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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

41.4: Discontinuous Alignment Thin-Film Formation by Self-Organized Dewetting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

41.4: Discontinuous Alignment Thin-Film Formation by Self-Organized Dewetting Chung-Yung Lee, Man alignment layer [4]. In this paper, we study the formation of a discontinuous alignment film by a dewetting be produced. The alignments produced are robust. Moreover, the processing window is also maximized. 2

3

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

4

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE's) Coal Program...

5

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study of the Coso Formation Study of the Coso Formation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geologic Study of the Coso Formation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the

7

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

8

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

9

DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations October 5, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact onCCS Opportunities in the United States [click on imageto link to the publication]Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed the manual to better understand the characteristics of geologic formations

10

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic performance computing to assess the risks involved in carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations-thermal- chemical processes in variably saturated, non-isothermal porous media is applied to sequestration

Mills, Richard

11

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

12

DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage September 16, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy today announced 11 projects valued at $75.5 million aimed at increasing scientific understanding about the potential of promising geologic formations to safely and permanently store carbon dioxide (CO2). View Project Details Funding for the projects includes $49.75 million from the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act and will result in substantial employment opportunities for local and regional organizations over the next three years while providing hands-on scientific experience for individuals looking to be employed in the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry.

13

Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy that can contribute to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide to maintain adsorbed methane in the coalbed formation. But now carbon dioxide will replace the methane

Mohaghegh, Shahab

14

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leveraging regionaL expLoration Leveraging regionaL expLoration to DeveLop geoLogic Framework For co 2 Storage in Deep FormationS Background The Midwestern region encompasses numerous coal-fired power plants that could be adversely impacted by carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission control restrictions. Geologic sequestration could be a viable option to mitigate the CO 2 emissions within this region. Unfortunately, the understanding of rock properties within deep forma- tions in the region is poorly understood due to lack of deep well data. Under this project, regional geologic characterization is being refined with new rock property data being collected in collaboration with regional oil and gas drilling companies. Description The project is designed to develop an improved understanding of the geologic frame-

15

in three types of geological formations found in the United States  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in three types of geological formations found in the United States in three types of geological formations found in the United States and Canada: saline formations, unmineable coal seams, and oil and gas reservoirs. The methodologies are based on widely accepted assumptions associated with fluid distribution and displacement processes commonly applied in petroleum and groundwater science. Leadership for this document was provided by the Capacity and Fairways Subgroup, a subcommittee convened in 2006 by the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Geological Working Group to develop the first carbon sequestration atlas. The document will be presented as an appendix in Atlas II, which DOE expects to release later this year. The Atlas recently won an APEX Grand Award for publication

16

Comparison of methods for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in saline formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary estimates of CO{sub 2} storage potential in geologic formations provide critical information related to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) technologies to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. Currently multiple methods to estimate CO{sub 2} storage and multiple storage estimates for saline formations have been published, leading to potential uncertainty when comparing estimates from different studies. In this work, carbon dioxide storage estimates are compared by applying several commonly used methods to general saline formation data sets to assess the impact that the choice of method has on the results. Specifically, six CO{sub 2} storage methods were applied to thirteen saline formation data sets which were based on formations across the United States with adaptations to provide the geologic inputs required by each method. Methods applied include those by (1) international efforts – the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (Bachu et al., 2007); (2) United States government agencies – U.S. Department of Energy – National Energy Technology Laboratory (US-DOE-NETL, 2012) and United States Geological Survey (Brennan et al., 2010); and (3) the peer-reviewed scientific community – Szulczewski et al. (2012) and Zhou et al. (2008). A statistical analysis of the estimates generated by multiple methods revealed that assessments of CO{sub 2} storage potential made at the prospective level were often statistically indistinguishable from each other, implying that the differences in methodologies are small with respect to the uncertainties in the geologic properties of storage rock in the absence of detailed site-specific characterization.

Goodman, Angela L. [U.S. DOE; Bromhal, Grant S. [U.S. DOE; Strazisar, Brian [U.S. DOE; Rodosta, Traci D. [U.S. DOE; Guthrie, William J. [U.S. DOE; Allen, Douglas E. [ORISE; Guthrie, George D. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Discontinued Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page lists projects that received a loan or a loan guarantee from DOE, but that are considered discontinued by LPO for one of several reasons.

18

The Cost of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Geologic Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure anD sTorage in geologiC formaTions The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic formations is a viable option for achieving deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions without hindering economic prosperity. Due to the abundance of fossil fuels in the United States and around the globe as compared to other energy sources, there is strong interest in geologic sequestration, but cost is a key issue. The volume of CO 2 emitted from power plants and other energy systems is enormous compared to other emissions of concern. For example, a pulverized coal (PC) boiler operating on Illinois #6 coal (2.5 percent sulfur) may generate 0.03 pounds of sulfur dioxide per kilowatt hour (kWh) and emit CO 2 at a rate of 1.7 pounds per kWh.

19

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the pressence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the differential current conducted into the formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figures.

Vail, W.B. III.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

22

Methods and apparatus for measurement of electronic properties of geological formations through borehole casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes including resistivities, polarization phenomena and dielectric constants. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. At least three voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of differential current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. These measurements facilitate calculation of the resistivities of the adjacent geological formations as well as an indication of whether cement is present. Measurements of the differential voltage response to transient currents provide a measurement of the polarization phenomena in formation as well as the capacitance of the casing in contact with the formation which is useful for determining whether oil and gas are present. Lithological characteristics of the formation such as the presence or absence of clay can also be determined. A calibration procedure is provided for minimizing errors induced by variations in the casing. The device also may be placed within the pipe attached to a drill bit while drilling open holes. 48 figs.

Vail, W.B. III.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Heterogeneous rock mass classification by means of the geological strength index: the San Mauro formation (Cilento, Italy)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes an application of the geological strength index (GSI) method to the San Mauro formation, which is characterized by sandstones alternating with argillaceous marls. The Sandstone/Pelite (S/P) r...

P. Budetta; M. Nappi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

White, Curt (Pittsburgh, PA); Wells, Arthur (Bridgeville, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Strazisar, Brian (Venetia, PA)

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

28

Natural iodine in a clay formation: Implications for iodine fate in geological disposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a significant contribution to potential overall long-term dose resulting from the waste storage (Altmann, 2008 Laboratory of Environmental Geology, Research Group of Geoenvironmental/Engineering Division of Solid Waste problematic radioisotopes in the context of nuclear waste geological disposal due to its high mobility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

29

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO 2 Christine Doughty (cadoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453) Karsten Pruess (k_pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; 510-486-5875) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Susan D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Paul R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313) Bureau of Economic Geology P.O. Box X, The University of Texas Austin, TX 78713 Christopher T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 530-752-1372) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences 1 Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The capacity of fluvial brine-bearing formations to sequester CO 2 is investigated using numerical simulations of CO

30

Research Library Discontinues OPPIE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Library Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Find more information below. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email The Research Library is...

31

Consistent geological-simulation modeling in carbonate reservoirs, a case study from the Khuff Formation, Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Khuff Formation constitutes reservoir body in many gas producer fields of the Persian Gulf and Arabian plate. This carbonate reservoir represents a complex character which strongly affects reservoir modeling and prediction of its reservoir performance. This paper examines construction of a reservoir model for this formation by the use of an integrated approach and shows how geological and simulation grids can perform consistently. This approach shows that in case of proper data integration, loss of value in z-dimension after grid scale-up would be ignorable and will not affect actual reservoir performance. The presented approach uses sequence stratigraphic framework (SSF) as the basis of reservoir zonation and permeability prediction. This is resulted to consistent poro/perm models that help accurate prediction of reservoir performance in simulation model. SSF also helped propagation of reservoir bodies in geological model. A seismic derived effective porosity (SPHIE) cube is used in conjunction with core and log data to distribute porosity. Hydraulic flow units (HFUs) which are assessed by the use of core and log data are used as the basis of grid scale-up. Our findings showed that if data integration is properly done, strong correlation of \\{HFUs\\} and SSF will be obtained which results to consistent geological and simulation models. Permeability should be populated into the 3D grid by the use of functions derived from SSF zonation and water saturation modeling should be upon capillary pressure curves assigned to each reservoir rock type (RRT) so that the final geological model and coarse simulation grid would be consistent. The presented approach in this study explains how various visions and different scale data could be properly used in a reservoir model. It also provides ideas about ideal consistent reservoir modeling for the Khuff Formation and similar heterogeneous carbonate reservoirs.

Ashkan Asadi-Eskandar; Hossein Rahimpour-Bonab; Shahab Hejri; Khalil Afsari; Alireza Mardani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DOE/EA-1482: Environmental Assessment for Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations (October 2003)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

82 82 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT EXPERIMENT FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN SALINE AQUIFER BRINE FORMATIONS FRIO FORMATION, LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS OCTOBER 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ii iii National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin, under contract with DOE, has studied the potential for sequestration of CO 2 in geologic formations of the United States as part of a broader series of DOE-sponsored research projects to

33

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shales. THE DEVELOPMENT OF CORRELATIONS TO ASSESS FORMATION PROPERTIES AND CONDITIONS Treatment of Anisotropic

Dobson, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the 1962 meetings of the Rocky Mountain Section of the Geological Society of America held on the Brigham University Provo, Utah Part I partially supported by the Rocky Mountaln Section. Officers of the Rocky ....................................................................Blackhawk Formation 56 Castlegate Sandstone and South Flat Formation ............................ 56

Seamons, Kent E.

35

Geological sequestration of carbon dioxide by hydrous carbonate formation in steelmaking slag .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??"The formation of carbonate solids from the alkaline earth oxide phases in steelmaking slag was investigated in dry and aqueous conditions as a vehicle for… (more)

Rawlins, C. Hank, 1968-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Numerical Modeling of CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations - Recent Results and Open Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed for oil and gas reservoirs, and for vadose zoneor depleting oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams,formations. While oil and gas reservoirs may provide some

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Simulating Geologic Co-sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in a Basalt Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-sequestered CO2 with H2S impurities could affect geologic storage, causing changes in pH and oxidation state that affect mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions and the mobility of metals present in the reservoir rocks. We have developed a variable component, non-isothermal simulator, STOMP-COMP (Water, Multiple Components, Salt and Energy), which simulates multiphase flow gas mixtures in deep saline reservoirs, and the resulting reactions with reservoir minerals. We use this simulator to model the co-injection of CO2 and H2S into brecciated basalt flow top. A 1000 metric ton injection of these supercritical fluids, with 99% CO2 and 1% H2S, is sequestered rapidly by solubility and mineral trapping. CO2 is trapped mainly as calcite within a few decades and H2S is trapped as pyrite within several years.

Bacon, Diana H.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geological Sequestration of CO2 by Hydrous Carbonate Formation with Reclaimed Slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of this project is to develop a process that improves the kinetics of the hydrous carbonate formation reaction enabling steelmakers to directly remove CO2 from their furnace exhaust gas. It is proposed to bring the furnace exhaust stream containing CO2 in contact with reclaimed steelmaking slag in a reactor that has an environment near the unit activity of water resulting in the production of carbonates. The CO2 emissions from the plant would be reduced by the amount sequestered in the formation of carbonates. The main raw materials for the process are furnace exhaust gases and specially prepared slag.

Von L. Richards; Kent Peaslee; Jeffrey Smith

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Physical Constraints on Geologic CO2 Sequestration in Low-Volume Basalt Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep basalt formations within large igneous provinces have been proposed as target reservoirs for carbon capture and sequestration on the basis of favorable CO2-water-rock reaction kinetics that suggest carbonate mineralization rates on the order of 102–103 d. Although these results are encouraging, there exists much uncertainty surrounding the influence of fracture-controlled reservoir heterogeneity on commercial-scale CO2 injections in basalt formations. This work investigates the physical response of a low-volume basalt reservoir to commercial-scale CO2 injections using a Monte Carlo numerical modeling experiment such that model variability is solely a function of spatially distributed reservoir heterogeneity. Fifty equally probable reservoirs are simulated using properties inferred from the deep eastern Snake River Plain aquifer in southeast Idaho, and CO2 injections are modeled within each reservoir for 20 yr at a constant mass rate of 21.6 kg s–1. Results from this work suggest that (1) formation injectivity is generally favorable, although injection pressures in excess of the fracture gradient were observed in 4% of the simulations; (2) for an extensional stress regime (as exists within the eastern Snake River Plain), shear failure is theoretically possible for optimally oriented fractures if Sh is less than or equal to 0.70SV; and (3) low-volume basalt reservoirs exhibit sufficient CO2 confinement potential over a 20 yr injection program to accommodate mineral trapping rates suggested in the literature.

Ryan M. Pollyea; Jerry P. Fairley; Robert K. Podgorney; Travis L. McLing

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Geologic setting and natural gas potential of Niobrara formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chalk units in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) have potential for generation and accumulation of shallow, biogenic gas in the central and eastern Williston basin. Similar to area of Niobrara gas production in the eastern Denver basin, Niobrara chalks in South and North Dakota were deposited on carbonate ramps sloping westward off the stable eastern platform of the Western Interior seaway. Within the Williston basin, the Niobrara of the western Dakotas, eastern North Dakota, and central South Dakota has different stratigraphic relationships. These three areas can be further subdivided and ranked into six areas that have different exploration potential. The south margin of the Williston basin in central South Dakota is the most attractive exploration area. Niobrara chalk reservoirs, source rocks, and structural traps in the southern Williston basin are similar to those in the eastern Denver basin. Chalk porosities are probably adequate for gas production, although porosity is controlled by burial depth. Organic carbon content of the chalk is high and shows of biogenic gas are reported. Large, low-relief structural features, which could serve as traps, are present.

Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 6, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates in the Panama Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a geological description of the Panama Basin, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, distribution of hydrates within the sediments, and the relation of hydrate distribution to other features such as salt diapirism are also included. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 63 refs., 38 figs., 7 tabs.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 9, Formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Middle America Trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a geological description of the Pacific margin of Mexico and Central America, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, and distribution of hydrates within the sediments are also included in this report. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 150 refs., 84 figs., 17 tabs.

Finley, P.; Krason, J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geologic and climatic controls on the formation of the Permian coal measures in the Sohagpur coal field, Madhya Pradesh, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of India (GSI) are concluding a cooperative study of the coking coal deposits in the Sohagpur coal field in central India. Because of the importance of coal in India's economy, the Coal Wing of the Geological Survey of India has studied the area intensely since the early 1980's. This report summarizes the overall stratigraphic, tectonic, and sedimentologic framework of the Sohagpur coal field area, and the interpretations of the geologic and climatic environments required for the accumulation of the thick Gondwana coal deposits, both coking and non-coking.

Milici, R.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Mukhopadhyah, A.; Adhikari, S.; Roy, S.P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evolutionarity of MHD Discontinuities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reasoning from the polar diagram for phase velocities of small-amplitude waves, ... transitions between different types of discontinuous solutions in MHD. However the evolutionarity conditions have not been...

