiviluoma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

293

NETL Report format template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First-Generation Toolset for Calculation First-Generation Toolset for Calculation of Induced Seismicity Hazard Profiles 17 January 2013 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its

294

Hydropower Potential Screening Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydropower Potential Screening Study Gillian Charles GRAC 5/28/14 #12;Latest Hydropower Potential Study Creating a Buzz 2014 DOE study on undeveloped stream reaches 84.7 GW undeveloped hydropower in undeveloped stream reaches hydropower in the PNW #12;Studies at both National

295

PRODUCTS & MATERIALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Phar-macia Biotech. Circle 141. Cell Culture Production The CellCube offers the fastest, most com-pact system available for high-volume...culture production, according to the manu-facturer. The CellCube not only saves up to four times the space of roller bottles...

1995-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

297

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Development of oil formation theories and their importance for peak oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews the historical development of both biogenic and non-biogenic petroleum formation. It also examines the recent claim that the so-called “abiotic” oil formation theory undermines the concept of “peak oil,” i.e. the notion that world oil production is destined to reach a maximum that will be followed by an irreversible decline. We show that peak oil is first and foremost a matter of production flows. Consequently, the mechanism of oil formation does not strongly affect depletion. We would need to revise the theory beyond peak oil only for the extreme — and unlikely — hypothesis of abiotic petroleum formation.

Mikael Höök; Ugo Bardi; Lianyong Feng; Xiongqi Pang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Formation, Habitability, and Detection of Extrasolar Moons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diversity and quantity of moons in the Solar System suggest a manifold population of natural satellites exist around extrasolar planets. Of peculiar interest from an astrobiological perspective, the number of sizable moons in the stellar habitable zones may outnumber planets in these circumstellar regions. With technological and theoretical methods now allowing for the detection of sub-Earth-sized extrasolar planets, the first detection of an extrasolar moon appears feasible. In this review, we summarize formation channels of massive exomoons that are potentially detectable with current or near-future instruments. We discuss the orbital effects that govern exomoon evolution, we present a framework to characterize an exomoon's stellar plus planetary illumination as well as its tidal heating, and we address the techniques that have been proposed to search for exomoons. Most notably, we show that natural satellites in the range of 0.1 - 0.5 Earth mass (i) are potentially habitable, (ii) can form within the c...

Heller, René; Kipping, David; Limbach, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin; Greenberg, Richard; Sasaki, Takanori; Bolmont, Émeline; Grasset, Olivier; Lewis, Karen; Barnes, Rory; Zuluaga, Jorge I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Mechanism for puddle formation in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When graphene is close to charge neutrality, its energy landscape is highly inhomogeneous, forming a sea of electron-like and hole-like puddles that determine the properties of graphene at low carrier density. However, the details of the puddle formation have remained elusive. We demonstrate numerically that in sharp contrast to monolayer graphene, the normalized autocorrelation function for the puddle landscape in bilayer graphene depends only on the distance between the graphene and the source of the long-ranged impurity potential. By comparing with available experimental data, we find quantitative evidence for the implied differences in scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of electron and hole puddles for monolayer and bilayer graphene in nominally the same disorder potential.

S. Adam; Suyong Jung; Nikolai N. Klimov; Nikolai B. Zhitenev; Joseph A. Stroscio; M. D. Stiles

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Clinical Trials Methods for Evaluation of Potential Reduced Exposure Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other substances of abuse. Some studies stated...from a relatively young, less dependent...with no active drug abuse (36, 39) or excessive...laboratory tended to be younger (age ranges from...through newspaper and internet; inclusion criteria...current alcohol or drug abuse Smoking behavior...

Dorothy K. Hatsukami; Karen Hanson; Anna Briggs; Mark Parascandola; Jeanine M. Genkinger; Richard O'Connor; and Peter G. Shields

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Determining the Potential Distribution of Vegetation, Crops and Agricultural Productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere component of the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect (IMAGE 2.0) uses changes in land cover to compute dynamically the greenhouse gas fluxes between the terrestrial biosp...

R. Leemans; G. J. van den Born

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Determining the potential distribution of vegetation, crops and agricultural productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere component of the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect (IMAGE 2.0) uses changes in land cover to compute dynamically the greenhouse gas fluxes between the terrestrial biosp...

R. Leemans; G. J. van den Born

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Clinical Trials Methods for Evaluation of Potential Reduced Exposure Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...April 14, 2008, the following search terms were used and searches were limited to humans and English...for acute effects and short-term self-administration studies...participants believed that people who enter trials are unique and enter into...

Dorothy K. Hatsukami; Karen Hanson; Anna Briggs; Mark Parascandola; Jeanine M. Genkinger; Richard O'Connor; and Peter G. Shields

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Identifying Improvement Potentials in Cement Production with Life Cycle Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Average heat contribution from waste, excluding petcoke, is 18% (4) (see Supporting Information S3 for waste types). ...

Michael Elias Boesch; Stefanie Hellweg

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Agroecological zones and the assessment of crop production potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...where the effects of sustainability must be viewed on...years, and the main pillars on which such sustainability rests are the replenishment...the concern about sustainability is not, as it is...in the future, three points of view should...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Potential Internet Applications in Forest Products Exporting and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Respondents #12;Adoption of Internet Technologies 0.0% 39.8% 57.0% 3.2% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100 to Other Industries (n=93) #12;Adoption of Internet Technologies 2.2% 51.1% 22.8%23.9% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80 (n=54) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Intranet Internet EDI Extranet VPN Do not use Use within next two

308

Clinical Trials Methods for Evaluation of Potential Reduced Exposure Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cigarettes Usual brand, Merit Ultra Light, Accord, and denicotinized...previous Accord use or Merit Ultra Light smokers, past or current...Marlboro Lights or Marlboro Ultra Lights cigarettes. Regul Toxicol...Ossip-Klein DJ , Epstein LH, Winter MK, et al. Does switching to...

Dorothy K. Hatsukami; Karen Hanson; Anna Briggs; Mark Parascandola; Jeanine M. Genkinger; Richard O'Connor; and Peter G. Shields

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then applying an acid-fracture stimulation treatment to the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. The study identified reservoir characteristics of beds that have the greatest long-term production potential.

Allison, M.L.; Morgan, C.D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrogen’s Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of future demand for non-fossil produced hydrogen and of its potential are oriented toward ... to the environment as the present fossil energy economy [10.4, 10.9].

J. Nitsch; C. Voigt

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Global Biomass Energy Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intensive use of renewable energy is one of the options to stabilize...2...atmospheric concentration at levels of 350 to 550ppm. A recent evaluation of the global potential of primary renewable energy carried...

Jos#X00C9; Roberto Moreira

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Logistic Map Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and illustrate methods to compute all single particle potentials that underlie the logistic map, x --> sx(1-x) for 02. We illustrate the methods numerically for the cases s=5/2 and s=10/3.

Thomas Curtright; Andrzej Veitia

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mesophase Formation in Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coke formation is a major problem in the petroleum industry because of its effect on liquid yield, catalyst deactivation, and fouling of reactor internals and… (more)

Bagheri, Seyed Reza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...security of unmatched sample traceability. Manufactured from high-quality polypropylene in a fully automated class-7 cleanroom environment ensures the laser-etched alphanumeric tubes exhibit absolute product consistency, near-zero contaminants...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bind cells and biomolecules through passive hydrophobic interactions. Molded from ultrapure polystyrene in a class 100,000 cleanroom production environment, the untreated culture plates are supplied with lids in individual sterile packs. The plates include...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

Production Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is obvious that we must bring a number of things into our controlled environment besides clean conditioned air, equipment, and ultrapure water. If we are to do any production work, or research involving the pr...

M. Kozicki; S. Hoenig; P. Robinson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Finally, as a personal pipetting system, Liquidator 96 fits any benchtop or laminar-flow cabinet making it suitable for cleanroom conditions. Mettler Toledo For info: 800-472-4646 www.mt.com/liquidator Electronically submit your new product...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

Forest Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Purchased energy remains the third largest manufacturing cost for the forest products industry–despite its extensive use of highly efficient co-generation technology. The industry has worked with...

319

NEW PRODUCTS:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also be used with other heating elements and probes...content of diesel and heating oils. A highly specific titration...requirements for fuel oil products are consistently...de- scriptions, and prices are included for columns......

New Products

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the area scanned. When the earth's thermal gradient appears, the vibrating mirror...Write for a Product Data Sheet giving specifications, typical drying perform-ance, and...pebble-bed heaters and electrical insulation at elevated temperatures. (Minneapolis-Honeywell...

Joshua Stern

1961-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

322

Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge Andrew F. Heckler is identified for some questions. When a problem potentially elicits prior knowledge that is contrary to scientific knowledge, e.g. a scientific "misconception", it is found that the concrete representation invokes

Heckler, Andrew F.

