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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

2

Positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions with Debye potentials  

SciTech Connect

Positronium (Ps) formation cross sections (n = 1, 2) in positron-hydrogen collisions in Debye plasma environment are calculated using the screening approximation model for various Debye screening lengths from the Ps formation thresholds to 50 eV. The effect of the screened Coulomb potential on Ps formation process is investigated by using the Debye-Hueckel potential. The present results are compared with available theoretical calculations.

Ma, J.; Cheng, Y.; Wang, Y. C.; Zhou, Y. [Center for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Modeling trihalomethane formation potential from wastewater chlorination. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deletion of federally mandated fecal coliform limits has led many states to review and modify their wastewater disinfection requirements. One issue in analyzing wastewater disinfection is the discharge of potentially carcinogenic halogenated organics formed during the chlorination process. This research investigates the formation of one class of the halogenated organics, the trihalomethanes. The applicability of using drinking water trihalomethane formation models for use with wastewater effluent is examined. Three models are compared for predictive capability by using measured trihalomethane values from previous research data. The results show that a previously developed model is applicable for use based on assumptions stated. Results provide environmental managers with worst case predictions for a range of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) parameters. Predictions indicate that trihalomethane formation from the chlorination of wastewater is typically lower than the Safe Drinking Water Act trihalomethane standard of 100 ug/L. The worst case model predictions reach, and in certain extreme cases, pass the standard of 100 ug/L. This level of trihalomethanes formed is minimized if aeration of the receiving bodies of water occurs. Based on this research, the risk of forming trihalomethanes as disinfection by-products from chlorination do not outweigh the benefits gained from proper chlorine disinfection of effluent.

McCormick, C.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Study of the geothermal production potential in the Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies of geothermal production potential for the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin have been carried out. Reservoir data such as formation depth, subsurface temperatures, and water quality were reviewed for geothermal brine production predictions. This study, in addition, provides important information about net pay thickness, porosity, volume of geothermal water available, and productivity index for future geothermal direct-use development. Preliminary results show that the Inyan Kara Formation of the Dakota Group is the most favorable geothermal resource in terms of water quality and productivity. The Madison, Duperow, and Red River Formations are deeper formations but because of their low permeability and great depth, the potential flow rates from these three formations are considerably less than those of the Inyan Kara Formation. Also, poor water quality and low porosity will make those formations less favorable for geothermal direct-use development.

Chu, Min H.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Changing World Product Markets and Potential Refining Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Changing World Product Markets and Potential Refining Capacity Increases. NPRA Annual Meeting March 2006

6

Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

Economics and market potential of hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to evaluate the economics of producing hydrogen from coal and from water and to assess the market potential for this hydrogen in chemical and fuel applications. Results of this study are summarized. Current chemical applications of hydrogen in manufacturing ammonia and methanol, in refining petroleum and in specialty uses provide a base market for penetration by new hydrogen production technologies, although prospects for the use of hydrogen in fuel applications remain unclear. Electrolysis and coal gasification will be complementary, not competitive, technologies for producing hydrogen. Coal gasification plants are better suited to production of large quantities of hydrogen, while electrolyzers are better suited to the production of hydrogen for small-scale uses. Hydrogen produced through coal gasification may be economical in chemical applications (e.g., ammonia production) by the late 1990's. Development programs now underway are expected to provide new coal gasification technologies with lower first costs and higher efficiencies than current technologies. An on-site coal gasification plant supplying hydrogen in the quantities usually required in chemical applications (from 10 to 100 million cubic feet per day) will be smaller than is generally proposed for syngas plants. Growth in smaller scale specialty uses of hydrogen and improvements in the technology for electrolysis will create conditions favorable to expanded use of hydrogen produced through water electrolysis. The major constraint on use of electrolysis will be the availability of low cost electricity. Shortages of natural gas caused by declining domestic production could induce shifts to producing hydrogen through electrolysis or through coal gasification earlier in time (i.e., the late 1980's or early 1990's) than is suggested by comparative cost calculations alone.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Economics and market potential of hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

A study was undertaken to evaluate the economics of producing hydrogen from coal and from water and to assess the market potential for this hydrogen in chemical and fuel applications. Results of this study are summarized. Current chemical applications of hydrogen in manufacturing ammonia and methanol, in refining petroleum and in specialty uses provide a base market for penetration by new hydrogen production technologies, although prospects for the use of hydrogen in fuel applications remain unclear. Electrolysis and coal gasification will be complementary, not competitive, technologies for producing hydrogen. Coal gasification plants are better suited to production of large quantities of hydrogen, while electrolyzers are better suited to the production of hydrogen for small-scale uses. Hydrogen produced through coal gasification may be economical in chemical applications (e.g., ammonia production) by the late 1990's. Development programs now underway are expected to provide new coal gasification technologies with lower first costs and higher efficiencies than current technologies. An on-site coal gasification plant supplying hydrogen in the quantities usually required in chemical applications (from 10 to 100 million cubic feet per day) will be smaller than is generally proposed for syngas plants. Growth in smaller scale specialty uses of hydrogen and improvements in the technology for electrolysis will create conditions favorable to expanded use of hydrogen produced through water electrolysis. The major constraint on use of electrolysis will be the availability of low cost electricity. Shortages of natural gas caused by declining domestic production could induce shifts to producing hydrogen through electrolysis or through coal gasification earlier in time (i.e., the late 1980's or early 1990's) than is suggested by comparative cost calculations alone.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SR/O&G/2000-02 Potential Oil Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral agency, EIA's standard analysis of the potential...

10

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 9 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Meat and Meat Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 9 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Meat and Meat Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutritio

11

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutriti

12

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 10 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Seafood and Seafood Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 10 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Seafood and Seafood Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

13

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 7 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Egg and Egg Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 7 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Egg and Egg Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition

14

Potential of Floriculture Residue For Biogas Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production of methane reach biogas through anaerobic digestion of organic material provides versatile carrier of renewable energy, as methane can be used in replacement for… (more)

TAMRAT, ASNAKE

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

16

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

17

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral agency, EIAs standard analysis of the...

18

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS:...

19

Formation of Low Potential Vorticity over the Deep Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low potential vorticity extends over the deep waters of the North Pacific and, possibly, the bottom waters of the North Atlantic. Isopycnic model integrations are conducted to investigate how these potential vorticity distributions are controlled,...

Vassil Roussenov; Richard G. Williams; Jane O'Dwyer

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

22

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre...

23

Experimental GOES Sounder Products for the Assessment of Downburst Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several experimental products derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Sounder retrievals (vertical profiles of temperature and moisture) have been developed to assist weather forecasters in assessing the potential ...

Gary P. Ellrod; James P. Nelson III; Michael R. Witiw; Lynda Bottos; William P. Roeder

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Utilization Potential of Advanced SO2 Control By Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results of literature surveys and preliminary market assessments, this report evaluates potential applications for advanced SO2 control by-products. Investigators formed their evaluations by comparing the marketability of these by-products with that of coal ash and wet scrubber sludge.

1987-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geologic setting and natural gas potential of Niobrara formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Chalk units in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) have potential for generation and accumulation of shallow, biogenic gas in the central and eastern Williston basin. Similar to area of Niobrara gas production in the eastern Denver basin, Niobrara chalks in South and North Dakota were deposited on carbonate ramps sloping westward off the stable eastern platform of the Western Interior seaway. Within the Williston basin, the Niobrara of the western Dakotas, eastern North Dakota, and central South Dakota has different stratigraphic relationships. These three areas can be further subdivided and ranked into six areas that have different exploration potential. The south margin of the Williston basin in central South Dakota is the most attractive exploration area. Niobrara chalk reservoirs, source rocks, and structural traps in the southern Williston basin are similar to those in the eastern Denver basin. Chalk porosities are probably adequate for gas production, although porosity is controlled by burial depth. Organic carbon content of the chalk is high and shows of biogenic gas are reported. Large, low-relief structural features, which could serve as traps, are present.

Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Formation and Evolution of Frontal Rainbands and Geostrophic Potential Vorticity Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A viscous semigeostrophic model is developed and used to study the formation and evolution of frontal rainbands in association with the dry and moist geostrophic potential vorticity (GPV) anomalies. The numerical results show that when moist GPV (...

Qin Xu

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Market potential of IGCC for domestic power production  

SciTech Connect

Mitretek Systems and CONSOL Inc. have completed the first phase of a market potential study for Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) domestic power production. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this study. The objective of this study is to provide DOE with data to estimate the future domestic market potential of IGCC for electricity generation. Major drivers in this study are the state of technology development, feedstock costs, environmental control costs, demand growth, and dispatchability. This study examines IGCC potential for baseload power production in the Northeast U. S., an important market area by virtue of existing coal infrastructure and proximity to coal producing regions. IGCC market potential was examined for two levels of technology development as a function of natural gas price and carbon tax. This paper discusses the results of this study, including the levels of performance and cost necessary to insure competitiveness with natural gas combined cycle plants.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; Hawk, E.; Maskew, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) PRODUCT: MONOLITH FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The most important requirement for Hanford's low activity waste (LAW) form for shallow land disposal is the chemical durability of the product. A secondary, but still essential specification, is the compressive strength of the material with regards to the strength of the material under shallow land disposal conditions, e.g. the weight of soil overburden and potential intrusion by future generations, because the term ''near-surface disposal'' indicates disposal in the uppermost portion, or approximately the top 30 meters, of the earth's surface. The THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) mineral waste form for LAW is granular in nature because it is formed by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR). As a granular product it has been shown to be as durable as Hanford's LAW glass during testing with ASTM C-1285-02 known as the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and with the Single Pass Flow Through Test (SPFT). Hanford Envelope A and Envelope C simulants both performed well during PCT and SPFT testing and during subsequent performance assessment modeling. This is partially due to the high aluminosilicate content of the mineral product which provides a natural aluminosilicate buffering mechanism that inhibits leaching and is known to occur in naturally occurring aluminosilicate mineral analogs. In order for the TTT Na-Al-Si (NAS) granular mineral product to meet the compressive strength requirements (ASTM C39) for a Hanford waste form, the granular product needs to be made into a monolith or disposed of in High Integrity Containers (HIC's). Additionally, the Hanford intruder scenario for disposal in the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) trench is mitigated as there is reduced intruder exposure when a waste form is in a monolithic form. During the preliminary testing of a monolith binder for TTT's FBSR mineral product, four parameters were monitored: (1) waste loading (not optimized for each waste form tested); (2) density; (3) compressive strength; and (4) durability must not be compromised--binding agent should not react with the NAS product and binding agent should not create an unfavorable pH environment that may cause accelerated leaching. It is the goal of the present study to survey cementitious waste forms based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Ceramicrete, and hydroceramic binders by correlating waste loading, density and compressive strength and then determine if these binders affect the product performance in terms of the PCT response. This will be done by making a one-to-one comparison of the PCT response measured on granular NAS mineral product (mixed bed and fines products) with the PCT response of the monolithed NAS product in the different binders. Future studies may include, refining the above binders, and examining other binders. It is likely that binders formed from kaolin would be most compatible with the chemistry of the THOR{reg_sign} mineral waste form which is made by steam reforming of kaolin and sodium rich wastes. The economics of production on a large scale have yet to be investigated for any of the binders tested.

Jantzen, C

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

29

National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand  

SciTech Connect

Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

30

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioche

31

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

32

POTENTIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR FISSION PRODUCTS AS HEAT AND RADIATION SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

An outline is presented of the potential applications and quantity requiremerts of fission products for the period 1964 to 1968. These applications include military, governmert, and civilian heat sources; irradiation processing; and food irradiation. The potential requirements for 1964 to 1968 are 273 MC / sup 90/Sr and 351 MC /sup 137/Cs. An evaluation is made of the applications of heat-producing isotopes in Coast Guard navigational buoys, lights, and beacons; undersea electronic systems; and weather stations. Costs were determined for conventional methods of power generation and compared to radioisotope power generation. Fuel requiremerts and break-even fuel costs for isotopic power are tabulated. (D.L.C.)

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Simulating Potential Switchgrass Production in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Using results from field trials of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) in the United States, the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) process-level agroecosystem model was calibrated, validated, and applied to simulate potential productivity of switchgrass for use as a biofuel feedstock. The model was calibrated with a regional study of 10-yr switchgrass field trials and subsequently tested against a separate compiled dataset of field trials from across the eastern half of the country. An application of the model in a national database using 8-digit watersheds as the primary modeling unit produces 30-yr average switchgrass yield estimates that can be aggregated to 18 major watersheds. The model projects average annual switchgrass productivity of greater than 7 Mg ha-1 in the Upper Mississippi, Lower Mississippi, and Ohio watersheds. The major factors limiting simulated production vary by region; low precipitation is the primary limiting factor across the western half of the country, while moderately acidic soils limit yields on lands east of the Mississippi River. Average projected switchgrass production on all crop land in the continental US is 5.6 Mg ha-1. At this level of productivity, 28.6 million hectares of crop land would be required to produce the 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol called for by 2022 in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. The model described here can be applied as a tool to inform the land-use and environmental consequences of switchgrass production.

Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, T. O.; Parrish, David J.; Tyler, Donald D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Electron correlation in a hard spherical external potential: Wigner molecule formation and hybridization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron correlation in a hard spherical external potential: Wigner molecule formation; published 12 May 2004 We study a model of N electrons confined to a hard spherical box of radius R, for N 3, and is a generalization of recent work on the corresponding two-electron system.1­3 The box acts as a hard wall to confine

Alavi, Ali

35

Removing of Formation Damage and Enhancement of Formation Productivity Using Environmentally Friendly Chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matrix acidizing is used in carbonate formations to create wormholes that connect the formation to the wellbore. Hydrochloric acid, organic acids, or mixtures of these acids are typically used in matrix acidizing treatments of carbonate reservoirs. However, the use of these acids in deep wells has some major drawbacks including high and uncontrolled reaction rate and corrosion to well tubulars, especially those made of chrome-based tubulars (Cr-13 and duplex steel), and these problems become severe at high temperatures. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and its based fluids have a major drawback in stimulating shallow (low fracture gradient) formations as they may cause face dissolution (formation surface washout) if injected at low rates. The objective of stimulation of sandstone reservoirs is to remove the damage caused to the production zone during drilling or completion operations. Many problems may occur during sandstone acidizing with Hydrochloric/Hydrofluoric acids (HCl/HF) mud acid. Among those problems: decomposition of clays in HCl acids, precipitation of fluosilicates, the presence of carbonate can cause the precipitation of calcium fluorides, silica-gel filming, colloidal silica-gel precipitation, and mixing between various stages of the treatment. To overcome problems associated with strong acids, chelating agents were introduced and used in the field. However, major concerns with most of these chemicals are their limited dissolving power and negative environmental impact. Glutamic acid diacetic acid (GLDA) a newly developed environmentally friendly chelate was examined as stand-alone stimulation fluid in deep oil and gas wells. In this study we used GLDA to stimulate carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite). GLDA was also used to stimulate and remove the damage from different sandstone cores containing different compositions of clay minerals. Carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite) of 6 and 20 in. length and 1.5 in. diameter were used in the coreflood experiments. Coreflood experiments were run at temperatures ranging from 180 to 300oF. Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyl ethylethylene diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), and GLDA were used to stimulate and remove the damage from different sandstone cores at high temperatures. X-ray Computed Topography (CT) scans were used to determine the effectiveness of these fluids in stimulation calcite and dolomite cores and removing the damage from sandstone cores. The sandstone cores used in this study contain from 1 to 18 wt percent illite (swellable and migratable clay mineral). GLDA was found to be highly effective in creating wormholes over a wide range of pH (1.7-13) in calcite cores. Increasing temperature enhanced the reaction rate, more calcite was dissolved, and larger wormholes were formed for different pH with smaller volumes of GLDA solutions. GLDA has a prolonged activity and leads to a decreased surface spending resulting in face dissolution and therefore acts deeper in the formation. In addition, GLDA was very effective in creating wormholes in the dolomite core as it is a good chelate for magnesium. Coreflood experiments showed that at high pH values (pH =11) GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were almost the same in increasing the permeability of both Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were compatible with Bandera sandstone cores which contains 10 wt percent Illite. The weight loss from the core was highest in case of HEDTA and lowest in case of GLDA at pH 11. At low pH values (pH =4) 0.6M GLDA performed better than 0.6M HEDTA in the coreflood experiments. The permeability ratio (final/initial) for Bandera sandstone cores was 2 in the case of GLDA and 1.2 in the case of HEDTA at pH of 4 and 300oF. At high pH HEDTA was the best chelating agent to stimulate different sandstone cores, and at low pH GLDA was the best one. For Berea sandstone cores EDTA at high pH of 11 was the best in increasing the permeability of the core at 300oF. The low pH GLDA based fluid has been especially designed for high temperature oil well stimulation i

Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Nasr Eldin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8254 8254 Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India Michael McNeil, Maithili Iyer, Stephen Meyers, Virginie Letschert, James E. McMahon Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA December 2005 This work was supported by the International Copper Association through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. 2 ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These

37

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

Blandford, J.W.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geothermal source potential and utilization for alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of using a potential geothermal source to drive a fuel grade alcohol plant. Test data from the well at the site indicated that the water temperature at approximately 8500 feet should approach 275/sup 0/F. However, no flow data was available, and so the volume of hot water that can be expected from a well at this site is unknown. Using the available data, numerous fuel alcohol production processes and various heat utilization schemes were investigated to determine the most cost effective system for using the geothermal resource. The study found the direct application of hot water for alcohol production based on atmospheric processes using low pressure steam to be most cost effective. The geothermal flow rates were determined for various sizes of alcohol production facility using 275/sup 0/F water, 235/sup 0/F maximum processing temperature, 31,000 and 53,000 Btu per gallon energy requirements, and appropriate process approach temperatures. It was determined that a 3 million gpy alcohol plant is the largest facility that can practically be powered by the flow from one large geothermal well. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared, operating costs were calculated, the economic feasibility of the propsed project was examined, and a sensitivity analysis was performed.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Comments on “Convectively Generated Potential Vorticity in Rainbands and Formation of the Secondary Eyewall in Hurricane Rita of 2005”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a previous paper Judt and Chen propose that secondary eyewall formation can be the result of the accumulation of convectively generated potential vorticity in the rainbands. They argue that secondary potential vorticity maxima precede the ...

Wesley Terwey; Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Precipitate Formation Potential of Resin Regeneration Effluent in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

Calculations performed as part of this study indicate that injection of treated groundwater containing treated regenerant solution has a high potential for precipitate formation that could lead to plugging of formation porosity surrounding the injection well. In the worst case scenario, substantial plugging could occur within a year of the initiation of injection. Some uncertainty is associated with respect to this conclusion. The uncertainty results from the fact that equilibrium with the most stable mineral assemblage cannot always be assumed and that slow precipitation rates could occur and reliable estimates of precipitation kinetics under Hanford aquifer conditions are not available. It is recommended that the potential of calcium phosphate precipitation be investigated further using a combination of laboratory and field investigations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations  

SciTech Connect

Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

R.L. Billingsley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

FORMATION FIELDS AND CURRENT EFFICIENCIES IN THE ANODIC OXIDATION OF ZIRCONIUM: A DIRECT COMPARISON OF HIGH-POTENTIAL FORMATION FIELDS WITH THOSE DERIVED FROM LOW-POTENTIAL CHARGING CURVES  

SciTech Connect

Formation fields at selected constant currents were obtained from high- potential unitary formation rates and polarographic current efficiency measurements carried out over the potential range, 20 to 130 volts. These values are compared with formation fields derived from low-potential unitary formation rates alone, in the potential range below 2 v. Results are reported for abraded Kroll process metal at 750 mu a/cm/sup 2/, for abraded and for chemically polished iodide process metal at 100 and 750 mu a/cm/sup 2/ and 100 mu a/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Ionic current efficiencies are reported for several current densities in the high-potential range and for the low-potential localized oxygen evolution process. (auth)

Adams, G.B. Jr.; Lee, T.; Van Bysselberghe, P.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification Matt Johnston1 and biodiesel feedstock crops. With biofuels coming under increasing pressure to slow or eliminate indirect land

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

45

Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation, 2011-2040 (million barrels per day) Permian Basin Bakken Eagle Ford

46

Potential of biogas production from livestock manure in China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With great change of food pattern on Chinese people‘s table, livestock production has been expanded to meet increasing demand of meat, egg and dairy products.… (more)

Liu, Gougou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Potential for biogas production fromslaughter houses residues in Bolivia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Residues from slaughter houses offer an abundant resource in Bolivia. The residues can beused for biogas production with biofertilizer as a bi-product. These resources… (more)

Tesfaye Tefera, Tadious

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Use of tamarisk as a potential feedstock for biofuel production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses the energy and water use of saltcedar (or tamarisk) as biomass for biofuel production in a hypothetical sub-region in New Mexico. The baseline scenario consists of a rural stretch of the Middle Rio Grande River with 25% coverage of mature saltcedar that is removed and converted to biofuels. A manufacturing system life cycle consisting of harvesting, transportation, pyrolysis, and purification is constructed for calculating energy and water balances. On a dry short ton woody biomass basis, the total energy input is approximately 8.21 mmBTU/st. There is potential for 18.82 mmBTU/st of energy output from the baseline system. Of the extractable energy, approximately 61.1% consists of bio-oil, 20.3% bio-char, and 18.6% biogas. Water consumptive use by removal of tamarisk will not impact the existing rate of evapotranspiration. However, approximately 195 gal of water is needed per short ton of woody biomass for the conversion of biomass to biocrude, three-quarters of which is cooling water that can be recovered and recycled. The impact of salt presence is briefly assessed. Not accounted for in the baseline are high concentrations of Calcium, Sodium, and Sulfur ions in saltcedar woody biomass that can potentially shift the relative quantities of bio-char and bio-oil. This can be alleviated by a pre-wash step prior to the conversion step. More study is needed to account for the impact of salt presence on the overall energy and water balance.

Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Norman, Kirsten

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production for Lignocellulosic Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns about oil dependency and the contributions of fossil fuel use to climatic change, the U.S. Department of Energy has begun a research initiative to make 20% of motor fuels biofuel based in 10 years, and make 30% of fuels bio-based by 2030. Fundamental to this objective is developing an understanding of feedstock dynamics of crops suitable for cellulosic ethanol production. This report focuses on switchgrass, reviewing the existing literature from field trials across the United States, and compiling it for the first time into a single database. Data available from the literature included cultivar and crop management information, and location of the field trial. For each location we determined latitude and longitude, and used this information to add temperature and precipitation records from the nearest weather station. Within this broad database we were able to identify the major sources of variation in biomass yield, and to characterize yield as a function of some of the more influential factors, e.g., stand age, ecotype, precipitation and temperature in the year of harvest, site latitude, and fertilization regime. We then used a modeling approach, based chiefly on climatic factors and ecotype, to predict potential yields for a given temperature and weather pattern (based on 95th percentile response curves), assuming the choice of optimal cultivars and harvest schedules. For upland ecotype varieties, potential yields were as high as 18 to 20 Mg/ha, given ideal growing conditions, whereas yields in lowland ecotype varieties could reach 23 to 27 Mg/ha. The predictive equations were used to produce maps of potential yield across the continental United States, based on precipitation and temperature in the long term climate record, using the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Potential yields calculated via this characterization were subsequently compared to the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County Level data base (ORECCL), which was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Graham et al. 1996) to predict biofuel crop yields at the county level within a limited geographic area. Mapped output using the model was relatively consistent with known switchgrass distribution. It correctly showed higher yields for lowland switchgrass when compared with upland varieties at most locations. Projections for the most northern parts of the range suggest comparable yields for the two ecotypes, but inadequate data for lowland ecotypes grown at high latitudes make it difficult to fully assess this projection. The final model is a predictor of optimal yields for a given climate scenario, but does not attempt to identify or account for other limiting or interacting factors. The statistical model is nevertheless an improvement over historical efforts, in that it is based on quantifiable climatic differences, and it can be used to extrapolate beyond the historic range of switchgrass. Additional refinement of the current statistical model, or the use of different empirical or process-based models, might improve the prediction of switchgrass yields with respect to climate and interactions with cultivar and management practices, assisting growers in choosing high-yielding cultivars within the context of local environmental growing conditions.

Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Davis, Ethan [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Potential benefits of geothermal electrical production from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential national benefits of geothermal electric energy development from the hydrothermal resources in the West are estimated for several different scenarios. The U.S. electrical economy is simulated by computer using a linear programming optimization technique. Under most of the scenarios, benefits are estimated at $2 to $4 billion over the next 50 years on a discounted present value basis. The electricity production from hydrothermal plants reaches 2 to 4 percent of the national total, which will represent 10 to 20 percent of the installed capacity in the West. Installed geothermal capacity in 1990 is estimated to be 9,000 to 17,000 Mw(e). The geothermal capacity should reach 28,000 to 65,000 Mw(e) by year 2015. The ''most likely'' scenario yields the lower values in the above ranges. Under this scenario geothermal development would save the utility industry $11 billion in capital costs (undiscounted); 32 million separative work units; 64,000 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/; and 700 million barrels of oil. The most favorable scenario for geothermal energy occurs when fossil fuel prices are projected to increase at 5 percent/year. The benefits of geothermal energy then exceed $8 billion on a discounted present value basis. Supply curves were developed for hydrothermal resources based on the recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment, resource characteristics, and projected power conversion technology and costs. Geothermal plants were selected by the optimizing technique to fill a need for ''light load'' plants. This infers that geothermal plants may be used in the future primarily for load-following purposes.

Bloomster, C.H.; Engel, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Formation of Jets through Mixing and Forcing of Potential Vorticity: Analysis and Parameterization of Beta-Plane Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation of multiple jets in forced beta-plane turbulence is studied from the perspective of nonuniform nonconservative arrangement of potential vorticity (PV). Numerical simulations are analyzed to show that mixing and forcing reinforce jets by ...

Noboru Nakamura; Da Zhu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Changing World Product Markets and Potential Refining Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... Asia Demand growth, product mix, trade Price Signals for Capacity Changes Capacity ... 150 AZ Clean Fuels FCC/RCC Coking ...

53

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey (USGS) resource assessments. This report contains EIA projections of future daily production rates using recent USGS resource estimates. The Coastal Plain study area...

54

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

here. The workshop hosted a team of independent and international experts to identify developing and existing commercial products that may be valuable to meet these challenges....

55

Changing World Product Markets and Potential Refining Capacity Increases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The presentation explores potential refinery capacity increases over the next 5 years in various world regions, based on changing demand patterns, changing price incentives, and capacity expansion announcements.

Information Center

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic...

57

Changing World Product Markets and Potential Refining Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The presentation explores potential refinery capacity increases over the next 5 years in various world regions, based on changing demand patterns, changing price ...

58

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

59

POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

62

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 9 Formation of ß-Carotene Cleavage Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 9 Formation of ß-Carotene Cleavage Products Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable

63

Market Potential of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production in Three Northeastern Utilities' Service Territories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis can be potentially cheaper than bottled industrial hydrogen. But in the Northeast, expensive electrolyzers, costly electricity, high interest rates, and excess hydrogen production capacity at existing plants make electrolytic hydrogen less attractive than bottled hydrogen.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

From product concept to user experience: exploring UX potentials at early product stages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus on users' needs and emotions while interacting with products is a key factor for product success. As the field of User Experience (UX) explores these needs and their fulfilment, it gains in importance against the background of the wish for ... Keywords: concept testing, design methods, participatory design, user experience, user-driven innovation

Sandra Sproll; Matthias Peissner; Christina Sturm

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

LEAPS: realising the potential of algal biomass production through semantic web and linked data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently algal biomass has been identified as a potential source of large scale production of biofuels. Governments, environmental research councils and special interests groups are funding several efforts that investigate renewable energy production ... Keywords: SPARQL, algal biomass, linked data, ontologies, semantic web

Monika Solanki; Johannes Skarka; Craig Chapman

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral agency, EIA’s standard analysis of the potential of the Alaska North Slope (ANS) has focused on the areas without exploration and development restrictions. EIA received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report "with plausible scenarios for ANWR supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments." This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA’s 1987 ANWR assessment.

68

Well production system to prevent cave-in and sloughing in unconsolidated formations  

SciTech Connect

A well production system is disclosed for controlling ingress and egress of high pressure fluid through the annuli formed between the well and a screen support tube internally thereof. The screen support tube and an internal high pressure wash pipe with valves maintain constant high fluid pressure against the overburden during work in the well, as during drilling of an enlarged cavity therein for preventing cave-in and sloughing of the unconsolidated formation well walls until a sand pack is formed and the well producing.

Widmyer, R.H.

1982-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Effect of finite chemical potential on QGP-Hadron phase transition in a statistical model of fireball formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effect of finite chemical potential for the QGP constituents in the Ramanathan et al. statistical model (Phys.Rev.C70, 027903,2004). While the earlier computations using this model with vanishing chemical potentials indicated a weakly first order phase transition for the system in the vicinity of 170 MeV (Pramana, 68, 757, 2007), the introduction of finite values for the chemical potentials of the constituents makes the transition a smooth roll over of the phases, while allowing fireball formation with radius of a few "fermi" to take place. This seems to be in conformity with the latest consensus on the nature of the QGP-Hadron phase transition. Keywords: Quark Gluon Plasma, Quark Hadron Phase Transition

R. Ramanathan; Agam k. Jha; K. k. Gupta; S. S. Singh

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment, (Washington, DC, November, 1986). U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Minerals Management Service. Northeast National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Final Integrated Activity Plan / Environmental Impact Statement, (Anchorage , Alaska, August, 1998).

72

Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential for Hydrogen Production Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States A. Milbrandt and M. Mann Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41134 February 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States A. Milbrandt and M. Mann Prepared under Task No. H278.2100 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41134 February 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

73

FOAM FORMATION IN THE SALTSTONE PRODUCTION FACILITY: EVALUATION OF SOURCES AND MITIGATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saltstone Production Facility receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. Influents into Tank 50H include the Effluent Treatment Project waste concentrate, H-Canyon low activity waste and General Purpose Evaporator bottoms, Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit decontaminated salt solution, and salt solution from the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjust campaign. Using the Waste Characterization System (WCS), this study tracks the relative amounts of each influent into Tank 50H, as well as the total content of Tank 50H, in an attempt to identify the source of foaming observed in the Saltstone Production Facility hopper. Saltstone has been using antifoam as part of routine processing with the restart of the facility in December 2006. It was determined that the maximum admix usage in the Saltstone Production Facility, both antifoam and set retarder, corresponded with the maximum concentration of H-Canyon low activity waste in Tank 50H. This paper also evaluates archived salt solutions from Waste Acceptance Criteria analysis for propensity to foam and the antifoam dosage required to mitigate foaming. It was determined that Effluent Treatment Project contributed to the expansion factor (foam formation) and General Purpose Evaporator contributed to foaminess (persistence). It was also determined that undissolved solids contribute to foam persistence. It was shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced both the expansion factor and foaminess of salt solutions. The evaluation of foaming in the grout hopper during the transition from water to salt solution indicated that higher water-to-premix ratios tended to produce increased foaming. It was also shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced foam formation and persistence.

Cozzi, A.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

74

Groundwater Quality Signatures for Assessing Potential Impacts from Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron and sulfate are recognized as potential indicators of the influence of leachate from coal-combustion products (CCPs) on groundwater quality. However, there are cases in which these two constituents do not provide sufficient data to characterize groundwater for potential impacts from CCPs. In these cases, the concentrations of other indicator constituents in solution and/or advanced analytical techniques may be used to support other information. A three-tiered analysis approach can provide a ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

On the Formation of Potential-Vorticity Anomalies in Upper-Level Jet-Front Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review and discuss a difference in interpretation of the role of turbulence in modifying the potential-vorticity distribution in the vicinity of upper-level jet-front systems. In the late 1970s, M. A. Shapiro presented observational evidence ...

Daniel Keyser; Richard Rotunno

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Estimating Hydrogen Production Potential in Biorefineries Using Microbial Electrolysis Cell Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are devices that use a hybrid biocatalysis-electrolysis process for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Future biofuel and bioproducts industries are expected to generate significant volumes of waste streams containing easily degradable organic matter. The emerging MEC technology has potential to derive added- value from these waste streams via production of hydrogen. Biorefinery process streams, particularly the stillage or distillation bottoms contain underutilized sugars as well as fermentation and pretreatment byproducts. In a lignocellulosic biorefinery designed for producing 70 million gallons of ethanol per year, up to 7200 m3/hr of hydrogen can be generated. The hydrogen can either be used as an energy source or a chemical reagent for upgrading and other reactions. The energy content of the hydrogen generated is sufficient to meet 57% of the distillation energy needs. We also report on the potential for hydrogen production in existing corn mills and sugar-based biorefineries. Removal of the organics from stillage has potential to facilitate water recycle. Pretreatment and fermentation byproducts generated in lignocellulosic biorefinery processes can accumulate to highly inhibitory levels in the process streams, if water is recycled. The byproducts of concern including sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furans and phenolics can also be converted to hydrogen in MECs. We evaluate hydrogen production from various inhibitory byproducts generated during pretreatment of various types of biomass. Finally, the research needs for development of the MEC technology and aspects particularly relevant to the biorefineries are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: Alaskan North Slope ANWR: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BBbls: billion barrels Bbls: barrels Daily Petroleum Production Rate: The amount of petroleum extracted per day from a well, group of wells, region, etc. (usually expressed in barrels per day) EIA: Energy Information Administration MBbls: thousand barrels MMBbls: million barrels NPR-A: National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Petroleum Play: A set of known or postulated petroleum accumulations sharing similar geologic, geographic, and temporal properties such as source rock, migration, pathway, timing, trapping mechanism, and hydrocarbon type

78

PETROPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE SECONDARY RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN THE CHERRY CANYON FORMATION NE LEA FIELD LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read and Stevens has proposed the evaluation of the waterflood potential from the Cherry Canyon formation in the NE Lea Field in lea County, New Mexico. Much of the development in this area is approaching primary recovery limitations; additional recovery of remaining oil reserves by waterflood needs to be evaluated. The Cherry Canyon formation is composed of fine grained sandstone, containing clay material which results in high water saturation, and also has the tendency to swell and reduce reservoir permeability--the ability of fluid to flow through the rock pores and fractures. There are also abundant organic materials that interfere with obtaining reliable well logs. These complications have limited oil in place calculations and identification of net pay zones, presenting a challenge to the planned waterflood. Core analysis of the Cherry Canyon should improve the understanding of existing well logs and possibly indicate secondary recovery measures, such as waterflood, to enhance field recovery. Lacking truly representative core to provide accurate analyses, Read and Stevens will obtain and preserve fresh core. The consulting firm of T. Scott Hickman and Associates will then collaborate on special core analyses and obtain additional well logs for a more detailed analysis of reservoir properties. The log interpretation will be compared to the core analysis results, and the entire collected data set will be used to assess the potential and economic viability of successfully waterflooding the identified oil zones. Successful results from the project will improve accuracy of log interpretation and establish a methodology for evaluating secondary recovery by waterflood.

T. Scott Hickman

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to develop plausible scenarios for Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessments. This report contains EIA projections of future daily production rates using recent USGS resource estimates. The Coastal Plain study area includes 1.5 million acres in the ANWR 1002 Area, 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands and State of Alaska offshore lands out to the 3-mile limit which are expected to be explored and developed if and when ANWR is developed. (Figure ES1) About 26 percent of the technically recoverable oil resources are in the Native and State lands.

80

EXPLORING THE POTENTIAL FORMATION OF ORGANIC SOLIDS IN CHONDRITES AND COMETS THROUGH POLYMERIZATION OF INTERSTELLAR FORMALDEHYDE  

SciTech Connect

Polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde, first through the formose reaction and then through subsequent condensation reactions, provides a plausible explanation for how abundant and highly chemically complex organic solids may have come to exist in primitive solar system objects. In order to gain better insight on the reaction, a systematic study of the relationship of synthesis temperature with resultant molecular structure was performed. In addition, the effect of the presence of ammonia on the reaction rate and molecular structure of the product was studied. The synthesized formaldehyde polymer is directly compared to chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from primitive meteorites using solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The molecular structure of the formaldehyde polymer is shown to exhibit considerable similarity at the functional group level with primitive chondritic IOM. The addition of ammonia to the solution enhances the rate of polymerization reaction at lower temperatures and results in substantial incorporation of nitrogen into the polymer. Morphologically, the formaldehyde polymer exists as submicron to micron-sized spheroidal particles and spheroidal particle aggregates that bare considerable similarity to the organic nanoglobules commonly observed in chondritic IOM. These spectroscopic and morphological data support the hypothesis that IOM in chondrites and refractory organic carbon in comets may have formed through the polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde after planetesimal accretion, in the presence of liquid water, early in the history of the solar system.

Kebukawa, Yoko; Cody, George D. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)] [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); David Kilcoyne, A. L., E-mail: ykebukawa@ciw.edu, E-mail: yoko@ep.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Mail Stop 7R0222, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Environmental characterization of two potential locations at Hanford for a new production reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes various environmental aspects of two areas on the Hanford Site that are potential locations for a New Production Reactor (NPR). The area known as the Skagit Hanford Site is considered the primary or reference site. The second area, termed the Firehouse Site, is considered the alternate site. The report encompasses an environmental characterization of these two potential NPR locations. Eight subject areas are covered: geography and demography; ecology; meteorology; hydrology; geology; cultural resources assessment; economic and social effects of station construction and operation; and environmental monitoring. 80 refs., 68 figs., 109 tabs.

Watson, E.C.; Becker, C.D.; Fitzner, R.E.; Gano, K.A.; Imhoff, K.L.; McCallum, R.F.; Myers, D.A.; Page, T.L.; Price, K.R.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Rice D.G.; Schreiber D.L.; Skumatz L.A.; Sommer D.J.; Tawil J.J.; Wallace R.W.; Watson D.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61446 61446 GAS PRODUCTION POTENTIAL OF DISPERSE LOW-SATURATION HYDRATE ACCUMULATIONS IN OCEANIC SEDIMENTS George J. Moridis Earth Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 E. Dendy Sloan Center for Hydrate Research and Chemical Engineering Department Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 August 2006 This work was partly supported by the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory, under the U.S. Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Gas Production Potential of Disperse Low-Saturation Hydrate Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and E. Dendy Sloan 2 1 Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1166

83

SR/O&G/2000-02 Potential Oil Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0-02 0-02 Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment May 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U. S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment ii Energy Information Administration

84

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development of the 1002 Area is up to Congress and has not been approved to date. Also included in the Coastal Plain are State lands to the 3-mile offshore limit and Native Inupiat land near the village of Kaktovik. The USGS estimated: a 95 percent probability that at least 5.7 billion barrels of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain,

85

Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reductions in Northeast Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets December 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy

86

Electric Energy Conservation and Production Project: Vpolume 3: Wind energy potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A final report has been prepared under the Electric Energy Conservation and Production Project, conducted by the Blackfeet Indian Tribe and its consultants, Black Hawk Associates, Inc. The report addresses two major issues - the heavy reliance on electricity by residents of the Blackfeet Reservation, and the opportunities for electricity production from wind energy resources on the Reservation. The findings of this report (1) help provide a basis for comprehensive energy management planning on the Reservation, (2) analyze the potential for minimizing electricity demand and maximizing the efficiency of electrical end-uses through appropriate conservation measures, (3) assess the potential of wind energy resources located on the Reservation, and (4) identify and assess the technical, financial, legal, institutional, and regulatory issues involved in wind energy development within the Blackfeet Reservation.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products  

SciTech Connect

The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Regional Differences in Corn Ethanol Production: Profitability and Potential Water Demands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the use of a stochastic simulation model this project analyzes both the impacts of the expanding biofuels sector on water demand in selected regions of the United States and variations in the profitability of ethanol production due to location differences. Changes in consumptive water use in the Texas High Plains, Southern Minnesota, and the Central Valley of California, as impacted by current and proposed grain-based ethanol plants were addressed. In addition, this research assesses the potential impacts of technologies to reduce consumptive water use in the production of ethanol in terms of water usage and the economic viability of each ethanol facility. This research quantifies the role of corn ethanol production on water resource availability and identifies the alternative water pricing schemes at which ethanol production is no longer profitable. The results of this research show that the expansion of regional ethanol production and the resulting changes in the regional agricultural landscapes do relatively little to change consumptive water usage in each location. The California Central Valley has the highest potential for increased water usage with annual water usage in 2017 at levels 15% higher than historical estimates, whereas Southern Minnesota and the Texas High Plains are predicted to have increases of less than 5% during the same time period. Although water use by ethanol plants is extremely minor relative to consumptive regional agricultural water usage, technological adaptations by ethanol facilities have the potential to slightly reduce water usage and prove to be economically beneficial adaptations to make. The sensitivity of net present value (NPV) with respect to changes in water price is shown to be extremely inelastic, indicating that ethanol producers have the ability to pay significantly more for their fresh water with little impact on their 10 year economic performance.

Higgins, Lindsey M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmute minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.

Stubbins, James

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

91

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

92

International Trade of Bio-Energy Products – Economic Potentials for Austria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRIOPOL studies the role of domestic bioenergy potentials for agriculture, the wider economy and international trade for Austria. In particular, agricultural biomass production can contribute to significant shares of energy provision in Austria. A detailed scenario is developed to explore the opportunities and challenges of enhanced domestic biomass production based on short rotation forestry (SRF) for heat supply which is currently among the most competitive technologies. To that end, TRIOPOL establishes a model linkage between a sectoral supply-model for Austrian agriculture and a national small open economy general equilibrium model. Model results show that a biomass premium of 65 € per ton dry matter is required to support 250,000 ha of SRF on cropland in Austria by 2020. The thus provided bioheat covers some 33 petajoule (PJ) heat energy demand in Austria; taking into account the likely rising of energy prices by 2020, this number rises to 47 PJ. Substantial land use changes may also be compensated by increases in land use intensity and as well as changes in imports and exports. Scenario results suggest that domestic food production of non-meat commodities falls by 1.3%. The sector meat products profits from the high competitiveness of Austrian livestock production and responds by a slight increase in net exports. The results of the quantitative analysis shall support the scientific and political debate on securing food and energy supply as well as economic development goals.

Olivia Kol; Martin Schönhart; Erwin Schmid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Impact of formation properties and well design on cumulative gas production from Devonian Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Devonian Shale refers to all the shale strata sandwiched between two different formations; the younger Berea sandstone above it and the older limestone termed Onondaga… (more)

Ita, Jacques.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

SciTech Connect

As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cultivar Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw J. Lindedam a, *, S.B. Andersen b , J. DeMartini c , S. Bruun b , H. Jørgensen a , C. Felby a , J. Magid b , B. Yang d , C.E. Wyman c a Forestry and Wood Products, Forest & Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark b Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark c Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, USA d Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University, 2710 University Drive, Richland, WA 99354, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history:

96

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries … Past Changes and Future Potential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Potential U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Department of Energy Office of Policy and International Affairs October 2010 Summary World consumption growth for middle distillate fuels (diesel fuel, heating oil, kerosene, and jet fuel) has exceeded the consumption growth for gasoline for some time, and the United States is no exception. Although the decrease in the ratio of total gasoline consumption to consumption for middle distillate fuels has been small in the United States, recent legislation requiring increased use of renewable fuels has resulted in forecasts that project a decline in consumption for petroleum-based gasoline from refineries, which would accelerate the decline in the

97

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS. Information from recent offset drilling, offsetting discoveries, and new geologic and geophysical data were used to update the oil and gas resource potential. An evaluation was made of each of 10 petroleum plays (similar geologic settings). For each play, USGS constructed statistical distributions of the number and size of potential accumulations based on a probabilistic range of geologic attributes. Minimum accumulation size was 500 million barrels. The resulting distributions were subjected to three risk parameters. Risk was assigned for the occurrence of adequate generation and migration of petroleum to meet the minimum size requirements, for the occurrence of reservoir rock to contain the minimum volume, and for the occurrence of a trapping mechanism to seal the petroleum in the reservoir. USGS analysts applied an appropriate recovery factor to the estimated oil in place that was calculated for each play to obtain an estimate of technically recoverable petroleum resources. The combined recovery factor for the entire study area averages approximately 37 percent of the initial oil in place. It is likely that the actual recovery factor of potential large fields would exceed 37 percent, because the nearby giant Prudhoe Bay field recovery factor will exceed 50 percent.

98

Fuels from solar energy: photosynthetic systems--state of the art and potential for energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the mass culturing of microalgae has been carried out over the past 30 years in many parts of the world. Today there are numerous potential applications for algal mass cultures including protein production, wastewater treatment, water renovation, closed life-support systems, production of commercial chemicals, aquaculture, and bioconversion of energy. Photosynthetic yields over 30 gr dry wt m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ have been attained on occasion in many locations for short periods and yields between 15 to 25 gr dry wt m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ for longer periods are now common. This apparent upper limit in productivity is not coincidental. Under outdoor conditions peak yields are possible only under conditions of light limitation. Photosynthetic algae absorb light energy and convert it to stored chemical energy under rigid adherence to the laws of thermodynamics. By examining the basic physics of photosynthesis, it is possible to clearly demonstrate that under conditions of full sunlight in the most ideal locations maximum yields of 30 to 40 gr m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ can be expected. For long-term operation of large-scale outdoor cultures, many bioengineering factors are involved and realistic yields considerably less than the maximum potential can be anticipated. Manipulation of the two independent variables, flow rate and depth, is the key to maximizing yields for varying outdoor sunlight intensities. Future applications for algal mass cultures will probably be restricted to small well-managed systems for solving specific environmental problems in individual communities and not on the grand scale envisaged in the past.

Goldman, J.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Chemicals from biomass: an assessment of the potential for production of chemical feedstocks from renewable resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This assessment of the potential for production of commodity chemicals from renewable biomass resources is based on (1) a Delphi study with 50 recognized authorities to identify key technical issues relevant to production of chemicals from biomass, and (2) a systems model based on linear programming for a commodity chemicals industry using renewable resources and coal as well as gas and petroleum-derived resources. Results from both parts of the assessment indicate that, in the absence of gas and petroleum, coal undoubtedly would be a major source of chemicals first, followed by biomass. The most attractive biomass resources are wood, agricultural residues, and sugar and starch crops. A reasonable approximation to the current product slate for the petrochemical industry could be manufactured using only renewable resources for feedstocks. Approximately 2.5 quads (10/sup 15/ Btu (1.055 x 10/sup 18/ joules)) per year of oil and gas would be released. Further use of biomass fuels in the industry could release up to an additional 1.5 quads. however, such an industry would be unprofitable under current economic conditions with existing or near-commercial technology. As fossil resources become more expensive and biotechnology becomes more efficient, the economics will be more favorable. Use of the chemicals industry model to evaluate process technologies is demonstrated. Processes are identified which have potential for significant added value to the system if process improvements can be made to improve the economics. Guidelines and recommendations for research and development programs to improve the attractiveness of chemicals from biomass are discussed.