Boris V. Somov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering Geosciences Careers in the ik ou ve n ver see t b f rel e y ' e n i e o ! Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Queen's University See the World Geological Sciences Arts and Science Faculty

Ellis, Randy

50

Explosive Synchronization is Discontinuous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spontaneous explosive is an abrupt transition to collective behavior taking place in heterogeneous networks when the frequencies of the nodes are positively correlated to the node degree. This explosive transition was conjectured to be discontinuous. Indeed, numerical investigations reveal a hysteresis behavior associated with the transition. Here, we analyze explosive synchronization in star graphs. We show that in the thermodynamic limit the transition to (and out) collective behavior is indeed discontinuous. The discontinuous nature of the transition is related to the nonlinear behavior of the order parameter, which in the thermodynamic limit exhibits multiple fixed points. Moreover, we unravel the hysteresis behavior in terms of the graph parameters. Our numerical results show that finite size graphs are well described by our predictions.

Vladimir Vlasov; Yong Zou; Tiago Pereira

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Template Discontinuation Access  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FOR SUBJECT FOR SUBJECT FROM: Personnel Security Program Manager SUBJECT: Discontinuation of Access Eligibility Determination Reference is made to your Questionnaire for National Security Positions signed on [insert date], which was forwarded to this office in connection with a Department of Energy security clearance request. A review of that form disclosed recent use of illegal drugs. [Insert a brief description of the circumstances such as: Specifically, you listed marijuana use 1 time in 5/02; 1 time in 2/03; and 1 time in 3/07.] This office has discontinued the personnel security processing of your security clearance due to your illegal drug usage within twelve months of the signing of your security clearance application.

52

Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Discontinuous Function Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discontinuous Function Integration Discontinuous Function Integration Name: Clarence Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: We know that the area under a continuous function on a certain interval, for instance, [a,b], can be found out by definite integration (taking limit of a sum of areas of rectangles). But when the curve is a discontinuous function, the limit does not exist and is not independent of the choice of the height of rectangle in each delta x. Does it mean that the height in an interval delta x including f(x) of undefined value can be any value so that a limiting value (area under the curve) does not exist? Replies: If I understand your question correctly, here is a way out. The limits of integration are divided into sections [x1,y1] to [x2,y2] over which the function is continuous. Then the next section [x2,y2] to [x3,y3] over which the function is continuous is added to the first section. You can carry this on as long as you need to include each of the separate segments. That is not so hard, but I am not completely sure that is what you are asking. There are some pathological functions where this pasting together does not work so well.

54

Petrophysical properties and geology of selected intervals in the Frio Formation, Stratton field, South Texas for modeling interwell seismic logging response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic or continuity logging consists of locating a seismic source in one borehole near or in a low-velocity layer and deploying a detector array in a second borehole. Detection of guided waves transmitted between the two wells indicates bed connectivity. The guided wave signatures are either leaky modes or normal modes (or both). The technique has numerous applications in various types of heterogeneous geological environments, including many Gulf Coast gas reservoirs. It can be used to determine the continuity of beds between wells, estimate and locate variations in the thickness of beds, and estimate the average rock physical properties of the beds. Stratton field was selected as the Gulf-Coast-gas-play type field for a project to model interwell seismic logging responses. Stratton is a mature gas field located in the south Texas Gulf Coast, about 30 miles southwest of Corpus Christi. It encompasses over 120,000 acres in portions of Kleberg, Nueces, and Jim Wells counties. Stratton is one of 29 fields in the Frio Formation fluvial-deltaic lay associated with the Vicksburg fault zone along the Texas Gulf Coast Basin. This poster presentation explains the technique of interwell seismic logging, documents the petrophysical properties and geology of intervals in the upper and middle Frio, and presents the results of the forward modeling tests.

Collier, H.A. [Tarleton State Univ., Stephenville, TX (United States); Parra, J.O. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Measuring resistivity changes from within a first cased well to monitor fluids injected into oil bearing geological formations from a second cased well while passing electrical current between the two cased wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A.C. current is conducted through geological formations separating two cased wells in an oil field undergoing enhanced oil recovery operations such as water flooding operations. Methods and apparatus are disclosed to measure the current leakage conducted into a geological formation from within a first cased well that is responsive to fluids injected into formation from a second cased well during the enhanced oil production activities. The current leakage and apparent resistivity measured within the first cased well are responsive to fluids injected into formation from the second cased well provided the distance of separation between the two cased wells is less than, or on the order of, a Characteristic Length appropriate for the problem.

Vail, W.B. III.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

57

Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations  – a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep,… (more)

Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Structural and stratigraphic evolution of the central Mississippi Canyon Area: interaction of salt tectonics and slope processes in the formation of engineering and geologic hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The analysis focused on salt tectonics and sequence stratigraphy to develop a geologic model for the study area and its potential impact on engineering and geologic hazards. Salt in the study area was found to be established structural end-members derived from...

Brand, John Richard

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

60

Geologic and hydrologic controls critical to coalbed methane producibility and resource assessment: Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Northwest Colorado. Topical report, December 1, 1993-November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: To further evaluate the interplay of geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane production and resource assessment; to refine and validate our basin-scale coalbed methane producibility model; and to analyze the economics of coalbed methane exploration and development in the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

Ernest A. Mancini

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

62

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY RESEARCH STUDIES Geology Seri,es Vol. 3 No. 2 April, 1956 GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN Dolomite Pine Canyon Limestone Humbug Formation Tertiary System North Horn Formation Moroni Formation Quaternary System Pre-Lake Bonneville Fanglomerate Lake Bonneville Sediments Recent Lake Sediments Igneous

Seamons, Kent E.

64

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fired  Power  Plants”,  DOE/NETL,  2010.   Chelme-­?Ayala,  Capture. ”   RADS  LLC,  DOE/NETL.  2011.   Gong,  Y.  and  Geologic   Formations. ”  NETL.  2009.   Texas  Water  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Smoothing of Stokes' discontinuity for the generalized Bessel function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Soc. Lond. A (1999) Smoothing of Stokes's discontinuity...given as in (2.16). 3. Exponential improvement and smoothing of Stokes's discontinuity...incorporates the concept of smoothing the Stokes discontinuity...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization is progressing. Data on reservoir production rate and pressure history at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been tabulated, and porosity data from core analysis has been correlated with porosity as observed from well log response. Data integration is on schedule, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database for reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation for the reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs for each of these fields.

Ernest A. Mancini

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stokes’ phenomenon; smoothing a victorian discontinuity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small exponentials in asymptotic representations of functionsy(k; X) (k ? ?) can appear and disappear across sets of codimension 1 in the space of variables X. These changes are not discontinuous but happen smoot...

M. V. Berry

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Regional Geologic Map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Regional Geologic Map  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

71

Method for simulating discontinuous physical systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The mathematical foundations of conventional numerical simulation of physical systems provide no consistent description of the behavior of such systems when subjected to discontinuous physical influences. As a result, the numerical simulation of such problems requires ad hoc encoding of specific experimental results in order to address the behavior of such discontinuous physical systems. In the present invention, these foundations are replaced by a new combination of generalized function theory and nonstandard analysis. The result is a class of new approaches to the numerical simulation of physical systems which allows the accurate and well-behaved simulation of discontinuous and other difficult physical systems, as well as simpler physical systems. Applications of this new class of numerical simulation techniques to process control, robotics, and apparatus design are outlined.

Baty, Roy S. (Albuquerque, NM); Vaughn, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Predictions of long-term behavior of a large-volume pilot test for CO2 geological storage in a saline formation in the Central Valley, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term behavior of a CO{sub 2} plume injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on mechanisms that lead to plume stabilization. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of CO{sub 2} phase-partitioning, which are examined by developing a numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture in the San Joaquin Valley, California, where a large-volume pilot test of CO{sub 2} injection will be conducted. The numerical model simulates a four-year CO{sub 2} injection period and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume until it stabilizes. Sensitivity studies are carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual gas saturation.

Doughty, Christine; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Discontinuous Buckling of Wide Beams and Metabeams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We uncover how nonlinearities dramatically influence the buckling of elastic beams by means of experiments, simulations and theory. We show that sufficiently wide, ordinary elastic beams exhibit discontinuous buckling, an unstable form of buckling where the post-buckling stiffness is negative. We develop a 1D model that matches our data and identify nonlinearity as the main cause for negative stiffness. Finally, we create nonlinear metamaterials that allow us to rationally design the (negative) post-buckling stiffness of metabeams, independently of beam thickness, and demonstrate discontinuous buckling for metabeams as slender as 1% numerically and 5% experimentally.

Corentin Coulais; Johannes T. B. Overvelde; Luuk A. Lubbers; Katia Bertoldi; Martin van Hecke

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Geologic spatial analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of geologic spatial analysis research which focuses on conducting comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of regions using geologic data sets that can be referenced by latitude, longitude, and elevation/depth. (CBS)

Thiessen, R.L.; Eliason, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

77

AASG State Geological Survey  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

78

Uniform Asymptotic Smoothing of Stokes's Discontinuities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Uniform Asymptotic Smoothing of Stokes's Discontinuities...a Stokes line, where one exponential in an asymptotic expansion...the multiplier of the small exponential changes rapidly. If the...second kind (Bi): the small exponential emerges in the predicted...

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

Doughty, C.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured over a range of confining pressures while injecting CO2 and brine into the samples. Pore fluid pressure was also varied and monitored together with porosity during injection. Effective medium models were developed to understand the mechanisms and impact of observed changes and to provide the means for implementation of the interpretation methodologies in the field. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in carbonate rocks show as much as 20-50% decrease after injection of the reactive CO2-brine mixture; the changes were caused by permanent changes to the rock elastic frame associated with dissolution of mineral. Velocity decreases were observed under both dry and fluid-saturated conditions, and the amount of change was correlated with the initial pore fabrics. Scanning Electron Microscope images of carbonate rock microstructures were taken before and after injection of CO2-rich water. The images reveal enlargement of the pores, dissolution of micrite (micron-scale calcite crystals), and pitting of grain surfaces caused by the fluid- solid chemical reactivity. The magnitude of the changes correlates with the rock microtexture – tight, high surface area samples showed the largest changes in permeability and smallest changes in porosity and elastic stiffness compared to those in rocks with looser texture and larger intergranular pore space. Changes to the pore space also occurred from flow of fine particles with the injected fluid. Carbonates with grain-coating materials, such as residual oil, experienced very little permanent change during injection. In the tight micrite/spar cement component, dissolution is controlled by diffusion: the mass transfer of products and reactants is thus slow and the fluid is expected to be close to thermodynamical equilibrium with the calcite, leading to very little dissolution, or even precipitation. In the microporous rounded micrite and macropores, dissolution is controlled by advection: because of an efficient mass transfer of reactants and products, the fluid remains acidic, far from thermodynamical equilibrium and the dissolution of calcite is important. These conclusions are consistent with the lab observations. Sandstones from the Tuscaloosa formation in Mississippi were also subjected to injection under representative in situ stress and pore pressure conditions. Again, both P- and S-wave velocities decreased with injection. Time-lapse SEM images indicated permanent changes induced in the sandstone microstructure by chamosite dissolution upon injection of CO2-rich brine. After injection, the sandstone showed an overall cleaner microstructure. Two main changes are involved: (a) clay dissolution between grains and at the grain contact and (b) rearrangement of grains due to compaction under pressure Theoretical and empirical models were developed to quantify the elastic changes associated with injection. Permanent changes to the rock frame resulted in seismic velocity-porosity trends that mimic natural diagenetic changes. Hence, when laboratory measurments are not available for a candidate site, these trends can be estimated from depth trends in well logs. New theoretical equations were developed to predict the changes in elastic moduli upon substitution of pore-filling material. These equations reduce to Gassmann’s equations for the case of constant frame properties, low seismic frequencies, and fluid changes in the pore space. The new models also predict the change dissolution or precipitation of mineral, which cannot be described with the conventional Gassmann theory.

Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Ghost Fluid Method for de agration and detonation discontinuities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ghost Fluid Method for de agration and detonation discontinuities Ronald P. Fedkiw Tariq Aslam and detonations discontinuities similar to the work in 22, 16, 23, 24 . The resulting numerical method is robust and detonation discontinuities similar to the work in 22 , 16 , 23 , and 24 where the authors extended the level

Aslam, Tariq

83

The Ghost Fluid Method for de agration and detonation discontinuities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ghost Fluid Method for de agration and detonation discontinuities Ronald P. Fedkiw #3; Tariq and detonation discontinuities are considered. The result- ing numerical method is robust and easy to implement for de agration and detonation discontinuities are considered simi- lar to the work in [25], [18], [26

Soatto, Stefano

84

The Ghost Fluid Method for deflagration and detonation discontinuities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ghost Fluid Method for deflagration and detonation discontinuities Ronald P. Fedkiw \\Lambda for deflagration and detonations discontinuities similar to the work in [22, 16, 23, 24]. The resulting numerical. As a specific example, we will consider interface models for deflagration and detonation discontinuities similar

Aslam, Tariq

85

Smoothing of Stokes's discontinuity for the generalized Bessel function. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lond. A (1999) Smoothing of Stokes's discontinuity...Expanding the second exponential function on the right-hand...Uniform asymptotic smoothing of Stokes's discontinuities...for the generalized exponential integral. SIAM J...Zhao, Y.-Q. 1999 Smoothing of Stokes's discontinuity...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of specie's distribution patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

7 January 2004 research-article Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of specie's...points Adobe PDF - rspb20032531s01.pdf Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of species...2003 Published online 24 November 2003 Coherence and discontinuity in the scaling of species...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Geological aspects of drilling horizontal wells in steam flood reservoirs, west side, southern San Joaquin Valley, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shell Western E P Inc. has drilled 11 horizontal wells in four mature steam floods in the Coalinga, South Belridge, and Midway-Sunset fields. Two medium radius wells are producing from the Pliocene Etchegoin Formation in Coalinga. One medium radius well is producing from the Pleistocene Tulare Formation in South Belridge field. Three short radius and five medium radius wells are producing from the upper Miocene, Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands in Midway-Sunset field. Horizontal wells at the base of these reservoirs and/or structurally downdip near the oil-water contact are ideally suited to take advantage of the gravity drainage production mechanism. Reservoir studies and production experience have shown these horizontal wells should increase reserves, improve recovery efficiency, improve the oil-steam ratio, and improve project profitability. Geological considerations of targeting the wells vary between fields because of the different depositional environments and resulting reservoir characteristics. The thin sands and semicontinuous shales in the Tulare Formation and the Etchegoin Formation require strict structural control on the top and base of the target sand. In the Sub-Hoyt and Potter sands, irregularities of the oil-water contact and sand and shale discontinuities must be understood. Logging and measurement while drilling provide geosteering capability in medium radius wells. Teamwork between all engineering disciplines and drilling and producing operations has been critical to horizontal well success.