323

Coke formation during pyrolysis of 1,2-dichloroethane  

SciTech Connect

Most processes involving hydrocarbons or carbon oxides at high temperatures suffer from the disadvantage of coke formation. The formation of coke deposits during pyrolysis of hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is of significant practical importance. Examples of such processes are the steam cracking of alkanes to produce olefins and the thermal decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC) for the production of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). Even id the rate of coke production is low, the cumulative nature of the solid product will result in reactor fouling. The present work deals with the thermal decomposition of EDC. Coke formation has been studied on metal surfaces in a quartz tubular reactor. The rate of coke deposition was measures on metal foils hanging from one arm of a microbalance. A complete analysis of the product gas was accomplished using on-line gas chromatography. The results show that coke deposition during thermal decomposition of EDC depends on the composition of the feed as well as on the nature of the surface of the metal foil. Small amounts of other components (contamination with other chlorinated hydrocarbons as an example) may have a large influence on the rate of coke formation. The results are discussed in terms of surface composition/morphology of the metal foil and the free radical mechanism for thermal decomposition of FDC.

Holmen, A. [Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Lindvag, O.A. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) estimate the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and methane production from, low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the east-central Texas region, (2) quantify uncertainty associated with these estimates, (3) conduct reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells, and (4) compare the results with those obtained from previous studies of vertical wells. To estimate the total volumes of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered in, and total volumes of methane that can be produced from, the Wilcox Group low-rank coals in east-central Texas, we used data provided by Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, data obtained during this research, and results of probabilistic simulation modeling studies we conducted. For the analysis, we applied our base-case coal seam characteristics to a 2,930-mi{sup 2} (1,875,200-ac) area where Calvert Bluff coal seams range between 4,000 and 6,200 ft deep. Results of the probabilistic analysis indicate that potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor, range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we presented the paper SPE 100584 at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on May 15-18, 2006. Also, we submitted an abstract to be considered for inclusion in a special volume dedicated to CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic media, which is planned for publication by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Coal precursors for production of carbon and graphite products. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this program was to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. These include binder and impregnation pitches, Coke for graphite electrodes, Cokes for anodes and specialty graphite, matrices for C/C composites and raw material for mesophase pitch fibers. Previous work in this program has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for achieving this objective. The current effort involved screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. The program involved an initial characterization of small-scale extracts using standard analytical methods and mesophase formation studies. This was followed by feedback to the WVU Group and to the CPC partners with recommendation of material for scaleup. Similar analytical and mesophase studies on some of the scaled-up extracts was performed. The activation of the coal extraction residues for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon was investigated. A further task was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of the studies are summarized in this report.

Lewis, I.C.; Lewis, R.T.; Mayer, H.K. [Ucar Carbon Co., Inc., Parma, OH (United States)

1996-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Uploading STI Products vs. Site Hosting of STI Products | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Uploading STI Products vs. Site Hosting of STI Products Uploading STI Products vs. Site Hosting of STI Products Print page Print page Email page Email page For unclassified unlimited and controlled unclassified (except for UCNI) there are currently two options (described below) for sites to provide the actual electronic STI products resulting from DOE-funded activities to OSTI. An important note, regardless of method used to provide the STI product to OSTI, the product cannot be encrypted or password protected. Site Uploads the STI Product Sites can upload their unclassified unlimited and controlled unclassified (except UCNI) STI products to OSTI via the following STI product submission/transmission methods: AN 241.1 Web Version Batch Upload AN 241.3 Web Version Refer to the formats section of this website for additional details related

327

Experimental Signature for Black Hole Production in Neutrino Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of extra degrees of freedom beyond the electroweak scale may allow the formation of black holes in nearly horizontal neutrino air showers. In this paper we examine the average properties of the light descendants of these black holes. Our analysis indicates that black hole decay gives rise to deeply penetrating showers with an electromagnetic component which differs substantially from that in conventional neutrino interactions, allowing a good characterization of the phenomenon against background. Naturally occurring black holes in horizontal neutrino showers could be detected and studied with the Auger air shower array. Since the expected black hole production rate at Auger is $> 1$ event/year, this cosmic ray observatory could be potentially powerful in probing models with extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity.

Luis Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Biodiesel Production from Freshwater Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel Production from Freshwater Algae ... Biodiesel derived from algae had a fuel value with the following characteristics: density, 0.801 kg/L; ash content, 0.21%; flash point, 98 °C; pour point, ?14 °C; cetane number, 52; minimum gross calorific value, 40 MJ/kg; and water content, 0.02 vol?%. ... For quite a long period, the production of hydrogen, methane, vegetable oils (triglycerides, for biodiesel), hydrocarbons, and ethanol from algae were in focus as potential biofuels. ...

Krishnan Vijayaraghavan; K. Hemanathan

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Diagenetic saline formation waters: Their role in crustal processes  

SciTech Connect

Formation waters typical of most sedimentary basins are Bi-rich, Na-Ca-Cl brines. High Cl content is due to halite dissolution and high Ca content to albitization of metastable detrital plagioclase deposited in both sands and shales. High Br content is due to halite recrystallization, especially during deformation, and to the conversion of carnallite to sylvite. Minor elements and isotopes are all controlled by mineral/water reactions. Saline formation waters are thus a normal diagenetic product formed during burial. Diagenetic formation waters constitute a previously unrecognized loop in crustal cycling. Transfer of Li, B, S, Cl, Ca, and Br from sediments to brines, and then discharge of brines back to the ocean, explains why these six elements are depleted in the average igneous crust relative to the average sedimentary crust. Diagenetic saline formation waters are limited in volume only by the availability of sedimentary halite and detrital plagioclase. Thus, the volume of fluids available for MVT-type mineralization and late stage sediment diagenesis is much larger than would be true if formation waters were modified surficial brines. Discharge of saline formation waters from sedimentary basins accounts for efficient chloride cycling (225 Ma residence time in the ocean), and for most of the chloride content of the world's rivers not due to aerosols. Expulsion of large volumes of diagenetic formation waters during tectonism can account for rapid excursions in oceanic chemistry, as in the case of [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr.

Land, L.S. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) determine the effects of permeability anisotropy on performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas, and (2) begin reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells. To evaluate the effects of permeability anisotropy on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds, we conducted deterministic reservoir modeling studies of 100% CO{sub 2} gas injection for the 6,200-ft depth base case (Case 1b) using the most likely values of the reservoir parameters. Simulation results show significant differences in the cumulative volumes of CH{sub 4} produced and CO{sub 2} injected due to permeability anisotropy, depending on the orientation of injection patterns relative to the orientation of permeability anisotropy. This indicates that knowledge of the magnitude and orientation of permeability anisotropy will be an important consideration in the design of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects. We continued discussions with Anadarko Petroleum regarding plans for additional coal core acquisition and laboratory work to further characterize Wilcox low-rank coals. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we submitted the paper SPE 100584 for presentation at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium to be held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on May 15-18, 2006.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

333

Identification and evaluation of bypassed and incompletely drained gas reservoirs in the wave-dominated deltaic system of the Frio Formation (Oligocene), North McFaddin field, Victoria County, South Texas  

SciTech Connect

An integrated geologic, engineering, and petrophysical evaluation of North McFaddin field, undertaken in cooperation with the current operator. Anaqua Oil and Gas, Inc., targeted actual and potential secondary natural gas resources within thin reservoirs (typically 5-15 ft thick). Funded by the Gas Research Institute, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the State of Texas, this research forms part of the Secondary Gas Recovery project of the Bureau of Economic Geology. Improved vertical resolution of recently developed wireline tools and advances in well-log analytical techniques have been fundamental in identifying these resources. Reservoirs are vertically compartmentalized by nonreservoir facies of subequal thicknesses and collectively are grouped into sequences 75-100 ft thick. Individual reservoirs typically form laterally discontinuous lobes (5000-6000 ft wide) of variable elongation and orientation with respect to inferred depositional dip. Reservoir facies are interpreted to be of distal shoreface origin. Contour maps of net sandstone thickness, relative spontaneous potential deflection, and resistivity were superposed for each reservoir unit. These data were integrated with structure maps and well-test production, wireline-formation test, and sidewall-core data, allowing the potentially productive limits of each reservoir unit to be delineated. By comparing subsequently determined volumes of original gas in place with historical production data, potentially recoverable reserves were estimated to be as much as 1000 mmcf for individual reservoirs. These procedures enabled not only the recommendation of recompletion targets, but also suggested a strategic location for a potential development well.

Burn, M.J.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)); Vidal, J. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services Technology, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Knowles, P. (Anaqua Oil and Gas, Inc., Corpus Christi, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Monster potential meets potential monster: pros and cons of deploying genetically modified microalgae for biofuels production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0322 ( doi:10.1098/rsif.2009.0322 ) 6 Williams, PJle-B , Laurens, LML. 2010 Microalgae as biodiesel biomass feedstocks: review analysis of the biochemistry, energetics economics. Energy Environ. Sci. 3, 554-590. 10.1039...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Formation of Biomimetic Porous Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Surfaces of Polyethylene/Zinc Stearate Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of Biomimetic Porous Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Surfaces of Polyethylene/Zinc Stearate phosphate coating, polyethylene Abstract Studies were undertaken investigating improvements presented in this paper concentrated on adding zinc stearate to polyethylene. Important potential benefits

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

337

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

338

Hydrogen Generation and Coke Formation over a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst under Fuel Rich Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Generation and Coke Formation over a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst under Fuel Rich Conditions† ... Hydrogen production via hydrocarbon steam reforming and water gas shift reactions was investigated over a monolith-supported Pt-based diesel oxidation catalyst. ...