Donaldson, T.L.; Culberson, O.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Potential air quality impact of geothermal power production in the Imperial Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A regional assessment of the potential impact on air quality of developing the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources for power production is presented. A network of six stations was installed to characterize the air quality and atmospheric transport properties of the valley before development. These measured the ambient air concentrations of H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO, NO/sub x/, CO/sub 2/, Hg, Rn, and particulates. Wind velocity and the directional variability of the winds were also measured to determine atmospheric stability. The geothermal fluids were analyzed chemically to estimate potential emission rates of H/sub 2/S, NH/sub 3/, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, Hg, and Rn from future power plants. Using these data and advanced air quality modeling led to the prediction of the potential valley-wide impact of a 3000 MW development scenario. The impact analysis reveals that H/sub 2/S is the principal gaseous pollutant of concern due to its noxious odor and the potential release rate. The ambient H/sub 2/S concentrations that would result from generating 3000 MW without emission controls exceed the California air quality standard (30 ppb) at least 1% of the time for an area in the northern part of the valley that is roughly 1500 km/sup 2/ in size. This compares with current ambient air concentrations that exceed the standard much less than 0.1% of the time. The population center most impacted is Calipatria, where the standard could be exceeded almost 10% of the time. In addition, the odor of H/sub 2/S will be noticeable at least 1% of the time for most of the valley if the 3000 MW are placed on-line without abatement systems.

Gudiksen, P.H.; Ermak, D.L.; Lamson, K.C.; Axelrod, M.C.; Nyholm, R.A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page viable gas production. The overall conclusion drawnnot promising targets for gas production. Acknowledgment TheTS. Strategies for gas production from hydrate accumulations

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Infrared absorption strengths of potential gaseous diffusion plant coolants and related reaction products  

SciTech Connect

The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is scheduled for production curtailment within the next few years, a search for substitutes is underway, and apparently workable alternatives have been found and are under testing. The presently favored substitutes, FC-c3l8 and FC-3110, satisfy ozone depletion and operational chemical compatibility concerns, but will be long-lived greenhouse gases, and thus may be regulated on that basis in the future. A further search is therefore underway for compounds with shorter atmospheric lifetimes which could otherwise satisfy operational physical and chemical requirements. A number of such candidates are in the process of being screened for chemical compatibility in a fluorinating environment. This document presents infrared spectral data developed and used in that study for candidates recently examined, and also for many of their fluorination reaction products. The data include gas-phase infrared spectra, quantitative peak intensities as a function of partial pressure, and integrated absorbance strength in the IR-transparent atmospheric window of interest to global warming modeling. Combining this last property with literature or estimated atmospheric lifetimes, rough estimates of global warming potential for these compounds are also presented.

Trowbridge, L.D.; Angel, E.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Market potential of electrolytic hydrogen production in three northeastern utilities' service territories. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study develops a method for exploring the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen. The service areas of three northeastern utilities - Public Service Electric and Gas, Niagara Mohawk, and Northeast Utilities - are examined, and results reported on the effort to locate specialty hydrogen users, determine patterns of hydrogen utilization, and assess the possibility of satisfying this hydrogen demand by electrolytic hydrogen from advanced electrolyzers. Hydrogen users were sought in six major product categories: chemicals, pharmaceuticals, oils, metals, electronics and float glass. Identification of users through appropriate standard industrial classification codes served as a basis for locating possible users in each of the service areas. Mailed questionnaires sought information on hydrogen demand, characteristics of hydrogen use, present hydrogen supply costs, and factors that would influence the purchase of an electrolyzer. In the three utility service areas examined, electrolytic hydrogen can be expected to have limited success competing with merchant hydrogen. Specific hydrogen users may be found whose location with respect to the source of merchant hydrogen may put electrolytic hydrogen at an economic advantage. Reduction in electrolyzer plant costs may be necessary to expand the possibilities for electrolysis. Annual power requirements for current potential demand for electrolytic hydrogen in three utilities was estimated at 140 x 10/sup 6/ kWh, which could expand to 240 x 10/sup 6/ kWh in ten years.

Fein, E.; Edwards, K.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022. Within the mandate, amounts of advanced biofuels, including biomass-based diesel and cellulosic biofuels, are required beginning in 2009. Imported renewable fuels are also eligible for the RFS. Another key U.S. policy is the $1.01 per gal tax credit for producers of cellulosic biofuels enacted as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. This credit, along with the DOE's research, development and demonstration (RD&D) programs, are assumed to enable the rapid expansion of U.S. and global cellulosic biofuels production needed for the U.S. to approach the 2022 RFS goal. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to issue RFS rules to determine which fuels would meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and land use restrictions specified in EISA, we assume that cellulosic ethanol, biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL), sugar-derived ethanol, and fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel would all meet the EISA advanced biofuel requirements. We also assume that enough U.S. corn ethanol would meet EISA's biofuel requirements or otherwise be grandfathered under EISA to reach 15 B gal per year.

Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

XAFS and LIBD Investigation of the Formation and Structure of Pu(IV) Hydrolysis Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu(IV) oxyhydroxide colloid growth is investigated with XAFS and LIBD. From combined results a model of colloid formation is proposed, which leads to a face-centered cubic Pu sublattice having cation defects, as observed with EXAFS, and a linear dependency of log [Pu(IV)] on -log [H{sup +}] with slope -2, in accord with LIBD. The solubility for Pu(IV) measured with LIBD is close to the lower limit of the solubility curve from previously reported data.

Rothe, J.; Walther, C.; Denecke, M.A.; Fanghänel, Th. (Karlesruhe)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Geology of the Cannonball Formation (Paleocene) in the Williston basin, with reference to uranium potential. Report of investigation No. 57  

SciTech Connect

The Paleocene Cannonball Formation is a marine, non-lignitic-bearing clastic sequence in the lower part of the Fort Union Group. It is overlain by the lignite-bearing Tongue River Formation in places and both overlain and underlain by the lignite-bearing Ludlow Formation in places. The Cannonball crops out primarily in southwest-central North Dakota and probably occurs throughout the western one-half of the state. It occurs also in northwestern South Dakota and may extend into parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Poorly consolidated, very fine- to fine-grained, light to medium brownish yellow-weathering sandstone and light gray-weathering, sandy mudstone are the principal types of lithology. Mudstone generally predominates in North Dakota whereas sandstone seems to predominate in South Dakota. Although uranium in the Williston basin has been found almost entirely in lignite and nonmarine carbonaceous rocks, its occurrence in the marine Cannonball Formation is possible. If the Cannonball, Ludlow, Tongue River, and Sentinel Butte Formations are at least partly penecontemporaneous, a variety of depositional environments were in areal juxtaposition during the Paleocene. Streams originating or passing through coastal plain bogs could have carried uranium ions (derived from volcanic materials) to the Cannonball sea where they were deposited syngenetically. Epigenetic uranium may occur in Cannonball mudstones or sandstones that directly underlie the Ludlow Formation, which is known to contain volcanic materials.

Cvancara, A.M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to economically Page viable gas production. The overallare not promising targets for gas production. AcknowledgmentEnergy, Office of Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology,

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Formation-evaluation technology for production enhancement. Annual technical report, October 1990-October 1991  

SciTech Connect

Major advances have been made in the area of formation evaluation in the shales of the Appalachian Basin. This technology can be transferred to the shales of other basins with only minor modifications. A project was initiated to determine reservoir permeability and natural fractures in shale in detail. The plan consists of evaluating three wells in Pike County, Kentucky. The log analysis results and the plan for determining reservoir permeability from core analysis and well tests are presented. The objective is to develop a log based method for determining shale permeability. Electrical properties of the rock are extremely important in formation evaluation. Laboratory techniques and results of determination of these properties from shale core samples in four comprehensive study wells (CSW) are discussed. Geochemical information obtained on shale core samples has been invaluable in development of the shale specific log model. Properties such as total organic carbon (TOC) and pyrolysis S1 are used in the determination of kerogen content. Contour maps of these properties, as well as other geochemical properties, were developed for the Lower Huron and Rhinestreet shale members to permit use in log analysis in the entire Appalachian Basin. Shale permeability can be changed with the addition of a clay-flocculating solute to the aqueous permeant. These properties, as well as specific surface area, adsorption isotherms, water holding capacity, and other fundamental properties are being studied by Purdue Research Foundation.

Luffel, D.L.; Lorenzen, J.; Curtis, J.B.; Low, P.F.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Energetic particle production, cavition formation, and nonlinear development at a plasma density maximum  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated several phenomena of importance to laser-plasma interactions. In our studies, these are modeled by microwave and rf-plasma interactions. Our focus has been on resonant absorption of intense electromagnetic radiation at the plasma critical layer. Electron plasma wave (EPW) growth and caviton formation have been shown to be most efficient for shallow density gradients at the critical layer, where EPW convection losses are minimized. EPW electric field energies of 5000 times the plasma thermal energy, and energetic electron tails out to 5000T{sub e}, have been observed at the top of an inverse parabolic density profile. Ions receive delta-function-like impulses from localized electron plasma waves and wave-breaking electron ejection; the disruption of the ion fluid can only partially be described by the ponderomotive force. Our attempt is to test and illuminate some of the fundamental concepts of strong turbulence and EM wave-plasma interaction. 7 refs.

Wong, A.Y.; Bauer, B.S. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

114

Quantifying the Nonconservative Production of Conservative Temperature, Potential Temperature, and Entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution equation of potential temperature has to date been treated as an approximation to the oceanic version of the first law of thermodynamics. That is, oceanographers have regarded the advection and diffusion of potential temperature as ...

Felicity S. Graham; Trevor J. McDougall

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of Potential Human Health Inhalation Risks from Mercury in Building and Construction Materials Containing Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns have been raised regarding the potential public health risks from mercury that is associated with the use of coal combustion products in building materials and construction applications. This report presents the results of a risk assessment that evaluated mercury inhalation under several exposure scenarios, including concrete and wallboard in residential and classroom settings.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Potential impact of Thailand's alcohol program on production, consumption, and trade of cassava, sugarcane, and corn  

SciTech Connect

On the first of May 1980, Thailand's fuel-alcohol program was announced by the Thai government. According to the program, a target of 147 million liters of ethanol would be produced in 1981, from cassava, sugarcane, and other biomasses. Projecting increases in output each year, the target level of ethanol produciton was set at 482 million liters of ethanol for 1986. The proposed amount of ethanol production could create a major shift up in the demand schedule of energy crops such as cassava, sugarcane, and corn. The extent of the adjustments in price, production, consumption, and exports for these energy crops need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impact of Thailand's fuel-alcohol program on price, production, consumption, and exports of three potential energy crops: cassava, sugarcane, and corn. Econometric commodity models of cassava, sugarcane, and corn are constructed and used as a method of assessment. The overall results of the forecasting simulations of the models indicate that the fuel-alcohol program proposed by the Thai government will cause the price, production, and total consumption of cassava, sugarcane, and corn to increase; on the other hand, it will cause exports to decline. In addition, based on the relative prices and the technical coefficients of ethanol production of these three energy crops, this study concludes that only cassava should be used to produce the proposed target of ethanol production.

Boonserm, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below the cost of production of 7.7 cents per kWh. Thus, the1 to 5.2 cents per kWh, well below the cost of electricitythe average cost of production was 7.7 cents per kWh. We

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Agricultural productivity potential assessment by using rainfall contribution index in Sub-Sahara Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food deficit alleviation is the most important aspect for poverty reduction in the entire Sub-Sahara African (SSA) region. This alleviation can be achieved by increasing agricultural productivity. The deficit is in one way or the other attributed to ... Keywords: agricultural water, effective rainfall, food deficit, planting period, productivity, rainfall contribution index

Yu-Min Wang; Seydou Traore; Willy Namaona; Tienfuan Kerh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production under elevated [CO2  

SciTech Connect

Elevated atmospheric [CO2] is projected to increase forest production, which could increase ecosystem carbon (C) storage. However, sustained forest production will depend on the nutrient balance of the forested ecosystem. Our aim was to examine the causes and consequences of increased fine-root production and mortality throughout the soil profile under elevated CO2 with respect to potential gross nitrogen (N) cycling rates. Our study was conducted in a CO2-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We used isotope pool dilution methodology to measure potential gross N cycling rates in laboratory incubations of soil from four depth increments to 60 cm. Our objectives were two-fold: (1) determine whether N is available for root acquisition in deeper soil, and (2) determine whether increased inputs of labile C from greater fine-root mortality at depth under elevated [CO2] had altered N cycling rates. While gross N fluxes declined with soil depth, we found that N is potentially available for roots to access, especially below 15 cm depth where microbial consumption of mineral N was reduced. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization, and 100% of potential net N mineralization, occurred below 15-cm depth at this site. This finding was supported by in situ measurements from ion-exchange resins, where total inorganic N availability at 55 cm depth was equal to or greater than N availability at 15 cm depth. While it is likely that trees grown under elevated [CO2] are accessing a larger pool of inorganic N by mining deeper soil, we found no effect of elevated [CO2] on potential gross or net N cycling rates. Thus, increased root exploration of the soil volume under elevated [CO2] may be more important than changes in potential gross N cycling rates in sustaining forest responses to rising atmospheric CO2.

Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Hooker, Toby [Utah State University (USU); Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Evaluation of a MODIS-Based Potential Evapotranspiration Product at the Point Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines the development of a continuous, daily time series of potential evapotranspiration (PET) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor data from the Terra satellite platform. The approach is based on the ...

Jongyoun Kim; Terri S. Hogue

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Monitoring natural subsidence and seismicity in the Imperial Valley as a basis for evaluating potential impacts of geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of work done on potential geologic effects of geothermal development are discussed. The key geological issues in the Imperial Valley are the potential for significant subsidence and seismicity which could be induced by geothermal production. The major technical problem is to develop techniques to distinguish between natural and induced activity. In both subsidence and seismicity studies, the projects augment the existing network to obtain additional information in critical areas; thus, local subsidence detection networks were added to the regional networks. The U.S. Geological Survey seismograph network was augmented to increase sensitivity to small earthquakes near the Salton Sea. Techniques being used and initial results are summarized briefly. (JGB)

Crow, N.B.; Kasamayer, P.W.

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

123

Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marginal electricity rates for the residential, commercial,residential and agricultural tariffs in line with the cost of electricity production. In particular, agricultural ratesresidential consumers would see a present (discounted) benefit of 1.9 billion dollars over the forecast period, based on a marginal electricity rate

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Supporting Information for: A Global Comparison of National Biodiesel Production Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by this study, units = US$ per liter OYi "Well-managed" oil yield for feedstock i NewCROP 2006, Duke 2001 Liters oil processing ratio Van Gerpen, Shanks et al. 2004 % of processed to crude vegetable oil ADj Biodiesel Potential · Table S.2: Variables Used in Calculating Biodiesel Volumes and Prices · Figure S.3: U.S

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

126

Potential of Using Poultry Litter as a Feedstock for Energy Production Rangika Perera, Graduate Research Assistant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on co-firing with woody biomass. 2. Potential of Poultry Litter for Energy Generation Poultry litter of phosphorous and potassium, which are important nutrients for plants. Co-firing is the simultaneous in the coal pile and fed to the boiler through the coal feed system. Co-firing poultry litter in an existing

127

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Strong RNAi-inhibition of 4CL expression alters lignification, saccharification potential and productivity of field-grown poplar  

SciTech Connect

RNAi-associated down-regulation of the Pt4CL1 gene family encoding 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) has been proposed as a means for reducing lignin content in cell walls, and thereby improving feedstock quality for paper and bioethanol production. Using hybrid poplars (Populus) we employed RNAi gene suppression of 4CL to generate 14 transgenic events and compared them to a non-transgenic control. After a two-year field trial we characterized the consequences of 4CL down-regulation on wood biochemistry and tree productivity. Lignin reductions correlated well with 4CL RNA expression, with a sharp decrease in lignin observed for RNA expression levels below ~50%. Lignin reductions greater than ~10% of the control value were associated with reduced productivity, decreased wood S/G (syringyl/guaiacyl) lignin monomer ratios, and increased incorporation of H-monomers (p-hydroxyphenyl) into cell walls. Strongly affected transgenic events were also characterized by patches of brown, discolored wood with about twice the extractive (complex polyphenolic) content of controls. There was no support for the hypothesis that reduced lignin would increase saccharification potential. The data presented suggest that a threshold of lignin reduction exists, beyond which there are large changes in wood chemistry and plant metabolism that affect productivity and potential ethanol yield.

Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Strauss, S [Oregon State University

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

NETL: News Release - DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test CO2 Injection Begins in Existing Production Well to Evaluate CO2 Storage Potential, Oil Recovery Washington, D.C. - A U.S. Department...

130

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of KeyElectrical Products: The Case of India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These products--refrigerators, room air conditioners, electric motors, and distribution transformers--are important targets for efficiency improvement in India and in other developing countries. India is an interesting subject of study because of it's size and rapid economic growth. Implementation of efficient technologies in India would save billions in energy costs, and avoid hundreds of megatons of greenhouse gas emissions. India also serves as an example of the kinds of improvement opportunities that could be pursued in other developing countries.

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert,Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geothermal source potential and utilization for methane generation and alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating a geothermally heated anaerobic digester with a fuel alcohol plant and cattle feedlot. Thin stillage produced from the alcohol production process and manure collected from the cattle feedlot would be digested in anaerobic digesters to produce biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide, and residue. The energy requirements to maintain proper digester temperatures would be provided by geothermal water. The biogas produced in the digesters would be burned in a boiler to produce low-pressure steam which would be used in the alcohol production process. The alcohol plant would be sized so that the distiller's grains byproduct resulting from the alcohol production would be adequate to supply the daily cattle feed requirements. A portion of the digester residue would substitute for alfalfa hay in the cattle feedlot ration. The major design criterion for the integrated facilty was the production of adequate distiller's grain to supply the daily requirements of 1700 head of cattle. It was determined that, for a ration of 7 pounds of distiller's grain per head per day, a 1 million gpy alcohol facility would be required. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared for the proposed project, operating costs were calculated for a facility based on a corn feedstock, the economic feasibility of the proposed project was examined by calculating its simple payback, and an analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity of the project's economic viability to variations in feedstock costs and alcohol and distiller's grain prices.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Potential Effects and Challenges of Required Increases in Production and Use Why GAO Did This Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expanded the renewable fuel standard (RFS), which requires rising use of ethanol and other biofuels, from 9 billion gallons in 2008 to 36 billion gallons in 2022. To meet the RFS, the Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy (DOE) are developing advanced biofuels that use cellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover and switchgrass. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the RFS. This report examines, among other things, (1) the effects of increased biofuels production on U.S. agriculture, environment, and greenhouse gas emissions; (2) federal support for domestic biofuels production; and (3) key challenges in meeting the RFS. GAO extensively reviewed scientific studies, interviewed experts and agency officials, and visited five DOE and USDA laboratories. What GAO Recommends GAO suggests that the Congress consider requiring EPA to develop a strategy to assess lifecycle environmental effects of increased biofuels production and whether revisions are needed to the VEETC. GAO also recommends that EPA, DOE, and USDA develop a coordinated approach for addressing uncertainties in lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis and give priority to R&D that addresses future blend wall issues. DOE, USDA, and EPA generally agreed with the recommendations. View GAO-09-446 or key components.

Congressional Requesters

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Potential growth of electric power production from Imperial Valley geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth of geothermal electric power operations in Imperial Valley, California is projected over the next 40 years. With commercial power forecast to become available in the 1980's, the scenario considers three subsequent growth rates: 40, 100, and 250 MW per year. These growth rates, along with estimates of the total resource size, result in a maximum level of electric power production ranging from 1000 to 8000 MW to be attained in the 2010 to 2020 time period. Power plant siting constraints are developed and used to make siting patterns for the 400- through 8000-MW level of power production. Two geothermal technologies are included in the scenario: flashed steam systems that produce cooling water from the geothermal steam condensate and emit noncondensable gases to the atmosphere; and high pressure, confined flow systems that inject the geoghermal fluid back into the ground. An analysis of the scenario is made with regard to well drilling and power plant construction rates, land use, cooling water requirements, and hydrogen sulfide emissions.

Ermak, D.L.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Potential for Biomass District Energy Production in Port Graham, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This project was a collaboration between The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Chugachmiut – A Tribal organization Serving the Chugach Native People of Alaska and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program. It was conducted to determine the economic and technical feasibility for implementing a biomass energy system to service the Chugachmiut community of Port Graham, Alaska. The Port Graham tribe has been investigating opportunities to reduce energy costs and reliance on energy imports and support subsistence. The dramatic rise in the prices of petroleum fuels have been a hardship to the village of Port Graham, located on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. The Port Graham Village Council views the forest timber surrounding the village and the established salmon industry as potential resources for providing biomass energy power to the facilities in their community. Benefits of implementing a biomass fuel include reduced energy costs, energy independence, economic development, and environmental improvement. Fish oil–diesel blended fuel and indoor wood boilers are the most economical and technically viable options for biomass energy in the village of Port Graham. Sufficient regional biomass resources allow up to 50% in annual heating savings to the user, displacing up to 70% current diesel imports, with a simple payback of less than 3 years for an estimated capital investment under $300,000. Distributive energy options are also economically viable and would displace all imported diesel, albeit offering less savings potential and requiring greater capital. These include a large-scale wood combustion system to provide heat to the entire village, a wood gasification system for cogeneration of heat and power, and moderate outdoor wood furnaces providing heat to 3–4 homes or community buildings per furnace. Coordination of biomass procurement and delivery, ensuring resource reliability and technology acceptance, and arbitrating equipment maintenance mitigation for the remote village are challenges to a biomass energy system in Port Graham that can be addressed through comprehensive planning prior to implementation.

Charles Sink, Chugachmiut; Keeryanne Leroux, EERC

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Assessment of potential domestic fossil-fuel resources for SNG (substitute natural gas) production. Final report, February 1983-August 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality and availability of naturally occurring resources and industrial by-products which could be gasified and thereby serve as feedstock for SNG plants were studied to identify those resources with the greatest potential for exploitation in this regard. KRSI accumulated information from a large number of literature sources relative to the resources identified by GRI for study. To the extent possible, KRSI then organized this information to highlight for each resource the grades available, typical chemical compositions, quantities and locations of reserves, recovery methods and rates of production and consumption. This information clearly shows that coal is the most practical source of long-term feedstock for SNG in the contiguous USA. Coal resources amount to 84% (by quads) of the energy resources which were studied. In comparison, peat, shale oil and tar sand contain about 11% of the total.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Koneru, P.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Potential for CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production, Blue Creek Field, NW Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a primary source of greenhouse gases. Injection of CO2 from power plants near coalbed reservoirs is a win-win method to reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. Limited studies have investigated CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production in San Juan and Alberta basins, but reservoir modeling is needed to assess the potential of the Black Warrior basin. Alabama ranks 9th nationally in CO2 emissions from power plants; two electricity generation plants are adjacent to the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway. This research project was a reservoir simulation study designed to evaluate the potential for CO2 sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery in the Blue Creek Field of Black Warrior basin, Alabama. It considered the injection and production rate, the components of injected gas, coal dewatering, permeability anisotropy, various CO2 soak times, completion of multiple reservoir layers and pressure constraints at the injector and producer. The simulation study was based on a 5-spot well pattern 40-ac well spacing. Injection of 100 percent CO2 in coal seams resulted in average volumes of 0.57 Bcf of sequestered CO2 and average volumes of 0.2 Bcf of enhance methane production for the Mary Lee coal zone only, from an 80-acre 5-spot well pattern. For the entire Blue Creek field of the Black Warrior basin, if 100 percent CO2 is injected in the Pratt, Mary Lee and Black Creek coal zones, enhance methane resources recovered are estimated to be 0.3 Tcf, with a potential CO2sequestration capacity of 0.88 Tcf. The methane recovery factor is estimated to be 68.8 percent, if the three coal zones are completed but produced one by one. Approximately 700 wells may be needed in the field. For multi-layers completed wells, the permeability and pressure are important in determining the breakthrough time, methane produced and CO2 injected. Dewatering and soaking do not benefit the CO2 sequestration process but allow higher injection rates. Permeability anisotropy affects CO2 injection and enhanced methane recovery volumes of the field. I recommend a 5-spot pilot project with the maximum well BHP of 1,000 psi at the injector, minimum well BHP of 500 psi at the producer, maximum injection rate of 70 Mscf/D, and production rate of 35 Mscf/D. These technical results, with further economic evaluation, could generate significant projects for CO2 sequestration and enhance coalbed methane production in Blue Creek field, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama.