Crough, D.D.; Holman, M.L.; Sande, J.J. (Shell Western E P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

89

Physical and geological processes of delta formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.r-4y 0gs Mrs24MyT2Fg-r 2FFTM2rg 0M 0g-8 80.19 M6 4s2T8gMTs rM41-0-M48f 0gs 2.0gMT M6 0g-8 1-88sT020-M4f Dg2T5s8 D2TFs40sT R20s8f 1-8rMisTs1 25M4y 0gs s280sT4 6524k M6 0gs FTs8s40b129 h-88-88-FF- 1s502 .4.8.25 5M4y8gMTs 241 M668gMTs 1-80T-o.0-M48 M....8s8 M6 1s5028f R20s8 g2i-4y 6MTu.520s1 2 rMuFTsgs48-is 0gsMT9 M6 1s502 6MTu20-M4bz, Ags jp;bWMT1 bz Ags TM5s M6 65Mrr.520-M4 241 0gs ysMyT2Fg9 M6 0gs 1sFM8-0-M4 M6 65Mrr.020s8 -8 4M0 -4is80-y20s1 28 0gs8s 1sFM8-08 8ssu 0M 2rr.u.520s 52Tys59 os9M41...

Bates, Charles Carpenter

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

Microsoft Word - CCS Geologic Storage-Intro_2011l.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Geologic carbon sequestration involves the storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep underground geologic formations. The majority of geologic formations considered for CO 2 storage, deep saline or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, are layers of subsurface porous rock that are overlain by a layer or multiple layers of low-permeability rock. Under high pressures, CO 2 is a supercritical fluid, with the high- density characteristics of a liquid but behaves like a gas by filling all available volume. Coal seams are also a viable option for geologic storage. When CO 2 is injected into a coal formation it is adsorbed onto the coal surfaces and methane gas is released and produced in adjacent wells. NETL's Core R&D research is focused on developing the ability to characterize a geologic formation

91

Geology of the South Mason-Llano River area, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mountain formation and located and redes- cribed many of Roemer's type localities (Bridge 1937). Bridge and Girty (1937) redescribed Roemer" s Paleozoic fossils and included notes on the geology of the region. Ventifacts of the basal Hickory sandstone... Mountain formation and located and redes- cribed many of Roemer's type localities (Bridge 1937). Bridge and Girty (1937) redescribed Roemer" s Paleozoic fossils and included notes on the geology of the region. Ventifacts of the basal Hickory sandstone...

Duvall, Victor Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

93

Continuous-Discontinuous Model for Ductile Fracture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this contribution, a continuum-dicontinuum model for ductile failure is presented. The degradation of material properties trough deformation is described by Continuum Damage Mechanics in a non-local integral formulation to avoid mesh dependence. In the final stage of failure, the damaged zone is replaced by a cohesive macro crack and subsequent traction-free macro crack for a more realistic representation of the phenomenon. The inclusion of the discontinuity surfaces is performed by the XFEM and Level Set Method and avoids the spurious damage growth typical of this class of models.

Seabra, Mariana R. R.; Cesar de Sa, Jose M. A. [IDMEC- FEUP University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465, Porto (Portugal)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Principles of Historical Geology Geology 331  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in West Virginia. #12;Original Lateral Continuity #12;Geology Field Camp in the Badlands of South Dakota surface of igneous or metamorphic rocks. #12;Crystalline Rocks #12;James Hutton, 18th Century founder Smith, the first 19th Century geologist to understand stratigraphy and make correlations. #12

Kammer, Thomas

95

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations February 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. Geologic storage is considered to be a key technological solution to mitigate CO2 emissions and combat climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple project awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $24 million to be distributed among selected recipients. This investment is

97

Geological Development of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Panama that geologists see today is a young ... /early Tertiary time. The geological development of Panama is a consequence of the relative motions ... igneous rocks that comprise much of present-day Panama f...

Russell S.Harmon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Template for Discontinuation of Access Eligibility Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MEMORANDUM FOR (SUBJECT'S NAME) MEMORANDUM FOR (SUBJECT'S NAME) FROM: Personnel Security Program Manager SUBJECT: Discontinuation of Access Eligibility Determination Reference is made to your Questionnaire for National Security Positions (QNSP) signed [insert date], which was forwarded to this office in connection with a Department of Energy security clearance request. Your case was submitted to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and an investigation dated [insert date] has been received. [Insert a brief description of the circumstances such as: A review of your case reveals that you listed marijuana use 5-10 times from 8/01 to 5/05 on your QNSP. During the personal subject interview with OPM, you stated that the end date for the marijuana use was incorrect and the last time

99

Geographic information systems (GIS) for geologic mapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer-based Geographic Information System (GIS) is a powerful and versatile tool for preparation of geologic maps. Using GIS different types of geographically oriented information can be displayed on a common base in a flexible format that facilitates examination of relationships between the types of information. In addition, text-based and graphic information (attributes) from separate databases can be attached to points, lines or areas within the different map layers. Although GIS has enormous potential for geologic mapping, it must be used with care. Key considerations when using GIS include realistic representation of the geology, choice of an appropriate scale for the maps, and comparison of the computer-generated maps with field observations to maintain quality control. In building multilayer GIS maps, the data sources must be at a scale appropriate to the intended use. Information derived from diverse sources must be examined carefully to assure that it is valid at the scale of representation required. Examples of GIS products created for one purpose, but potentially misused for a different purpose, include formation contacts (lines) on a regional geologic map scaled up for a facility siting study or well locations on a small-scale location map subsequently contoured for contaminant plume prediction at a very large scale. In using GIS to prepare geologic maps, it is essential to have a clear rationale for the map and use an appropriate scale to depict the various layers of information. The authors of GIS-based geologic maps must be aware that the attractive, polished appearance of their products may tempt some end users to stretch and misinterpret the information displayed.

Schock, S.C. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Center for Environmental Research Information)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

42nd Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference, September 28-29, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology of Page Valley: Stratigraphy, Structure, and Landscape Evolution #12;Luray Elkton Shenandoah 0 2/ Swift Run Formations Cambrian Chilhowee Group Cambrian - Ordovician carbonates undivided Ordovician Beekmantown Group Ordovician Edinburg Formation, Lincolnshire, New Market Limestones Ordovician Martinsburg

Whitmeyer, Steven J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

1 Kilometers Base map modified from Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Troutdale Formation Working river profile diagram (Jim O'Connor,in slow progress) #12;Geological thumbnail create large fans, locally overlying old Columbia River sand and gravels of the Troutdale Formation

102

6th lnternationaiiAEG Congress I fiime Gongres International de AlGI, 1990 Balkema, Rotterdam. ISBN 90 6191 130 3 A refraction seismic study to determine discontinuity properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the term "discontinuities". 935 A series of tests have been executed in open-pit mines and quarries of Geology of the University of Leeds, United Kingdom. In the neighbourhood of Leeds a series of quarries in the quarries chosen were simple and the rocks only slightly weathered, in order to avoid inter- ference

Hack, Robert

103

CO2/EOR and Geological Carbon Storage Resource Potential in the Niagaran Pinnacle Reef Trend, Lower Michigan, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Early Silurian age, Niagaran pinnacle reef trend (NPRT) oil fields in the Guelph Formation in Northern Lower Michigan (NNPRT) comprise a giant oil province with nearly 63.6 million cubic meters (Mm3) of cumulative petroleum and 680 billion cubic meters (Bm3) of natural gas production (through 2010) from over 700 discrete reservoirs at depths of 800-2100 m. Several NNPRT fields are the main target of a proposed, DOE-NETL funded, large scale carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization and sequestration project. The NNPRT comprises closely-spaced, but highly geologically compartmentalized and laterally discontinuous oil and gas fields many of which have either reached or are nearing their economic limit in primary production mode. Total oil production from the largest 207 oil fields in the NNPRT, each with more than 80,000 m3 of cumulative oil production per field, constitutes 86% or 54.6 Mm3 of trend oil production totals and are considered most likely targets for CO2/EOR activities in the future. We have evaluated regional CO2/Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) potential in these NNPRT fields from historic production data in addition to recovery efficiencies observed in seven, on-going, commercial CO2/EOR projects and determined that incremental CO2/EOR potential in these fields ranges from 22-33 Mm3. We have also evaluated trend-wide Geological Storage Resource (GSR) potential using 2 different approaches: 1) a produced fluid volumes approach, and 2) a gross storage capacity approach using petrophysical well log estimates of net, effective porosity in NNPRT field wells and estimates of reservoir acreage from GIS data. These approaches provide robust low and high estimates of more than 200 Mmt but less than 500 Mmt (respectively) for Geological Storage Resource (GSR) potential in the NNPRT.

David Barnes; Bill Harrison; G. Michael Grammer; Jason Asmus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTONJACOBI EQUATIONS WITH DISCONTINUOUS COEFFICIENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON­JACOBI EQUATIONS WITH DISCONTINUOUS COEFFICIENTS GIUSEPPE MARIA of viscosity solution to the Cauchy problem, and that the front tracking algorithm yields an L contractive semigroup. We define a viscosity solution by treating the discontinuities in the coefficients analogously

105

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

106

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

107

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

108

Development of experimental methods for intermediate scale testing of deep geologic CO2 sequestration trapping processes at ambient laboratory conditions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a potential strategy to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Deep geological formations provide a viable storage site for… (more)

Vargas-Johnson, Javier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)] [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION A number of geodetic and morphotectonic techniques. 2). Geology, November 2008; v. 36; no. 11; p. 871­874; doi: 10.1130/G25073A.1; 3 figures; Data

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

111

Discontinuity-induced bifurcations of piecewise smooth dynamical systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...piecewise smooth dynamical systems M. di Bernardo 1 2...UK 2 Department of Systems and Computer Engineering, University...state of the art in the analysis of discontinuity-induced...piecewise smooth dynamical systems, a particularly relevant...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Calculation of Accurate Hexagonal Discontinuity Factors for PARCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study we derive a methodology for calculating discontinuity factors consistent with the Triangle-based Polynomial Expansion Nodal (TPEN) method implemented in PARCS for hexagonal reactor geometries. The accuracy of coarse-mesh nodal methods is greatly enhanced by permitting flux discontinuities at node boundaries, but the practice of calculating discontinuity factors from infinite-medium (zero-current) single bundle calculations may not be sufficiently accurate for more challenging problems in which there is a large amount of internodal neutron streaming. The authors therefore derive a TPEN-based method for calculating discontinuity factors that are exact with respect to generalized equivalence theory. The method is validated by reproducing the reference solution for a small hexagonal core.

Pounders. J., Bandini, B. R. , Xu, Y, and Downar, T. J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Extrapolation and bandwidth choice in the regression discontinuity design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis consists of three methodological contributions to the literature on the regression discontinuity (RD) design. The first two chapters develop approaches to the extrapolation of treatment effects away from the ...

Rokkanen, Miikka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Bubble stabilized discontinuous Galerkin method for parabolic and elliptic problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we give an analysis of a bubble stabilized discontinuous Galerkin method for elliptic and parabolic problems. The method consists of stabilizing the numerical scheme by enriching the discontinuou...

Erik Burman; Benjamin Stamm

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

Wilson, David Gordon (Winchester, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices. 11 figures.

Wilson, D.G.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

118

Geological well log analysis. Third ed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

Pirson, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

120

Process for structural geologic analysis of topography and point data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantitative method of geologic structural analysis of digital terrain data is described for implementation on a computer. Assuming selected valley segments are controlled by the underlying geologic structure, topographic lows in the terrain data, defining valley bottoms, are detected, filtered and accumulated into a series line segments defining contiguous valleys. The line segments are then vectorized to produce vector segments, defining valley segments, which may be indicative of the underlying geologic structure. Coplanar analysis is performed on vector segment pairs to determine which vectors produce planes which represent underlying geologic structure. Point data such as fracture phenomena which can be related to fracture planes in 3-dimensional space can be analyzed to define common plane orientation and locations. The vectors, points, and planes are displayed in various formats for interpretation.

Eliason, Jay R. (Richland, WA); Eliason, Valerie L. C. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL: News Release - DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2010 5, 2010 DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Information in Comprehensive Report Important to Carbon Capture and Storage Research Washington, D.C. - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States [click on image to link to the publication] Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's

122

Abstract, Institute of Lake Superior Geology, 2011 Mtg. Neoarchean magmatism in the NW Superior Craton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract, Institute of Lake Superior Geology, 2011 Mtg. Neoarchean magmatism in the NW Superior in an attempt to understand the magmatic history and processes involved in batholith formation. Mapping

123

Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting...

124

Geologic Framework Model (GFM2000)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the geologic framework model, version GFM2000 with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, and the differences between GFM2000 and previous versions. The version number of this model reflects the year during which the model was constructed. This model supersedes the previous model version, documented in Geologic Framework Model (GFM 3.1) (CRWMS M&O 2000 [DIRS 138860]). The geologic framework model represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the geology surrounding the location of the monitored geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The geologic framework model encompasses and is limited to an area of 65 square miles (168 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the geologic framework model (shown in Figure 1-1) were chosen to encompass the exploratory boreholes and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The upper surface of the model is made up of the surface topography and the depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The geologic framework model was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphic sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. The intended use of the geologic framework model is to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest consistent with the level of detailed needed for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the UZ and for repository design. The model is limited by the availability of data and relative amount of geologic complexity found in an area. The geologic framework model is inherently limited by scale and content. The grid spacing used in the geologic framework model (200 feet [61 meters]), discussed in Section 6.4.2, limits the size of features that can be resolved by the model but is appropriate for the distribution of data available and its intended use. Uncertainty and limitations are discussed in Section 6.6 and model validation is discussed in Section 7.

T. Vogt

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reservoir Characterization, Formation Evaluation, and 3D Geologic Modeling of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate Reservoir and Associated Reservoir Facies at Little Cedar Creek Field, Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 2001). Basin subsidence and erosion of the southern Appalachian Mountain chain during the Callovian and Oxfordian stages of the Upper Jurassic resulted in the widespread deposition of the Norphlet Formation (Mancini et al., 1985; Salvador, 1987... of the offshore Gulf of Mexico shelf area. The Norphlet is approximately 30 meters (98 feet) thick along the northern and northwestern rims of the basin (Mancini et al., 1985; Salvador, 1987). On a carbonate ramp surface, intertidal to subtidal laminated lime...

Al Haddad, Sharbel

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

The interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic wave ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUMMARY. Recently, there has been an increased interest in applying the discontinuous Galerkin method ... methods to approximate the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in the ...... the SEM that it can handle non-conforming finite-element meshes ... and Technology (CONACYT) and a PhD summer support by the.

Ambika p PrasadTECHBOOKS

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hamilton-Jacobi equations with discontinuous source terms Nao Hamamuki  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hamilton-Jacobi equations with discontinuous source terms Nao Hamamuki We study the initial-value problem for the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of the form { tu(x, t) + H(x, xu(x, t)) = 0 in Rn Ă? (0, T), u control problem with a semicontinuous running cost function. References [1] Y. Giga, N. Hamamuki, Hamilton

Ishii, Hitoshi

128

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS 1 Discontinuous Modulation Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

originally for this inverter, activates all the10 modules of the DMCI. The new discontinuous modulation single-stage, switched mode power supply.26 I. INTRODUCTION27 FOR low-cost inverter applications, ranging topology, while the topologies outlined in [2]­[4]40 support unidirectional power flow. While several HFL-inverter

Mazumder, Sudip K.