Meshari AL-Harbi; Jin-Yong Luo; Robert Hayes; Martin Votsmeier; William S. Epling

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Reservoir characterization of Yates Formation (Permian, Guadalupian), South Ward field, Ward County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Yates Formation is a prominent hydrocarbon producing unit in the Permian Basin of west Texas. Production is predominantly from very fine grained sandstones and siltstones that are interbedded with carbonates. The producing clastics have...

Dronamraju, Sharma

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Developing new theoretical models of the formation of atomic collision cascades and subcascades in irradiated solids  

SciTech Connect

A new theoretical model is developed for the investigation of atomic collision cascades and subcascades in irradiated solids consisting of atoms of a single type. The model is based on an analytical description of the elastic collisions between moving atoms knocked out of the crystal lattice sites and the immobile atoms of the lattice. The description is based on the linear kinetic Boltzmann equation describing the retardation of primary recoil atoms (PRAs) in irradiated solids. The laws of conservation for the total number and the kinetic energy of moving atoms, which follow from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, are analyzed using the proposed model. An analytical solution is obtained for the stationary kinetic Boltzmann equation, which describes the retardation of PRAs for a given source responsible for their production. A kinetic equation for the moving atoms and the corresponding laws of conservation are also analyzed with allowance for the binding energy of atoms at the crystal lattice sites. A criterion for determining the threshold energy of subcascade formation in irradiated solids is formulated. Based on this criterion, the threshold energy of subcascade formation is calculated using the Thomas-Fermi potential. Formulas are presented for determining the mean size and number of subcascades formed in a solid as functions of the PRA energy.

Metelkin, E. V.; Ryazanov, A. I., E-mail: ryazanoff@comail.ru; Semenov, E. V. [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Using RSI format  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of radioactive ion beams using the in-flight technique B. Harss, a) R. C. Pardo, K. E. Rehm, F. Borasi, b) J. P. Greene, R. V. F. Janssens, C. L. Jiang, J. Nolen, M. Paul, c) J. P. Schiffer, R. E. Segel, d) J. Specht, T. F. Wang, e) P. Wilt, and B. Zabransky Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ͑Received 4 August 1999; accepted for publication 5 November 1999͒ Reactions with a heavy projectile incident on a light target can be used for the efficient in-flight production of secondary radioactive beams. An overview of this technique is given using data on 17 F beams produced via the p( 17 O, 17 F)n and d( 16 O, 17 F)n reactions. With primary 16,17 O beam currents of 100 pnA, intensities of up to 2ϫ10 6 17 F/s on target were achieved. Using this beam, the p( 17 F,␣) 14 O reaction was measured. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. ͓S0034-6748͑00͒04002-8͔ I. INTRODUCTION Recently,

342

Effect of silica sand size on the formation kinetics of CO2 hydrate in porous media in the presence of pure water and seawater relevant for CO2 sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Understanding the kinetics of carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate formation in pure water, seawater and porous media aids in developing technologies for CO2 gas storage, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and potentially for methane production from methane hydrates. The present work is focused on understanding the kinetics of CO2 hydrate formation in pure water and seawater at an initial formation pressure of 6 MPa (providing a driving force of about 4.0 MPa) and a formation temperature of 276.15 K with 75% water saturation in three silica sand particle sizes (0.16 mm, 0.46 mm and 0.92 mm). The seawater (3.3 wt% salinity) used in the present study is obtained from sea coast of Chennai (India). It is observed that the gas consumption of CO2 in hydrate is more for smaller silica sand particle and decreases as the size of the sand increases. The total gas consumed at the end of the seawater experiment is found to be less than the gas consumed at the end of the pure water experiment. This is due to the fact that salts in seawater act as a thermodynamic inhibitor resulting in lower gas consumption of CO2 in hydrate. The average rate of hydrate formation observed is optimum in 0.46 mm particles and is observed to be higher as compared to 0.16 and 0.92 mm particles over 10 h experimental time. This indicates that 0.46 mm silica sand provides an optimum environment for efficient hydrate formation. The study can be useful to understand the suitability of potential sandstone reservoir for CO2 sequestration in the form of hydrate in the presence of saline formation water.

Prathyusha Mekala; Marc Busch; Deepjyoti Mech; Rachit S. Patel; Jitendra S. Sangwai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Formation control of underactuated ships with elliptical shape approximation and limited communication ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the recent theoretical development for formation control of multiple fully actuated agents with an elliptical shape in Do (2012), this paper develops distributed controllers that force a group of N underactuated ships with limited communication ... Keywords: Collision avoidance, Elliptical disks, Formation control, Potential functions, Underactuated ships

K. D. Do

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

1 INTRODUCTION Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) and Alkali-Aggregate Reaction (AAR) are both internal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INTRODUCTION Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) and Alkali-Aggregate Reaction (AAR) are both to produce potentially expansive ettringite in the set concrete. AAR may affect concretes cast with aggregate combined delayed ettringite formation and alkali aggregate reaction R.-P. Martin, J.-C. Renaud & F

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

345

Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta , Georgia 30332-0340, USA Abstract The solar chimney power the potential impacts on plant capacity resulting from cloud formation within or downwind of the solar chimney

Nenes, Athanasios

346

Hydrogen formation in nearly stoichiometric amounts from glucose by a Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides mutant.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reduction (hydrogen production...operate in the cell. Hillmer...a primary fuel source or...synthetic fuel cycles (i...and how 446 HYDROGEN FORMATION...conditions. Cells were grown...analysis was car- ried out...wild-type cells were spread...BACTERIOL. HYDROGEN FORMATION...

B A Macler; R A Pelroy; J A Bassham

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Study on the flow production characteristics of deep geothermal wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a study on the potential flow production characteristics of three non-producing, deep (average depth 4000 m) geothermal wells in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. The expected production characteristics of these wells were computed in order to determine whether their inability to sustain flow was due to: (1) heat loss effects in the well; (2) the influence of casing diameters; (3) transient temperature effects during the first days of well discharge, and/or (4) the effects of secondary low-enthalpy inflows. For the study, the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for two-phase homogeneous flow were solved for the wellbore, since homogeneous flow provides the simplest technique for analyzing two-phase flows when the flow patterns are not well established. The formation temperature distribution was computed assuming radial transient heat conduction. The numerical model was validated by comparison with analytical solutions and with measured pressure and temperature profiles of well H-17 from the Los Humeros geothermal field, Mexico. It was found that the wells should have sustained production. The early heat losses were so large that the flow needed to be induced, and flow will be sustained only after a few days of induced discharge. For well M-202, the analysis suggests that the inflow of secondary colder fluids was responsible for stopping the flow in this well.

Alfonso Garcia-Gutierrez; Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes; Isa??as Hernandez-Ramirez

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Green methods for hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses environmentally benign and sustainable, as green, methods for hydrogen production and categorizes them based on the driving sources and applications. Some potential sources are electrical, thermal, biochemical, photonic, electro-thermal, photo-thermal, photo-electric, photo-biochemical, and thermal-biochemical. Such forms of energy can be derived from renewable sources, nuclear energy and from energy recovery processes for hydrogen production purposes. These processes are analyzed and assessed for comparison purposes. Various case studies are presented to highlight the importance of green hydrogen production methods and systems for practical applications.

Ibrahim Dincer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

Minnesota, University of

350

LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

Minnesota, University of

351

Ionisation Potential of Radon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... WE have determined the ionisation potential of radon, using the well-known method,1 due to Hertz, of compensation of the negative ... xenon and krypton: it was found to be 2.6 volts. The quantity of radon used in different experiments was of the order of 300 millicuries. The volume of ...

F. HOLWECK; L. WERTENSTEIN

1930-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...syrris.com Crimping Tool The La-Pha-Pack stainless steel cleanroom crimping tools are designed for a controlled, low-effort...product range is ideal for highly sensitive chromatography cleanroom applications where it is essential that the environment remains...

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...qiagen.com Crimping Tool The La-Pha-Pack stainless steel cleanroom crimping tools are designed for a controlled, low-effort...product range is ideal for highly sensitive chromatography cleanroom applications where it is essential that the environment remains...

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

New Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...three regulated d-c power supplies, a digital...Product Data Sheet giving specifications, typical drying perform-ance...than 4 lb. Nominal power consumption is less...heaters and electrical insulation at elevated temperatures...and 0.01 xsec. Power source is a 5-Mw...

Joshua Stern

1961-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar April 30, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will understand the components of identifying energy project potential and options. Presenters will discuss market considerations, initial site considerations, project savings or rate-of-return estimates, production potential, final site selection, tribal options, finance, partnerships, and participation processes. Attendees will also become familiar with data gathering and analysis procedures such as tribal facility electric cost data, regulations, and interconnection requirements; paths to market for project power; and renewable sales, risks; and utility rules. By following the steps outlined in the webinar, Tribes can determine

356

Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?  

SciTech Connect

Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Global bioenergy potential from high-lignin agricultural residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production systems has a global bioenergy production potential of 4.1...efficiency (15–40%) of the bioenergy into actual electricity...Costa Rica, Chile, and Argentina (coconut, olive, mango...2000 (17, 18). Modeling Bioenergy Based on Geospatial Data Shows...