He, Ting

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Potential for Biomass District Energy Production in Port Graham, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

implementing a biomass fuel include reduced energy costs, energy independence, economic development, and environmental improvement. Fish oil–diesel blended fuel and indoor wood boilers are the most economical and technically viable options for biomass energy in the village of Port Graham. Sufficient regional biomass resources allow up to 50% in annual heating savings to the user, displacing up to 70% current diesel imports, with a simple payback of less than 3 years for an estimated capital investment under $300,000. Distributive energy options are also economically viable and would displace all imported diesel, albeit offering less savings potential and requiring greater capital. These include a large-scale wood combustion system to provide heat to the entire village, a wood gasification system for cogeneration of heat and power, and moderate outdoor wood furnaces providing heat to 3–4 homes or community buildings per furnace. Coordination of biomass procurement and delivery, ensuring resource reliability and technology acceptance, and arbitrating equipment maintenance mitigation for the remote village are challenges to a biomass energy system in Port Graham that can be addressed through comprehensive planning prior to implementation.

Charles Sink, Chugachmiut; Keeryanne Leroux, EERC

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

AN INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES FOR EPSILON-METAL WASTE FORMS  

SciTech Connect

This report examines and ranks a total of seven materials processing techniques that may be potentially utilized to consolidate the undissolved solids from nuclear fuel reprocessing into a low-surface area form. Commercial vendors of processing equipment were contacted and literature researched to gather information for this report. Typical equipment and their operation, corresponding to each of the seven techniques, are described in the report based upon the discussions and information provided by the vendors. Although the report does not purport to describe all the capabilities and issues of various consolidation techniques, it is anticipated that this report will serve as a guide by highlighting the key advantages and disadvantages of these techniques. The processing techniques described in this report were broadly classified into those that employed melting and solidification, and those in which the consolidation takes place in the solid-state. Four additional techniques were examined that were deemed impractical, but were included for completeness. The techniques were ranked based on criteria such as flexibility in accepting wide-variety of feed-stock (chemistry, form, and quantity), ease of long-term maintenance, hot cell space requirements, generation of additional waste streams, cost, and any special considerations. Based on the assumption of ~2.5 L of waste to be consolidated per day, sintering based techniques, namely, microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering and hot isostatic pressing, were ranked as the top-3 choices, respectively. Melting and solidification based techniques were ranked lower on account of generation of volatile phases and difficulties associated with reactivity and containment of the molten metal.

Rohatgi, Aashish; Strachan, Denis M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tidal stream energy is one of the alternative energy sources that are renewable and clean. With the constantly increasing effort in promoting alternative energy, tidal streams have become one of the more promising energy sources due to their continuous, predictable and spatially-concentrated characteristics. However, the present lack of a full spatial-temporal assessment of tidal currents for the U.S. coastline down to the scale of individual devices is a barrier to the comprehensive development of tidal current energy technology. This project created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speed and water level surface. The performance of the model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed with an independent validation. The geodatabase is published at a public domain via a spatial database engine and interactive tools to select, query and download the data are provided. Regions with the maximum of the average kinetic power density larger than 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth larger than 5 m are defined as hotspots and list of hotspots along the USA coast is documented. The results of the regional assessment show that the state of Alaska (AK) contains the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, and is followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL). The average tidal stream power density at some of these locations can be larger than 8 kW/m2 with surface areas on the order of few hundred kilometers squared, and depths larger than 100 meters. The Cook Inlet in AK is found to have a substantially large tidal stream power density sustained over a very large area.

Haas, Kevin A.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline  

SciTech Connect

Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States. This project created a national database of ocean current energy resources to help advance awareness and market penetration in ocean current energy resource assessment. The database, consisting of joint velocity magnitude and direction probability histograms, was created from data created by seven years of numerical model simulations. The accuracy of the database was evaluated by ORNL?s independent validation effort documented in a separate report. Estimates of the total theoretical power resource contained in the ocean currents were calculated utilizing two separate approaches. Firstly, the theoretical energy balance in the Gulf Stream system was examined using the two-dimensional ocean circulation equations based on the assumptions of the Stommel model for subtropical gyres with the quasi-geostrophic balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis force, wind stress and friction driving the circulation. Parameters including water depth, natural dissipation rate and wind stress are calibrated in the model so that the model can reproduce reasonable flow properties including volume flux and energy flux. To represent flow dissipation due to turbines additional turbine drag coefficient is formulated and included in the model. Secondly, to determine the reasonableness of the total power estimates from the Stommel model and to help determine the size and capacity of arrays necessary to extract the maximum theoretical power, further estimates of the available power based on the distribution of the kinetic power density in the undisturbed flow was completed. This used estimates of the device spacing and scaling to sum up the total power that the devices would produce. The analysis has shown that considering extraction over a region comprised of the Florida Current portion of the Gulf Stream system, the average power dissipated ranges between 4-6 GW with a mean around 5.1 GW. This corresponds to an average of approximately 45 TWh/yr. However, if the extraction area comprises the entire portion of the Gulf Stream within 200 miles of the US coastline from Florida to North Carolina, the average power dissipated becomes 18.6 GW or 163 TWh/yr. A web based GIS interface, http://www.oceancurrentpower.gatech.edu/, was developed for dissemination of the data. The website includes GIS layers of monthly and yearly mean ocean current velocity and power density for ocean currents along the entire coastline of the United States, as well as joint and marginal probability histograms for current velocities at a horizontal resolution of 4-7 km with 10-25 bins over depth. Various tools are provided for viewing, identifying, filtering and downloading the data.

Haas, Kevin

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Escherichia coli Enhanced Hydrogen Production, Genome-wide Screening for Extracellular DNA, and Influence of GGDEF Proteins on Early Biofilm Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escherichia coli is the best characterized bacterium; it grows rapidly, and it is easy to manipulate genetically. An increased knowledge about the physiology of this model organism will facilitate the development of engineered E.coli strains for applications such as production of biofuels and biofilm control. The aims of this work were the application of protein engineering to increase E. coli hydrogen production, the identification of the proteins regulating extracellular DNA production (eDNA), and the evaluation of the effect of the proteins synthesizing the signal 3'-5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) on biofilm formation. The Escherichia coli hydrogen production rate was increased 9 fold through random mutagenesis of fhlA. Variant FhlA133 (Q11H, L14V, Y177F, K245R, M288K, and I342F) enhances hydrogen production by increasing transcription of the four transcriptional units regulated by FhlA. The amino acid replacements E363G and L14G in FhlA increased hydrogen production 6 fold and 4 fold, respectively. The complete E. coli genome was screened to identify proteins that affect eDNA production. The nlpI, yfeC, and rna mutants increased eDNA production and the hns and rfaD mutants decreased eDNA production. Deletion of nlpI increases eDNA 3 fold while overexpression of nlpI decreases eDNA 16 fold. Global regulator H-NS is required for eDNA with E. coli since deletion of hns abolished eDNA production while overexpression of hns restored eDNA to 70 percent of the wild-type levels. Our results suggest that eDNA production in E. coli is related to direct secretion. Deletions of the genes encoding the diguanylate cyclases YeaI, YedQ, and YfiN increased swimming motility and eDNA as expected for low c-di-GMP levels. However, contrary to the current paradigm, early biofilm formation increased dramatically for the yeaI (30 fold), yedQ (12 fold), and yfiN (18 fold) mutants. Hence, our results suggest that c-di-GMP levels should be reduced for initial biofilm formation because motility is important for initial attachment to a surface.

Sanchez Torres, Viviana

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, Northwestof Depressurization for Gas Production from Gas Hydrate5L-38 Gas Hydrate Thermal Production Test Through Numerical

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Evaluation of the Potential for the Production of Lignocellulosic Based Ethanol at Existing Corn Ethanol Facilities: Final Subcontract Report, 2 March 2000 - 30 March 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report on opportunities to explore the business potential provided by converting biomass to products such as ethanol. The goals of this study were: (1) To provide the opportunity to explore the business potential provided by converting biomass to products such as ethanol. (2) To take advantage of the grain-processing infrastructure by investigating the co-location of additional biomass conversion facilities at an existing plant site.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Potential products and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process n Well-suited to prepare dense ceramics n Removal of drying step. Contact us Industry Engagement magnification, (b) cross-sectional view at high magnification, (c) surface view. Drying-free ceramic casting colloidal casting method for forming advanced ceramics without requiring a drying step. A polymerisable

Albrecht, David

147

Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

None

1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Macroalgae Analysis A National GIS-based Analysis of Macroalgae Production Potential Summary Report and Project Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall project objective is to conduct a strategic analysis to assess the state of macroalgae as a feedstock for biofuels production. The objective in FY11 is to develop a multi-year systematic national assessment to evaluate the U.S. potential for macroalgae production using a GIS-based assessment tool and biophysical growth model developed as part of these activities. The initial model development for both resource assessment and constraints was completed and applied to the demonstration areas. The model for macroalgal growth was extended to the EEZ off the East and West Coasts of the United States, and a plan to merge the findings for an initial composite assessment was developed. In parallel, an assessment of land-based, port, and offshore infrastructure needs based on published and grey literature was conducted. Major information gaps and challenges encountered during this analysis were identified. Also conducted was an analysis of the type of local, state, and federal requirements that pertain to permitting land-based facilities and nearshore/offshore culture operations

Roesijadi, Guritno; Coleman, Andre M.; Judd, Chaeli; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Buenau, Kate E.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: Part 1 - Simulations of beneficial use  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a project that assessed the potential for mercury (Hg) release to air and water from soil amended with combustion products to simulate beneficial use. Combustion products (ash) derived from wood, sewage sludge, subbituminous coal, and a subbituminous coal-petroleum coke mixture were added to soil as agricultural supplements, soil stabilizers, and to develop low permeability surfaces. Hg release was measured from the latter when intact and after it was broken up and mixed into the soil. Air-substrate Hg exchange was measured for all materials six times over 24 hr, providing data that reflected winter, spring, summer, and fall meteorological conditions. Dry deposition of atmospheric Hg and emission of Hg to the atmosphere were both found to be important fluxes. Measured differences in seasonal and diel (24 hr) fluxes demonstrated that to establish an annual estimate of air-substrate flux from these materials data on both of these time steps should be collected. Air-substrate exchange was highly correlated with soil and air temperature, as well as incident light. Hg releases to the atmosphere from coal and wood combustion product-amended soils to simulate an agricultural application were similar to that measured for the unamended soil, whereas releases to the air for the sludge-amended materials were higher. Hg released to soil solutions during the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure for ashamended materials was higher than that released from soil alone. On the basis of estimates of annual releases of Hg to the air from the materials used, emissions from coal and wood ash-amended soil to simulate an agricultural application could simply be re-emission of Hg deposited by wet processes from the atmosphere; however, releases from sludge-amended materials and those generated to simulate soil stabilization and disturbed low-permeability pads include Hg indigenous to the material. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Mae Sexauer Gustin; Jody Ericksen; George C. Fernandez [University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States). Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

FACTORS WHICH AFFECT FORMATION AND DEPOSITION OF TRANSPORT CORROSION PRODUCTS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE RECIRCULATING WATER LOOPS  

SciTech Connect

Deposits of corrosion products form on heat transfer surfaces and in radiation flux zones attemperatures around 500 deg F in stainless steel systems operating with circulating watcr. The report considers the possible harmful effects of such deposits on heat transfer and fluid flow, as well as factors involved in the origin of these corrosion products and in the mechanisms of deposition. The prevention of d electrostatic methods is discussed. (auth)

Wohlberg, C.; Kleimola, F.W.

1953-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Potential Impacts of the Use of Southern Oscillation Information on theTexas Aggregate Sorghum Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic decision models incorporating biophysical simulation models are used to examine the impact of the use of Southern Oscillation (SO) information on sorghum production in Texas. Production for 18 sites is aggregated to examine the impact of ...

Harvey S. J. Hill; James W. Mjelde; Wesley Rosenthal; Peter J. Lamb

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Analysis of Devonian Black Shales in Kentucky for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Enhanced Natural Gas Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO2. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine both CO2 and CH4 adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO2 displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO2 adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton in the more organic-rich zones. There is a direct linear correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO2 adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial volumetric estimates based on these data indicate a CO2 sequestration capacity of as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. In the Big Sandy Gas Field area of eastern Kentucky, calculations using the net thickness of shale with 4 percent or greater total organic carbon, indicate that 6.8 billion tonnes of CO2 could be sequestered in the five county area. Discounting the uncertainties in reservoir volume and injection efficiency, these results indicate that the black shales of Kentucky are a potentially large geologic sink for CO2. Moreover, the extensive occurrence of gas shales in Paleozoic and Mesozoic basins across North America make them an attractive regional target for economic CO2 storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall; Cortland F. Eble; James A. Drahovzal; R. Marc Bustin

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific productivities of selected algal strains will eventually be incorporated into this model.

Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake (SmartWhale Consulting, Dartmouth, NS, CA); Pienkos, Philip P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); O'Leary, Stephen J. (National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Halifax, NS, CA); Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong production and trade model with a greenhouse gas model to assess leakage associated with modified beef

Zhou, Yaoqi

163

Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; Yakama Indian Nation, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document represents the FY2002 BPA contract Statement of Work for the Yakama Nation (YN) portion of the project entitled 'Assessment of current and potential salmonid production in Rattlesnake Creek associated with restoration efforts'. The purpose of the project is to complete detailed surveys of water quality, fish populations, habitat conditions and riparian health in the Rattlesnake Creek sub-basin of the White Salmon River in south central Washington. Results of the surveys will be used to establish Rattlesnake Creek sub-basin baseline environmental factors prior to anticipated removal of Condit Dam in 2006 and enable cost-effective formulation of future watershed restoration strategies.

Morris, Gregory

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fermentative production of butanol from sorghum molasses as a potential agricultural fuel. Final report, June 26, 1981-September 25, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strain, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 4259, suitable for butanol-acetone fermentation of sorghum molasses was selected from several strains of the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It was cultivated in the composition-optimized sorghum molasses medium. The microbial growth and sugar consumption pattern in the sorghum molasses medium exhibited a typical diauxie phenomenon. The results strongly suggest that the difficulty encountered by the Weizmann type of organisms in butanol-acetone fermentation of molasses is due to the diauxie phenomenon causing a significant decrease in the solvent production rate. Acid hydrolysis of sorghum molasses minimizes the occurrence of the phenomenon, thereby remarkably increasing the solvent yield. The final solvent concentrations in the inverted molasses medium were butanol, 1.0% (w/v); acetone, 0.37% (w/v); ethanol, 0.18% (w/v); and total solvent, 1.55% (w/v). The total solvent yield in the inverted sorghum molasses medium was 30.3% based on the weight of sugar consumed. Effects of the temperature, agitation and heat-shocking were also investigated.

Fan, L.T.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast - their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following subjects are included: regional setting, stratigraphic sections, Lower Wilcox sandstone distribution, formation pressure, formation temperature used to delineate geothermal fairways, Zapata Fairway, Duval Fairway, Live Oak Fairway, De Witt Fairway, Colorado Fairway, and Harris Fairway. Depositional and structural style, formation pressures and temperatures, porosity and permeability, formation water salinity, and Cuero Prospect are covered for De Witt Fairway. Depositional and structural style, formation and fluid properties, and Eagle Lake Prospect are covered for Colorado Fairway. (MHR)

Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Direct Carbon Conversion: Review of Production and Electrochemical Conversion of Reactive Carbons, Economics and Potential Impact on the Carbon Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over global warning have motivated the search for more efficient technologies for electric power generation from fossil fuels. Today, 90% of electric power is produced from coal, petroleum or natural gas. Higher efficiency reduces the carbon dioxide emissions per unit of electric energy. Exercising an option of deep geologic or ocean sequestration for the CO{sub 2} byproduct would reduce emissions further and partially forestall global warming. We introduce an innovative concept for conversion of fossil fuels to electricity at efficiencies in the range of 70-85% (based on standard enthalpy of the combustion reaction). These levels exceed the performance of common utility plants by up to a factor of two. These levels are also in excess of the efficiencies of combined cycle plants and of advanced fuel cells now operated on the pilot scale. The core of the concept is direct carbon conversion a process that is similar to that a fuel cell but differs in that synthesized forms of carbon, not hydrogen, are used as fuel. The cell sustains the reaction, C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2} (E {approx} 1.0 V, T = 800 C). The fuel is in the form of fine particulates ({approx}100 nm) distributed by entrainment in a flow of CO{sub 2} to the cells to form a slurry of carbon in the melt. The byproduct stream of CO{sub 2} is pure. It affords the option of sequestration without additional separation costs, or can be reused in secondary oil or gas recovery. Our experimental program has discovered carbon materials with orders of magnitude spreads in anode reactivity reflected in cell power density. One class of materials yields energy at about 1 kW/m{sup 2} sufficiently high to make practical the use of the cell in electric utility applications. The carbons used in such cells are highly disordered on the nanometer scale (2-30 nm), relative to graphite. Such disordered or turbostratic carbons can be produced by controlled pyrolysis (thermal decomposition) of hydrocarbons extracted from coal, petroleum or natural gas. For coal and lignite, such hydrocarbons may be produced by cyclic hydrogenation (hydropyrolysis), with the recycle of the hydrogen intermediate following pyrolysis. Starting with common CH{sub x} feedstock for carbon black manufacture, the ash entrained into the carbon (<0.03%) does not jeopardize cell life or enter into the economic estimates for power generation. The value of carbon (relative to hydrogen) as an electrochemical fuel derives from thermodynamic aspects of the C/O{sub 2} reaction. First, the entropy change of the C/O{sub 2} reaction is nearly zero, allowing theoretical efficiencies ({Delta}G(T)/{Delta}H{sub i298}) of 100% (cf. H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} theoretical efficiency of 70%). Second, the thermodynamic activity of the carbon fuel and the CO{sub 2} product are spatially and temporally invariant. This allows 100% utilization of the carbon fuel in single pass (cf. hydrogen utilizations of 75-85%). The carbodmelt slurry is non-explosive at operating temperatures. The total energy efficiency for the C/O{sub 2} is roughly 80% for cell operation at practical rates. In summary, what gives this route its fundamental advantage in energy conversion is that it derives the greatest possible fraction of energy of the fossil resource from an electrochemical reaction (C+O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) that is comparatively simple to operate at efficiencies of 80%, in a single-pass cell configuration without bottoming turbine cycles.

Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N; Upadhye, R; Pasternak, A; Steinberg, M

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Soy Protein Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will provide an overview of the key benefits of soy protein products in an easily understood format. ...

174

Potential role of the Fast Flux Test Facility and the advanced test reactor in the U.S. tritium production system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deparunent of Energy is currently engaged in a dual-track strategy to develop an accelerator and a conunercial light water reactor (CLWR) as potential sources of tritium supply. New analysis of the production capabilities of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site argues for considering its inclusion in the tritium supply,system. The use of the FFTF (alone or together with the Advanced Test Reactor [ATR] at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) as an integral part of,a tritium production system would help (1) ensure supply by 2005, (2) provide additional time to resolve institutional and technical issues associated with the- dual-track strategy, and (3) reduce discounted total life-cycle`costs and near-tenn annual expenditures for accelerator-based systems. The FFRF would also provide a way to get an early start.on dispositioning surplus weapons-usable plutonium as well as provide a source of medical isotopes. Challenges Associated With the Dual-Track Strategy The Departinent`s purchase of either a commercial reactor or reactor irradiation services faces challenging institutional issues associated with converting civilian reactors to defense uses. In addition, while the technical capabilities of the individual components of the accelerator have been proven, the entire system needs to be demonstrated and scaled upward to ensure that the components work toge ther 1548 as a complete production system. These challenges create uncertainty over the ability of the du2a-track strategy to provide an assured tritium supply source by 2005. Because the earliest the accelerator could come on line is 2007, it would have to operate at maximum capacity for the first few years to regenerate the reserves lost through radioactive decay aftei 2005.

Dautel, W.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Surface and subsurface fault and fracture systems with associated natural gas production in the Lower Mississippian and Upper Devonian, Price Formation, southern West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production from natural gas deposits is often enhanced by fault and fracture systems associated with reservoirs. This study presents analyses of fault and fracture systems… (more)

Johnson, S. Reed.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the shale boundaries k B on gas production (Q R and Q P )during the production period. The shale interlayer betweenbounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production

Moridis, G.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Using Flue Gas Huff 'n Puff Technology and Surfactants to Increase Oil Production from the Antelope Shale Formation of the Railroad Gap Oil Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to test cyclic injection of exhaust flue gas from compressors located in the field to stimulate production from Antelope Shale zone producers. Approximately 17,000 m{sup 3} ({+-}600 MCF) of flue gas was to be injected into each of three wells over a three-week period, followed by close monitoring of production for response. Flue gas injection on one of the wells would be supplemented with a surfactant.

McWilliams, Michael

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Focus Area 1 - Biomass Formation and Modification : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation and Modification BESC biomass formation and modification research involves working directly with two potential bioenergy crops (switchgrass and Populus) to develop...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The White Salmon River Watershed Enhancement Project (WSRWEP) began in 1993 through efforts of the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), local stakeholders and various agencies. Early accomplishments of the project included the formation of a multi-stakeholder watershed management committee (WMC) and technical advisory committee (TAC), completion of several baseline assessments, drafting of a watershed management plan, and beginning implementation of the plan. Since inception, the effort has utilized the support of various government/private grants, and local in-kind contributions to accomplish project goals. The WMC and its partners utilize a four-pronged approach for achieving watershed enhancement: on-ground restoration, extension of technical and financial assistance to cooperators, community and environmental education, and assessment/monitoring to develop strategies and track the success of ongoing work. Project activities are generally targeted to sub-basins and stream reaches within the White Salmon watershed that exhibit important water quality and fish/wildlife habitat problems. Such project prioritization is being conducted with the active input of both the White Salmon WMC and TAC. An important current phase of the WSRWEP targets detailed monitoring and assessment of the Rattlesnake Creek sub-basin, and is the focus of this report. The 'Assessment of Rattlesnake Creek in Relation to Restoration Efforts' project (BPA Project ID Number 21009) was identified and prioritized for accomplishment by the White Salmon River TAC in January of 2000. Rationale for the project stemmed from the group's realization that Condit Dam on the lower White Salmon is scheduled for removal, or fish passage retrofitting, within the near future. Given this eventuality, the TAC identified the current lack of understanding regarding both potential anadromous habitat and existing native fish and habitat conditions above Condit Dam (RM 3.2) as an important need. In response to the TAC's determination, the US Geological Survey (USGS), Yakama Nation (YN) and UCD began work to develop the current project that is intended to address the above. The overall goal of the Rattlesnake Creek assessment is to document existing riparian habitat and water quality conditions, native fish populations, and future restoration sites before future return of anadromous fish to the basin above RM 3.2. Since the project is jointly enacted by the USGS, YN and UCD, a high degree of shared planning and joint implementation is applied during completion of tasks. In general, the USGS and YN are cooperatively working to monitor and assess fish populations and riparian habitat conditions within the drainage and adjacent sections of the White Salmon. The UCD is generally responsible for assessing water quality, mapping stream channel geomorphology to enable future restoration planning, and measuring the ratios of carbon and nitrogen isotopes at various trophic levels The remainder of this report provides a summary of significant activities achieved by the UCD under BPA Project 21009 during the first project year. The report follows the FY 2001 UCD/BPA contract Statement of Work (SOW) format. Discussion of major problems encountered, changes in the work plan and schedule deviations are noted in italics after the description of accomplishments for each task.