129

Current Status of The Romanian National Deep Geological Repository Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of a deep geological repository is a very demanding and costly task. By now, countries that have Candu reactors, have not processed the spent fuel passing to the interim storage as a preliminary step of final disposal within the nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Romania, in comparison to other nations, represents a rather small territory, with high population density, wherein the geological formation areas with radioactive waste storage potential are limited and restricted not only from the point of view of the selection criteria due to the rocks natural characteristics, but also from the point of view of their involvement in social and economical activities. In the framework of the national R and D Programs, series of 'Map investigations' have been made regarding the selection and preliminary characterization of the host geological formation for the nation's spent fuel deep geological repository. The fact that Romania has many deposits of natural gas, oil, ore and geothermal water, and intensively utilizes soil and also is very forested, cause some of the apparent acceptable sites to be rejected in the subsequent analysis. Currently, according to the Law on the spent fuel and radioactive waste management, including disposal, The National Agency of Radioactive Waste is responsible and coordinates the national strategy in the field and, subsequently, further actions will be decided. The Romanian National Strategy, approved in 2004, projects the operation of a deep geological repository to begin in 2055. (authors)

Radu, M.; Nicolae, R.; Nicolae, D. [Center of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (CITON), ILFOV County (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration March 17, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has created a comprehensive new document that examines existing and emerging techniques to monitor, verify, and account for carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations. The report, titled Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations, should prove to be an invaluable tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere through geologic sequestration. The report was prepared by NETL with input from the seven Regional Carbon

131

Chinese Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Place: China Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Chinese body which is involved in surveys of geothermal sites. References: Chinese Geological Survey1 This...

132

On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Geological Characterization of California's Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Characterization of California's Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity ENVIRONMENTAL offshore onto the continental shelf, and these offshore sections constitute additional storage capacity potential of Californias offshore subsurface environment. California offshore sedimentary basins (in green

134

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

135

Central American geologic map project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

Dengo, G.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geologic mapping of the air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The air intake shaft (AS) was geologically mapped from the surface to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon. The entire shaft section including the Mescalero Caliche, Gatuna Formation, Santa Rosa Formation, Dewey Lake Redbeds, Rustler Formation, and Salado Formation was geologically described. The air intake shaft (AS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was constructed to provide a pathway for fresh air into the underground repository and maintain the desired pressure balances for proper underground ventilation. It was up-reamed to minimize construction-related damage to the wall rock. The upper portion of the shaft was lined with slip-formed concrete, while the lower part of the shaft, from approximately 903 ft below top of concrete at the surface, was unlined. As part of WIPP site characterization activities, the AS was geologically mapped. The shaft construction method, up-reaming, created a nearly ideal surface for geologic description. Small-scale textures usually best seen on slabbed core were easily distinguished on the shaft wall, while larger scale textures not generally revealed in core were well displayed. During the mapping, newly recognized textures were interpreted in order to refine depositional and post-depositional models of the units mapped. The objectives of the geologic mapping were to: (1) provide confirmation and documentation of strata overlying the WIPP facility horizon; (2) provide detailed information of the geologic conditions in strata critical to repository sealing and operations; (3) provide technical basis for field adjustments and modification of key and aquifer seal design, based upon the observed geology; (4) provide geological data for the selection of instrument borehole locations; (5) and characterize the geology at geomechanical instrument locations to assist in data interpretation. 40 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

Holt, R.M.; Powers, D.W. (IT Corporation (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

James E. Faulds

139

A Short History of Engineering Geology and Geophysics at the British Geological Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Engineering geology in the British Geological Survey (BGS) began, in a formal sense, with the creation of the Engineering Geology Unit in 1967. Virtually since its inception, despite changing research prioriti...

M. G. Culshaw; K. J. Northmore; D. M. McCann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 140 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Data Series 140 Geological Survey Data Series 140 Jump to: navigation, search Name U.S. Geological Society Data Series 140 Data Format Excel Spreadsheets Geographic Scope United States TODO: Import actual dataset contents into OpenEI "The US Minerals Databrowser (USGS DS140) is a collection of Excel spreadsheets which contain United States' historical consumption, production, imports and exports of various minerals. [1] It is produced by the United States Geological Survey. Many of the minerals it covers are important to the energy industry. Data from DS140 is used in various tools, including the US Minerals Databrowser.[2]" References ↑ "USGS DS140 Homepage" ↑ "US Minerals Databrowser" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=U.S._Geological_Survey_Data_Series_140&oldid=381562"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CIP methods for hyperbolic system with variable and discontinuous coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a multi-moment method for one-dimensional hyperbolic equations with smooth coefficient and piecewise constant coefficient. The method is entirely based on the backward characteristic method and uses the solution and its derivative as unknowns and cubic Hermite interpolation for each computational cell. The exact update formula for solution and its derivative is derived and used for an efficient time integration. At points of discontinuity of wave speed we define a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolation based on immersed interface method. The method is extended to the one-dimensional Maxwell's equations with variable material properties.

Ito, Kazufumi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Discontinuing Donepezil or Starting Memantine for Alzheimer's Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...discontinue it, or switch to memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate–receptor antagonist that is specifically indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease in both the United Kingdom and the United States. The NHS does not approve the addition of memantine to a cholinesterase inhibitor... Donepezil, the most frequently prescribed cholinesterase inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, was marketed in 1997 on the basis of the results of 3-month and 6-month clinical trials showing that patients had improvements in cognitive test ...

Schneider L.S.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high, and vegetation arcs and litter dams may be...all these-systems, micro-organisms are abundant...the composition of the micro-organism community...terraces formed by the oxidation of iron in highly acidic...from the atmosphere and micro-organism photosynthesis...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Blundell and Fraser Armstrong Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage Sam...Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a...80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hawaii geologic map data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologic map data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii geologic map data Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

147

Hypersonic heat transfer and anisotropic visualization with a higher order discontinuous Galerkin finite element method .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Higher order discretizations of the Navier-Stokes equations promise greater accuracy than conventional computational aerodynamics methods. In particular, the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method has… (more)

Quattrochi, Douglas J. (Douglas John)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

149

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

Watson, Andrew

150

Geological and geotechnical databases and developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological and geotechnical databases and developments in the Netherlands Robert Hack & Wiebke Tegtmeier Namur, Belgium, 9 October 2007 #12;9 October 2007 Geological and geotech databases in NL - Hack 2007 Geological and geotech databases in NL - Hack & Tegtmeier 3 Surface data: · Climate · Vegetation

Hack, Robert

151

11 Years Engineering Geology Fieldwork in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 2 What did we Produce ? Why did we ? #12;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 3 happy #12;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 4 Why keep

Hack, Robert

152

New Look at Deep Mantle Discontinuity | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Searching for Next-Generation Electronic Materials Searching for Next-Generation Electronic Materials "Temple of the Mind" Unlocked A Key to Drought Resistant Crops Secrets of the Lacewing's Silk The Structure of the Cell Nucleus "Gatekeeper" Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Look at Deep Mantle Discontinuity DECEMBER 14, 2009 Bookmark and Share Fig. 1. Schematic illustration of the Earth's core-mantle boundary showing the location of the mixture perovskite, post-perovskite, and ferropericlase phases. The pPv boundary would be particularly thick in regions with an elevated Al content and/or a low Mg/Si ratio, reducing the effects of the large positive Clapeyron slope on the buoyancy of thermal anomalies and

153

MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology Environmental Geology 3 3. Specialization in Stratigraphy and Palaeontology 5 4. Specialization programme leading to MSc degree in the following specializations (majors): · Applied Environmental Geology

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

154

Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: analcime; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; chlorite; chlorite group; clay minerals; economic geology; exploration; framework silicates; geothermal energy; Idaho; illite; kaolinite; laumontite; montmorillonite; Neogene; Precambrian; Raft Formation; Raft River KGRA; Salt Lake Formation; sheet silicates; silicates; Tertiary; United States; wairakite; wells; zeolite group Author(s): Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 1983, 1/1/1983 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable

155

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

An Investigation of the Complex Motions Inherent to Machining Systems via a Discontinuous Systems Theory Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE COMPLEX MOTIONS INHERENT TO MACHINING SYSTEMS VIA A DISCONTINUOUS SYSTEMS THEORY APPROACH A Dissertation by BRANDON CHRISTOPHER GEGG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... SYSTEMS VIA A DISCONTINUOUS SYSTEMS THEORY APPROACH A Dissertation by BRANDON CHRISTOPHER GEGG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Gegg, Brandon C.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hypersonic Heat Transfer and Anisotropic Visualization with a Higher Order Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hypersonic Heat Transfer and Anisotropic Visualization with a Higher Order Discontinuous Galerkin;Hypersonic Heat Transfer and Anisotropic Visualization with a Higher Order Discontinuous Galerkin Finite used to predict heat transfer to a cylinder in a hypersonic flow. The strong shock is captured

Peraire, Jaime

158

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

159

The Geological Research in France - The Dossier 2005 Argile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of fifteen years of research defined by the French act of December 30, 1991 on radwaste management, ANDRA gave a report, 'Dossier Argile 2005', which concluded with the feasibility of a reversible disposal in the argillaceous Callovo-Oxfordian formation studied by means of an underground research laboratory at the Meuse/Haute-Marne site. Starting from source data like the characteristics of the geological medium and the waste inventory, the process followed by ANDRA to achieve this conclusion is of a sequential type, and iterative between concept design, scientific knowledge, in particular that of the phenomenological evolution of the repository and its geological environment from operating period to long term, and safety assessment. The 'Dossier Argile 2005' covers a broad radwaste inventory, ILLW, HLW and Spent Fuel, so that it makes it possible to cover the whole of the technological, scientific and safety topics. This article will give an overview of the geological disposal studies in France and draw the main conclusion of the Dossier 2005 Argile. It will be focused on the near field (engineering components and near field host rock), while considering, if necessary, its integration within the whole system. After a short description of the concepts (including waste inventory and the characteristics of the Meuse/Haute the Marne site) and the functions of the components of repository and geological medium, one will describe, successively, the broad outline of the phenomenological evolution of repository and the geological medium in near field, in particular, by releasing the time scales of processes and uncertainties of knowledge. On this basis, one will indicate the safety scenarios that were considered and the broad outline of performance and dose calculations. Lessons learn from the Dossier 2005 Argile will be discussed and perspectives and priorities for future will be indicated. (authors)

Plas, Frederic; Wendling, Jacques [DS/IT, Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, Chatenay-Malabry, 92298 (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

162

DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of 19 projects to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. The projects' total value is approximately $35.8 million over four years, with $27.6 million of DOE funding and $8.2 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Coal is the Nation's most abundant energy resource, supplying nearly 50 percent of domestic electricity. In order for low-cost electricity from

163

Regional stratigraphy and general petroleum geology, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the Northern Great Plains and northern Rocky Mountain region include a sequence of dominantly shallow-water marine carbonate, clastic, and evaporite deposits of Middle Cambrian through Early Permian age. The lower part of the Paleozoic section is a sequence of marine sandstone, shale, and minor limestone, rangeing in age from Middle Cambrian through Middle Ordovician. Some porous sandstone beds occur in this section, mainly in the eastern and southern bordering areas of the Williston basin and Central Montana trough. Upper Ordovician through middle Upper Mississippian rocks are primarily carbonate beds, which contain numerous widespread cyclic interbeds of evaporite and fine-grained clastic deposits. Carbonate mounds or banks were deposited through most of this time in the shallow-water areas of the Williston basin and northern Rocky Mountains. Porous units, mainly dolomite or dolomitic limestone, are common but discontinuous in most of this sequence, and are more widespread in the eastern and southern margins of the Williston basin. Cumulative petroleum production (January 1982) in the United States part of the Williston basin was about 1.1 billion bbl of oil and 1.6 tcf gas. Estimated remaining recoverable reserves are about 400 million bbl of oil and 0.8 tcf gas. U.S. Geological Survey 1980 estimates of undiscovered recoverable oil and gas resources are about 900 million bbl of oil and 3.5 tcf gas.

Peterson, J.A.; Maccary, L.M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

Reitze, Arnold

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

Identification and evaluation of bypassed and incompletely drained gas reservoirs in the wave-dominated deltaic system of the Frio Formation (Oligocene), North McFaddin field, Victoria County, South Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated geologic, engineering, and petrophysical evaluation of North McFaddin field, undertaken in cooperation with the current operator. Anaqua Oil and Gas, Inc., targeted actual and potential secondary natural gas resources within thin reservoirs (typically 5-15 ft thick). Funded by the Gas Research Institute, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the State of Texas, this research forms part of the Secondary Gas Recovery project of the Bureau of Economic Geology. Improved vertical resolution of recently developed wireline tools and advances in well-log analytical techniques have been fundamental in identifying these resources. Reservoirs are vertically compartmentalized by nonreservoir facies of subequal thicknesses and collectively are grouped into sequences 75-100 ft thick. Individual reservoirs typically form laterally discontinuous lobes (5000-6000 ft wide) of variable elongation and orientation with respect to inferred depositional dip. Reservoir facies are interpreted to be of distal shoreface origin. Contour maps of net sandstone thickness, relative spontaneous potential deflection, and resistivity were superposed for each reservoir unit. These data were integrated with structure maps and well-test production, wireline-formation test, and sidewall-core data, allowing the potentially productive limits of each reservoir unit to be delineated. By comparing subsequently determined volumes of original gas in place with historical production data, potentially recoverable reserves were estimated to be as much as 1000 mmcf for individual reservoirs. These procedures enabled not only the recommendation of recompletion targets, but also suggested a strategic location for a potential development well.

Burn, M.J.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)); Vidal, J. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services Technology, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Knowles, P. (Anaqua Oil and Gas, Inc., Corpus Christi, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Geological Aspects of the Port Hacking Estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The geology of Port Hacking, a small estuary on Australia’s east ... construction sand that could be dredged from Port Hacking.

Alberto D. Albani; Peter C. Rickwood…

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

168

geologic-sequestration | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

169

Handbook of the Geology of Ireland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE work is based on the late Prof. Cole's contributions to the "Handbook of Regional Geology," published some years ago in Heidelberg, and revised and brought ...

1925-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of...

171

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Many Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs) are using 3D modelling software technology for a vast variety of applications. Initially many 3D tools were designed for the exploitation of digital seismic mass data existing in hydrocarbon exploration industry. Accordingly, GSOs have to adapt available software and to modify it to their special requirements, defining their own best practice. The Geological Survey of the Bavarian Environment Agency has developed procedures and workflows for a variety of

172

Acoustic radiation due to a fluid loading discontinuity on an infinite membrane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Edge?mode radiation is determined for an infinite membrane with a discontinuous fluid loading condition. The upper half of the membrane is exposed to a heavy fluid which accounts for a fluid–structure interaction. The lower half of the membrane is exposed to very light fluid which imposes no fluid loading on the structure. A very soft compliant layer is attached to half of the membrane surface. The compliant layer lessens the local coupling between the fluid and the structure thus creating the fluid loading discontinuity. The effect of this fluid loading discontinuity upon the radiated farfield is evaluated.

Mauro Pierucci

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

doi: 10.1130/focus012012.1 2012;40;95-96Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Society of America on December 26, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;GEOLOGY, January

174

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

Demouchy, Sylvie

175

Artificial Neural Network Models for the Gap Discontinuities in Stripline Circuits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gap discontinuities appear in many stripline circuits, such as the multilayer microwave monolithic ICs and the interconnect systems in high-speed digital circuits. In this paper, a multilayer perceptron neural...