Venugopal Mendu; Tom Shearin; J. Elliott Campbell; Jr; Jozsef Stork; Jungho Jae; Mark Crocker; George Huber; Seth DeBolt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Quarkonium Production in PHENIX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quarkonia provide a sensitive probe of the properties of the hot dense medium created in high energy heavy ion collisions. Hard scattering processes result in the production of heavy quark pairs that interact with the collision medium during hadronization. These in medium interactions convey information about the fundamental properties of the medium itself and can be used to examine the modification of the QCD confining potential in the collision environment. Baseline measurements from the d+Au and p+p collision systems can be used to distinguish cold nuclear matter effects while measurements from heavy ion collision systems, Au+Au and Cu+Cu, can be used to quantify in-medium effects. PHENIX results for the production of the $J/\\psi$ for a diverse set of collision systems and energies and for the $\\Upsilon$ in p+p collisions are presented.

Abigail Bickley; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reducing carbon dioxide to products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria: metabolic control of end product formation in Thermoanaerobium brockii.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...monoculture, T. brockii grew on ethanol as the energy source, and acetate and methane...monoculture, T. brockii grew on ethanol as the energy source, and acetate and methane...monoculture, T. brockii grew on ethanol as the energy source, and acetate and methane...

A Ben-Bassat; R Lamed; J G Zeikus

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100 ?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 1–4 mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8 mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500 mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000 s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20 days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250 days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

STEO December 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen topping 7 million bpd U.S. crude oil production is now expected to rise by about 760,000 barrels per day in 2012, the biggest annual increase in oil output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. American oil producers are expected to pump a daily average of 6.4 million barrels of crude oil this year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administrator's new monthly energy forecast. The annual increase in oil output tops the previous record set in 1951 and marks the largest yearly production increase ever. Most of the increase in crude oil production is driven by drilling activity in shale formations located in Texas, North Dakota and Montana. U.S. crude oil production next year is expected to top 7 million barrels per day for the first time

363

Varying properties of in situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation based on assessed viscosities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A viscosity of one or more zones of the hydrocarbon layer is assessed. The heating rates in the zones are varied based on the assessed viscosities. The heating rate in a first zone of the formation is greater than the heating rate in a second zone of the formation if the viscosity in the first zone is greater than the viscosity in the second zone. Fluids are produced from the formation through the production wells.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

The effects of two-phase flow on streaming potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of approximately 60 for the capillary. The enhancement in streaming potentials may be important in many different geophysical applications in geothermal zones, earthquake zones and fracture pattern determination in areas such as production wells...). Streaming potentials are associated with some self-potential (SP) anomalies. These anomalies are related to fluid flow and may play a key role in subsurface flow investigations of geothermal resources, earthquake prediction, environmental...

Estrada, Cecilia

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Copy Service, Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copy Service Copy Service Copying in color or black-and-white from hard copy or electronic files. Paper size up to 13" x 19" in a variety of stocks and colors. Larger Documents (up to 36" wide and 100" long) can be reproduced in Black & White from prints or files and can be saved in a variety of electronic format Variable Data Printing - personalized document production Tab Printing Forms CD/DVD Duplication CD/DVD direct printing Binding Collate documents, insert tab dividers, punch holes for binding Stapling documents up to 1 inch thick Spiral, adhesive and perfect binding. Hard covers also available upon request Folding & Mailing Print and apply mailing addresses and labels Machine fold documents and insert into envelopes for mailing Laminate printed items up to 35" wide.

367

The Carbon Footprint of Bioenergy Sorghum Production in Central Texas: Production Implications on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Carbon Cycling, and Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhanced interest in biofuel production has renewed interest in bioenergy crop production within the United States. Agriculture’s role in biofuel production is critical because it has the potential to supply renewable energy while minimizing...

Storlien, Joseph Orgean

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

Kelkar, Mohan

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30-year Best-on-market Primary Energy Savings Potential (30-year Best-on-market Primary Energy Savings Potential (ultra-low-energy-use products to market could significantly

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

371

Muon Production in Relativistic Cosmic-Ray Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enough to study high p T muon production in air showers.production of far forward muons, potentially probing nuclearto this study of high p T muons. This work was supported in

Klein, Spencer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water H. R. Warman In...the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Earth's deeper water areas, an attempt...United Kingdom 1981 Hydrocarbon potential of deep water Warman H. R. Author...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reactor power history from fission product signatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to identify fission product signatures that could be used to uniquely identify a specific spent fuel assembly in order to improve international safeguards. This capability would help prevent and deter potential...

Sweeney, David J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Broiler Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,","efficient broiler production. ,. . , .: I-A +>+ Panels or translucent plastic curtains which close and open easily when weather varies are helpful in providing comfortable temperatures for the birds. A damper is needed so that ridge ventilatm can be dosed... easily during ooM weather. inclement weather. However, poultry housing costs should be kept within a range whereby earnings can justify the investment. Location Orient the house with the long axis run- ning east and west to prevent the early morn...

Cawley, W. O.; Wormeli, B. C.; Quisenberry, J. H.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Evaluation of Moringa oleifera seed flour as a flocculating agent for potential biodiesel producer microalgae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microalgal biofuel alternatives have been hindered by their cost and energy intensive production. In the microalgal harvesting process, the intermediate step of flocculation shows potential in drastically redu...

Cláudia Maria Luz Lapa Teixeira…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy and Environmental Aspects of an FPSO for LNG Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The floating production unit HLNG FPSO-1 has been evaluated with respect to its energy consumption and emissions to air, and improvement potentials within the same… (more)

Revheim, Lars Petter Rein

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER MONOLITH FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as an alternative technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of aqueous high sodium containing radioactive wastes at various DOE facilities in the United States. The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants converts aqueous Low Activity Wastes (LAW) to a granular or ''mineralized'' waste form while converting organic components to CO{sub 2} and steam, and nitrate/nitrite components, if any, to N{sub 2}. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage-like structures that atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The granular product has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Shallow land burial requires that the mineralized waste form be able to sustain the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations. The strength requirement necessitates binding the granular product into a monolith. FBSR mineral products were formulated into a variety of monoliths including various cements, Ceramicrete, and hydroceramics. All but one of the nine monoliths tested met the <2g/m{sup 2} durability specification for Na and Re (simulant for Tc-99) when tested using the Product Consistency Test (PCT; ASTM C1285). Of the nine monoliths tested the cements produced with 80-87 wt% FBSR product, the Ceramicrete, and the hydroceramic produced with 83.3 wt% FBSR product, met the compressive strength and durability requirements for an LAW waste form.

Jantzen, C

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Petroleum exploration of Winnipegosis Formation in north-central North Dakota (Williston basin)  

SciTech Connect

The Winnipegosis Formation (Middle Devonian) in north-central Dakota has the greatest potential for large oil reserves in the Williston basin. The Winnipegosis carbonate (50 to 325 ft thick) was deposited in the southeast end of the Elk Point restricted sea. During Winnipegosis deposition, the Williston basin could be divided into two distinct environments: (1) a deep starved basin with accompanying pinnacle reefs separated by interreef, laminated limestone and (2) a surrounding carbonate shelf. Within the carbonate shelf are patch reefs, banks, and tidal flats. Overlying the Winnipegosis carbonate is the Prairie Formation, which has a basal anhydrite (0 to 70 ft thick) and an overlying salt (0 to 650 ft thick). These were deposited in a regressive phase of the Elk Point sea and act as seals for Winnipegosis oil entrapment. Currently, oil production from the Winnipegosis in the Williston basin is from stratigraphic traps and from small structures on the carbonate shelf. The most significant accumulation to date is Temple field, in which 11 wells produce from +/- 20 ft of Winnipegosis dolomite. The pinnacle reef environment has potential for significant oil reserves from 250-ft thick reefs covering 160 ac or less. Two pinnacle reefs have had free-oil recoveries from thin pay zones. The Rainbow/Zama fields in northwest Alberta have an ultimate reserve of more than 1 billion bbl of oil from Keg River reefs, which are correlative and similar to the Winnipegosis reefs in North Dakota. The strong seismic reflection that originates from the Winnipegosis-Prairie evaporite interface provides an excellent means of detecting Winnipegosis reefs. Amplitude of the Winnipegosis reflection is reduced dramatically over the reefs. The resulting dim spot is one criteria used in identifying reefs.

Guy, W.J. Jr.; Braden, K.W.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

STAR FORMATION NEAR BERKELEY 59: EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS  

SciTech Connect

A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (?2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 ?m) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v {sub LSR} = –15 to –17 km s{sup –1}, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (–15.7 km s{sup –1}), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction A{sub V} and distance of 15 ± 2 mag and 830 ± 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

Rosvick, J. M. [Department of Physical Sciences, Thompson Rivers University, 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC V2C 0C8 (Canada); Majaess, D. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Dynamics of assembly production flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite recent developments in management theory, maintaining a manufacturing schedule remains difficult because of production delays and fluctuations in demand and supply of materials. The response of manufacturing systems to such disruptions to dynamic behavior has been rarely studied. To capture these responses, we investigate a process that models the assembly of parts into end products. The complete assembly process is represented by a directed tree, where the smallest parts are injected at leaves and the end products are removed at the root. A discrete assembly process, represented by a node on the network, integrates parts, which are then sent to the next downstream node as a single part. The model exhibits some intriguing phenomena, including overstock cascade, phase transition in terms of demand and supply fluctuations, nonmonotonic distribution of stockout in the network, and the formation of a stockout path and stockout chains. Surprisingly, these rich phenomena result from only the nature of distr...