Stampfli, Steve

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Market Structure Across Retail Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study how market structure within a product category varies across retail formats. Building on the literature on internal market structure, we estimate a joint store and brand choice model where the loading matrix of brand attributes are allowed to ... Keywords: brand maps, heterogeniety, market structure, retail formats

Karsten Hansen; Vishal Singh

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reduction potential of the sulfhydryl radical: Pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis studies of the formation and reactions of {sm_bullet}SH and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

H{sub 2}S, which is a very toxic gas, has a large number of natural and anthropogenic sources, and the safe removal of this substance has been a matter of ongoing industrial concern. Formation and reactions of the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} radicals in aqueous solutions have been studied by excimer laser flash photolysis and by pulse radiolysis. Acidic H{sub 2}S solutions can be photolyzed with 193 nm laser pulses and produce a transient species with {lambda}{sub max} at 240 nm, ascribed to the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} radical. Solutions of SH{sup {minus}} can be photolyzed also with 248 nm laser pulses to produce the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} reacts with SH{sup {minus}} ({kappa}{sub f} = 4 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s, {kappa}{sub r} = 5 {times} 10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}) to form HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}, with {lambda}{sub max} at 380 nm. Both {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} react rapidly with O{sub 2}; the former produces SO{sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} ({kappa} = 5 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s), and the latter produces O{sub 2}{sm_bullet} ({kappa} = 4 {times} 10{sup 8} L/mol s). Both radicals react with olefinic compounds. The monomeric radical oxidizes Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and chlorpromazine. The dimeric radical is a weaker oxidant toward ferrocyanide but reduces N-methylpyridinium compounds. The reduction potential for the dimeric radical at pH 7 was determined from one-electron transfer equilibria with Mo(CN){sub 8}{sup 3{minus}} and with the 4-methoxyaniline radical cation and found to be 0.69 V vs NHE. From the equilibrium constant K = [HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}]/[SH{sup {minus}}][{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}}] = 8 {times} 10{sup 3} L/mol, the reduction potential for ({sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}},H{sup +}/SH{sup {minus}}) is calculated to be 0.92 V.

Das, T.N.; Huie, R.E.; Neta, P.; Padmaja, S. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Div.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effects of momentum-dependent nuclear potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions RID A-2398-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model, we study the effects due to the momentum dependence of isoscalar nuclear potential as well as that of symmetry potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions induced by neutron-rich nuclei. It is found that both observables are affected significantly by the momentum dependence of nuclear potential, leading to a reduction of their sensitivity to the stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy. However, the t/He-3 ratio remains a sensitive probe of the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy.

Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Energy Resource Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Potential Resource Potential of Methane Hydrate Energy Resource Potential An introduction to the science and energy potential of a unique resource Disclaimer Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

187

Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy alpha phase sintering experiment where the Mg is a surrogate for Pu and Am. The powder production system utilized the uranium hydrogen interaction in order to break down larger pieces of uranium into fine powder. After several iterations, a successful reusable system was built. The nominal size of the powder product was on the order of 1 to 3 mm. The resulting uranium powder was pressed into pellets of various compositions (DU, DU-10Zr, DU-Mg, DU-10Zr-Mg) and heated to approximately 650?C, just below the alphabeta phase transition of uranium. The dimensions of the pellets were measured before and after heating and in situ dimension changes were measured using a linear variable differential transducer (LVDT). Post experiment measurement of the pellets proved to be an unreliable indicator of sintering do the cracking of the pellets during cool down. The cracking caused increases in the diameter and height of the samples. The cracks occurred in greater frequency along the edges of the pellets. All of the pellets, except the DU-10Zr-Mg pellet, were slightly conical in shape. This is believed to be an artifact of the powder pressing procedure. A greater density occurs on one end of the pellet during pressing and thus leads to gradient in the sinter rate of the pellet. The LVDT measurements proved to be extremely sensitive to outside vibration, making a subset of the data inappropriate for analysis. The pellets were also analyzed using electron microscopy. All pellets showed signs of sintering and an increase in density. The pellets will the greatest densification and lowest porosity were the DU-Mg and DU-10Zr-Mg. The DU-Mg pellet had a porosity of 14 +or- 2.%. The DU-10Zr-Mg porosity could not be conclusively determined due to lack of clearly visible pores in the image, however there were very few pores indicating a high degree of sintering. In the DU-10Zr-Mg alloy, large grains of DU were surrounded by Zr. This phenomena was not present in the DU-10Zr pellet where the Zr and DU stayed segregated. There was no indication of alloying between the Zr and DU in pellets.

Garnetti, David J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cumulative mass of produced water (M W ). Production Using aw and cumulative mass of produced water M w associated withcumulative mass of produced water M w in Figure 16 increase

Moridis, G.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

190

Oil Crop Potential for Biodiesel Production: Summary of Three Years of Spring Mustard Research -- Methodologies, Results, and Recommendations; 2000-2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a project whose goal was to support R&D to develop an oil-seed crop that has the potential to reduce the feedstock cost of biodiesel to between 7 and 8 cents per pound of oil and expand supplies of biodiesel as demand for biodiesel grows. The key to this goal is that the non-oil fraction of the oil crop (the seed meal) must have a high value outside of the animal feed markets and produce oil that is not suitable for human consumption. To that end, a spring breeding program was developed to increase diversity of glucosinolate and the concentration of glucosinolates in the meal and to optimize the oil composition for biodiesel fuels. This report presents the research on the spring planted hybrids.

Brown, J.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Titanium Alloys Production for High Temperature Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes · Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion · Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on ...

195

Eddy Formation in 2½-Layer, Quasigeostrophic Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of nonlinear eddies in unstable 2½-layer, quasigeostrophic jets is investigated using a piecewise constant potential vorticity, “contour dynamical” model. Both infinite and semi-infinite jet dynamics are explored, considering a ...

Ilson C. A. da Silveira; Glenn R. Flierl

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Person Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Renewable Energy Production By State Renewable Energy Production By State 2009 Total Energy Production by State 2009 Total...

197

Production I/O Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

library that collects IO access pattern in- formation from large-scale production applications with minimal overhead. In this paper we present our experiences in...

198

Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes  

SciTech Connect

The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

Gurgel, Angelo C.

200

Production analysis of Marcellus Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to analyze the production potential of Marcellus shale using actual field data. By using real field production data for… (more)

Belyadi, Hossein.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Resource Recovery of Coal Bed Methane Formation Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the excavation of natural gas, petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted brine water, termed production water, is drawn from the coal bed methane formations (CBMF) along with the… (more)

Bishop, Catherine Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Influence of Substrate Temperature and RF Power on the Formation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Substrate Temperature and RF Power on the Formation of ZnO Nanorods for Solar Driven Hydrogen Production. Author(s) ...

203

Map Data: Renewable Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Production Map Data: Renewable Production renewprod2009.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Total Production Map Data: State Consumption Directory of Potential...

204

Biomedical device potential for robust, implantable product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraViolet Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraViolet Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraviolet A team of scientists has developed a process for creating glass-based, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce light in the ultraviolet range. February 24, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

205

Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects  

SciTech Connect

A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Improved recovery using horizontal drilling in the Dundee Formation Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to demonstrate that oil production from selected fields in the Dundee Formation (Dev.) of Michigan can be substantially increased, perhaps restored to near--original production levels in some fields in Michigan, by utilizing horizontal drain wells. Devonian rocks have been the most prolific hydrocarbon producers of any system in the Michigan Basin. The Traverse, Dundee, and Lucas Formations have produced nearly all of the 525 Mbbls of oil and 150 Bcf of gas since the late 1920`s, 50% of the state`s oil and 7% of the state`s natural gas production. The Dundee Formation is Michigan`s all-time leader with 352 million barrels of oil and 42 billion cubic feet of gas. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI, selected as a field trial for this project is such a field. Analysis of production data for Crystal Field suggests that an additional 200,000 bbls of oil can be produced using 1 strategically located horizontal well. Total addition production from the Crystal Field could be as much as 6-8 Mbbls. Spin-offs from the technology developed in this project to other fields has the potential to increase Dundee production in Michigan by 35%, adding 80-100 Mbbls to the cumulative production. The approach combines proven, cost-effective horizontal drilling technology with modern reservoir characterization and management. A total of 30 Dundee fields will be characterized including the Crystal Field. Well logs, other well data, drilling, and production data and rock samples from the Dundee Fm. will be obtained, assembled, and input into digital databases designed for this project. Computer models describing the diagenetic, stratigraphic and thermal evolution of the Michigan Basin will be developed and applied to the Crystal Field reservoir. A post-mortem study is scheduled to monitor the effect of the horizontal well on Crystal Field production.

Harrison, W.B. III; Wood, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.; Tester, C.; Taylor, E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Higgs discovery potential of ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higgs boson production and decay at the LHC is described, together with related ATLAS search channels, in order to provide an overview of the ATLAS Higgs discovery potential.

Christopher Collins-Tooth

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

Hodge, D.S. [SUNY, Buffalo, NY (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Innovations in Steel Production—Animations for Aluminium ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 30, 2008 ... Innovations in Steel Production—Animations for Aluminium Technologies? by Reiner Kopp. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: Webcast. Pages ...

212

Technology drives natural gas production growth from shale ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... Rapid increases in natural gas production from shale gas formations resulted from widespread application ...

213

Renewable Energy Production By State | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Per Person Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential 2009 Total Energy Production by State 2009 Total Energy Production by State 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person...

214

2009 Total Energy Production by State | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Per Person Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Renewable Energy Production By State Renewable Energy Production By State 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person...

215

Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level ...

Michael T. Montgomery; Brian F. Farrell

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

In situ oxidation of subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

217

Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offshore Togo, West Africa provides exciting potential for hydrocarbon exploration. Previous exploration is limited to four wells, drilled prior to 1986 in shallow water. This investigation focuses on a 625 km² section of 3100 km² of high quality 3-D seismic data acquired by Petroleum Geo-Services Inc. (PGS), Houston, Texas. The study area ranges from approximately 180 m - 2500 m water depth. Research included regional geologic correlation, seismic interpretation, and structural modeling of the major fault systems and unconformities. Proven source and reservoir formations from existing oil and gas fields in neighboring countries are analogous to formations identified on seismic for offshore Togo. Structures suitable for hydrocarbon accumulation were identified on seismic within potentially productive formations. Based on the correlations, seismic interpretation and modeling, four possible exploration prospects were identified. The prospects were ranked according to exploration potential based on structural characteristics and original oil in place (OOIP) calculations. The existence of suitable structures for hydrocarbon accumulation in potentially productive formations makes offshore Togo highly prospective.

Gray, Max Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Bayesian Forecast Model of Australian Region Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new and potentially skillful seasonal forecast model of tropical cyclone formation [tropical cyclogenesis (TCG)] is developed for the Australian region. The model is based on Poisson regression using the Bayesian approach. Predictor combinations ...

Angelika Werner; Neil J. Holbrook

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board The Shale Gas Subcommittee of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board is charged with identifying measures that can be taken to reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of shale gas production. Natural gas is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, providing a quarter of the country's total energy. Owing to breakthroughs in technology, production from shale formations has gone from a negligible amount just a few years ago to being almost 30 percent of total U.S. natural gas production. This has brought lower prices, domestic jobs, and the prospect of enhanced national security due to the potential of substantial

220

Dictionary of Natural Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seawater and polarized for some days at -200 mV vs. Ag/ AgCl. The current increase indicated the formation acceptor for the MFC cathode reaction because of its high redox potential (+0.82 V vs. SHE) and its low with a 0.2 µm filter before entering the system. 2.4. Fluorescent microscopy and 3D imaging Microbial

Maoz, Shahar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Hiroshi Sakuragi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Large amounts of fossil fuels are consumed every day in spite of increasing environmental problems. To preserve the environment and construct a sustainable society, the use of biofuels derived from different kinds of biomass is being practiced worldwide. Although bioethanol has been largely produced, it commonly requires food crops such as corn and sugar cane as substrates. To develop a sustainable energy supply, cellulosic biomass should be used for bioethanol production instead of grain biomass. For this purpose, cell surface engineering technology is a very promising method. In biobutanol and biodiesel production, engineered host fermentation has attracted much attention; however, this method has many limitations such as low productivity and low solvent tolerance of microorganisms. Despite these problems, biofuels such as bioethanol, biobutanol, and biodiesel are potential energy sources that can help establish a sustainable society. 1.

Hiroshi Sakuragi; Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

U.S. monthly crude oil production reaches highest level since ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Eagle Ford formation in South Texas and the Permian Basin in West Texas. North Dakota's increase in oil production comes from the Bakken formation in the ...

223

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

224

A study of coal formation  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Production Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall (2005), “Prices, Production, and Inventories over theProduction Targets ? Guillermo Caruana CEMFI caruana@cem?.esthe theory using monthly production targets of the Big Three

Caruana, Guillermo; Einav, Liran

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pottery Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul T. Nicholson. ) Pottery Production, Nicholson, UEE 2009Short Citation: Nicholson 2009, Pottery Production. UEE.Paul T. , 2009, Pottery Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Nicholson, Paul T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cordage Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

294: fig. 15-3). Cordage Production, Veldmeijer, UEE 2009Short Citation: Veldmeijer, 2009, Cordage Production. UEE.André J. , 2009, Cordage Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Veldmeijer, André J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

portable document format - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

City. State/Province. Zip/Postal Code. Country. Telephone. Fax. E-mail Address. Job Responsibility. ? Production ? R&D. Education. Topics of Specific Interest ...

232

Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A coupled flow and geomechanics model for enhanced oil and gas recovery in shale formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Economic production from shale formations has been achieved because of advances in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Nonetheless, hydrocarbon recovery from these reservoirs is… (more)

Fakcharoenphol, Perapon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

236

High temperature simulation of petroleum formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum formation has been simulated in the laboratory with emphasis on the effects of temperature, mineral catalysis, and starting material structure on the yield and composition of the liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon products. In an attempt to prove the hypothesis that petroleum formation can be simulated using high temperatures, Green River Shale from Colorado, USA, was subjected to pyrolysis for 16 hours at temperatures ranging from 300 to 500/sup 0/C. The sequence of products formed over this temperature range was used as the basis for defining five different zones of maturation reaction: 1) a heterobond cracking zone; 2) a labile carbon bond cracking zone; 3) a free radical synthesis zone; 4) a wet gas formation zone; and 5) an aromatization zone. The role of some typical inorganic components of sedimentary rocks in the origin and maturation of petroleum has been investigated using this high temperature model. The importance of the structure of organic matter in petroelum formation has also been investigated using this high temperature model. Lignin and cellulose are poor sources of liquid hydrocarbons, but cellulose in the presence of carbonate gives a high yield of gaseous hydrocarbons. Protein pyrolysis gives a high oil yield with an alkane distribution similar to petroleum. The lipids produced the highest oil yield of the substances tested but the n-alkanes show an odd carbon length predominance unlike the distribution found in petroleum.

Evans, R.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope  

SciTech Connect

New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Genomic Prospecting for Microbial Biodiesel Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is defined as fatty acid mono-alkylesters and is produced from triacylglycerols. In the current article we provide an overview of the structure, diversity and regulation of the metabolic pathways leading to intracellular fatty acid and triacylglycerol accumulation in three types of organisms (bacteria, algae and fungi) of potential biotechnological interest and discuss possible intervention points to increase the cellular lipid content. The key steps that regulate carbon allocation and distribution in lipids include the formation of malonyl-CoA, the synthesis of fatty acids and their attachment onto the glycerol backbone, and the formation of triacylglycerols. The lipid biosynthetic genes and pathways are largely known for select model organisms. Comparative genomics allows the examination of these pathways in organisms of biotechnological interest and reveals the evolution of divergent and yet uncharacterized regulatory mechanisms. Utilization of microbial systems for triacylglycerol and fatty acid production is in its infancy; however, genomic information and technologies combined with synthetic biology concepts provide the opportunity to further exploit microbes for the competitive production of biodiesel.

Lykidis, Athanasios; Lykidis, Athanasios; Ivanova, Natalia

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geothermal resources Frio Formation, South Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the Frio sand distribution and formation temperatures and pressures was undertaken in order to define prospective areas in which a more detailed reservoir analysis is necessary prior to the selection of a site for a geothermal well. As a result two potential geothermal fairways were identified--one in the south part of the area in Hidalgo, Willacy, and Cameron Counties, and the other in the north part in north-central Nueces County.

Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Objective Estimation of the 24-h Probability of Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new product for estimating the 24-h probability of TC formation in individual 5° × 5° subregions of the North Atlantic, eastern North Pacific, and western North Pacific tropical basins is developed. This product uses environmental and ...

Andrea B. Schumacher; Mark DeMaria; John A. Knaff

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Formation flow channel blocking  

SciTech Connect

A method is claimed for selectively blocking high permeability flow channels in an underground hydrocarbon material bearing formation having flow channels of high permeability and having flow channels of lesser permeability. The method includes the following steps: introducing a blocking material fluid comprising a blocking material in a carrier into the flow channels through an injection well in communication with the formation; introducing a buffer fluid into the formation through the injection well for the buffer fluid to displace the blocking material fluid away from the injection well; allowing the blocking material to settle in the channels to resist displacement by fluid flowing through the channels; introducing a quantity of an activating fluid into the channels through the injection well at a sufficient rate for the activating fluid to displace the buffer fluid and finger into the high permeability channels to reach the blocking material in the high permeability channels without reaching the blocking material in the low permeability channels, the activating fluid being adapted to activate the blocking material which it reaches to cause blocking of the high permeability channels.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

245

Interatomic Potentials Repository Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... W Tungsten (W). ... See the Zhou04 page for more information. Format: EAM/alloy setfl File(s): W.set GJ Ackland, unpublished. ...

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Isolation, Preliminary Characterization and Preliminary Assessment of Scale-Up Potential of Photosynthetic Microalgae for the Production of Both Biofuels and Bio-Active Molecules in the U.S. and Canada: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-372  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion flue gases are a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions into the Earth's atmosphere, a factor that has been linked to the possible global climate change. It is, therefore, critical to begin thinking seriously about ways to reduce this influx into the atmosphere. Using carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion as a feedstock for the growth, photosynthetic microorganisms can provide a large sink for carbon assimilation as well as a feedstock for the production of significant levels of biofuels. Combining microalgal farming with fossil fuel energy production has great potential to diminish carbon dioxide releases into the atmosphere, as well as contribute to the production of biofuels (e.g., biodiesel, renewable diesel and gasoline and jet fuel) as well as valuable co-products such as animal feeds and green chemicals. CO2 capture may be a regulatory requirement in future new coal or natural gas power plants and will almost certainly become an opportunity for commerce, the results of such studies may provide industries in the US and Canada with both regulatory relief and business opportunities as well as the ability to meet environmental and regulatory requirements, and to produce large volumes of fuels and co-products.

Pienkos, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

248

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). The software tools in ICS have been developed for characterization of reservoir properties and evaluation of hydrocarbon potential using a combination of inter-disciplinary data sources such as geophysical, geologic and engineering variables. The ICS tools provide a means for logical and consistent reservoir characterization and oil reserve estimates. The tools can be broadly characterized as (1) clustering tools, (2) neural solvers, (3) multiple-linear regression, (4) entrapment-potential calculator and (5) file utility tools. ICS tools are extremely flexible in their approach and use, and applicable to most geologic settings. The tools are primarily designed to correlate relationships between seismic information and engineering and geologic data obtained from wells, and to convert or translate seismic information into engineering and geologic terms or units. It is also possible to apply ICS in a simple framework that may include reservoir characterization using only engineering, seismic, or geologic data in the analysis. ICS tools were developed and tested using geophysical, geologic and engineering data obtained from an exploitation and development project involving the Red River Formation in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. Data obtained from 3D seismic surveys, and 2D seismic lines encompassing nine prospective field areas were used in the analysis. The geologic setting of the Red River Formation in Bowman and Harding counties is that of a shallow-shelf, carbonate system. Present-day depth of the Red River formation is approximately 8000 to 10,000 ft below ground surface. This report summarizes production results from well demonstration activity, results of reservoir characterization of the Red River Formation at demonstration sites, descriptions of ICS tools and strategies for their application.

Mark A. Sippel; William C. Carrigan; Kenneth D. Luff; Lyn Canter

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Self-formation in Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external formation of integrated circuits based on lithographic processes is not the only possible method for manufacturing electron devices, either integrated circuits or photovoltaic cells. Planar technology, based on external formation, requires ... Keywords: Artificial Systems, Development, Microelectronics, Reproduction, Self-Formation

Stepas Janušonis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Optimal reorganization of agent formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we address the problem of determining how a structured formation of autonomous undistinguishable agents can be reorganized into another, eventually non-rigid, formation based on changes in the environment, perhaps unforeseeable. The methodology ... Keywords: combinatorial optimization, dynamic programming, formation reorganization

Dalila B. M. M. Fontes; Fernando A. C. C. Fontes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Freckle Formation in Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

production of freckling in superalloy castings, made directionally in a Bridgemau furnace capable of producing DS castings in which the ..... developed by UES Inc. , Dayton, OH, USA. 14. ... Alloys for Gas Turbines 1986”, eds. W. Betz et al, .... # Oil. #009. 1435. 1435. 1500. 1500. 1400. 1465. 1400. 1465. 1400. 1435. 1500.

254

Biogas Potential in the United States (Fact Sheet), Energy Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Biogas Potential in the United States Biogas is the gaseous product of anaerobic digestion, a biological process in which microorganisms break down biodegradable...

255

Low-Temperature Biodiesel Research Reveals Potential Key to Successful...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

while making biodiesel blends an affordable option. While biodiesel has very low production costs and the potential to displace up to 10% of petroleum diesel, until now,...

256

Biomass fuel systems: directory of sources and potential users  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sources and potential users of technical information on biomass fuel systems are identified. Organizations and individual contacts are listed in various production and conversion categories.

Henry, J.F.; Salo, D.J.; Schauffler, M.S.; Smith, B.T.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential targets for CCS. The study also investigated the feasibility of combining CO2 storage with enhanced methane production. When CO2 comes in contact with coal, including...

258

Segregation of Fission Products to Dislocations in Uranium Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Irradiation of nuclear fuel leads to the formation of extended ... very important to understand the interaction of fission products with dislocations.