Bing-Zhong Wang; Jingsong Hong

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hypersonic heat transfer and anisotropic visualization with a higher order discontinuous Galerkin finite element method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higher order discretizations of the Navier-Stokes equations promise greater accuracy than conventional computational aerodynamics methods. In particular, the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method has O(hP+l) ...

Quattrochi, Douglas J. (Douglas John)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Analytical Solutions for Multicomponent, Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media with Double Contact Discontinuities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the first instance of a double contact discontinuity in analytical solutions for multicomponent, two-phase flow in porous media. We use a three-component system with constant equilibrium ratios and fixed ...

Orr, F. M. Jr

178

Appraising the reliability of converted wavefield imaging: application to USArray imaging of the 410-km discontinuity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......upper mantle. Two technical developments have made this possible...data show have significant temperature dependence (e.g. Ringwood...rough thermometer of mantle temperature. However, as pointed out...discontinuity structure beneath the snake river plain, western united......

Xin Liu; Gary L. Pavlis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 88, 042152 (2013) Unstable supercritical discontinuous percolation transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as displaying a "Devil's staircase" of discrete jumps in the supercritical regime. Here we investigate whether where the order parameter exhibits a staircase, the largest discontinuity generically does not coincide

D'Souza, Raissa

180

Geology, Society and the Environmental health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Environmental analysis Sustainability Learning Objectives #12; As members of the biological The water we drink The air we breathe Geologic factors in environmental health #12; Health can be definedChapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future #12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste

Pan, Feifei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Careers in Geology Department of Geosciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coal, and water. Environmental geology ­ study of problems associated with pollution, waste disposal ­ study of earth materials of economic interest, including metals, minerals, building stone, petroleum Army Corps of Engineers, state geological surveys Industry Oil companies, environmental firms, mining

Logan, David

182

Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. As it turns out, a good portion of the pipeline is not in the Sandhills and doesn't overlie the Ogallala1 Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke Providing a short, succinct description of the sandhills geology is a difficult and nebulous request. The sandhills themselves are primarily eolian

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

183

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin; Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 7462, 35 pGEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462 Alteration within the basement rocks associated with the P2 fault and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin E.E. Adlakha, K. Hattori, G

184

Fundamental gaps with approximate density functionals: The derivative discontinuity revealed from ensemble considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental gap is a central quantity in the electronic structure of matter. Unfortunately, the fundamental gap is not generally equal to the Kohn-Sham gap of density functional theory (DFT), even in principle. The two gaps differ precisely by the derivative discontinuity, namely, an abrupt change in slope of the exchange-correlation energy as a function of electron number, expected across an integer-electron point. Popular approximate functionals are thought to be devoid of a derivative discontinuity, strongly compromising their performance for prediction of spectroscopic properties. Here we show that, in fact, all exchange-correlation functionals possess a derivative discontinuity, which arises naturally from the application of ensemble considerations within DFT, without any empiricism. This derivative discontinuity can be expressed in closed form using only quantities obtained in the course of a standard DFT calculation of the neutral system. For small, finite systems, addition of this derivative discontinuity indeed results in a greatly improved prediction for the fundamental gap, even when based on the most simple approximate exchange-correlation density functional – the local density approximation (LDA). For solids, the same scheme is exact in principle, but when applied to LDA it results in a vanishing derivative discontinuity correction. This failure is shown to be directly related to the failure of LDA in predicting fundamental gaps from total energy differences in extended systems.

Kraisler, Eli; Kronik, Leeor [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)] [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

An implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method (LD-FEM) that spans the space of (l, x, y, z). A practical implementation of LD includes 1) selecting a computationally efficient algorithm to solve the 4 x 4 matrix system Ax = b that describes the angular flux in a mesh element, and 2) choosing how to store the data used to construct the matrix A and the vector b to either reduce memory consumption or increase computational speed. To analyze the first of these, three algorithms were selected to solve the 4 x 4 matrix equation: Cramer's rule, a streamlined implementation of Gaussian elimination, and LAPACK's Gaussian elimination subroutine dgesv. The results indicate that Cramer's rule and the streamlined Gaussian elimination algorithm perform nearly equivalently and outperform LAPACK's implementation of Gaussian elimination by a factor of 2. To analyze the second implementation detail, three formulations of the discretized LD-FEM equations were provided for implementation in a transport solver: 1) a low-memory formulation, which relies heavily on 'on-the-fly' calculations and less on the storage of pre-computed data, 2) a high-memory formulation, which pre-computes much of the data used to construct A and b, and 3) a reduced-memory formulation, which lies between the low - and high-memory formulations. These three formulations were assessed in the Jaguar transport solver based on relative memory footprint and computational speed for increasing mesh size and quadrature order. The results indicated that the memory savings of the low-memory formulation were not sufficient to warrant its implementation. The high-memory formulation resulted in a significant speed advantage over the reduced-memory option (10-50%), but also resulted in a proportional increase in memory consumption (5-45%) for increasing quadrature order and mesh count; therefore, the practitioner should weigh the system memory constraints against any required runtime constraints to determine which option is more suitable for his or her specific applications. (authors)

Becker, T. L. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, NY 12301-1072 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Geological Aspects of High-Pressure Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...garnet-pyroxene assemblage typical of eclogites by heating it for an hour at 1200 C at a pressure...eclogite at the M discontinuity. The geothermal gradient would have to have curved so...kyanite-sillimanite transition three times. The geothermal gradient probably has a slope not far...

F. R. Boyd

1964-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Data Formats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter provides a taxonomy of existing data formats for power power system analysis. These include most commonly used formats of free and proprietary software packages as well as the IEC common informati...

Federico Milano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Journal Article: Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential Author L.T. Grose Published Journal Colorado Geological Survey Bulletin, 1974 DOI Not Provided...

190

Geothermal Well Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Logging: Geological...

191

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy January 11, 2013 -...

192

Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey Abstract Abstract...

193

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

David Archer

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

194

Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Geological Survey Utah Geological Survey Name Utah Geological Survey Address 1594 W. North Temple Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6100 Phone number 801.537.3300 Website http://geology.utah.gov/ Coordinates 40.7713859°, -111.9367973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7713859,"lon":-111.9367973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

196

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

197

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...only when reservoir condi-tions...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...reservoir quality of the sands. Porosity. High-grade...reservoir sandstones (5 to 20...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

198

A hyper-spherical adaptive sparse-grid method for high-dimensional discontinuity detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work proposes and analyzes a hyper-spherical adaptive hi- erarchical sparse-grid method for detecting jump discontinuities of functions in high-dimensional spaces is proposed. The method is motivated by the the- oretical and computational inefficiencies of well-known adaptive sparse-grid methods for discontinuity detection. Our novel approach constructs a func- tion representation of the discontinuity hyper-surface of an N-dimensional dis- continuous quantity of interest, by virtue of a hyper-spherical transformation. Then, a sparse-grid approximation of the transformed function is built in the hyper-spherical coordinate system, whose value at each point is estimated by solving a one-dimensional discontinuity detection problem. Due to the smooth- ness of the hyper-surface, the new technique can identify jump discontinuities with significantly reduced computational cost, compared to existing methods. Moreover, hierarchical acceleration techniques are also incorporated to further reduce the overall complexity. Rigorous error estimates and complexity anal- yses of the new method are provided as are several numerical examples that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.

Zhang, Guannan [ORNL; Webster, Clayton G [ORNL; Gunzburger, Max D [ORNL; Burkardt, John V [ORNL

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Parallel Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Compressible Flows on Aritrary Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconstruction-based discontinuous Galerkin method is presented for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary grids. In this method, an in-cell reconstruction is used to obtain a higher-order polynomial representation of the underlying discontinuous Galerkin polynomial solution and an inter-cell reconstruction is used to obtain a continuous polynomial solution on the union of two neighboring, interface-sharing cells. The in-cell reconstruction is designed to enhance the accuracy of the discontinuous Galerkin method by increasing the order of the underlying polynomial solution. The inter-cell reconstruction is devised to remove an interface discontinuity of the solution and its derivatives and thus to provide a simple, accurate, consistent, and robust approximation to the viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel strategy is also devised for the resulting reconstruction discontinuous Galerkin method, which is based on domain partitioning and Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) parallel programming model. The RDG method is used to compute a variety of compressible flow problems on arbitrary meshes to demonstrate its accuracy, efficiency, robustness, and versatility. The numerical results demonstrate that this RDG method is third-order accurate at a cost slightly higher than its underlying second-order DG method, at the same time providing a better performance than the third order DG method, in terms of both computing costs and storage requirements.

Hong Luo; Amjad Ali; Robert Nourgaliev; Vincent A. Mousseau

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development of a Geological and Geomechanical Framwork for the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Systems - Permeable zones have to be created by stimulation, a process that involves fracture initiation andor activation of discontinuities - Rock stimulation can be accompanied...

202

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

203

File Formats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

204

Utility Formation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amounts See detailed discussion of these standards. For more information regarding tribal utility formation, contact the Power Service Line Account Executives: Eastern Power...

205

Multiwavelet Discontinuous Galerkin Accelerated ELP Method for the Shallow Water Equations on the Cubed Sphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new approach to increase the time-step size for an explicit discontinuous Galerkin numerical method. The attributes of this approach are demonstrated on standard tests for the shallow-water equations on the sphere. The addition of multiwavelets to discontinuous Galerkin method, which has the benefit of being scalable, flexible, and conservative, provides a hierarchical scale structure that can be exploited to improve computational efficiency in both the spatial and temporal dimensions. This paper explains how combining a multiwavelet discontinuous Galerkin method with exact linear part time-evolution schemes, which can remain stable for implicit-sized time steps, can help increase the time-step size for shallow water equations on the sphere.

White III, James B [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Drake, John [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

UNITED STATES D E P A R T M E N T O F THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D D E P A R T M E N T O F THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL S U R V E Y GEOLOGIC ASPECTS OF THE N O V E M B E R 1960 HIGH-EXPLOSIVE TEST AT TEE PR0;IECT CHARIOT SITE, N O R T H W E S T E R N ALASKA* Reuben Kachadoorian May 1961 This r e p o r t i s preliminary and has not been e d i t e d f o r conformity with Geological Survey format. "Prepared on behalf of t h e U. S. Atomic Energy Commission Page Abstract. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledgments 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geology 4 General statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Pre-shot studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Frozen active zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Thawed active zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Permafrost zone 7 Post-shot studies . . .

207

A mathematical model for three dimensional detonation as pure gas-dynamic discontinuity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for three dimensional detonation is proposed based on the approximation that the detonation thickness is small compared to the characteristic scales of the fluid motion. In this framework detonations are treated as a modified hydrodynamic discontinuity. The altered Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions take into account the internal structure of the detonation including the chemical reaction. The position of the discontinuity surface and the corresponding jump conditions are derived from first principles. The final modified conditions are dependent on curvature, flame thickness and stretching and allow for simple physical interpretation.

Jorge Yanez Escanciano; Andreas G. Class

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Numerical Modeling of a Discontinuous Incineration Process with On-line Validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The waste, coming from diverse collections, is transferred from the pit into a vertical hopper and enters into the furnace pushed by a discontinuous feeding grate. ... Also the burning waste is discontinuously moved through the primary combustion chamber by reciprocating grates. ... Latest data from FederAmbiente, the Italian environmental federation, show that 35 plants, having incineration capacities from 30000 to 300000 t/y, burn about 2400000 t/y of solid wastes.1 More stringent specifications for correct operation, adopted throughout the European community countries, call for a proper optimal control of those units. ...

Davide Manca; Maurizio Rovaglio

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

209

Coal geology of the U.S. Gulf Coastal region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a comprehensive assessment of the major coal regions of the country. In this program, known as the National Coal Resource Assessment, the quantity and quality of coals that are expected to be mined during the next 30 years will be characterized. For the Gulf Coast region, the evaluation will include reviews of the stratigraphic setting, resource potential, and the quality of the lignites in four coal-producing areas. These areas are: the Sabine Uplift (including parts of Texas and Louisiana), Northeast Texas, Central Texas, and South Texas. The results of these efforts will be a series of digital Geographic Information System (GIS) maps, text, and tables that will be published in a CD-ROM format. These products, along with a national summary CD-ROM, are expected to be completed in 1999. This paper is to present a review of Gulf Coast coal geology and to outline the USGS assessment efforts for the Gulf Coast region. Most coal in the Gulf Coast area is produced from the Paleocene Wilcox Group, and minor amounts of coal are produced from the Ecocene Jackson and Claiborne Groups. Initial results indicate that for coals being mined in the Sabine Uplift, Northeast, and Central Texas areas mean moisture values are about 34%, mean ash yields range from 12 to 15%, and mean calorific values range from about 5,800 to 6,900 Btu/lb (all data are on an as-received basis). Detailed bed and zone analysis in all areas indicate that resource figures will be greater than previous estimates that have usually combined multiple coal horizons to estimate cumulative coal thicknesses for a formation. Ongoing research in the Sabine Uplift and Northeast study areas suggests that coal zones in both the upper and lower Wilcox may be more laterally extensive than previous studies indicate.

Warwick, P.D.; Aubourg, C.E.; Crowley, S.S. [and others

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Stress corrosion cracking under low stress: Continuous or discontinuous Longkui K. Zhu a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress corrosion cracking under low stress: Continuous or discontinuous cracks? Longkui K. Zhu a , Yu Yan a , Jinxu X. Li a , Lijie J. Qiao a, , Alex A. Volinsky b,a a Corrosion and Protection Center. Stress corrosion C. Anodic dissolution a b s t r a c t Two-dimensional and three-dimensional crack

Volinsky, Alex A.

211

Two-phase model of the basal ganglia: implications for discontinuous control of the motor system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reserved. November 5, 2014 review-article Part I: Brain circuits...synapses that represent the chosen plan could be selectively strengthened...operated discontinuously. I will review evidence suggesting that this...subsequent action choices (for reviews, see [1,2]). Synaptic...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Seismic Discontinuities in the Mantle Beneath the Western Pacific: Evidence from ScS Reverberations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earthquakes generate seismic waves that travel through the Earth and can be reflected by changes in density and/or seismic velocity that may relate to changes in the phase or chemical composition of the mantle. To study these discontinuities we use...