Ezaki, Takahiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Bitumen-rubber composite binders for production of asphalt concretes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dissolution of vulcanized rubber in bitumen in the presence of a devulcanizing additive and the formation of bitumen-rubber composites, which are promising binders for the production of asphalt concretes, wer...

R. G. Zhitov; V. N. Kizhnyaev; V. V. Alekseenko…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro?Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins  

SciTech Connect

The Knox Supergroup is a significant part of the Cambrian-Ordovician age sedimentary deposition in the Illinois Basin. While there is a very small amount of oil production associated with the upper Knox, it is more commonly used as a zone for both Class I and Class II disposal wells in certain areas around the state. Based on the three penetrations of the Knox Formation at the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration site in Macon County, Illinois, there is potential for certain zones in the Knox to be used for CO2 sequestration. More specifically, the Potosi member of the Knox Formation at about –3,670 feet (ft) subsea depth would be a candidate as all three penetrations had massive circulation losses while drilling through this interval. Each well required the setting of cement plugs to regain wellbore stability so that the intermediate casing could be set and successfully cemented to surface. Log and core analysis suggests significant karst porosity throughout the Potosi member. The purpose of this study is to develop a well plan for the drilling of a CO2 injection well with the capability to inject 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA] CO2 into the Knox Formation over a period of 30 years.

Kirksey, Jim; Ansari, Sajjad; Malkewicz, Nick; Leetaru, Hannes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations  

SciTech Connect

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Carrier cooling and exciton formation in GaSe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial cooling of hot carriers and the subsequent exciton formation in GaSe are studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) using femtosecond up-conversion techniques. From the time-resolved PL spectra of this layered III-VI semiconductor two different energy relaxation channels are derived. After an initial subpicosecond cooling due to Fröhlich-type interaction of carriers with longitudinal optical E?(22) phonons a slower regime follows, which is dominated by deformation potential interaction with the nonpolar optical A1?(12) phonons. The coupling constant for nonpolar optical phonon scattering is derived. The subsequent formation of excitons is studied at different carrier densities and detection energies. A cross section for the free-exciton formation is determined based on a rate equation model.

S. Nüsse; P. Haring Bolivar; H. Kurz; V. Klimov; F. Levy

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Gas plants, new fields spark production rise  

SciTech Connect

Gas plant construction is welcomed by operators in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. Petroleum and gas production has increased. The Montana portion of the Williston Basin shows new discoveries. Some secondary recovery efforts are in operation. Industrial officials share the same enthusiasm and optimism for rising production as they do for exploration potential in the basin. 5 tables.

Lenzini, D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Effect of tab design on large-format Li-ion cell performance , Gang Luo b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model a b s t r a c t Large-format Li-ion batteries are essential for vehicle and grid energy storage. Today, scale-up of Li-ion cells has not maximized the potential of available battery materials, leading a sustainable energy future. How to unlock the potential of existing Li battery materials and scale up Li-ion

388

Sugar Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Production Sugar Production Name: Lauren Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: This is the experiment I did: our class took 6 sugars, placed them in test tubes and put three drops of yeast in each test tube. we then placed them in the incubator for one day and the next day looked at our results. the purpose was to find out with sugar would produce the most carbon dioxide. two of the sugars that we tested were LACTOSE and STARCH. my question is, why are lactose and starch the only sugars who didn't produce any, or very very little, carbon dioxide? and how is this process related to glycolysis? Replies: Bacteria and yeast are very efficient with their enzyme systems. They don't make enzymes they can't use. Yeast don't have the enzymes necessary to metabolize lactose. Starch is a complex sugar and yeast needs certain enzymes to break starch down into sugar. Every chemical reaction needs its own enzyme.

389

Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Abuse Liability Assessment of Tobacco Products Including Potential Reduced Exposure Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for cancer and its targeted market is the Black community. In...voltage of 25 V and collision energy of 15 eV. The mass transitions...voltage of 25 V and collision energy of 20 eV. As show in Fig...for cancer and its targeted market is the Black community. In...

Lawrence P. Carter; Maxine L. Stitzer; Jack E. Henningfield; Rich J. O'Connor; K. Michael Cummings; and Dorothy K. Hatsukami

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Abuse Liability Assessment of Tobacco Products Including Potential Reduced Exposure Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1993;61:743-50. 23 Stitzer ML , de Wit H. Abuse liability of nicotine. In...Addiction 2006;101 Suppl 1:134-41. 88 de Wit H , Griffiths RR. Testing the abuse liability...predictions of the economic concept of unit price in a choice context. J Exp Anal Behav...

Lawrence P. Carter; Maxine L. Stitzer; Jack E. Henningfield; Rich J. O'Connor; K. Michael Cummings; and Dorothy K. Hatsukami

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

STEO January 2013 - oil production increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 U.S. crude oil production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. America's oil output will jump nearly 900,000 barrels per day in 2013 to an average 7.3 million barrels a day, according to the latest monthly forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This would mark the biggest one-year increase in output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. U.S. daily oil production is expected to rise by another 600,000 barrels in 2014 to nearly 8 million barrels a day, the highest level since 1988. Most of America's oil production growth over the next two years will come from more drilling activity in tight shale rock formations located in North Dakota and Texas

395

STEO September 2012 - natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

natural gas production at record high, inventories most natural gas production at record high, inventories most ever at start of heating season on Nov. 1 U.S. marketed natural gas production is expected to rise by 2.6 billion cubic feet per day this year to a record 68.9 billion cubic feet per day, said the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Katherine Teller explains: "This strong growth in production was driven in large part by production in Pennsylvania's Marcellus shale formation where drilling companies are using hydraulic fracturing to free the trapped gas." The increase in production, along with the large natural gas inventories left over from last winter because of warmer temperatures, will push U.S. gas inventories to a record high of nearly

396

Pair production in inhomogeneous fields  

SciTech Connect

We employ the recently developed worldline numerics, which combines string-inspired field theory methods with Monte Carlo techniques, to develop an algorithm for the computation of pair-production rates in scalar QED for inhomogeneous background fields. We test the algorithm with the classic Sauter potential, for which we compute the local production rate for the first time. Furthermore, we study the production rate for a superposition of a constant E field and a spatially oscillating field for various oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal that the approximation by a local derivative expansion already fails for frequencies small compared to the electron-mass scale, whereas for strongly oscillating fields a derivative expansion for the averaged field represents an acceptable approximation. The worldline picture makes the nonlocal nature of pair production transparent and facilitates a profound understanding of this important quantum phenomenon.

Gies, Holger; Klingmueller, Klaus [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pair production in inhomogeneous fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ the recently developed worldline numerics, which combines string-inspired field theory methods with Monte-Carlo techniques, to develop an algorithm for the computation of pair-production rates in scalar QED for inhomogeneous background fields. We test the algorithm with the classic Sauter potential, for which we compute the local production rate for the first time. Furthermore, we study the production rate for a superposition of a constant E field and a spatially oscillating field for various oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal that the approximation by a local derivative expansion fails already for frequencies small compared to the electron mass scale, whereas for strongly oscillating fields a derivative expansion for the averaged field represents an acceptable approximation. The worldline picture makes the nonlocal nature of pair production transparent and facilitates a profound understanding of this important quantum phenomenon.

Holger Gies; Klaus Klingmuller

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Product Life Cycle, and Market Entry and Exit Decisions Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key characteristic of the product life cycle (PLC) is the depletion of the product’s market potential due to technological obsolescence. Based on this concept, we develop a stochastic model for evaluating market entry and exit decisions during...

Chi, Tailan; Liu, John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Economics and Energy of Ethanol Production from Alfalfa, Corn, and Switchgrass in the Upper Midwest, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the USA, biomass crop systems will be needed to meet future ethanol production goals. We estimated production costs, profits, and energy budgets for three potential crop systems for ... . Production costs, pro...

P. A. Vadas; K. H. Barnett; D. J. Undersander

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ARTIFACT FORMATION DURING NEUTRALIZATION OF TANK 50 SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

Degradation products have been identified in the extracts of Tank 50 samples analyzed by semivolatile organic compound analysis (SVOA) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These materials, identified as short chain alkyl alcohols, were formed by acidification during sample preparation. A number of questions were raised about the formation of these and other materials reported in Tank 50 surface samples, and this report serves to address these questions.

Crump, S.; Young, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The evolution of hydraulic fracturing in the Almond formation  

SciTech Connect

This study draws from a database of over 600 wells to evaluate reservoir, production and treatment characteristics in the low-permeability, naturally-fractured Almond formation. Treatment-induced damage can be significant; damage mechanisms are discussed and ways are shown to mitigate these problems. An effective fracture stimulation design combines proppant scheduling of the late 1970`s with fluid and gel-breaker systems of today.

Cramer, D.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Schwanniomyces: a potential superyeast  

SciTech Connect

In 1977, when our quest to determine the industrial potential of the genus Schwanniomyces began, little was known about this microbe. The genus was first described by Kloecker in 1909, after the isolation in the Antilles of Schwanniomyces occidentalis. A number of biological descriptions (see Ferreira and Phaff) and other species were also described. In addition, it was known that close to 100 yeasts were able to assimilate at least part of the starch molecule. Then, Augustin et al. and Costamagna et al. reported the ability of Schwanniomyces spp. to produce extracellular alpha-amylase and utilize starch. Later discoveries would indicate that both alpha-amylase and glucoamylase were present, and from then on, research with the yeast Schwanniomyces would become very competitive - especially in Canada and Europe. (Refs. 53).