259

NETL Report format template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First-Generation Toolset for Calculation First-Generation Toolset for Calculation of Induced Seismicity Hazard Profiles 17 January 2013 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its

260

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

Reed, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Formation of Globular Clusters in Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-resolution simulation of globular cluster formation in a galaxy merger. For the first time in such a simulation, individual star clusters are directly identified and followed on their orbits. We quantitatively compare star formation in the merger to that in the unperturbed galaxies. The merging galaxies show a strong starburst, in sharp contrast to their isolated progenitors. Most star clusters form in the tidal tails. With a mass range of $5\\times10^{5}$--$5\\times 10^{6} M_{\\odot}$, they are identified as globular clusters. The merger remnant is an elliptical galaxy. Clusters with different mass or age have different radial distributions in the galaxy. The cluster mass spectrum appears to be roughly log-normal. Our results show that the high specific frequency and bimodal distribution of metallicity observed in elliptical galaxies are natural products of gas-rich mergers, supporting a merger origin for the ellipticals and their globular cluster systems.

Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Formation of Globular Clusters in Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-resolution simulation of globular cluster formation in a galaxy merger. For the first time in such a simulation, individual star clusters are directly identified and followed on their orbits. We quantitatively compare star formation in the merger to that in the unperturbed galaxies. The merging galaxies show a strong starburst, in sharp contrast to their isolated progenitors. Most star clusters form in the tidal features. With a mass range of $5\\times10^{5}$--$5\\times 10^{6} M_{\\odot}$, they are identified as globular clusters. The merger remnant is an elliptical galaxy. Clusters with different mass or age have different radial distributions in the galaxy. Our results show that the high specific frequency and bimodal distribution of metallicity observed in elliptical galaxies are natural products of gas-rich mergers, supporting a merger origin for the ellipticals and their globular cluster systems.

Yuexing Li; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49: Medical Isotopes Production Project EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to establish a...

265

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Piecewise Potential Vorticity Inversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The treatment of the potential vorticity (PV) distribution as a composite of individual perturbations is central to the diagnostic and conceptual utility of PV. Nonlinearity in the inversion operator for Ertel's potential vorticity renders ...

Christopher A. Davis

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Testing Activity, Frio Formation, Texas and Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to provide the environmental input into the Division of Geothermal Energy's decisions to expand the geothermal well testing activities to include sites in the Frio Formation of Texas and Louisiana. It is proposed that drilling rigs be leased before they are removed from sites in the formation where drilling for gas or oil exploration has been unsuccessful and that the rigs be used to complete the drilling into the geopressured zone for resource exploration. This EA addresses, on a regional basis, the expected activities, affected environment, and the possible impacts in a broad sense as they apply to the Gulf Coast well testing activity of the Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram of the Department of Energy. Along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast (Plate 1 and Overlay, Atlas) water at high temperatures and high pressures is trapped within Gulf basin sediments. The water is confined within or below essentially impermeable shale sequences and carries most or all of the overburden pressure. Such zones are referred to as geopressured strata. These fluids and sediments are heated to abnormally high temperatures (up to 260 C) and may provide potential reservoirs for economical production of geothermal energy. The obvious need in resource development is to assess the resource. Ongoing studies to define large-sand-volume reservoirs will ultimately define optimum sites for drilling special large diameter wells to perform large volume flow production tests. in the interim, existing well tests need to be made to help define and assess the resource.

None

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Continuous production of conducting polymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A device to continuously produce polypyrrole was designed, manufactured, and tested. Polypyrrole is a conducting polymer which has potential artificial muscle applications. The objective of continuous production was to ...

Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Open Standards, Open Formats, and Open Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper proposes some comments and reflections on the notion of “openness ” and on how it relates to three important topics: open standards, open formats, and open source. Often, these terms are considered equivalent and/or mutually implicated: “open source is the only way to enforce and exploit open standards”. This position is misleading, as it increases the confusion about this complex and extremely critical topic. The paper clarifies the basic terms and concepts. This is instrumental to suggest a number of actions and practices aiming at promoting and defending openness in modern ICT products and services.

Davide Cerri; Alfonso Fuggetta; Davide Cerri; Alfonso Fuggetta; Cefriel Politecnico Di Milano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Kaon Electromagnetic Production on Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation and excitation of hypernuclei through kaon photoproduction is reviewed. Basic features of the production process are emphasized. The possibility of extracting new information on hypernuclear structure and on the wave function of the bound $\\Lambda$ is discussed. New results are presented for the quasifree production process $A(\\gamma, K \\Lambda)B$. Observables of this reaction are shown to be sensitive to the $\\Lambda$-nucleus final state interaction.

C. Bennhold; F. X. Lee; T. Mart; L. E. Wright

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hydropower potential in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey has a total hydropower potential of 433 GW that is equal to 1.2% of the total hydropower potential of the world and to 14% of European hydropower potential. Only 125 GW of the total hydroelectric potential of Turkey can be economically used. By the commissioning of new hydropower plants, which are under construction, 34% of the economically usable potential of the country would be tapped. At the present, hydropower energy is an important energy source for Turkey due to its useful characteristics such as being renewable, clean, and less of an impact on the environment, and a cheap and domestic energy source.

Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

RMOTC - Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

275

Antihydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Antihydrogen production in ATHENA is analyzed more carefully. The most important peculiarities of the different experimental situations are discussed. The protonium production via the first matter-antimatter chemical reaction is commented too.

Rizzini, Evandro Lodi; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l'Ingegneria e per i Materiali, Universita di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

277

Production of hydrogen bromide by bromine-methane reactions at elevated temperature.  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen bromide is a potentially useful intermediate for hydrogen production by electrolysis because it has a low cell potential and is extremely soluble in water. Processes have been proposed to exploit these properties, but among the important issues to be resolved is the efficiency of HBr production from hydrocarbon precursors. This investigation evaluated a fundamental facet of such a technology by studying the reaction of methane and bromine at elevated temperature to determine the yield and kinetics of HBr formation. Laboratory experimentation and computational chemistry were combined to provide a description of this reaction for possible application to reactor design at a larger scale. Experimental studies with a tubular flow reactor were used to survey a range of reactant ratios and reactor residence times at temperatures between 500 C and 800 C. At temperatures near 800 C with excess methane, conversions of bromine to HBr exceeded 90% and reaction products included solid carbon (soot) in stoichiometric amounts. At lower temperatures, HBr conversion was significantly reduced, the products included much less soot, and the formation of bromocarbon compounds was indicated qualitatively. Calculations of chemical equilibrium behavior and reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions were performed using the Sandia CHEMKIN package. An elementary multistep mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry was used together with a surface mechanism that assumed facile deposition of radical species at the reactor walls. Simulations with the laminar-flow boundary-layer code of the CHEMKIN package gave reasonable agreement with experimental data.

Bradshaw, Robert W.; Larson, Richard S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

New oilseeds boast feedstock potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers in the United States are investigating the chemical potential of the Chinese tallow tree and the buffalo gourd. It is estimated that the Houston area of Texas could yield up to 70lb of seeds per tree per year. The oily component of the seed is recovered by solvent extraction and the product may some day compete with petroleum-based waxes or fats. In contrast to the Chinese tallow tree, which grows near swamps and marshes, the buffalo gourd is a desert plant. Experiments are underway aimed at improving the yield of the plant by hybridization and other genetic manipulations, and also to come up with an efficient harvesting technique.

Not Available

1982-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tin Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...descending order, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Bolivia, and Australia. These countries supply more than 85% of total world production....

280

Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE and Maurer Technology are to evaluate the subsurface hydrate occurrence and its production potential. It is anticipated that it will require two to three months from spud...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen Production Argonne researchers are studying thermochemical cycles to determine their potential...

282

Canopy architecture and water productivity in sorghum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing crop water use efficiency (WUE), the amount of biomass produced per unit water consumed, can enhance crop productivity and yield potential. The objective of… (more)

Narayanan, Sruthi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures has proven to be an effective strategy for shale gas reservoir exploitation. Some operators are successfully producing shale oil using the same strategy. Due to its higher viscosity and eventual 2-phase flow conditions when the formation pressure drops below the oil bubble point pressure, shale oil is likely to be limited to lower recovery efficiency than shale gas. However, the recently discovered Eagle Ford shale formations is significantly over pressured, and initial formation pressure is well above the bubble point pressure in the oil window. This, coupled with successful hydraulic fracturing methodologies, is leading to commercial wells. This study evaluates the recovery potential for oil produced both above and below the bubble point pressure from very low permeability unconventional shale oil formations. We explain how the Eagle Ford shale is different from other shales such as the Barnett and others. Although, Eagle Ford shale produces oil, condensate and dry gas in different areas, our study focuses in the oil window of the Eagle Ford shale. We used the logarithmically gridded locally refined gridding scheme to properly model the flow in the hydraulic fracture, the flow from the fracture to the matrix and the flow in the matrix. The steep pressure and saturation changes near the hydraulic fractures are captured using this gridding scheme. We compare the modeled production of shale oil from the very low permeability reservoir to conventional reservoir flow behavior. We show how production behavior and recovery of oil from the low permeability shale formation is a function of the rock properties, formation fluid properties and the fracturing operations. The sensitivity studies illustrate the important parameters affecting shale oil production performance from the stimulated reservoir volume. The parameters studied in our work includes fracture spacing, fracture half-length, rock compressibility, critical gas saturation (for 2 phase flow below the bubble point of oil), flowing bottom-hole pressure, hydraulic fracture conductivity, and matrix permeability. The sensitivity studies show that placing fractures closely, increasing the fracture half-length, making higher conductive fractures leads to higher recovery of oil. Also, the thesis stresses the need to carry out the core analysis and other reservoir studies to capture the important rock and fluid parameters like the rock permeability and the critical gas saturation.

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Solar Power Potential in SE New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

285

EIA - Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In three  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production in Three Cases (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Data Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 6 complete) Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Oil Production Capacity by Region and Country, Reference Case Projections of Oil Production Capacity and Oil Production In Three Cases Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

286

Study of net soot formation in hydrocarbon reforming for hydrogen fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen fuel cell is expected to be a valuable addition to the electric utility industry; however, the current fuel supply availability requires that conventional heavier hydrocarbon fuels also be considered as primary fuels. Typical heavier fuels would be No. 2 fuel oil with its accompanying sulfur impurities, compared with the currently used light hydrocarbon gases. The potential future use of alternate fuels which are rich in aromatics would exacerbate the problems associated with hydrogen production. Among the more severe of these problems, is the greater tendency of heavier hydrocarbons to form soot. The development of a quasi-global kinetics model to represent the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions which control the autothermal hydrogen reforming process and the accompanying soot formation and gasification was the objective of this study.

Edelman, R. B.; Farmer, R. C.; Wang, T. S.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

288

Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Product Family Glossary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Printed on Recycled PaperIMPORTANT NOTICE Texas Instruments (TI) reserves the right to make changes to its products or to discontinue any semiconductor product or service without notice, and advises its customers to obtain the latest version of relevant information to verify, before placing orders, that the information being relied on is current. TI warrants performance of its semiconductor products and related software to the specifications applicable at the time of sale in accordance with TI’s standard warranty. Testing and other quality control techniques are utilized to the extent TI deems necessary to support this warranty. Specific testing of all parameters of each device is not necessarily performed, except those mandated by government requirements. Certain applications using semiconductor products may involve potential risks of death, personal injury, or severe property or environmental damage (“Critical Applications”).

Sprua Glossary; Tms Dsp; Literature Number Sprua

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

291

Definition: Self-Potential (SP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self-Potential (SP) Self-Potential (SP) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Self-Potential (SP) The self-potential (SP) technique is a passive electrical geophysical method based upon the measurement of spontaneous or natural electrical potential developed in the earth due to: 1) electrochemical interactions between minerals and subsurface fluids; 2) electrokinetic processes resulting from the flow of ionic fluids; or 3) thermoelectric mechanisms from temperature gradients in the subsurface.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Spontaneous potential (SP), also called self potential, is a naturally occurring electric potential difference in the Earth, measured by an electrode relative to a fixed reference electrode. Spontaneous potentials are often measured down boreholes for formation evaluation in

292

Interatomic Potentials Repository Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... potentials appropriate for simulation of liquid and glass properties of ... Superalloy," Sandia National Laboratories Report Number SAND-95-8549C ...

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olivines, a significant constituent of basaltic rocks, have the potential to immobilize permanently CO2 after it is injected in the deep subsurface, due to carbonation reactions occurring between CO2 and the host rock. To investigate the reactions of fayalitic olivine with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and formation of mineral carbonates, experiments were conducted at temperatures of 35 °C to 80 °C, 90 atm pressure and anoxic conditions. For every temperature, the dissolution of fayalite was examined both in the presence of liquid water and H2O-saturated scCO2. The experiments were conducted in a high pressure batch reactor at reaction time extending up to 85 days. The newly formed products were characterized using a comprehensive suite of bulk and surface characterization techniques X-ray diffraction, Transmission/Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Focused Ion Beam, and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Siderite with rhombohedral morphology was formed at 35 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C in the presence of liquid water and scCO2. In H2O-saturated scCO2, the formation of siderite was confirmed only at high temperature (80 °C). Characterization of reacted samples in H2O-saturated scCO2 with high resolution TEM indicated that siderite formation initiated inside voids created during the initial steps of fayalite dissolution. Later stages of fayalite dissolution result in the formation of siderite in layered vertical structures, columns or pyramids with a rhombus base morphology.

Qafoku, Odeta; Kovarik, Libor; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Arey, Bruce W.; Tucek, Jiri; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

THE RESULTS OF TESTING TO EVALUATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND SETTLING IN THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER  

SciTech Connect

The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology offers the potential to increase waste loading for High Level Waste (HLW) glasses leading to significant improvements in waste throughput rates compared to the reference Joule Heated Melter (JHM). Prior to implementation of a CCIM in a production facility it is necessary to better understand processing constraints associated with the CCIM. The glass liquidus temperature requirement for processing in the CCIM is an open issue. Testing was conducted to evaluate crystal formation and crystal settling during processing in the CCIM to gain insight into the effects on processing. A high aluminum/high iron content glass composition with known crystal formation tendencies was selected for testing. A continuous melter test was conducted for approximately 51 hours. To evaluate crystal formation, glass samples were obtained from pours and from glass receipt canisters where the glass melt had varying residence time in the melter. Additionally, upon conclusion of the testing, glass samples from the bottom of the melter were obtained to assess the degree of crystal settling. Glass samples were characterized in an attempt to determine quantitative fractions of crystals in the glass matrix. Crystal identity and relative composition were determined using a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Select samples were also analyzed by digesting the glass and determining the composition using inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). There was evidence of crystal formation (primarily spinels) in the melt and during cooling of the collected glass. There was evidence of crystal settling in the melt over the duration of the melter campaign.

Marra, J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Method for completing wells in unconsolidated formations  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for producing fluids from a subterranean formation in a formation region of substantially unconsolidated sandlike particles comprising the steps of: penetrating the region to form an uncased wellbore cavity extending within the region; extending within the region; inserting filter means into the cavity, the filter means forming an interior space for gathering fluids from the region for production from the wellbore and the filter means including means for permitting the flow of solids fines into the space with the fluids from the region; causing fluids to flow into the cavity and through the filter means into the space to be produced from the region at a rate which will cause sand particles in the region to flow into and occupy the cavity to form an in situ packing around the filter means; producing fluids from the region through the cavity and into the space and having a limited quantity of solids fines entrained therein smaller than the solid particles retained in the cavity; and controlling the rate of production of fluids to form a cylindrical dilatant zone extending radially outward in the region from the cavity and which is mechanically stable.

Perkins, T.K.

1989-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

Using RSI format  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of radioactive ion beams using the in-flight technique B. Harss, a) R. C. Pardo, K. E. Rehm, F. Borasi, b) J. P. Greene, R. V. F. Janssens, C. L. Jiang, J. Nolen, M. Paul, c) J. P. Schiffer, R. E. Segel, d) J. Specht, T. F. Wang, e) P. Wilt, and B. Zabransky Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ͑Received 4 August 1999; accepted for publication 5 November 1999͒ Reactions with a heavy projectile incident on a light target can be used for the efficient in-flight production of secondary radioactive beams. An overview of this technique is given using data on 17 F beams produced via the p( 17 O, 17 F)n and d( 16 O, 17 F)n reactions. With primary 16,17 O beam currents of 100 pnA, intensities of up to 2ϫ10 6 17 F/s on target were achieved. Using this beam, the p( 17 F,␣) 14 O reaction was measured. © 2000 American Institute of Physics. ͓S0034-6748͑00͒04002-8͔ I. INTRODUCTION Recently,

299

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

300

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important).

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Potential Enthalpy: A Conservative Oceanic Variable for Evaluating Heat Content and Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential temperature is used in oceanography as though it is a conservative variable like salinity; however, turbulent mixing processes conserve enthalpy and usually destroy potential temperature. This negative production of potential ...

Trevor J. McDougall

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Topic: Productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General Information: 301-975-5020 mfg@nist ... competitive in the global market, companies need to ... become more efficient in energy, production and ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Silicon Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... An Investigation into the Electrochemical Production of Si by the FFC Cambridge Process: Emre Ergül1; ?shak Karakaya2; Metehan Erdo?an2; ...

304

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

305

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

306

Potential Conservation Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman, Cheviakov and Ivanova [J. Math. Phys., 2006, V.47, 113505]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of proved statements is considered. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

Michael Kunzinger; Roman O. Popovych

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

By-products from DU Storage (Fluorine and Empty Cylinders)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

By-products from DU Storage By-products from DU Storage (Fluorine and Empty Cylinders) Potential applications involving by-products from DUF6 storage include fluorine applications...

308

Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

310

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Small HVAC Problems and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Small HVAC Problems and Potential Savings Reports Summary of Problems of the Integrated Design of Small Commercial HVAC Systems research project. The reports are a result of funding: Productivity and Interior Environments Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design

311

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

In 1987 the Department of Interior recommended opening the area for oil and gas exploration and development. In 1995 the House and Senate approved ANWR 1002 Area...

312

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOEEIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy...

313

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Posted By Office of Public Affairs IAEA Copper Seal (Photo credit: International Atomic Energy Agency) IAEA Copper Seal (Photo credit: International Atomic Energy...

314

Ohio: Devonian evaluated for most favorable potential production  

SciTech Connect

Commercial quantities of gas are likely to occur within closely spaced natural fracture systems close to, or within, organic-rich source beds. Four principal source beds have been identified within the shales of east Ohio. Ranked in order of importance based on geographic distribution and thickness, they are the Huron, Rhinestreet, Cleveland, and Marcellus shales. Within each of these zones, there is believed to be a north-south trending area of most favorable shale lying between immature shales to the west and shales too organically lean to the east. Closely spaced localized fracturing of the Devonian shale sequence is likely to occur along 2 regional trends in east Ohio: the Cambridge arch and the Lake Erie shoreline. Operators drilling within these areas, or near any structurally disturbed area, should evaluate and test shale zones that exhibit indications of being naturally fractured.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Biogas production Potential of Cotton Seed Cake and Rapeseed Cake.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A Thesis Submitted to the School of Graduate Studies of Addis Ababa University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Master of… (more)

Selamawit, Seyoum

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Refinery Outages: Description and Potential Impact on Petroleum Product Prices  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a July 13, 2006 request from Chairman Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requested that EIA conduct a study of the impact that refinery shutdowns have had on the price of oil and gasoline.

Joanne Shore

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn stover, and switchgrass. A life-cycle assessment approach ...

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Setting Geology 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment Method of Analysis ANWR Coastal Plain Assessment 3. Summary Glossary References Access the PDF version of the...

319

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn… (more)

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Background. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope represents an area ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Design and Analysis of a Test Rig for Modeling the Bit/Formation Interface in Petroleum Drilling Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment failure and well deviations are prevailing contributors to production delays within the petroleum industry. Particular monetary focus is given to the drilling operations of wells to overcome these deficits, in order to extract natural resources as efficiently, and as safely, as possible. The research presented here focuses on minimizing vibrations of the drill string near the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) by identifying the cause of external forcing on the drillstring in vertical and horizontal wells and measuring the effects of various factors on the stability of perturbations on the system. A test rig concept has been developed to accurately measure the interaction forces and torques between the bit, formation and fluids during drilling in order to clearly define a bit/formation interface law (BFIL) for the purpose vibrational analysis. As a secondary function, the rig will be able to measure the potential inputs to a drilling simulation code that can be used to model drillstring vibrations. All notable quantities will be measured including torque on bit (TOB), weight on bit (WOB), lateral impact loads (LIL), formation stiffness, bit specific properties, fluid damping coefficients and rate of penetration (ROP). The conceptual design has been analyzed and refined, in detail, to verify its operational integrity and range of measurement error. The operational envelope of the rig is such that a drill bit of up to 8 ½ inches in diameter can be effectively tested at desired operational parameters (WOB: 0-55,000 lbf, RPM: 60-200) with various rock formations and multiple fluid types. Future use and design possibilities are also discussed to enhance the functionality of the rig and the potential for further research in the area of oil and gas drilling and vibrational modeling.

Wilson, Joshua Kyle

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Mechanisms of Banner Cloud Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Banner clouds are clouds in the lee of steep mountains or sharp ridges. Their formation has previously been hypothesized as due to three different mechanisms: (i) vertical uplift in a lee vortex (which has a horizontal axis), (ii) adiabatic ...

Matthias Voigt; Volkmar Wirth

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hail Formation via Microphysical Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that alternation of low-density riming and wet growth processes play a role in hailstone formation. Such alternation of growth processes, which has been called microphysical recycling, is envisioned to operate in the following ...

John C. Pflaum

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Heart and Electric Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heart and Electric Potential Name: Pete Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What is the electrical output that the SA Node andor AV Node put out when emitting an...

326

Daylighting potential in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Daylighting has good potential for application in tropical climates. It can help save electric energy as well as reduce the daytime power demand substantially. It can bring another dimension of energy efficiency in addition to efficient lighting technology, as well as aesthetic value. Its integration with continuous-dimming electric lighting is found to be acceptable. However, fundamental research as well as daylighting application technology are required to realize the potential.

Chirarattananon, S.; Limmechokchai, B. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Length-scale Effects in Cascade Damage Production in Iron  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics simulations provide an atomistic description of the processes that control primary radiation damage formation in atomic displacement cascades. An extensive database of simulations describing cascade damage production in single crystal iron has been compiled using a modified version of the interatomic potential developed by Finnis and Sinclair. This same potential has been used to investigate primary damage formation in nanocrystalline iron in order to have a direct comparison with the single crystal results. A statistically significant number of simulations were carried out at cascade energies of 10 keV and 20 keV and temperatures of 100 and 600K to make this comparison. The results demonstrate a significant influence of nearby grain boundaries as a sink for mobile defects during the cascade cooling phase. This alters the residual primary damage that survives the cascade event. Compared to single crystal, substantially fewer interstitials survive in the nanograined iron, while the number of surviving vacancies is similar or slightly greater than the single crystal result. The fraction of the surviving interstitials contained in clusters is also reduced. The asymmetry in the survival of the two types of point defects is likely to alter damage accumulation at longer times.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Kamenski, Paul J [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The flip-side of galaxy formation: A combined model of Galaxy Formation and Cluster Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Only ~10% of baryons in the universe are in the form of stars, yet most models of luminous structure formation have concentrated on the properties of the luminous stellar matter. In this paper we focus on the "flip side" of galaxy formation and investigate the properties of the material that is not presently locked up in galaxies. This "by-product" of galaxy formation can be observed as an X-ray emitting plasma (the intracluster medium, hereafter ICM) in groups and clusters, and we present a version of the Durham semi-analytic galaxy formation model GALFORM that allows us to investigate the properties of the ICM. As we would expect on the basis of gravitational scaling arguments, the previous model (presented in Bower et al. 2006) fails to reproduce even the most basic observed properties of the ICM; however, we present a simple modification to the model to allow for heat input into the ICM from the AGN "radio mode" feedback. This heating acts to expel gas from the X-ray luminous central regions of the host halo. With this modification, the model reproduces the observed gas mass fractions and luminosity-temperature relation of groups and clusters. Introducing the heating process into the model requires changes to a number of model parameters in order to retain a good match to the observed galaxy properties. With the revised parameters, the best fitting luminosity function is comparable to that presented in Bower et al. (2006). The new model makes a fundamental step forward, providing a unified model of galaxy and cluster ICM formation. However, the detailed comparison with the data is not completely satisfactory, and we highlight key areas for improvement.