Bagley, Brian

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

213

Numerical Analysis of Cell Deformation of Twophase Flow with Discontinuous Viscosity and Nonlinear Surface Tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­linear Surface Tension Zhilin Li and Sharon Lubkin Center For Research in Scientific Computation & Department equations, cell deformation, non­linear surface tension, jump conditions, interface, discontinuous and non boundary separating two fluids that have equal or different viscosity and non­linear surface tension

214

A discontinuous Galerkin front tracking method for two-phase flows with surface tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A discontinuous Galerkin front tracking method for two-phase flows with surface tension Vinh with surface tension. Ă? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Interfaces separating regions tension. In this case, the interface separates two different fluids and the effect of surface tension re

Peraire, Jaime

215

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice , C. A. Geiger1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice M. Thomas1 , C. A. Geiger1 , P the sea ice on the po- lar ocean surfaces serve as thermal regulators for the planet. The variable thickness and dynamic nature of the sea ice is intimately connected with the thermal reg- ulation

Geiger, Cathleen

216

BUBBLE STABILIZATION OF DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN PAOLA ANTONIETTI, FRANCO BREZZI, AND L. DONATELLA MARINI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUBBLE STABILIZATION OF DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS PAOLA ANTONIETTI, FRANCO BREZZI, AND L. DONATELLA MARINI Abstract. We analyze the stabilizing effect of the introduction of suitable bubble, can be used if suitable bubbles are added to the local spaces ( 1. Introduction Most commonly used DG

Brezzi, Franco

217

BUBBLE STABILIZATION OF DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN PAOLA F. ANTONIETTI, FRANCO BREZZI, AND L. DONATELLA MARINI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUBBLE STABILIZATION OF DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS PAOLA F. ANTONIETTI, FRANCO BREZZI, AND L. DONATELLA MARINI Abstract. We analyze the stabilizing effect of the introduction of suitable bubble, by definition, a function whose support is contained in a single element. The bubble stabilization, in its turn

Marini, Donatella

218

Deformation and evolution of solar-wind discontinuities through their interactions with the Earth's bow shock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Deformation and evolution of solar-wind discontinuities through their interactions with the Earth Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria. (2) Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, Alberta, Canada. (5) Institut für Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik, Technische Universität

219

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

220

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Disposal - No New Taxes - 12469  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To some, the perceived inability of the United States to dispose of high-level nuclear waste justifies a moratorium on expansion of nuclear power in this country. Instead, it is more an example of how science yields to social pressure, even on a subject as technical as nuclear waste. Most of the problems, however, stem from confusion on the part of the public and their elected officials, not from a lack of scientific knowledge. We know where to put nuclear waste, how to put it there, how much it will cost, and how well it will work. And it's all about the geology. The President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future has drafted a number of recommendations addressing nuclear energy and waste issues (BRC 2011) and three recommendations, in particular, have set the stage for a new strategy to dispose of high-level nuclear waste and to manage spent nuclear fuel in the United States: 1) interim storage for spent nuclear fuel, 2) resumption of the site selection process for a second repository, and 3) a quasi-government entity to execute the program and take control of the Nuclear Waste Fund in order to do so. The first two recommendations allow removal and storage of spent fuel from reactor sites to be used in the future, and allows permanent disposal of actual waste, while the third controls cost and administration. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NPWA 1982) provides the second repository different waste criteria, retrievability, and schedule, so massive salt returns as the candidate formation of choice. The cost (in 2007 dollars) of disposing of 83,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) high-level waste (HLW) is about $ 83 billion (b) in volcanic tuff, $ 29 b in massive salt, and $ 77 b in crystalline rock. Only in salt is the annual revenue stream from the Nuclear Waste Fund more than sufficient to accomplish this program without additional taxes or rate hikes. The cost is determined primarily by the suitability of the geologic formation, i.e., how well it performs on its own for millions of years with little engineering assistance from humans. It is critical that the states most affected by this issue (WA, SC, ID, TN, NM and perhaps others) develop an independent multi-state agreement in order for a successful program to move forward. Federal approval would follow. Unknown to most, the United States has a successful operating deep permanent geologic nuclear repository for high and low activity waste, called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Its success results from several factors, including an optimal geologic and physio-graphic setting, a strong scientific basis, early regional community support, frequent interactions among stakeholders at all stages of the process, long-term commitment from the upper management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over several administrations, strong New Mexico State involvement and oversight, and constant environmental monitoring from before nuclear waste was first emplaced in the WIPP underground (in 1999) to the present. WIPP is located in the massive bedded salts of the Salado Formation, whose geological, physical, chemical, redox, thermal, and creep-closure properties make it an ideal formation for long-term disposal, long-term in this case being greater than 200 million years. These properties also mean minimal engineering requirements as the rock does most of the work of isolating the waste. WIPP has been operating for twelve years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 80,000 m{sup 3} of nuclear weapons waste, called transuranic or TRU waste (>100 nCurie/g but <23 Curie/1000 cm{sup 3}) including some high activity waste from reprocessing of spent fuel from old weapons reactors. All nuclear waste of any type from any source can be disposed in this formation better, safer and cheaper than in any other geologic formation. At the same time, it is critical that we complete the Yucca Mountain license application review so as not to undermine the credibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the scientific commun

Conca, James [RJLee Group, Inc., Pasco WA 509.205.7541 (United States); Wright, Judith [UFA Ventures, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

223

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Online Exams 1, 2 & 3 In general, know Cretaceous 145.0-- 66.0 Jurassic 201.3 -- 145.0 Triassic 252.2 -- 201.3 Paleozoic Permian 298.9 -- 252 Supergroup: rifting of Pangaea to form Central Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

224

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Exams 1 & 2 In general, know the basic 145.5 -- 65.5 Jurassic 201.5 -- 145.5 Triassic 252.3 -- 201.5 Paleozoic Permian 299 -- 252 to form Central Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

225

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Exams 1 & 2 In general, know the basic 145.5 -- 65.5 Jurassic 199.6 -- 145.5 Triassic 251 -- 199.6 Paleozoic Permian 299 -- 251 Carboniferous Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak Mesozoic Era: Jurassic

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

226

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Online Exams 1, 2 & 3 In general, know.0 Triassic 252.2 -- 201.3 Paleozoic Permian 298.9 -- 252.2 Carboniferous/Pennsylvanian 323.2 -- 298 Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak Mesozoic Era: Jurassic

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

227

Sir John Flett and the Geological Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ON October 1 Sir John Flett retired from the directorship of the Geological Survey and Museum. He joined the ... in 1901, in 1903 he was appointed petrographer, and in 1911 he succeeded Dr. John Home as assistant director for Scotland. On the retirement of Sir Aubrey Strahan in ...

1935-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...the sands. Porosity. High-grade...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...Ath-abasca reservoir is the distribution...ofpri-mary porosity and permeability in the McMurray...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...flow only when reservoir condi-tions...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...the subsurface reservoir and supplying...ex-cellent reservoir quality of the sands. Porosity. High-grade...petroleum reservoir sandstones (5 to 20 0036-8075...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

231

, UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies; and depositing of sedi- ments in an Ice-Age lake called Lake Bonneville which intermittently filled the valley-transported sediment more than a mile in thickness (Text-fig. 2). At the;ery top of this accumulation of valley

Seamons, Kent E.

232

Petroleum reservoir porosity versus depth: Influence of geological age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in late Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs, Bothamsall oilfield, E. Midlands: Journal of the Geological Society of...carbonate reservoir quality: Examples from Abu Dhabi and the Amu Darya Basin: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v.-15, p...

S. N. Ehrenberg; P. H. Nadeau; Ř. Steen

233

Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website Abstract Provides access to digital...

234

Paleontology and Geology of Indiana Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Iowa Tracheophyta (vascular plants) Spores, New Albany Shale Sporing bodies, Dugger Fm. #12;Department (conifers) Walchia, Abo Fm. New Mexico (Permian) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 5

Polly, David

235

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic  Geology Billion  Gallons  per  Year Brine  Use  Sequence Carbon  dioxide  Capture  and  Storage Carbon  Dioxide Coal-­?

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

237

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a simple and transparent approach for assessing CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk associated with CO{sub 2} injection at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. The approach, called the Certification Framework (CF), is based on the concept of effective trapping, which takes into account both the probability of leakage from the storage formation and impacts of leakage. The effective trapping concept acknowledges that GCS can be safe and effective even if some CO{sub 2} and brine were to escape from the storage formation provided the impact of such leakage is below agreed-upon limits. The CF uses deterministic process models to calculate expected well- and fault-related leakage fluxes and concentrations. These in turn quantify the impacts under a given leakage scenario to so-called 'compartments,' which comprise collections of vulnerable entities. The probabilistic part of the calculated risk comes from the likelihood of (1) the intersections of injected CO{sub 2} and related pressure perturbations with well or fault leakage pathways, and (2) intersections of leakage pathways with compartments. Two innovative approaches for predicting leakage likelihood, namely (1) fault statistics, and (2) fuzzy rules for fault and fracture intersection probability, are highlighted here.

Oldenburg, C.; Jordan, P.; Zhang, Y.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geologic Mapping and Database for Portland Area Fault Studies Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This collection of digital geologic data derives from geologic and interpretive maps prepared by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) over the last 15 years. Most of the data was collected in the course of preparing digital earthquake hazards maps for all or part of the greater Portland (METRO) urban growth

Ian P. Madin

240

High performance computing aspects of a dimension independent semi-Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recently developed semi-Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin approach is used to discretize hyperbolic partial differential equations (usually first order equations). Since these methods are conservative, local in space, and able to limit numerical diffusion, they are considered a promising alternative to more traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes (which are usually based on polynomial or spline interpolation). In this paper, we consider a parallel implementation of a semi-Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin method for distributed memory systems (so-called clusters). Both strong and weak scaling studies are performed on the Vienna Scientific Cluster 2 (VSC-2). In the case of weak scaling, up to 8192 cores, we observe a parallel efficiency above 0.89 for both two and four dimensional problems. Strong scaling results show good scalability to at least 1024 cores (we consider problems that can be run on a single processor in reasonable time). In addition, we study the scaling of a two dimensional Vlasov--Poisson sol...

Einkemmer, Lukas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A toolbox for a class of discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin methods using trilinos.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The class of discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods (DPG) proposed by L. Demkowicz and J. Gopalakrishnan guarantees the optimality of the solution in an energy norm and produces a symmetric positive definite stiffness matrix, among other desirable properties. In this paper, we describe a toolbox, implemented atop Sandia's Trilinos library, for rapid development of solvers for DPG methods. We use this toolbox to develop solvers for the Poisson and Stokes problems.

Roberts, Nathaniel David (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Demkowicz, Leszek D. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Ridzal, Denis

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A study of microstrip T-juction discontinuity effects and modeling on GAAS substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Microstrip T-junction discontinuity. . Microstrip T-junction geometry's. (a) symmetrical, (b) nonsymmetrical. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Transmission line equivalent circuit model for a lossless T-junction. . . . S? for an ideal 3 port... transmission lines and structures. Through decades of research, analysis and measurement the electrical properties of micmstrip transmission lines can be calculated and predicted with great accuracy. However any variation &om a longitudinally straight...

Guill, Dennis Jarrett

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lattice Boltzmann method for relativistic hydrodynamics: Issues on conservation law of particle number and discontinuities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we aim to address several important issues about the recently developed lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for relativistic hydrodynamics [M. Mendoza et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 014502 (2010); Phys. Rev. D 82, 105008 (2010)]. First, we study the conservation law of particle number in the relativistic LB model. Through the Chapman-Enskog analysis, it is shown that in the relativistic LB model the conservation equation of particle number is a convection-diffusion equation rather than a continuity equation, which makes the evolution of particle number dependent on the relaxation time. Furthermore, we investigate the origin of the discontinuities appeared in the relativistic problems with high viscosities, which were reported in a recent study [D. Hupp et al., Phys. Rev. D 84, 125015 (2011)]. A multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) relativistic LB model is presented to examine the influences of different relaxation times on the discontinuities. Numerical experiments show the discontinuities can be eliminated by setting the relaxation time $\\tau_e$ (related to the bulk viscosity) to be sufficiently smaller than the relaxation time $\\tau_v$ (related to the shear viscosity). Meanwhile, it is found that the relaxation time $\\tau_\\varepsilon$, which has no effect on the conservation equations at the Navier-Stokes level, will affect the numerical accuracy of the relativistic LB model. Moreover, the accuracy of the relativistic LB model for simulating moderately relativistic problems is also investigated.

Q. Li; K. H. Luo; X. J. Li

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

A spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for solving nearly incompressible flows. Decoupling the collision step from the streaming step offers numerical stability at high Reynolds numbers. In the streaming step, we employ high-order spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin discretizations using a tensor product basis of one-dimensional Lagrange interpolation polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. Our scheme is cost-effective with a fully diagonal mass matrix, advancing time integration with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We present a consistent treatment for imposing boundary conditions with a numerical flux in the discontinuous Galerkin approach. We show convergence studies for Couette flows and demonstrate two benchmark cases with lid-driven cavity flows for Re = 400-5000 and flows around an impulsively started cylinder for Re = 550-9500. Computational results are compared with those of other theoretical and computational work that used a multigrid method, a vortex method, and a spectral element model.

Min, M.; Lee, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; City Univ. of New York

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Volume 22, Part 1-September 1975 P"$P".hdpk of the Sunailand Formation, an ~-pm&chg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Sunniland Formation, an Oil-producing 17ormat1on in South Florida ................................. Helen C to the geology of Utah for beginn~ngstudents and laymen. Distributed September 30, 1975 Price $5.00 (Subject to change without notice) #12;Petrographic Analysis of the Sunniland Formation, an Oil-producing Formation

Seamons, Kent E.

246

United States Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Survey Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Geological Survey Name United States Geological Survey Address USGS National Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive Place Reston, VA Zip 20192 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 1879 Phone number 703-648-5953 Website http://www.usgs.gov/ Coordinates 38.947077°, -77.370315° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.947077,"lon":-77.370315,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State North Carolina State North Carolina Name North Carolina Geological Survey Address 1612 Mail Service Center City, State Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27699-1612 Website http://www.geology.enr.state.n Coordinates 35.67°, -78.66° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.67,"lon":-78.66,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Idaho Geological Survey Name Idaho Geological Survey Address 300 North 6th Street Suite 103 City, State Boise, Idaho Zip 83720-0050 Website http://www.idahogeology.org/Dr Coordinates 43.615992°, -116.199217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615992,"lon":-116.199217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

Collins, E.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

252

Horizontally Explicit and Vertically Implicit (HEVI) Time Discretization Scheme for a Discontinuous Galerkin Non-Hydrostatic Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-dimensional non-hydrostatic (NH) atmospheric model based on the compressible Euler system has been developed in the (x, z) Cartesian domain. The spatial discretization is based on a nodal discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method with exact ...

Lei Bao; Robert Klöfkorn; Ramachandran D. Nair

253

Asymptotics of the Generalized Exponential Integral, and Error Bounds in the Uniform Asymptotic Smoothing of Its Stokes Discontinuities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Asymptotics of the Generalized Exponential Integral, and Error...the Uniform Asymptotic Smoothing of Its Stokes Discontinuities...for the generalized exponential integral E (z), where...the so-called Stokes smoothing theory which was initiated...

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A high-order, adaptive, discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents high-order, discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretizations of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and an output-based error estimation and mesh adaptation algorithm for these discretizations. ...

Oliver, Todd A., 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Theoretical estimation of discontinuity flaw of adhesive contacts between multilayer elements of the liquid metal blanket in a fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technique developed for calculating the discontinuity flaw of an adhesive contact and the adhesion energy for two bodies makes it possible to take into account these effects in designing a multilayer cermet wal...