Ingledew, W.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Ground potential rise monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

404

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

SciTech Connect

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

406

SPOILAGE OF ANIMAL PRODUCTS | Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A seafood product is considered spoiled when it is deemed by consumers to be unacceptable for consumption due to poor appearance, flavor, or texture. Microbial spoilage occurs when the formation of off-flavors, off-odors, discoloration, or slime reach objectionable levels, the determination of which is influenced by cultural and economic background. Spoilage of seafood depends on the types and populations of microbial contaminants, intrinsic factors (pH, water activity, enzyme activity, and nutrient content), and extrinsic environmental factors (temperature, package head space gas composition, and storage time). Although spoiled seafoods generally are not unsafe, spoiled fish of the Scombridae family can result in the formation of toxic biogenic amines such as histamine.

D.L. Marshall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. In this reporting period we revised all of the economic calculations, participated in technology transfer of project results, and began working on project closeout tasks in anticipation of the project ending December 31, 2005. In this research, we conducted five separate simulation investigations, or cases. These cases are (1) CO{sub 2} sequestration base case scenarios for 4,000-ft and 6,200-ft depth coal beds in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of east-central Texas, (2) sensitivity study of the effects of well spacing on sequestration, (3) sensitivity study of the effects of injection gas composition, (4) sensitivity study of the effects of injection rate, and (5) sensitivity study of the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection/sequestration. Results show that, in most cases, revenue from coalbed methane production does not completely offset the costs of CO{sub 2} sequestration in Texas low-rank coals, indicating that CO{sub 2} injection is not economically feasible for the ranges of gas prices and carbon credits investigated. The best economic performance is obtained with flue gas (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) injection, as compared to injection of 100% CO{sub 2} and a mixture of 50% CO{sub 2} and 50% N{sub 2}. As part of technology transfer for this project, we presented results at the West Texas Geological Society Fall Symposium in October 2005 and at the COAL-SEQ Forum in November 2005.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method to inhibit deposit formation  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for inhibiting deposit formation on the contact surfaces of structures confining heated hydrocarbon fluid which exhibits substantial fouling. The process consists of introducing into the hydrocarbon fluid at least an inhibiting amount of thiophene-containing polycondensed aromatic/naphthenic compounds of number average molecular weight (M-bar n) from 200 to 1,000.

Dickakian, G.B.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Plasma Rotation during Spheromak Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe Doppler shifts of a CIII impurity line in a spheromak plasma showing toroidal rotation during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration but not during the equilibrium or decay phase. The evolution of the velocity fields is consistent with the estimated rate of cross-helicity decay given the viscosity and resistivity of the plasma.

T. Peyser and G. C. Goldenbaum

1988-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

412

Method of protecting a permeable formation  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of drilling a well bore through subsurface formations including a permeable formation. It comprises: drilling a well bore through the permeable formation to at least the lower boundary thereof; filling the bore in the permeable formation with liquid composition capable of gelling, the liquid composition containing a gel breaker; allowing the gel to mature; drilling through the gel so as to open the well bore in the permeable formation, some of the gel remaining to plug the permeable formation in the well bore; installing a casing in the well bore in the permeable formation; and allowing the remaining gel to revert to a liquid.

Falk, D.O.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Product lines for digital information products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Digital information products are an important class of widely used digital products, whose core benefit is the delivery of information or education (e.g., electronic books,… (more)

Pankratius, Victor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa-

415

Chemical conversions of butyraldehydes during separation of the products of oxo synthesis  

SciTech Connect

It was shown that aldol condensation and formation of acetals occur during isolation of butyraldehydes by continuous fractionation of the products of oxo synthesis. Aldehyde losses due to chemical conversions decrease with increase of temperature in the reboiler, and may be virtually eliminated, while the selectivity of formation of the products of aldol condensation increases.

Kuz'mina, L.S.; Maiorova, L.V.; Katsnel'son, M.G.; Kharisov, M.A.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Bubble Over-Potential During Two-Phase Alkaline Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During two-phase water electrolysis production of bubbles at one or both electrodes is observed. This leads to a change in the electrolyser electrical and hydrodynamic properties. When gravity is present, the production of bubbles at the electrodes induces a macro-convection in the electrolyser. This leads to a local distribution of the bubbles determining the local gas void fraction and current density at the electrodes. The absence of gravity eliminates the natural convection and buoyancy forces and consequently the frictional forces. It is generally difficult to estimate the quantitative influence of each of these single phenomena due to strong coupling. In the present work, alkaline water electrolysis is performed. The formation of gas bubbles at the anode is observed using four cameras. The aim of this study is to establish the quantitative evolution laws for the electrochemical cell potential, the bubble diameter and population density during alkaline (NaOH) two-phase electrolysis in function of the two explored inputs current density and gravity.

Philippe Mandin; Zine Derhoumi; Hervé Roustan; Wüthrich Rolf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Coatings in geothermal energy production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geothermal energy has a forecasted potential of 25000 MW years of electrical and 16 000-67 000 MW years of thermal energy capacity by the year 2000. Current estimates indicate that lower temperature resources exist in at least 39 states. The development of these resources requires a wide range of cost-effective materials. The purpose of this paper is to review geothermal conditions and the present use of coatings in geothermal production, and to assess the potential for their future applications. The early identification of such materials needs is an essential step for planning the total requirements for well drilling and facilities construction in all sectors of the energy program.

Robert R. Reeber

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Technical Potential for Local Distributed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact of high penetrations of solar PV on wholesale power markets (energy and capacity Technical Potential for Local Distributed Photovoltaics in California Preliminary.391.5100 www.ethree.com Technical Potential for Local Distributed Photovoltaics in California Preliminary

419

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Natural Gas Data Collection and Estimation This presentation to the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association gives an overview of the EIA natural gas data collection system, Oklahoma natural gas statistics, recent changes in monthly natural gas production statistics, and the May 2010 short-term natural gas forecast. The presentation focuses on the EIA-914, the "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report," and recent changes to this survey's estimation methodology. Categories: Production (Released, 6/9/2010, ppt format)

420

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields April 25, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that an innovative technology has successfully improved oil recovery at a 106-year old Illinois field by more than 300 percent. This method of extraction could help pull as many as 130 million additional barrels of oil from the depleted field, which is past peak production using traditional drilling. "The Energy Department is making critical investments in innovations today that are helping the U.S. find and develop every available source of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields April 25, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that an innovative technology has successfully improved oil recovery at a 106-year old Illinois field by more than 300 percent. This method of extraction could help pull as many as 130 million additional barrels of oil from the depleted field, which is past peak production using traditional drilling. "The Energy Department is making critical investments in innovations today that are helping the U.S. find and develop every available source of

422

Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formatting Formatting Jump to: navigation, search You can format your text using wiki markup. This consists of normal characters like asterisks, single quotes or equation marks which have a special function in the wiki, sometimes depending on their position. For example, to format a word in italic, you include it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character formatting - applies anywhere Italic text ''italic'' italic Bold text '''bold''' bold Bold and italic '''''bold & italic''''' bold & italic Escape wiki markup no ''markup'' no ''markup'' section formatting - only at the beginning of the line Headings of different levels

423

Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472 Federal Register 472 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 83 / Monday, April 30, 2012 / Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document

424

Formation control for cooperative surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

>>> >>>> >>> >>>> >>>> >>> >>>> >>> >>>: _xi = vi cos i cos`i _yi = vi sin i cos`i _zi = vi sinfii _ i = !i _`i = ?i _vi = ui (2.10) Formation Constraints can be deflned by Qi = [r?i]I ?[bi]I = 0 and formation errors are represented byEi = [ri]I?[r?i]I. Let us deflne the error vector... velocity of the second virtual agent was determined 24 from Eq.(2.17). Also, Fig.6 shows that all errors are stabilized exponentially by the controllers ui in Eq.(2.9). The ith row in Fig.6 shows the errors between [ri]I and [r?i]I. The convergence rate...

Woo, Sang-Bum

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen production from coal gasification can be enhanced by driving the equilibrium limited Water Gas Shift reaction forward by incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} by-product via the carbonation of calcium oxide. This project aims at using the OSU patented high-reactivity mesoporous precipitated calcium carbonate sorbent for removing the CO{sub 2} product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the show the superior performance of the PCC sorbent over other naturally occurring calcium sorbents. Gas composition analyses show the formation of 100% pure hydrogen. Novel calcination techniques could lead to smaller reactor footprint and single-stage reactors that can achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production for multicyclic applications. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the effect of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of the diluent gas and the sorbent loading on the calcination kinetics which play an important role on the sorbent morphology. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, is envisioned to be a potential diluent gas due to its enhanced thermal properties. Steam calcination studies at 700-850 C reveal improved sorbent morphology over regular nitrogen calcination. A mixture of 80% steam and 20% CO{sub 2} at ambient pressure was used to calcine the spent sorbent at 820 C thus lowering the calcination temperature. Regeneration of calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate was achieved by carbonating the calcium sulfide slurry by bubbling CO{sub 2} gas at room temperature.