Richard G. Bower; Ian G. McCarthy; Andrew J. Benson

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Formation and Fate of Trihalomethanes in Power Plant Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are semi-volatile compounds that form in water when chlorine or bromine reacts with dissolved organic carbon. This report investigates the formation and fate of THM compounds in power plant cooling water systems, THM health risks, a generalized mechanism of THM formation, and the applicability of existing THM research to power plant cooling. The report presents results of a two-site sampling and analytical program designed to identify THM formation potential in cooling towers using...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence.

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

332

Precise inversion of logged slownesses for elastic parameters in a gas shale formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dipole sonic log data recorded in a vertical pilot well and the associated production well are analyzed over a 200×1100-ft section of a North American gas shale formation. The combination of these two wells enables angular ...

Miller, Douglas E.

333

Relative Humidity as an Indicator for Cloud Formation over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of land surface heterogeneity on potential cloud formation is investigated using relative humidity as an indicator. This is done by performing numerical experiments using a large-eddy simulation model (LES). The land surface in the ...

Chiel C. van Heerwaarden; Jordi Vilà Guerau de Arellano

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show vacancy activation energy. Thermal expansion coefficients as function of temperature are displayed in Fig

335

On the global economic potentials and marginal costs of non-renewable resources and the price dynamics of energy commodities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is presented in this work for simulating endogenously the evolution of the marginal costs of production of energy carriers from non-renewable resources, their consumption, depletion pathways and timescales. Such marginal costs can be used to simulate the long term average price formation of energy commodities. Drawing on previous work where a global database of energy resource economic potentials was constructed, this work uses cost distributions of non-renewable resources in order to evaluate global flows of energy commodities. A mathematical framework is given to calculate endogenous flows of energy resources given an exogenous commodity price path. This framework can be used in reverse in order to calculate an exogenous marginal cost of production of energy carriers given an exogenous carrier demand. Using rigid price inelastic assumptions independent of the economy, these two approaches generate limiting scenarios that depict extreme use of natural resources. This is useful to characterise the cur...

Mercure, Jean-Francois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

337

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

From the Office Document Format Battlefield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two most common XML-based formats for office application suites are now international standards. Unfortunately, the Open Document Format and Office Open XML are similar but imperfectly compatible. Keywords: ODF, OOXML, XML, document format, office application

Jirka Kosek

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) estimate the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and methane production from, low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the east-central Texas region, (2) quantify uncertainty associated with these estimates, (3) conduct reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells, and (4) compare the results with those obtained from previous studies of vertical wells. To estimate the total volumes of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered in, and total volumes of methane that can be produced from, the Wilcox Group low-rank coals in east-central Texas, we used data provided by Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, data obtained during this research, and results of probabilistic simulation modeling studies we conducted. For the analysis, we applied our base-case coal seam characteristics to a 2,930-mi{sup 2} (1,875,200-ac) area where Calvert Bluff coal seams range between 4,000 and 6,200 ft deep. Results of the probabilistic analysis indicate that potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor, range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we presented the paper SPE 100584 at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on May 15-18, 2006. Also, we submitted an abstract to be considered for inclusion in a special volume dedicated to CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic media, which is planned for publication by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Interstellar MHD Turbulence and Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter reviews the nature of turbulence in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and its connections to the star formation (SF) process. The ISM is turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating, and is subject to heating and cooling processes that control its thermodynamic behavior. The turbulence in the warm and hot ionized components of the ISM appears to be trans- or subsonic, and thus to behave nearly incompressibly. However, the neutral warm and cold components are highly compressible, as a consequence of both thermal instability in the atomic gas and of moderately-to-strongly supersonic motions in the roughly isothermal cold atomic and molecular components. Within this context, we discuss: i) the production and statistical distribution of turbulent density fluctuations in both isothermal and polytropic media; ii) the nature of the clumps produced by thermal instability, noting that, contrary to classical ideas, they in general accrete mass from their environment; iii) the density-magnetic field correla...

Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Potential energy for quarks  

SciTech Connect

It is argued on theoretical and phenomenological grounds that confinement of quarks is intrinsically a many-body interaction. The Born-Oppenheimer approximation to the bag model is shown to give rise to a static potential energy that consists of a sum of two-body Coulomb terms and a many-body confining term. Following the success of this potential in heavy Q anti Q systems it is being applied to Q/sup 2/ anti Q/sup 2/. Preliminary calculations suggest that dimeson bound states with exotic flavor, such as bb anti s anti s, exist. 13 refs., 5 figs.

Heller, L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Uploading STI Products vs. Site Hosting of STI Products | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Uploading STI Products vs. Site Hosting of STI Products Uploading STI Products vs. Site Hosting of STI Products Print page Print page Email page Email page For unclassified unlimited and controlled unclassified (except for UCNI) there are currently two options (described below) for sites to provide the actual electronic STI products resulting from DOE-funded activities to OSTI. An important note, regardless of method used to provide the STI product to OSTI, the product cannot be encrypted or password protected. Site Uploads the STI Product Sites can upload their unclassified unlimited and controlled unclassified (except UCNI) STI products to OSTI via the following STI product submission/transmission methods: AN 241.1 Web Version Batch Upload AN 241.3 Web Version Refer to the formats section of this website for additional details related

345

TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

Minnesota, University of

346

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

Bakken Shale Oil Production Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the conventional reservoirs decrease in discovering, producing and reserving, unconventional reservoirs are more remarkable in terms of discovering, development and having more reserve. More fields have been discovered where Barnett Shale and Bakken Shale are the most recently unconventional reservoir examples. Shale reservoirs are typically considered self-sourcing and have very low permeability ranging from 10-100 nanodarcies. Over the past few decades, numerous research projects and developments have been studied, but it seems there is still some contention and misunderstanding surrounding shale reservoirs. One of the largest shale in the United State is the Bakken Shale play. This study will describe the primary geologic characteristics, field development history, reservoir properties,and especially production trends, over the Bakken Shale play. Data are available for over hundred wells from different companies. Most production data come from the Production Data Application (HDPI) database and in the format of monthly production for oil, water and gas. Additional 95 well data including daily production rate, completion, Pressure Volume Temperature (PVT), pressure data are given from companies who sponsor for this research study. This study finds that there are three Types of well production trends in the Bakken formation. Each decline curve characteristic has an important meaning to the production trend of the Bakken Shale play. In the Type I production trend, the reservoir pressure drops below bubble point pressure and gas releasingout of the solution. With the Type II production trend, oil flows linearly from the matrix into the fracture system, either natural fracture or hydraulic fracture. Reservoir pressure is higher than the bubble point pressure during the producing time and oil flows as a single phase throughout the production period of the well. A Type III production trend typically has scattering production data from wells with a different Type of trend. It is difficult to study this Type of behavior because of scattering data, which leads to erroneous interpretation for the analysis. These production Types, especially Types I and II will give a new type curve matches for shale oil wells above or below the bubble point.

Tran, Tan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Product Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1 Wrought alloy products and tempers...or cold-finished Rivets Forgings and forging stock Foil Fin stock Drawn Extruded Rod Bar Wire 1050 . . . . . . . . . H112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1060 O, H12, H14, H16, H18 O, H12, H14, H112 O, H12, H14, H18, H113 O, H112 . . . .

351

Recovery of heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from underground formations  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of producing heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from an underground formation. The method consists of utilizing or establishing an aqueous fluid communication path within and through the formation between an injection well or conduit and a production well or conduit by introducing into the formation from the injection well or conduit hot water and/or low quality steam at a temperature in the range about 60{sup 0}-130{sup 0}C and at a substantially neutral or alkaline pH to establish or enlarge the aqueous fluid communication path within the formation from the injection well or conduit to the production well or conduit by movement of the introduced hot water or low quality steam through the formation, increasing the temperature of the injected hot water of low quality steam to a temperature in the range about 110{sup 0}-180{sup 0}C while increasing the pH of the injected hot water or low quality steam to a pH of about 10-13 so as to bring about the movement or migration or stripping of the heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation substantially into the hot aqueous fluid communication path with the formation and recovering the resulting produced heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation as an emulsion containing less than about 30% oil or bitumen from the production well or conduit.

McKay, A.S.

1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

352

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Methods of cracking a crude product to produce additional crude products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a crude product is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce one or more crude products. At least one of the crude products has a boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. as determined by ASTM Method D5307. The crude product having the boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. is catalytically cracked to produce one or more additional crude products. At least one of the additional crude products is a second gas stream. The second gas stream has a boiling point of at most 38.degree. C. at 0.101 MPa.

Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Dynamics of Potential Vorticity Fronts and Eddy Detachment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation and detachment of quasi-geostrophic eddies in a 1½ layer jet is studied using a piecewise uniform potential vorticity model. A vorticity front separates the two pieces, and thus the jet has cusplike character. The evolution of large ...

L. J. Pratt; Melvin E. Stern

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fracturing results in diatomaceous earth formations, South Belridge Field, California  

SciTech Connect

The company began fracturing diatomaceous earth zones in the San Joaquin Valley (CA) in 1976. Fracturing has proved an effective method of exploiting these previously noncommercial reservoirs. Nevertheless, productivity behavior is typified by high initial rates followed by rapid decline. Reasons for this decline have been evaluated and are discussed. Also discussed are laboratory experiments performed to determine an appropriate fracture design for this formation.

Strubhar, M.K.; Andreani, F.S.; Medlin, W.L.; Nabi, S.M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Summertime photochemistry during CAREBeijing-2007: ROx budgets and O3 formation  

SciTech Connect

We analyze summertime photochemistry near the surface in Beijing, China, using a 1-D photochemical model (Regional chEmical and trAnsport Model, REAM-1D) constrained by in situ observations, focusing on the budgets of ROx (OH + HO2 + RO2) radicals and O3 formation. While the modeling analysis focuses on near-surface photochemical budgets, the implications for the budget of O3 in the planetary boundary layer are also discussed. In terms of daytime average, the total ROx primary production rate near the surface in Beijing is 6.6 ppbv per hour (ppbv h{sup 1}, among the highest found in urban atmospheres. The largest primary ROx source in Beijing is photolysis of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), which produces HO2 and RO2 at 2.5 ppbv h{sup 1}1 and 1.7 ppbv h{sup 1}, respectively. Photolysis of excess HONO from an unknown heterogeneous source is the predominant primary OH source at 2.2 ppbv h{sup 1}, much larger than that of O1D+H2O (0.4 ppbv h{sup 1}). The largest ROx sink is via OH + NO2 reaction (1.6 ppbv h{sup 1}), followed by formation of RO2NO2 (1.0 ppbv h{sup 1}) and RONO2 (0.7 ppbv h{sup 1}). Due to the large aerosol surface area, aerosol uptake of HO2 appears to be another important radical sink, although the estimate of its magnitude is highly variable depending on the uptake coefficient value used. The daytime average O3 production and loss rates near the surface are 32 ppbv h{sup 1} and 6.2 ppbv h{sup 1}, respectively. Assuming NO2 to be the source of excess HONO, the NO2 to HONO transformation leads to considerable O3 loss and reduction of its lifetime. Our observation-constrained modeling analysis suggests that oxidation of VOCs (especially aromatics) and heterogeneous reactions (e.g. HONO formation and aerosol uptake HO2) play potentially critical roles in the primary radical budget and O3 formation in Beijing. One important ramification is that O3 production is neither NOx nor VOC limited, but in a transition regime where reduction of either NOx or VOCs could result in reduction of O3 production. The transition regime implies more flexibility in the O3 control strategies than a binary system of either NOx or VOC limited regime. The co-benefit of concurrent reduction of both NOx and VOCs in reducing column O3 production integrated in the planetary boundary layer is significant. Further research on the spatial extent of the transition regime over the polluted eastern China is critically important for controlling regional O3 pollution.

Liu, Zhen; Wang, Y.; Gu, Dasa; Zhao, Chun; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, Robert; Liao, Jin; Shao, Min; Zhu, T.; Zeng, Limin; Amoroso, Antonio; Costabile, Francesa; Chang, Chih-Chung; Liu, Shaw C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

Copy Service, Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copy Service Copy Service Copying in color or black-and-white from hard copy or electronic files. Paper size up to 13" x 19" in a variety of stocks and colors. Larger Documents (up to 36" wide and 100" long) can be reproduced in Black & White from prints or files and can be saved in a variety of electronic format Variable Data Printing - personalized document production Tab Printing Forms CD/DVD Duplication CD/DVD direct printing Binding Collate documents, insert tab dividers, punch holes for binding Stapling documents up to 1 inch thick Spiral, adhesive and perfect binding. Hard covers also available upon request Folding & Mailing Print and apply mailing addresses and labels Machine fold documents and insert into envelopes for mailing Laminate printed items up to 35" wide.

360

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar April 30, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will understand the components of identifying energy project potential and options. Presenters will discuss market considerations, initial site considerations, project savings or rate-of-return estimates, production potential, final site selection, tribal options, finance, partnerships, and participation processes. Attendees will also become familiar with data gathering and analysis procedures such as tribal facility electric cost data, regulations, and interconnection requirements; paths to market for project power; and renewable sales, risks; and utility rules. By following the steps outlined in the webinar, Tribes can determine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Source/Sink Matching for U.S. Ethanol Plants and Candidate Deep Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents data on the 140 existing and 74 planned ethanol production facilities and their proximity to candidate deep geologic storage formations. Half of the existing ethanol plants and 64% of the planned units sit directly atop a candidate geologic storage reservoir. While 70% of the existing and 97% of the planned units are within 100 miles of at least one candidate deep geologic storage reservoir. As a percent of the total CO2 emissions from these facilities, 92% of the exiting units CO2 and 97% of the planned units CO2 emissions are accounted for by facilities that are within 100 miles of at least one potential CO2 storage reservoir.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

363

Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource Christopher B. Field1 , J. Elliott Campbell1 Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550, USA Increased production of biomass for energy has the potential to offset resources and decrease food security. The net effect of biomass energy agriculture on climate could

364

Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?  

SciTech Connect

Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

STEO December 2012 - oil production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen Rise in 2012 U.S. oil production largest since 1859, output in 2013 seen topping 7 million bpd U.S. crude oil production is now expected to rise by about 760,000 barrels per day in 2012, the biggest annual increase in oil output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. American oil producers are expected to pump a daily average of 6.4 million barrels of crude oil this year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administrator's new monthly energy forecast. The annual increase in oil output tops the previous record set in 1951 and marks the largest yearly production increase ever. Most of the increase in crude oil production is driven by drilling activity in shale formations located in Texas, North Dakota and Montana. U.S. crude oil production next year is expected to top 7 million barrels per day for the first time

366

Production Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Figure 1 shows the sequence of shapes in the production of a hollow handle for a table knife formed and coined in a 410 kg (900 lb) pneumatic drop hammer. The work metal was 0.81 mm (0.032 in.) thick copper alloy C75700 (nickel silver, 65â??12) annealed to a hardness of 35 to 45 HRB; blank size was 25 by...

367

California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Potential for Energy Efficiency. Prepared for The EnergyIndustrial Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Study - DraftIndustrial Energy Efficiency Market Characterization Study.

Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; Rafael Friedmann; Rufo, Mike

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472 Federal Register 472 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 83 / Monday, April 30, 2012 / Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document

369

Alaska's renewable energy potential.  

SciTech Connect

This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

Not Available

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Vector potential photoelectron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

Browning, R. [R. Browning Consultants, 14 John Street, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method for the Production of Mineral Wool andIron from ...  

Method for the Production of Mineral Wool and Iron from Serpentine Ore Overview This invention discloses a method to fabricate a product that has the potential

372

Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formatting Formatting Jump to: navigation, search You can format your text using wiki markup. This consists of normal characters like asterisks, single quotes or equation marks which have a special function in the wiki, sometimes depending on their position. For example, to format a word in italic, you include it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character formatting - applies anywhere Italic text ''italic'' italic Bold text '''bold''' bold Bold and italic '''''bold & italic''''' bold & italic Escape wiki markup no ''markup'' no ''markup'' section formatting - only at the beginning of the line Headings of different levels

373

Economic analysis for utilization of geothermal energy by North Dakota Concrete Products Co.  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota Concrete Products Company uses a steam curing process that accelerates the concrete curing so that 28-day strength is obtained within 24 hours. The cost of energy required to accomplish this is significant, amounting to approximately $80,000 in 1980. The present boilers are oil fired. Recently, fuel oil prices have increased substantially. Further, supply shortages in the past have threatened plant production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the economic feasibility of using deep formation warm water as an alternative energy source. A water-to-water heat pump system to replace the existing boiler system was investigated. TPI, Inc. economic and engineering findings for this particular potential geothermal application are disclosed. The operating cost savings of the geothermal system over the operating costs of the existing oilfired system would be insufficient to provide an acceptable rate of return on the investment at todays cost of money.

Zink, L.L.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

On the Potential Energy of Baroclinic Rossby Waves in the North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of baroclinic Rossby wave potential energy spectra for various parts of the North Pacific were calculated from published material containing information about this energy in many different formats, definitions and units. The ...

Lorenz Magaard

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

On the Use of Potential Vorticity Tendency Equations for Diagnosing Atmospheric Dynamics in Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study critically assesses potential vorticity (PV) tendency equations used for analyzing atmospheric convective systems. A generic PV tendency format is presented to provide a framework for comparing PV tendency equations, which isolates the ...

K. J. Tory; J. D. Kepert; J. A. Sippel; C. M. Nguyen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at z~0, collisional excitation following photo-heating may well dominate the total emission at higher redshifts. The central regions of these systems are dense enough to shield themselves from the metagalactic ionizing background; unfortunately, in this regime our simulations are no longer reliable. We therefore consider several scenarios for the emission from the central cores, including one in which self-shielded gas does not emit at all. We show that the combination of star formation and cooling IGM gas can explain most of the observed "Lyman-alpha blobs" at z~3, with the important exception of the largest sources. On the other hand, except under the most optimistic assumptions, cooling IGM gas cannot explain the observations on its own.

Steven Furlanetto; Joop Schaye; Volker Springel; Lars Hernquist

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geothermal resources in California: potentials and problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology, cost and potential of geothermal resources in California are examined. The production of power from dry stream fields is expanding in Northern California, at The Geysers, at costs that compare favorably with alternate means of generation. The possibility exists that economic production of power can be started in the Imperial Valley, but numerous issues remain to be resolved; chief among them is the demonstration that commercially valuable aquifers indeed exist. The production of demineralized water from the geothermal fluids of the Imperial Valley depends, among other things, upon the identification of other sources of water for power plant cooling, or for reservoir reinjection, should it be necessary to avoid subsidence. It would appear that water production, without the income-producing capability of associated power generation, is not economically reasonable. The pace of geothermal development at the Geysers could probably be accelerated perhaps offering the opportunity for maintenance of adequate generating reserves should their nuclear construction program be delayed. The unknown factors and risks involved seem to preclude the Imperial Valley resource from being immediately effective in improving the power generation picture in Southern California. However, in the next decade, geothermal power could provide a useful energy increment, perhaps 10 percent of peak load. Associated water production could offer relief for the Imperial Valley in its predicted water quality problem. The pace of public and private development in the Imperial Valley seems incommensurately slow in relation to the potential of the resource. Geothermal power and water production is not intrinsically pollution-free, but appropriate environmental protection is possible.

Goldsmith, M.

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book provides background information on the agroenergetic potential of 65 countries and offers summaries of major crops planted, total area planted, yield per hectare, and total production. Total land area is categorized as to agriculture, forest, and woodland, and is discussed with demographic statistics for each country. The potential for agricultural by-products and biomass to contribute to energy availability is explored, with reference to each major crop. Vegetation and/or economic activity, or soil maps are presented for most countries, as are climatic data, with crop yields and residues which are compared with production elsewhere.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

380

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief primer on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat, and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. References for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper.

Singh, S.P.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. Because the subject is vast and the space is limited, references for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper. 24 references.

Singh, S.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Ethanol production method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

Methanol production method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Brazil Eucalyptus Potential Productivity Project: Influence of water, nutrients and stand uniformity on wood production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Ecology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA e Fibria Celulose, Aracruz, Espirito Santo, Brazil f Veracel Celulose, Eunapolis, Bahia, Brazil g International Paper do Brasil, Mogi Guacu, Sao Paulo, Brazil h Suzano Papel e Celulose, Teixeira de Freitas, Bahia, Brazil i CENIBRA, Ipatinga, Minas

Binkley, Dan

385

Gravity and the quantum potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review some material connecting gravity and the quantum potential and provide a few new observations.

Robert Carroll

2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy Efficiency Potential Assessment: (Appendices)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the appendices to EPRI Report 1008911, "Energy Efficiency Potential Assessment."

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Performance potential of the coal strip mining in the east of Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potentialities of the leading mining districts in Russia to improve coal production by strip mining are analyzed. The operational issues of the Erunakovskiy (Kuzbass), Kansko-Achinskiy and South Yakutia territorial production complexes are considered.

Cheskidov, V.I. [Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Mining

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ground potential rise monitor  

SciTech Connect

A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

389

Controlled-Potential Electrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Metals determined by controlled-potential coulometry...27 Silver Pt Ag + â?? Ag(s) 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 14 , 28 Technetium Hg Tc 7+ â?? Tc 3+ Acetate-tripolyphosphate 29 Thallium Pt Tl + â?? Tl 3+ 1 M HCl 30 Tin Hg Sn 4+ Sn(Hg) 3 M KBr, 0.2 M HBr 31 Titanium Hg Ti 4+ â?? Ti 3+ 6â??9 M H 2 SO 4 32 Uranium Hg U 6+ â?? U 4+ 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 33 Vanadium Pt V 5+ â?? V 4+ V 4+ â?? V 5+ 1.5...

390

EIA - Appendix I-Projections of Natural Gas Production in Five...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Production in Five Cases Tables (2007-2035) International Energy Outlook 2010 Projections of Natural Gas Production in Five Cases Tables (2007-2035) Formats Data Table...

391

Sugar Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Production Sugar Production Name: Lauren Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: This is the experiment I did: our class took 6 sugars, placed them in test tubes and put three drops of yeast in each test tube. we then placed them in the incubator for one day and the next day looked at our results. the purpose was to find out with sugar would produce the most carbon dioxide. two of the sugars that we tested were LACTOSE and STARCH. my question is, why are lactose and starch the only sugars who didn't produce any, or very very little, carbon dioxide? and how is this process related to glycolysis? Replies: Bacteria and yeast are very efficient with their enzyme systems. They don't make enzymes they can't use. Yeast don't have the enzymes necessary to metabolize lactose. Starch is a complex sugar and yeast needs certain enzymes to break starch down into sugar. Every chemical reaction needs its own enzyme.