I. V. Vitkovsky; A. N. Konev; V. S. Shorkin; S. I. Yakushina

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods forMonitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of their wide application within the petroleumindustry it is natural to consider geophysical techniques for monitoringof CO2 movement within hydrocarbon reservoirs, whether the CO2 isintroduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic sequestration.Among the available approaches to monitoring, seismic methods are by farthe most highly developed and applied. Due to cost considerations, lessexpensive techniques have recently been considered. In this article, therelative merits of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) methods as monitoringtools for geological CO2 sequestration are examined for two syntheticmodeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhancedoil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, theSchrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The secondscenario is a simplified model of a brine formation at a depth of 1,900m.

Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (CRWMS M&O 2000b) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) engineering design basis in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The engineering design basis documented in the PDD is to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the engineering design basis from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the engineering design basis captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 2-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1),the Engineering Design Bases (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (YMP 2000a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. M. Curry

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling geologic storage of carbon dioxide: Comparison ofnon-hysteretic chracteristic curves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TOUGH2 models of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in brine-bearing formations use characteristic curves to represent the interactions of non-wetting-phase CO2 and wetting-phase brine. When a problem includes both injection of CO2 (a drainage process) and its subsequent post-injection evolution (a combination of drainage and wetting), hysteretic characteristic curves are required to correctly capture the behavior of the CO2 plume. In the hysteretic formulation, capillary pressure and relative permeability depend not only on the current grid-block saturation, but also on the history of the saturation in the grid block. For a problem that involves only drainage or only wetting, a nonhysteretic formulation, in which capillary pressure and relative permeability depend only on the current value of the grid-block saturation, is adequate. For the hysteretic formulation to be robust computationally, care must be taken to ensure the differentiability of the characteristic curves both within and beyond the turning-point saturations where transitions between branches of the curves occur. Two example problems involving geologic CO2 storage are simulated using non-hysteretic and hysteretic models, to illustrate the applicability and limitations of non-hysteretic methods: the first considers leakage of CO2 from the storage formation to the ground surface, while the second examines the role of heterogeneity within the storage formation.

Doughty, Christine

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Magnetic field induced discontinuous spin reorientation in ErFeO{sub 3} single crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin reorientation of ErFeO{sub 3} that spontaneously occurs at low temperature has been previously determined to be a process involving the continuous rotation of Fe{sup 3+} spins. In this work, the dynamic process of spin reorientation in ErFeO{sub 3} single crystal has been investigated by AC susceptibility measurements at various frequencies and static magnetic fields. Interestingly, two completely discontinuous steps are induced by a relatively large static magnetic field due to the variation in the magnetic anisotropy during this process. It provides deeper insights into the intriguing magnetic exchange interactions which dominate the sophisticated magnetic phase transitions in the orthoferrite systems.

Shen, Hui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China); Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Cheng, Zhenxiang, E-mail: cheng@uow.edu.au; Hong, Fang; Wang, Xiaolin [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia)] [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Xu, Jiayue [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 201418 (China); Yuan, Shujuan; Cao, Shixun [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)] [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

The future of oil: Geology versus technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We discuss and reconcile the geological and economic/technological views concerning the future of world oil production and prices, and present a nonlinear econometric model of the world oil market that encompasses both views. The model performs far better than existing empirical models in forecasting oil prices and oil output out-of-sample. Its point forecast is for a near doubling of the real price of oil over the coming decade, though the error bands are wide, reflecting sharply differing judgments on the ultimately recoverable reserves, and on future price elasticities of oil demand and supply.

Jaromir Benes; Marcelle Chauvet; Ondra Kamenik; Michael Kumhof; Douglas Laxton; Susanna Mursula; Jack Selody

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the repository design. These downstream models include the hydrologic flow models and the radionuclide transport models. All the models and the repository design, in turn, will be incorporated into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of the potential radioactive waste repository block and vicinity to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a host for the repository. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 2.

R. Clayton

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

264

Uranium in iron formations and the rise of atmospheric oxygen C.A. Partin a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uranium in iron formations and the rise of atmospheric oxygen C.A. Partin a, , S.V. Lalonde b , N.J. Planavsky c , A. Bekker a , O.J. Rouxel b,d , T.W. Lyons e , K.O. Konhauser f a Dept. of Geological Sciences), UMR 6538, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280 Plouzané, France c Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale

Konhauser, Kurt

265

Application of Cutting-Edge 3D Seismic Attribute Technology to the Assessment of Geological Reservoirs for CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project were to develop innovative 3D seismic attribute technologies and workflows to assess the structural integrity and heterogeneity of subsurface reservoirs with potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic attributes to aide in quantifying reservoir properies and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. Our study area is the Dickman field in Ness County, Kansas, a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontent to Indiana and beyond. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. Geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We systematically tested over a dozen seismic attributes, finding that curvature, SPICE, and ANT were particularly useful for mapping discontinuities in the data that likely indicated fracture trends. Our simulation results in the deep saline aquifer indicate two effective ways of reducing free CO{sub 2}: (a) injecting CO{sub 2} with brine water, and (b) horizontal well injection. A tuned combination of these methods can reduce the amount of free CO{sub 2} in the aquifer from over 50% to less than 10%.

Christopher Liner; Jianjun Zeng; Po Geng Heather King Jintan Li; Jennifer Califf; John Seales

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geologic considerations in underground coal mining system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic characteristics of coal resources which may impact new extraction technologies are identified and described to aid system designers and planners in their task of designing advanced coal extraction systems for the central Appalachian region. These geologic conditions are then organized into a matrix identified as the baseline mine concept. A sample region, eastern Kentucky is analyzed using both the developed baseline mine concept and the traditional geologic investigative approach.

Camilli, F.A.; Maynard, D.P.; Mangolds, A.; Harris, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross?sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Geology of the Carlos-East area, Grimes County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY ' ' A &M COLLEGE OF TEYJ5 '4, GEOLOGY OF TRE CARLOS EAST AREA ' *, , GRIIKS COUNTY, TEXAS ==, . :; A Thesii "?, :, WILLIAM' LAWRENCE WALTON 'I ' Submitted to thi Graduate School of the, . : Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in ~ ' k '. -. . -. Partial fulflllnent of the, ' requireaents' for the' degree 'of ;i llASTER OF SCIENCE: 'k ' - Ltigor' Subgeht: 'Geology. r . - '7 r 'k GEOLOGY OP TBE, CARLOS-EAST AREA GRIEES COUNTY' TEXAS 'I ?ILLIAB u...

Walton, William Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rolling hills and broad beaches of southern Taiwan to the tropical rain forests that cover much of the lower elevations in northern Taiwan. Above 1000 m, drier air results in thinner forest dominated by hard woods and conifers and, at the highest elevations, alpine-like meadows and rolling hills. Geologically

Alpay, S. Pamir

270

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equation  2   5  Carbon  capture  technology  requires  for  Geologic  Carbon  Capture  and   Sequestration."  the  additional  carbon  capture  system  (1.24  assuming  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Survey of expert geological...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Survey of expert geological opinion on feasibility of Plowshare stimulation of natural geothermal systems. Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact...

272

International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign.  To date, UFD’s International Disposal R...

273

Seismic modeling to monitor CO2 geological storage: The Atzbach ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 8, 2012 ... greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide in depleted hydrocarbon ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract hydrocarbons for energy needs. The apparatus provides more efficient...

275

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract...

276

Development of a Geological and GeomechanicalFramework for the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

during shearing; geological study of the mechanisms accommodating deformation at fracture walls using literature review, core observations, and numerical simulations 5 | US...

277

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c. contamination from Chernobyl m. Technologic complexity a.and Complications from the Chernobyl Disaster . . . .5by radionuclides from Chernobyl Geological division of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

- 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

James E. Faulds

279

Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

footwall shear zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial...

280

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Awardee Website http:www.azgs.az.gov Partner 1 Microsoft Research Partner 2 Energy Industry Metadata Standards Working Group Partner 4 String representation "Geological...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Paleomagnetism, Potassium-Argon Ages, and Geology of Rhyolites...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Dalrymple, 1966). Authors Richard R. Doell, G. Brent Dalrymple, Robert Leland Smith and Roy A. Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoirs, 1968 DOI...

282

Geophysics, Geology and Geothermal Leasing Status of the Lightning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Status of the Lightning Dock KGRA, Animas Valley, New Mexico Author C. Smith Published New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

283

A seismic modeling methodology for monitoring CO2 geological ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 20, 2011 ... possible causes of the greenhouse effect. In order to avoid these emissions, one of the. 30 options is the geological storage of carbon dioxide ...

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Publications AASG State Geological Survey National Geothermal Data Systems Data Acquisition and Access National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance...

285

Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2 1 Department of Geology, University of Alexandria, Egypt 2 Geology Department localities in an area approximately 30,000 km2 within the eastern desert of Egypt. With the exception

El-Shazly, Aley

287

Geologic investigation :an update of subsurface geology on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to generate a revised geologic model of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) incorporating the geological and geophysical data produced since the Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project (SWHC) of 1994 and 1995. Although this report has certain stand-alone characteristics, it is intended to complement the previous work and to serve as a status report as of late 2002. In the eastern portion of KAFB (Lurance Canyon and the Hubbell bench), of primary interest is the elevation to which bedrock is buried under a thin cap of alluvium. Elevation maps of the bedrock top reveal the paleodrainage that allows for the interpretation of the area's erosional history. The western portion of KAFB consists of the eastern part of the Albuquerque basin where bedrock is deeply buried under Santa Fe Group alluvium. In this area, the configuration of the down-to-the-west, basin-bounding Sandia and West Sandia faults is of primary interest. New geological and geophysical data and the reinterpretation of old data help to redefine the location and magnitude of these elements. Additional interests in this area are the internal stratigraphy and structure of the Santa Fe Group. Recent data collected from new monitoring wells in the area have led to a geologic characterization of the perched Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater system and have refined the known limits of the Ancestral Rio Grande fluvial sediments within the Santa Fe Group. Both the reinterpretation of the existing data and a review of the regional geology have shown that a segment of the boundary between the eastern and western portions of KAFB is a complicated early Tertiary (Laramide) wrench-fault system, the Tijeras/Explosive Ordnance Disposal Area/Hubbell Spring system. A portion of this fault zone is occupied by a coeval ''pull-apart'' basin filled with early Tertiary conglomerates, whose exposures form the ''Travertine Hills''.

Van Hart, Dirk (GRAM, Inc.)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

V. Trebules

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations on Arbitrary Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconstruction-based discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) method is presented for the solution of the compressible Navier–Stokes equations on arbitrary grids. The RDG method, originally developed for the compressible Euler equations, is extended to discretize viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier–Stokes equations using a so-called inter-cell reconstruction, where a smooth solution is locally reconstructed using a least-squares method from the underlying discontinuous DG solution. Similar to the recovery-based DG (rDG) methods, this reconstructed DG method eliminates the introduction of ad hoc penalty or coupling terms commonly found in traditional DG methods. Unlike rDG methods, this RDG method does not need to judiciously choose a proper form of a recovered polynomial, thus is simple, flexible, and robust, and can be used on arbitrary grids. The developed RDG method is used to compute a variety of flow problems on arbitrary meshes to demonstrate its accuracy, efficiency, robustness, and versatility. The numerical results indicate that this RDG method is able to deliver the same accuracy as the well-known Bassi–Rebay II scheme, at a half of its computing costs for the discretization of the viscous fluxes in the Navier–Stokes equations, clearly demonstrating its superior performance over the existing DG methods for solving the compressible Navier–Stokes equations.

Hong Luo; Luqing Luo; Robert Nourgaliev; Vincent A. Mousseau

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Compressible Flows on Unstructured Tetrahedral Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconstruction-based discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) method is presented for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured tetrahedral grids. The RDG method, originally developed for the compressible Euler equations, is extended to discretize viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations using a so-called inter-cell reconstruction, where a smooth solution is locally reconstructed using a least-squares method from the underlying discontinuous DG solution. Similar to the recovery-based DG (rDG) methods, this reconstructed DG method eliminates the introduction of ad hoc penalty or coupling terms commonly found in traditional DG methods. Unlike rDG methods, this RDG method does not need to judiciously choose a proper form of a recovered polynomial, thus is simple, flexible, and robust, and can be used on unstructured grids. The preliminary results indicate that this RDG method is stable on unstructured tetrahedral grids, and provides a viable and attractive alternative for the discretization of the viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations.

Hong Luo; Yidong Xia; Robert Nourgaliev; Chunpei Cai

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations on Arbitrary Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconstruction-based discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) method is presented for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary grids. The RDG method, originally developed for the compressible Euler equations, is extended to discretize viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations using a so-called inter-cell reconstruction, where a smooth solution is locally reconstructed using a least-squares method from the underlying discontinuous DG solution. Similar to the recovery-based DG (rDG) methods, this reconstructed DG method eliminates the introduction of ad hoc penalty or coupling terms commonly found in traditional DG methods. Unlike rDG methods, this RDG method does not need to judiciously choose a proper form of a recovered polynomial, thus is simple, flexible, and robust, and can be used on arbitrary grids. The developed RDG method is used to compute a variety of flow problems on arbitrary meshes to demonstrate its accuracy, efficiency, robustness, and versatility. The numerical results indicate that this RDG method is able to deliver the same accuracy as the well-known Bassi-Rebay II scheme, at a half of its computing costs for the discretization of the viscous fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations, clearly demonstrating its superior performance over the existing DG methods for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

Hong Luo; Luqing Luo; Robert Nourgaliev; Vincent A. Mousseau

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Adsorbed films of three-patch colloids: Continuous and discontinuous transitions between thick and thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate numerically the role of spatial arrangement of the patches on the irreversible adsorption of patchy colloids on a substrate. We consider spherical three-patch colloids and study the dependence of the kinetics on the opening angle between patches. We show that growth is suppressed below and above minimum and maximum opening angles, revealing two absorbing phase transitions between thick and thin film regimes. While the transition at the minimum angle is continuous, in the Directed Percolation class, that at the maximum angle is clearly discontinuous. For intermediate values of the opening angle, a rough colloidal network in the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class grows indefinitely. The nature of the transitions was analyzed in detail by considering bond flexibility, defined as the dispersion of the angle between the bond and the center of the patch. For the range of flexibilities considered we always observe two phase transitions. However, the range of opening angles where growth is sustained increases with flexibility. At a tricritical flexibility, the discontinuous transition becomes continuous. The practical implications of our findings and the relation to other nonequilibrium transitions are discussed.

C. S. Dias; N. A. M. Araújo; M. M. Telo da Gama

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dynamic simulations of geologic materials using combined FEM/DEM/SPH analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the Lawrence Discrete Element Code (LDEC) is presented, and results from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geologic materials using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC) are detailed. LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses using large numbers of polyhedral blocks. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model this class of problems, LDEC now includes implementations of Cosserat point theory and cohesive elements. This approach directly simulates the transition from continuum to discontinuum behavior, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture within a combined finite element/discrete element framework. In addition, there are many application involving geologic materials where fluid-structure interaction is important. To facilitate solution of this class of problems a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) capability has been incorporated into LDEC to simulate fully coupled systems involving geologic materials and a saturating fluid. We will present results from a study of a broad range of geomechanical problems that exercise the various components of LDEC in isolation and in tandem.