Mahesh Iyer; Himanshu Gupta; Danny Wong; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Knockdown of endothelial NOS by lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA in hemangioendothelioma cells increases proliferation and tumor formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) derived nitric oxide (NO) is a key contributor to the angiogenic process. By augmenting angiogenesis NO could potentially promote tumor progression. The object of this study was to determine how knockdown of ecNOS affects endothelial NO production and the angiogenic response in endothelial cells. EOMA cells derived from a spontaneously arising murine hemangioendothelioma were genetically manipulated to stably express siRNA targeting ecNOS. Knockdown of ecNOS in different stably transfected EOMA cell lines was demonstrated by quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and ecNOS specific ELISA. An EOMA cell line with near complete knockdown of ecNOS exhibited dramatically altered morphology and changes in the expression of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in angiogenesis. This cell line exhibited a 4-fold increase in proliferation in vitro, altered tube formation in matrigel and formed tumors in mice more rapidly than the parental cells. In contrast, a cell line in which ecNOS protein levels were reduced only 5-fold did not show changes in proliferation rate, tube formation or tumor growth. These results suggest that ecNOS derived nitric oxide reduces the growth of hemangioendothelioma derived tumors, and underscore the importance of careful consideration of the tumor type when selecting modulation of nitric oxide signaling as a treatment strategy.

Zhi Chen; Sarasijam Joshi; Katalin Kauser; Alan R. Brooks

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Biogas Potential in the United States (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Biogas has received increased attention as an alternative energy source in the United States. The factsheet provides information about the biogas (methane) potential from various sources in the country (by county and state) and estimates the power generation and transportation fuels production (renewable natural gas) potential from these biogas sources. It provides valuable information to the industry, academia and policy makers in support of their future decisions.

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

430

Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5) Subsetting Tools Available for New MODIS Land Products (Collection 5) The ORNL DAAC announces two tools for subsetting land products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. The first tool allows users to obtain MODIS land products for 1,052 selected sites worldwide in ASCII format (7 x 7 km) and in GeoTIFF format (25 x 25 km). To access this tool see http://daac.ornl.gov/modisfixedsite. The global subsetting tool creates MODIS land product subsets for user-selected areas worldwide from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km area and for a user-selected time period during the MODIS record. To access this tool, please see http://daac.ornl.gov/modisglobal. Both tools subset the following MODIS Land Products:

431

Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

433

Chapter 20: Electric Potential and Electric Potential Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Chapter 20: Electric Potential and Electric Potential Energy 2. A 4.5 µC charge moves in a uniform electric field ( )5 ^4.1 10 N/C= �E x . The change in electric potential energy of a charge that moves against an electric field is given by equation 20-1, 0U q Ed = . If the charge moves in the same

Kioussis, Nicholas

434

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Liquids Production Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquids Production Projection Tables (1990-2030) Liquids Production Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Liquids Production Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 19 complete) Liquids Production Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Liquids Production Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table G1 World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case Table G1. World Total Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table G2 World Conventional Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case Table G2. World Conventional Liquids Production by Region and Country, Reference Case. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

435

Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehugera 1 , B and methane are the main biogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) con-2 tributing to the global warming potential (GWP to design productive16 agro-ecosystems with low global warming impact.17 Keywords18 Global warming potential

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

436

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 28412865 Cleaning products and air fresheners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 2841­2865 Cleaning products and air fresheners: exposure of certain cleaning products and air fresheners. In addition, many cleaning agents and air fresheners contain chemicals that can react with other air contaminants to yield potentially harmful secondary products

Short, Daniel

437

Conceptual study of thermal stimulation in shale gas formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shale gas formations have become a major source of energy in recent years. Developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have made these reservoirs more accessible and productive. Apart from other dissimilarities from conventional gas reservoirs, one major difference is that a considerable amount of gas produced from these shale gas formations comes from desorption. Up to 85% of the total gas within shale can be found as an adsorbed phase on clay and kerogen, so how much adsorbed gas can be produced will have significant impact on ultimate gas recovery. The Langmuir isotherm has been widely used in industry to describe the pressure dependence of adsorbed gas. However, temperature dependent adsorption behavior and its major implications for evaluating thermal stimulation as a recovery method for shale reservoirs have not been thoroughly explored. Therefore, in order to design and analyze the thermal treatment of shale gas formations successfully, it is crucial to understand the effects of fracture heating on the shale gas adsorption and desorption phenomenon, and how can we exploit such effects to enhance shale gas recovery from hydraulically fractured reservoirs. Even though numerous research efforts have been focused on thermal recovery of shale oil, its possible application to shale gas has not been investigated. In this research, we propose a method to evaluate desorbed gas as a function of pressure and temperature in shale formations, by regression of a Bi-Langmuir model on Langmuir isotherm data. We have developed a fully coupled unconventional reservoir simulator, which is capable of capturing real gas flow in the shale matrix and in the hydraulic fracture by accounting for the effects of gas desorption and diffusion, as well as the temperature diffusion process within the matrix. This simulator enables us to investigate the effects of fracture heating on the shale gas desorption phenomenon on the global well performance and recovery. The results of this study show, for the first time in a rigorous way, that by increasing the temperature within the fracture, shale gas recovery can be improved. We have rationalized and quantified relations between the adsorption/desorption fundamental phenomena and stimulation temperature, fracture spacing, reservoir permeability and bottom hole pressure. The thermal properties of shale formations only have limited impacts on long term production. The results of this study can provide a guidance to develop a strategy to design thermal treatment in hydraulically fractured shale formations and propose the degree of thermal stimulation temperature required in a fracture to promote an economically viable return on production.

HanYi Wang; Omobola Ajao; Michael J. Economides

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Novel forms of carbon as potential anodes for lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to design and synthesize novel carbons as potential electrode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries. A synthetic approach which utilizes inorganic templates is described and initial characterization results are discussed. The templates also act as a catalyst enabling carbon formation at low temperatures. This synthetic approach should make it easier to control the surface and bulk characteristics of these carbons.

Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

440

On the mobility and potential retention of iodine in the Callovovian-Oxfordian formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

manuscript, published in "Physics and Chemistry of the Earth Parts A/B/C 32 (2007) 539-551" DOI : 10.1016/j.pce organic matter of the sediment before and during deposition, and early diagenesis. At variance with total diffusion on similar rock materials have already shown that iodide does not behave like chloride

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Shale Gas Formations and Their Potential for Carbon Storage: Opportunities and Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale gas resources are proving to be globally abundant...2...(carbon dioxide) to mitigate the climate impacts of global carbon emissions from power and industrial sectors. This paper reviews global shale gas res...

Roozbeh Khosrokhavar; Steve Griffiths; Karl-Heinz Wolf

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Persian Gulf Basin: Geological history, sedimentary formations, and petroleum potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Persian Gulf Basin is the richest region of the ... Foredeep, which is a member of the Persian Gulf Basin. During the most part of the...

A. I. Konyuhov; B. Maleki

443

Identification of potential biophysical and molecular signalling mechanisms underlying hyaluronic acid enhancement of cartilage formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TGF-beta pathway targets activin 6.82 up inhibitor of DNA binding 1 8.57 down inhibitor of DNA binding 2 4.67 up c-Myc transcription...murine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in chitosan sponges. Am. J. Vet. Res. 72, 42-50...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Identifying soils with potential of expanding sulfate mineral formation using electromagnetic induction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, moisture, salinity, and temperature (Doerge et al., 2003). Soil properties such as cation exchange capacity, solum depth and pore continuity may also be extrapolated from apparent EC measurements. Currently, the two most popular commercial instruments...

Fox, Miranda Lynn

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

446

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Proportional structural effects of formative indicators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formative constructs must influence two or more distinct outcome variables for meaningful tests of the formative conceptualization. Because the construct mediates the effects of its indicators, the indicators must have ...

Franke, George R.; Preacher, K. J.; Rigdon, Ed E.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

T. Padmanabhan

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

449

Interchange format for hybrid systems: abstract semantics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In [1] we advocated the need for an interchange format for hybrid systems that enables the integration of design tools coming from many different research communities. In deriving such interchange format the main challenge is to define a language that, ...

Alessandro Pinto; Luca P. Carloni; Roberto Passerone; Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

451

Caustic formation in expanding condensates of cold atoms  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of density in an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate that initially has a spatially varying phase, concentrating on behavior when these phase variations are large. In this regime large density fluctuations develop during expansion. Maxima have a characteristic density that diverges with the amplitude of phase variations and their formation is analogous to that of caustics in geometrical optics. We analyze in detail caustic formation in a quasi-one-dimensional condensate, which before expansion is subject to a periodic or random optical potential, and we discuss the equivalent problem for a quasi-two-dimensional system. We also examine the influence of many-body correlations in the initial state on caustic formation for a Bose gas expanding from a strictly one-dimensional trap. In addition, we study a similar arrangement for noninteracting fermions, showing that Fermi surface discontinuities in the momentum distribution give rise in that case to sharp peaks in the spatial derivative of the density. We discuss recent experiments and argue that fringes reported in time of flight images [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. A 77, 033632 (2008)] are an example of caustic formation.