392

Spatial assessment of the environmental impacts of potential wheat and switchgrass bioethanol chains in Ukraine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various scientific sources have identified Ukraine as one of the most promising European countries for the production of bioethanol. However, before exploiting this potential, the… (more)

Gelten, R.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Potential of Beauty Leaf Tree (Calophyllum inophyllum L) as a biodiesel feedstock.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"The primary goal of this project was to evaluate the potential of Calophyllum inophylum as a biodiesel feedstock by studying various aspects of biodiesel production.… (more)

Hathurusingha, Subhash.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Some potential material supply constraints in the deployment of photovoltaic solar electric systems. (A preliminary screening to identify critical materials)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to: (1) identify potential material supply constraints which could seriously impede the large scale installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems; (2) provide a functional description of materials used in the construction of selected photovoltaic systems in computerized format suitable for interactive updating in workshops or for future reviews; (3) provide a data base of statistics and production processes in machine accessible format for making this assessment and supporting future PV assessments; and (4) show the sensitivity of potential shortages to the size of the PV implementation scenario. The scope of the study includes the screening of 13 photovoltaic cells in a total of 15 system designs. Some cells are also included in concentrating systems at 500 suns and 30 suns. The systems all are based on the substitutions of various cells and concentrator devices into designs based on the Meade, Nebraska 25 kW installation. The system designs all include energy storage but the effect of deleting energy storage is also examined. The study methodology, results, and recommendations are presented in detail. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Bloomster, C.H.; Smith, S.A.; Nelson, T.A.; Pawlewicz, W.W.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

SciTech Connect

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom part of the Ugnu and throughout the West Sak. No hydrate-bearing zones were identified either in recovered core or on well logs. The base of the permafrost was found at about 1260 ft. With the exception of the deepest sands in the West Sak and some anomalous thin, tight zones, all sands recovered (after thawing) are unconsolidated with high porosity and high permeability. At 800 psi, Ugnu sands have an average porosity of 39.3% and geometrical mean permeability of 3.7 Darcys. Average grain density is 2.64 g/cc. West Sak sands have an average porosity of 35.5%, geometrical mean permeability of 0.3 Darcys, and average grain density of 2.70 g/cc. There were several 1-2 ft intervals of carbonate-cemented sandstone recovered from the West Sak. These intervals have porosities of only a few percent and very low permeability. On a well log they appear as resistive with a high sonic velocity. In shallow sections of other wells these usually are the only logs available. Given the presence of gas in Hot Ice No. 1, if only resistivity and sonic logs and a mud log had been available, tight sand zones may have been interpreted as containing hydrates. Although this finding does not imply that all previously mapped hydrate zones are merely tight sands, it does add a note of caution to the practice of interpreting the presence of hydrates from old well information. The methane hydrate stability zone below the Hot Ice No. 1 location includes thick sections of sandstone and conglomerate which would make excellent reservoir rocks for hydrates and below the permafrost zone shallow gas. The Ugnu formation comprises a more sand-rich section than does the West Sak formation, and the Ugnu sands when cleaned and dried are slightly more porous and significantly more permeable than the West Sak.

Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Wormhole formation in dissolving fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dissolution of artificial fractures with three-dimensional, pore-scale numerical simulations. The fluid velocity in the fracture space was determined from a lattice-Boltzmann method, and a stochastic solver was used for the transport of dissolved species. Numerical simulations were used to study conditions under which long conduits (wormholes) form in an initially rough but spatially homogeneous fracture. The effects of flow rate, mineral dissolution rate and geometrical properties of the fracture were investigated, and the optimal conditions for wormhole formation determined.

Szymczak, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

399

The Formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution global model forecast of the formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979 is analyzed by means of several diagnostic computations on the model's output history. The formation is addressed from an analysis of limited-area energetics ...

T. N. Krishnamurthi; H. S. Bedi; Darlene Oosterhof; Vivek Hardiker

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Western North Pacific Monsoon Depression Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relatively few studies have been carried out as to the conditions leading to the formation of monsoon depressions in the western North Pacific. Two monsoon depression formations during July 2007 were analyzed using ECMWF analyses and satellite ...

Jodi C. Beattie; Russell L. Elsberry

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations production potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Negative ion formation processes: A general review  

SciTech Connect

The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs.

Alton, G.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Production of fuel products by the thermal dissolution of enriched Baltic combustible shale  

SciTech Connect

The thermal dissolution of enriched Baltic shale (kerogen-70) in the presence of an organosilicon compound reduces the formation of gas and raises the solubility of its organic matter and, when the sludge from the process is coked, it decreases the formation of semicoke and gas; as a result of this, the yield of liquid products calculated on the shale processed is increased one and a half times.

Vol-Epshtein, A.B.; Gorlov, E.G.; Shpilberg, M.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Decommissioning of U.S. Uranium Production Facilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report analyzes the uranium production facility decommissioning process and its potential impact on uranium supply and prices. 1995 represents the most recent publication year.

Information Center

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Energy and Environmental Aspects of an FPSO for LNG Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The floating production unit HLNG FPSO-1 has been evaluated with respect to its energy consumption and emissions to air, and improvement potentials within the same… (more)

Revheim, Lars Petter Rein

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

408

Unifying biological image formats with HDF5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biosciences need an image format capable of high performance and long-term maintenance. Is HDF5 the answer?

Matthew T. Dougherty; Michael J. Folk; Erez Zadok; Herbert J. Bernstein; Frances C. Bernstein; Kevin W. Eliceiri; Werner Benger; Christoph Best

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining reserves of the Leona Este Field, which is located in the southern portion of the Eastern Venezuela Basin. Two or more of these reservoir sands, which are interbedded with shales, have been simultaneously produced pursuing an increase in the oil production rate, but an unexpected production performance was obtained: the accelerated and early increase of the water volume associated to the produced oil has caused the shut down of some wells in the Leona Este Field. In order to understand this productive performance and to re-evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the study interval, it is important to describe these reservoirs in terms of their depositional origin and trap formation. An integrated reservoir model was constructed using all the available geological, geophysical and production data. The hydrocarbon trapping mechanism of each studied stratigraphic interval, traditionally known as the "S5", "TU", "TL", "U1U", "U1L", "U2U", "U2MA", "U2MB" and "U2L" sands, includes two components: ? Stratigraphic component: each stratigraphic interval presents one or more reservoir zones composed by sandy deposits that fill belts of stacked tidal-fluvial channels in a SSE-NNW trending tide-dominated estuarine system. In most intervals, these contemporaneous-in-deposition reservoir zones are not connected due to the lateral variation of facies present in the tide-dominated estuary. ? Structural component: northward dipping strata have been offset by a W-E trending major normal fault and secondary normal faults striking parallel to the major one. The major fault is the southern seal of the hydrocarbon traps. The most important prospects of the study interval are the reservoir zones 1 and 2 of the "U1L" sand, the reservoir zone 3 of the "U2MB" sand, and the "U1U" sand, which show more than 15 feet of average net sand thickness, and contain the largest volume of recoverable oil per reservoir zone in the Leona Este Field.

Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

411

A metrics framework for evaluating group formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many approaches to learning and teaching rely upon students working in groups. So far, many Computer-Supported Group Formation systems have been designed to facilitate the formation of optimal groups in learning. However, evaluating the quality of automated ... Keywords: efficiency, group formation, optimization

Asma Ounnas; David E. Millard; Hugh C. Davis

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Field guide to Muddy Formation outcrops, Crook County, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline bamer reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. This report contains the data and analyses collected from outcrop exposures of the Muddy Formation, located in Crook County, Wyoming, 40 miles south of Bell Creek oil field. The outcrop data set contains permeability, porosity, petrographic, grain size and geologic data from 1-inch-diameter core plugs chilled from the outcrop face, as well as geological descriptions and sedimentological interpretations of the outcrop exposures. The outcrop data set provides information about facies characteristics and geometries and the spatial distribution of permeability and porosity on interwell scales. Appendices within this report include a micropaleontological analyses of selected outcrop samples, an annotated bibliography of papers on the Muddy Formation in the Powder River Basin, and over 950 permeability and porosity values measured from 1-inch-diameter core plugs drilled from the outcrop. All data contained in this resort are available in electronic format upon request. The core plugs drilled from the outcrop are available for measurement.

Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Lifting hydro's potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are taking another look at potential sites for hydroelectric installations, reevaluating sites that had been uneconomic to develop and those that can be renovated or expanded. Both large- and small-scale facilities now offer the advantages of free fuel, no air or thermal pollution, and no waste - making hydro an attractive way to increase utility capacity. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is participating in screening studies which evaluate the unique characteristics of specific sites and recommend technical improvements for better water control and a higher output. Pumped-hydro facilities are increasing, with new attention going to underground storage as new aboveground sites become harder to find. The institutional hurdles of licensing and regulation, interference with recreational and shoreline activities, down-stream water temperature changes, fish migration, and insurance are often in conflict. EPRI's screening program includes a simplified cost/benefit analysis and a site characterization, which utilities can use for their evaluation. Future research will explore a new financing arrangement that will lower front-end costs. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Ferreira, A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Tropical Cyclone Formation Guidance Using Pregenesis Dvorak Climatology. Part I: Operational Forecasting and Predictive Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While there are a variety of modes for tropical cyclone (TC) development, there have been relatively few efforts to systematically catalog both nondeveloping and developing cases. This paper introduces an operationally derived climatology of ...

Joshua H. Cossuth; Richard D. Knabb; Daniel P. Brown; Robert E. Hart

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Combustion Tests of Rocket Motor Washout Material: Focus on Air toxics Formation Potential and Asbestos Remediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to determine the suitability of cofiring as a recycle / reuse option to landfill disposal for solid rocket motor washout residue. Solid rocket motor washout residue (roughly 55% aluminum powder, 40% polybutadiene rubber binder, 5% residual ammonium perchlorate, and 0.2-1% asbestos) has been fired in Sandia's MultiFuel Combustor (MFC). The MFC is a down-fired combustor with electrically heated walls, capable of simulating a wide range of fuel residence times and stoichiometries. This study reports on the fate of AP-based chlorine and asbestos from the residue following combustion.

G. C. Sclippa; L. L. Baxter; S. G. Buckley

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and coal-bed methane). The Energy for Sustainable Development l Volume VII No. 4 l December 2003 Overview 5 to diesel fuel and gasoline. 7. Including small reserves of natural gas and coal-bed methane far fromTransforming coal for sustainability: a strategy for China Report by the Task Force on Energy

Wilson, Thomas H.

417

Potential application of Madison formation waters for community heating in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

It is suggested that the most practical early application of the Madison waters is in community space heating with the local hot waters considered as a municipal commodity. The general design of such a community system is discussed along with its cost, means of financing, and life expectancy. Legal questions and state statutes that are pertinent are cited and the life expectancy of the entire Madison resource and equipment to expoit the resource are considered. (MHR)

Freeman, R.A.; Meier, R.F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

STEO September 2012 - natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

natural gas production at record high, inventories most natural gas production at record high, inventories most ever at start of heating season on Nov. 1 U.S. marketed natural gas production is expected to rise by 2.6 billion cubic feet per day this year to a record 68.9 billion cubic feet per day, said the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Katherine Teller explains: "This strong growth in production was driven in large part by production in Pennsylvania's Marcellus shale formation where drilling companies are using hydraulic fracturing to free the trapped gas." The increase in production, along with the large natural gas inventories left over from last winter because of warmer temperatures, will push U.S. gas inventories to a record high of nearly

419

STEO January 2013 - oil production increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 oil production to increase in 2013 and 2014 U.S. crude oil production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. America's oil output will jump nearly 900,000 barrels per day in 2013 to an average 7.3 million barrels a day, according to the latest monthly forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This would mark the biggest one-year increase in output since U.S. commercial crude oil production began in 1859. U.S. daily oil production is expected to rise by another 600,000 barrels in 2014 to nearly 8 million barrels a day, the highest level since 1988. Most of America's oil production growth over the next two years will come from more drilling activity in tight shale rock formations located in North Dakota and Texas

420

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at ...

Furlanetto, S; Springel, V; Hernquist, L; Furlanetto, Steven; Schaye, Joop; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa-

423

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

424

Synfuel (hydrogen) production from fusion power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A potential use of fusion energy for the production of synthetic fuel (hydrogen) is described. The hybrid-thermochemical bismuth-sulfate cycle is used as a vehicle to assess the technological and economic merits of this potential nonelectric application of fusion power.

Krakowski, R.A.; Cox, K.E.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Case Study Diagnosis of the Formation of an Upper-Level Cutoff Cyclonic Circulation over the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synoptic-scale evolution during the formation phase of a midtropospheric cutoff cyclonic circulation over the eastern United States is diagnosed within the potential vorticity framework using the GALE (Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment) ...

Gerald D. Bell; Lance F. Bosart

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Market potential for electrolytic hydrogen. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The economics of hydrogen production by the major users of hydrogen (petroleum refiners and manufacturers of ammonia and methanol) favor the continued use of fossil fuels for hydrogen generation. However, there are a large number of miscellaneous small users for whom hydrogen produced by advanced electrolyzers may become economically attractive. Many of these small users, with hydrogen demands of < 0.5 million SCF per day, purchase their hydrogen requirements from industrial gas suppliers. Forseeable improvements in current electrolyzer technology, which will reduce plant capital costs and improve plant performance and efficiency, may make electrolytic hydrogen competitive with purchased hydrogen for many specialty users. This study analyzed the small user hydrogen market. Telephone interviews were conducted with representative hydrogen users in the chemical, pharmaceutical, electronics, metals, fats and oils, and float glass industries to determine the decision factors governing the choice of their hydrogen supply. Cost projections to the year 2000 for production of hydrogen by advanced electrolyzers were made and compared with price projections for merchant hydrogen, and the estimates of the potential market for each of the industrial sub-sectors were determined. By the year 2000, the potential market for advanced technology electrolytic hydrogen among specialty users is projected to be about half of what the merchant hydrogen market would be in the absence of electrolytic hydrogen. This potential market, representing an annual demand of about 16 billion SCF of hydrogen, will develop from market penetrations of electrolyzers assumed to begin in the early 1980s.

Fein, E.; Mathey, C.J.; Arnstein, C.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

429

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) studies oil recovery mechanisms relevant to thermal and heavy-oil production. The scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. In August of 2000 we received funding from the U. S. DOE under Award No. DE-FC26-00BC15311 that completed December 1, 2003. The project was cost shared with industry. Heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o} API) is an underutilized energy resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods. Heating reduces oil viscosity dramatically. Hence, thermal recovery is especially important because adding heat, usually via steam injection generally improves displacement efficiency. The objectives of this work were to improve our understanding of the production mechanisms of heavy oil under both primary and enhanced modes of operation. The research described spanned a spectrum of topics related to heavy and thermal oil recovery and is categorized into: (1) multiphase flow and rock properties, (2) hot fluid injection, (3) improved primary heavy-oil recovery, (4) in-situ combustion, and (5) reservoir definition. Technology transfer efforts and industrial outreach were also important to project effort. The research tools and techniques used were quite varied. In the area of experiments, we developed a novel apparatus that improved imaging with X-ray computed tomography (CT) and high-pressure micromodels etched with realistic sandstone roughness and pore networks that improved visualization of oil-recovery mechanisms. The CT-compatible apparatus was invaluable for investigating primary heavy-oil production, multiphase flow in fractured and unfractured media, as well as imbibition. Imbibition and the flow of condensed steam are important parts of the thermal recovery process. The high-pressure micromodels were used to develop a conceptual and mechanistic picture of primary heavy-oil production by solution gas drive. They allowed for direct visualization of gas bubble formation, bubble growth, and oil displacement. Companion experiments in representative sands and sandstones were also conducted to understand the mechanisms of cold production. The evolution of in-situ gas and oil saturation was monitored with CT scanning and pressure drop data. These experiments highlighted the importance of depletion rate, overburden pressure, and oil-phase chemistry on the cold production process. From the information provided by the experiments, a conceptual and numerical model was formulated and validated for the heavy-oil solution gas drive recovery process. Also in the area of mechanisms, steamdrive for fractured, low permeability porous media was studied. Field tests have shown that heat injected in the form of steam is effective at unlocking oil from such reservoir media. The research reported here elucidated how the basic mechanisms differ from conventional steamdrive and how these differences are used to an advantage. Using simulations of single and multiple matrix blocks that account for details of heat transfer, capillarity, and fluid exchange between matrix and fracture, the importance of factors such as permeability contrast between matrix and fracture and oil composition were quantified. Experimentally, we examined the speed and extent to which steam injection alters the permeability and wettability of low permeability, siliceous rocks during thermal recovery. Rock dissolution tends to increase permeability moderately aiding in heat delivery, whereas downstream the cooled fluid deposits silica reducing permeability. Permeability reduction is not catastrophic. With respect to wettability, heat shifts rock wettability toward more water wet conditions. This effect is beneficial for the production of heavy and medium gravity oils as it improves displacement efficiency. A combination of analytical and numerical studies was used to examine the efficiency of reservoir heating using nonconventional wells such as horizontal and multi

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cement report - CEC format 110611  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9E 9E Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Daniel Olsen, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, Aimee McKane Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or

431

Reaction of Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2 with Forsterite: Evidence for Magnesite Formation at Low Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nature of the reaction products that form on the surfaces of nanometer-sized forsterite particles during reaction with H2O saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 35 C and 50 C were examined under in situ conditions and ex situ following reaction. The in situ analysis was conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ex situ analysis consisted of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surface phases and chemical characterization of precipitates using a combination of confocal Raman spectroscopy, 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that the forsterite surface is highly reactive with the primary reaction products being a mixture of nesquehonite (MgCO3.3H2O) and magnesite (MgCO3) at short reaction times ({approx}3-4 days) and then magnesite (MgCO3) and a highly porous amorphous silica phase at longer reaction times (14 days). After 14 days of reaction most of the original forsterite transformed to reaction products. Importantly, the formation of magnesite was observed at temperatures much lower (35 C) than previously thought needed to overcome its well known sluggish precipitation kinetics. The conversion of nesquehonite to magnesite liberates H2O which can potentially facilitate further metal carbonation, as postulated by previous investigators, based upon studies at higher temperature (80 C). The observation that magnesite can form at lower temperatures implies that water recycling may also be important in determining the rate and extent of mineral carbonation in a wide range of potential CO2 storage reservoirs.

Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Hess, Nancy J.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Feng, Ju; Rosso, Kevin M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the author. ) Stone Tool Production, Hikade, UEE 2010Short Citation: Hikade 2010, Stone Tool Production. UEE.Thomas, 2010, Stone Tool Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

434

Scale formation at various locations in a geothermal operation due to injection of imported waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of waters that are not native to a geothermal formation generates various physical and chemical problems. The major chemical problem resulting from such injections is the formation of sulfate scales (particularly CaSO4, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at various locations starting from the injection well through the production well to the surface facilities of any geothermal operation. One of the ways to prevent this type of scale formation is by reducing the sulfate concentration of the injection waters. The effect of sulfate deionization on scale formation at various locations of the geothermal operations is studied. Some experimental results on the CaSO4 scale formation in porous media upon heating an injection water with and without addition of scale inhibitors are also given.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

KETENE FORMATION IN INTERSTELLAR ICES: A LABORATORY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO, ethenone) in polar and apolar ices was studied with in situ 0.8 MeV proton irradiation, far-UV photolysis, and infrared spectroscopic analyses at 10-20 K. Using isotopically enriched reagents, unequivocal evidence was obtained for ketene synthesis in H{sub 2}O-rich and CO{sub 2}-rich ices, and several reaction products were identified. Results from scavenging experiments suggested that ketene was formed by free-radical pathways, as opposed to acid-base processes or redox reactions. Finally, we use our results to draw conclusions about the formation and stability of ketene in the interstellar medium.

Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark J., E-mail: Reggie.Hudson@NASA.gov [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Entropy production for an interacting quark-gluon plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the entropy production within dissipative hydrodynamics in the Israel-Stewart (IS) and Navier-Stokes theory (NS) for relativistic heavy ion physics applications. In particular we focus on the initial condition in a 0+1D Bjorken scenario, appropriate for the early longitudinal expansion stage of the collision. Going beyond the standard simplification of a massless ideal gas we consider a realistic equation of state consistently derived within a virial expansion. The EoS used is well in line with recent three-flavor QCD lattice data for the pressure, speed of sound, and interaction measure at nonzero temperature and vanishing chemical potential ($\\mu_{\\rm q} = 0$). The shear viscosity has been consistently calculated within this formalism using a kinetic approach in the ultra-relativistic regime with an explicit and systematic evaluation of the transport cross section as function of temperature. We investigate the influence of the viscosity and the initial condition, i.e. formation time, initial temperature, and pressure anisotropy for the entropy production at RHIC at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=130$ GeV. We find that the interplay between effects of the viscosity and of the realistic EoS can not be neglected in the reconstruction of the initial state from experimental data. Therefore, from the experimental findings it is very hard to derive unambiguous information about the initial conditions and/or the evolution of the system.

Stefano Mattiello

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Review of current research on hydrocarbon production by plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This review assesses the status of research and development in the area of plants that produce hydrocarbons as a possible replacement for traditional fossil fuels. The information is meant to be used as a basis for determining the scope of a possible R and D program by DOE/FFB. Except in the case of guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray), research on hydrocarbon species generally has not advanced beyond preliminary screening, extraction, and growth studies. Virtually no field studies have been initiated; hydrocarbon component extraction, separation, identification, and characterization have been only timidly approached; the biochemistry of hydrocarbon formation remains virtually untouched; and potential market analysis has been based on insufficient data. Research interest is increasing in this area, however. Industrial interest understandably centers about guayule prospects and is supplemented by NSF and DOE research funds. Additional support for other research topics has been supplied by DOE and USDA and by certain university systems. Due to the infant state of technology in this area of energy research, it is not possible to predict or satisfactorily assess at this time the potential contribution that plant hydrocarbons might make toward decreasing the nation's dependence upon petroleum. However, the general impression received from experts interviewed during this review was that the major thrust of research should be directed toward the manufacture of petrochemical substitutes rather than fuel production.

Benedict, H. M.; Inman, B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fracturing results in diatomaceous earth formations, South Belridge Field, California  

SciTech Connect

Fracturing significantly increases light oil production rates at South Belridge making this an economically successful technique for exploitation of the Reef Ridge reservoir. No fracturing mechanics problems were encountered in any of the treatments. The loosely consolidated formations behaved mechanically much like brittle, elastic rocks. Net oil and gross production is typified by initial high rates and an early rapid decline. The major cause of this early rapid decline is the transient flow effect. This behavior is typical of low permeability oil and gas production. Fractures are vertical, as shown by gamma ray and temperature logs run following several treatments. The fractures grow slightly out of the perforated intervals (10 to 15 feet). Loss of fracture conductivity due to fines migration, scale deposition, and/or fracture healing (imbedment) is not a serious problem. Oil viscosity can vary as much as ten-fold. Some wells produce significant amounts of gas--100 to 200 MCFPD initially. The formation is primarily diatomaceous earth which is very fine particle size siliceous material composed of whole or fragmented diatom tests (skeletons). There is no evidence that clay swelling or dispersion is a problem. Field and laboratory data support this conclusion. Aqueous fracturing fluids were successfully used which confirmed laboratory tests on cores.

Strubhar, M.K.; Medin, W.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

On the Economic Nature of Crop Production Decisions Using the Oklahoma Mesonet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the sensitivity of agricultural production to both short-term weather and long-range climatic patterns, the availability of reliable and relevant meteorological data and climate products can potentially affect the entire production ...

Kimberly E. Klockow; Renee A. McPherson; Daniel S. Sutter

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Origin of compositional differences in organic matter abundance and oil potential of cherty and clayey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shale source rocks . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G of petroleum . In: Petroleum Geochemistry and Source Rock Potential of Carbonate Rocks (Ed. by G. Palacas of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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