Chalker, J. T. [Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Shapiro, B. [Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

On October 1, 2008 US DOE-sponsored research project entitled “Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery” under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005643 officially started at The University of North Dakota (UND). This is the final report of the project; it covers the work performed during the project period of October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. The objectives of this project are to outline the methodology proposed to determine the in-situ stress field and geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 3% to a higher level. The success of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing depends on knowing local in-situ stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks. We propose a proactive approach to determine the in-situ stress and related geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in representative areas through integrated analysis of field and well data, core sample and lab experiments. Geomechanical properties are measured by AutoLab 1500 geomechanics testing system. By integrating lab testing, core observation, numerical simulation, well log and seismic image, drilling, completion, stimulation, and production data, in-situ stresses of Bakken formation are generated. These in-situ stress maps can be used as a guideline for future horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing design to improve the recovery of Bakken unconventional oil.

Ling, Kegang; Zeng, Zhengwen; He, Jun; Pei, Peng; Zhou, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Huang, Luke; Ostadhassan, Mehdi; Jabbari, Hadi; Blanksma, Derrick; Feilen, Harry; Ahmed, Salowah; Benson, Steve; Mann, Michael; LeFever, Richard; Gosnold, Will

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments  

SciTech Connect

Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

Rio, Yvon [CEA/IRFU/Sap, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

454

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Experimental studies of spheromak formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies in the PS?1 spheromak configuration can be effectively formed by a combined z? and ??pinch technique on both a fast (?formation??Alfvén) and a much slower timescale. The gross tilt and shift instability of the toroid can be suppressed by a combination of conduction walls shaping the separatrix by externally applied fields and the use of ‘‘figure?eight’’ coils. Optimum stabilty is obtained for almost spherical toroids. Maximum field?reversal times for stable well?confined toroids are ?40 /?sec consistent with resistive decay. Temperatures during the stable decay are 5–10 eV; impurity radiation is an important energy?loss mechanism.

H. Bruhns; C. Chin?Fatt; Y. P. Chong; A. W. DeSilva; G. C. Goldenbaum; H. R. Griem; G. W. Hart; R. A. Hess; J. H. Irby; R. S. Shaw

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Bar Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the various mechanisms for creating bars in rotating stellar disks, and conclude that the swing-amplified feed-back loop, which produces rapidly tumbling bars, remains the most probable. The bar continues to evolve after its formation in a number of ways; here I discuss what appears to be inevitable thickening normal to the plane, continued spiral activity in the outer disk and also underscore the increasingly important problem presented by angular momentum loss to the halo. Finally, I examine possible means, excluding interaction, by which bars in galaxies could be destroyed.

J A Sellwood

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

457

Zonal flow as pattern formation  

SciTech Connect

Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Scale formation at various locations in a geothermal operation due to injection of imported waters  

SciTech Connect

The injection of waters that are not native to a geothermal formation generates various physical and chemical problems. The major chemical problem resulting from such injections is the formation of sulfate scales (particularly CaSO4, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at various locations starting from the injection well through the production well to the surface facilities of any geothermal operation. One of the ways to prevent this type of scale formation is by reducing the sulfate concentration of the injection waters. The effect of sulfate deionization on scale formation at various locations of the geothermal operations is studied. Some experimental results on the CaSO4 scale formation in porous media upon heating an injection water with and without addition of scale inhibitors are also given.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

459

Light with nonzero chemical potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic states and processes involving light are discussed in which the chemical potential of light is nonzero. Light with nonzero chemical potential is produced in photochemical reactions for example in a light emitting diode. The chemical potential of black-body radiation becomes negative upon a Joule expansion. The isothermal diffusion of light which is a common phenomenon is driven by the gradient in the chemical potential. These and other examples support the idea that light can be interpreted as a gas of photons with properties similar to a material gas.

F. Herrmann; P. Würfel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Directed lines in sparse potentials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a continuum formulation of a (d+1)-dimensional directed line interacting with sparse potentials (i.e., d-dimensional potentials defined only at discrete longitudinal locations.) An iterative solution for the partition function is derived. The impulsive influence of the potentials induces discontinuities in the evolution of the probability density P(x,t) of the directed line. The effects of these discontinuities are studied in detail for the simple case of a single defect. We then investigate sparse columnar potentials defined as a periodic array of defects in (2+1) dimensions, and solve exactly for P. A nontrivial binding-unbinding transition is found.

T. J. Newman and A. J. McKane

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations  

SciTech Connect

Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Planet Formation in the Outer Solar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews coagulation models for planet formation in the Kuiper Belt, emphasizing links to recent observations of our and other solar systems. At heliocentric distances of 35-50 AU, single annulus and multiannulus planetesimal accretion calculations produce several 1000 km or larger planets and many 50-500 km objects on timescales of 10-30 Myr in a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula. Planets form more rapidly in more massive nebulae. All models yield two power law cumulative size distributions, N_C propto r^{-q} with q = 3.0-3.5 for radii larger than 10 km and N_C propto r^{-2.5} for radii less than 1 km. These size distributions are consistent with observations of Kuiper Belt objects acquired during the past decade. Once large objects form at 35-50 AU, gravitational stirring leads to a collisional cascade where 0.1-10 km objects are ground to dust. The collisional cascade removes 80% to 90% of the initial mass in the nebula in roughly 1 Gyr. This dust production rate is comparable to rates inferred for alpha Lyr, beta Pic, and other extrasolar debris disk systems.

Scott J. Kenyon

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

463

Reservoir characteristics of Putnam zone (Silurian Interlake Formation) lithofacies, southwestern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

Reservoirs in the Putnam zone (lower Interlake Formation) in the southwestern part of the Williston basin include oolitic-pellet dolomite grainstone, fossil-pellet grainstone, and a wide spectrum of reef-related, fossil-corral dolomite packstones and coral-stromatoporoid rudstone/boundstones. Each of these potential reservoirs has a unique pore system and, thus a different set of petrophysical properties which define their reservoir characteristics. Oolitic grainstones have a homogeneous intercrystalline-micro-crystalline pore system, whereas the fossil-pellet dolomite grainstone facies consists of separate mesovugs dispersed in well-interconnected intercrystalline porosity. Capillary pressure curves indicate that pore-throat heterogeneity is greater, and entry pressures lower, for reefal lithofacies than for pelletal grainstones. These curves also demonstrate why many of the producing fields tend to have high water cuts. In many oolitic-pellet grainstone units, irreducible water saturations of 10% would not be reached until a hydrocarbon column of 700 ft was reached. High water production characteristics are therefore expected because Red River/Interlake structures attain only 50-100 ft of closure. This, however, does not mean that Putnam is not an economic zone, especially as a secondary objective. Wells in Putnam and Crane fields, for instance, have reserves in excess of 300,000 bbl of oil. The reservoirs here may be dominated by the reef-related facies, which have an extremely high relative permeability to oil.

Inden, R. (LSSI, Denver, CO (United States)); Oglesby, C. (Bass Enterprises, Fort Worth, TX (United States)); Byrnes, A. (Geocore, Loveland, CO (United States)); Cluff, B. (The Discovery Group, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Flash pyrolysis of kerogens from algal rich oil shales from the Eocene Huadian Formation, NE China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The hydrocarbon composition of the kerogen fractions of two samples (HD-20 and HD-21) from oil shale layer 4 in the Eocene Huadian Formation, NE China were investigated by analytical flash pyrolysis (650 °C/10 s) followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Py–GC–MS). Organic petrography showed that the two kerogens were almost entirely derived from algal remains but contained very different algal maceral compositions, with 40% of the macerals in HD-20 being of macroalgal origin that were not present in HD-21. Py–GC–MS yielded high concentrations of n-alkanes from both kerogens, but with different molecular weight profiles due to the different algal contributors to the two kerogen samples. The hydrocarbon pyrolysates generated at 650 °C from HD-21 in which the green microalga Botryococcus braunii was identified showed a higher proportion of longer chain alkanes and alkenes presumably from cracking of the botryococcus algaenan. We also identified a C40 monoaromatic lycopane derivative, which was absent in the HD-20. The high hydrocarbon potential of both kerogens can be attributed to common microalgal sources, whereas the macroalgae, which is abundant in HD-20, makes only a minor contribution to the hydrocarbon products.

Zhirong Zhang; John K. Volkman; Paul F. Greenwood; Wenxuan Hu; Jianzhong Qin; Tenger Borjigin; Changbo Zhai; Weixin Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

466

Evaluation of methods for measuring relative permeability of anhydride from the Salado Formation: Sensitivity analysis and data reduction  

SciTech Connect

This report documents, demonstrates, evaluates, and provides theoretical justification for methods used to convert experimental data into relative permeability relationships. The report facilities accurate determination of relative permeabilities of anhydride rock samples from the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Relative permeability characteristic curves are necessary for WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) predictions of the potential for flow of waste-generated gas from the repository and brine flow into repository. This report follows Christiansen and Howarth (1995), a comprehensive literature review of methods for measuring relative permeability. It focuses on unsteady-state experiments and describes five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments. Unsteady-state experimental methods were recommended for relative permeability measurements of low-permeability anhydrite rock samples form the Salado Formation because these tests produce accurate relative permeability information and take significantly less time to complete than steady-state tests. Five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments are described: the Welge method, the Johnson-Bossler-Naumann method, the Jones-Roszelle method, the Ramakrishnan-Cappiello method, and the Hagoort method. A summary, an example of the calculations, and a theoretical justification are provided for each of the five methods. Displacements in porous media are numerically simulated for the calculation examples. The simulated product data were processed using the methods, and the relative permeabilities obtained were compared with those input to the numerical model. A variety of operating conditions were simulated to show sensitivity of product