Morris, J P; Johnson, S M

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geological resources, geological hazards and environmental pollution. The curriculum includes courses fromThe Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set- ting (Structural Geology). The Geology Department is housed in the historic and newly renovated Old Main Building

Baskaran, Mark

295

Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The focus of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

Reidel, Steve P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wave-influenced deltaic sandstone bodies and offshore deposits in the Viking Formation, Hamilton Lake area, south-central Alberta, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Nevis Avalon Reservoirs, Jeanne dArc Basin. Geological Association of Canada...sedimentation in the Devonian Bokkeveld Basin of South Africa. Journal of Sedimentary...Cretaceous San Miguel Formation, Maverick Basin, South Texas. Transactions - Gulf...

Lynn T. Dafoe; Murray K. Gingras; S. George Pemberton

298

Hamilton--Jacobi theory for continuation of magnetic field across a toroidal surface supporting a plasma pressure discontinuity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The vanishing of the divergence of the total stress tensor (magnetic plus kinetic) in a neighborhood of an equilibrium plasma containing a toroidal surface of discontinuity gives boundary and jump conditions that strongly constrain allowable continuations of the magnetic field across the surface. The boundary conditions allow the magnetic fields on either side of the discontinuity surface to be described by surface magnetic potentials, reducing the continuation problem to that of solving a Hamilton--Jacobi equation. The characteristics of this equation obey Hamiltonian equations of motion, and a necessary condition for the existence of a continued field across a general toroidal surface is that there exist invariant tori in the phase space of this Hamiltonian system. It is argued from the Birkhoff theorem that existence of such an invariant torus is also, in general, sufficient for continuation to be possible. An important corollary is that the rotational transform of the continued field on a surface of discontinuity must, generically, be irrational.

M. McGann; S. R. Hudson; R. L. Dewar; G. von Nessi

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

James E. Faulds

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Z .Marine Geology 162 2000 303316 www.elsevier.nlrlocatermargeo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources and Energy Directorate, PB 5091 Majorstua, 0301 Oslo, Norway b Institute of Geology, Uni�ersity of Oslo, PB 1047, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway c Institute of Geology, Uni�ersity of Oslo, PB 1047, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway d J.S.I. Oil and Gas Consultants AS, PB 218, 1301 Sand�ika, Norway e

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross?section.

Hinz, Nick

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Presented, the nuclear industry faces unique hurdles to expansion and waste management. Geology plays a critical role in the nuclear fuel cycle beyond just the mining of uranium for nuclear fuel. Come hear Frannie Skomurski

303

3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Florida Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Florida Name Florida Geological Survey Address 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard M.S. 49 City, State Tallahassee, Florida Zip 32399 Website http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geo Coordinates 30.47491°, -84.357967° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.47491,"lon":-84.357967,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

305

Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

none,

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

GIS data models for coal geology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of spatial data models can be applied to different aspects of coal geology. The simple vector data models found in various Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) programs are sometimes used for routine mapping and some simple analyses. However, more sophisticated applications that maintain the topological relationships between cartographic elements enhance analytical potential. Also, vector data models are best for producing various types of high quality, conventional maps. The raster data model is generally considered best for representing data that varies continuously over a geographic area, such as the thickness of a coal bed. Information is lost when contour lines are threaded through raster grids for display, so volumes and tonnages are more accurately determined by working directly with raster data. Raster models are especially well suited to computationally simple surface-to-surface analysis, or overlay functions. Another data model, triangulated irregular networks (TINs) are superior at portraying visible surfaces because many TIN programs support break fines. Break lines locate sharp breaks in slope such as those generated by bodies of water or ridge crests. TINs also {open_quotes}honor{close_quotes} data points so that a surface generated from a set of points will be forced to pass through those points. TINs or grids generated from TINs, are particularly good at determining the intersections of surfaces such as coal seam outcrops and geologic unit boundaries. No single technique works best for all coal-related applications. The ability to use a variety of data models, and transform from one model to another is essential for obtaining optimum results in a timely manner.

McColloch, G.H. Jr.; Timberlake, K.J.; Oldham, A.V. [West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support , Technical Feasibility Projects Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Brandon Nutall, Division of Carbon Management Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In

310

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

311

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance Project Description The project is expected to make large quantities of geothermal-relevant geoscience data held by the State Geological Surveys available via the NGDS. State Arizona Objectives Expand and enhance the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermalrelevant data that operates as an integral compliant component of NGDS.

312

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

313

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Paleontological Resources Preservation Act 43 CFR 8365.1-5: Public Property and Resources 43 CFR 3620: Petrified Wood 16 USC 4301: Federal Cave Resources Protection Act 43 CFR 1610.7-2: Areas of Critical Environmental Concern Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

314

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

Bau, Domenico A.

315

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity: Characterization and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity and long-term sustainability of geologic carbon sequestration sites depends upon the ability on geologic carbon sequestration site monitoring. The management framework and costs will be similar

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

316

Evaluation of a New Method to Build Geological Models of Fractured Reservoirs Calibrated to Production Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Associates (UK) Ltd, Clyde House, Reform Road, Maidenhead, Berks SL6 8BY, UK...Conference and Exhibition, Villahermosa, Mexico, 1-3 February. Wei, L. , Hadwin...2001-051943 Economic geology, geology of energy sources Geological Society Publishing...

Keith Rawnsley; Lingli Wei

317

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors-581-7250) Faculty Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

Johnson, Cari

318

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2013-14 academic year)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Martinez (email: judy.martinez@utah.edu, office: 383 FASB, phone: 801-581-6553) Faculty Advisors Advisor for Environmental Science Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Dave Dinter (email: david

Johnson, Cari

319

LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOCATIONS OF LIBRARY MATERIALS Syracuse University Libraries include Bird Library, Carnegie Library, and the Geology Library in Heroy Geology Laboratory. Our catalog also includes material housed in the separately administered Law Library in White Hall and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in the Department

McConnell, Terry

320

Geological model of the Jurassic section in the State of Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until the end of the seventies, the knowledge of Jurassic Geology in the State of Kuwait was very limited, since only one deep well was drilled and bottomed in the Triassic sediments. Few scattered wells partially penetrated the Jurassic sequence. During the eighties, appreciable number of wells were drilled through the Jurassic, and added a remarkable volume of information. consequently it was necessary to analyze the new data, in order to try to construct a geological model for the Jurassic in the State of Kuwait. This paper includes a number of isopach maps explaining the Jurassic depositional basin which also helps in trying to explain the Jurassic basin in the Arabian Gulf basin. Structural evolution of the Jurassic sequence indicated an inversion of relief when compared with the Cretaceous sequence. In fact, the main Cretaceous arches were sites of sedimentation troughs during the Jurassic period. This fact marks a revolution in the concepts for the Jurassic oil exploration. One of the very effective methods of the definition of the Jurassic structures is the isopaching of the Gotnia Formation. Najmah, Sargelu and Marrat Formations include the main Jurassic reservoirs which were detected as a result of the exploration activities during the eighties. Selective stratigraphic and structural cross sections have been prepared to demonstrate and explain the nature of the Jurassic sediments.

Yousif, S.; Nouman, G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The impact of continuous and discontinuous alliance strategies on startup innovation performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The open innovation paradigm emphasises the importance of alliances for improving the innovation performance of firms. However, existing empirical research on innovation performance implications of alliances is dominated by cross-sectional studies. As a result, we do not know how the time frame of alliances might influence innovation performance. In this study, we therefore examine the impact of different time frames of alliance strategies on innovation performance. In order to do so, we collected panel data on 217 Flemish startup firms. The results show a positive association between 'discontinuous alliance strategies' with suppliers, customers and competitors and 'incremental' innovation performance. In addition, we find a positive impact of 'continuous alliance strategies' with suppliers, competitors and universities and other research institutes on 'radical' innovation performance. These findings encourage startup firms to balance their alliance portfolio not only in terms of different kinds of partners but also in terms of different kinds of time frames.

Inge Neyens; Dries Faems; Luc Sels

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual engineering geology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manhattan Summary: , C. A., 1994, Bedrock and engineering geology maps of New York County and parts of Kings and Queens... -199 in New York (State) Geological Survey Annual...

323

Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium concentrations (NURE). Fig. 3. Geologic map of Newuranium concentrations (NURE). New Hampshire Geology Geol.Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), which were processed (

Apte, M.G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University consists of five full-time faculty and five  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geology (Site Assessment, Soils and Soil Pollution, Environmental Isotope Geochemistry, Environmental (Economic Geology). The Geology Department is housed in the historic Old Main Building, and owns in traditional fields (Hydrogeology, Eco- nomic Geology, Geochronology), and in the field of Environmental

Baskaran, Mark

325

The thermal influence of the subducting slab beneath South America from 410 and 660 km discontinuity observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermal influence of the subducting slab beneath South America from 410 and 660 km of the depth of the 410 km discontinuity are made beneath central South America in the vicinity of the aseismic form 2000 April 28 SUMMARY Regional seismic network data from deep South American earthquakes

Helffrich, George

326

2-D Hypersonic Non-equilibrium Flow Simulation using r-p Adaptive Time-Implicit Discontinuous Galerkin Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2-D Hypersonic Non-equilibrium Flow Simulation using r-p Adaptive Time-Implicit Discontinuous Aerospace Sciences Meeting #12;1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2-D Hypersonic Non Galerkin (DG) methods to 2-D hypersonic flow problems. Previous applications of DG method were limited

Roy, Subrata

327

360-degree fringe-projection profilometry of discontinuous solids with 2 co-phased projectors and 1-camera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a theoretical analysis and experimental set-up of a co-phased 360-degree fringe-projection profilometer. This 360-degree profilometer is built using 2-projections and 1-camera and can digitize discontinuous solids with diffuse light surface. A 360-degree profilometer rotate the object a full revolution to digitize the analyzing solid. Although 360-degree profilometry is not new, we are proposing however a new experimental set-up which permits the 360-degree digitalization of discontinuous (piecewise-continuous) solids. The main advantage of using this co-phased 2-projectors profilometer is that self-occluding shadows due to discontinuities are solved efficiently. Previous 1-projector, 1-camera 360-degree profilometers generate self-occluding shadows at the solid discontinuities. Yet another advantage of our new profilometer is a trivial line-by-line fringe-data assembling from all 360-degree perspectives. Finally we used a 400 steps/rotation turntable, and a 640x480 pixels CCD camera. Higher resol...

Servin, Manuel; Padilla, J M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Numerical solution of Cauchy problem for second order nonlinear wave equation with changeable type in a class of discontinues functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a special numerical method for the solution of second order nonlinear wave equation with changeable type in a class of discontinues functions, which accurately describe the physical properties of the problem of interest is suggested. For ... Keywords: Nonlinear wave propagation, Numerical modeling, Shock waves, Transconic flow

Mahir Rasulov, Turhan Karaguler, Bahaddin Sinsoysal

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

What is at the end of the road? Understanding discontinuities of on-street bicycle lanes in urban settings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is at the end of the road? Understanding discontinuities of on-street bicycle lanes in urban-street bicycle facilities is often mentioned as an important strategy to encourage increased bicycle safety and bicycle travel. However, little if any literature has focused on instances where separate on- street

Levinson, David M.

330

Multiwavelet Discontinuous Galerkin-Accelerated Exact Linear Part (ELP) Method for the Shallow-Water Equations on the Cubed Sphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper a new approach is presented to increase the time-step size for an explicit discontinuous Galerkin numerical method. The attributes of this approach are demonstrated on standard tests for the shallow-water equations on the sphere. ...

Rick Archibald; Katherine J. Evans; John Drake; James B. White III

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

332

Geology and geophysics of the Beata Ridge - Caribbean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS OF THE BEATA RIDGE - CARIBBEAN A Thesis by LANAR BURTON ROEMER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Ak? University in partial fu1fillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Ma...)or Subject: Oceanography GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS OF THE BEATA RIDGE ? CARIBBEAN A Thesis by LAMAR BURTON ROEMER Approved as to style and content by: o-Chairman o C it ee -Car f o ee ea o Dep r e Member August 1973 ABSTRACT Geology and Geophysics...

Roemer, Lamar Burton

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Regulation of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been actively developing needed regulations over the last two years for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Technical criteria are about to be published in the form of a proposed regulation. The waste packages, underground facility, and geologic setting form the major elements of any geologic repository and the basis of a multibarrier system. Performance objectives and supporting technical criteria have been developed for each of these repository elements to provide benchmarks for scientists and engineers working in each of these major areas. 9 refs.

White, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geologic model of a small, intraslope basin: Garden Banks 72 field, offshore Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Garden Banks 72 field is 115 mi off the Louisiana coast and lies near the shelf-slope break in water depths ranging from 450 to 800 ft. During the middle Pleistocene, the area was the site of a small, restricted basin on the upper slope, into which turbidite sandstones were deposited. These sandstones have been slumped, uplifted, and faulted, forming oil and gas traps in the field. Mobil and partners AGIP and Kerr-McGee leased block 72 in 1984. Three wells and two sidetracks have been drilled, discovering oil and gas in middle Pleistocene sandstones. A total of 650 ft of core was cut in two wells. Geologic data in the block have been supplemented by 2-D and 3-D seismic surveys. Trapping mechanisms in the field are both structural and stratigraphic. The structural high is on the southwest flank of a northwest-southeast-trending shale/salt ridge. The middle Pleistocene reservoir sandstones trend northeast, and their seismic signature consists of discontinuous, hummocky reflections; the presence of hydrocarbons in these sandstones causes anomalous seismic responses. Amplitude terminations often cross structural contours, implying stratigraphic pinch-outs. Data from electric logs, seismic, and cores demonstrate that the middle Pleistocene reservoir sandstones are the result of deposition by turbidites into a small, restricted basin. Associated facies identified include channels, levees, and possible sheet (lobe) sandstones. Postdepositional activity has included slumping and reworking by bottom currents (contour currents ). The resulting depositional model for this field can be applied to many of the recent discoveries in the Flexure trend.

Kolb, R.A.; Tuller, J.N.; Link, M.H.; Shanmugam, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Electrical resistivity in support of geological mapping along the Panama Canal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dredging and widening of the Panama Canal is currently being conducted to allow larger vessels to transit to and from the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Dredging efficiency relies heavily on knowledge of the types and volumes of sediments and rocks beneath the waterway to ensure the right equipment is used for their removal. To aid this process, a waterborne streaming electrical resistivity survey was conducted along the entire length of the canal to provide information on its geology. Within the confines of the canal, a total of 663 line-kilometers of electrical resistivity data were acquired using the dipole–dipole array. The support of the survey data for dredging activities was realized by calibrating and qualitatively correlating the resistivity data with information obtained from nearby logged boreholes and geological maps. The continuity of specific strata was determined in the resistivity sections by evaluating the continuity of similar ranges of resistivity values between boreholes. It was evident that differing geological units and successions can have similar ranges of resistivity values. For example, Quaternary sandy and gravelly alluvial fill from the former river channel of the Chagres River had similar resistivity ranges (generally from 40 to 250 ? m) to those characteristic of late Miocene basalt dikes (from 100 to 400 ? m), but for quite different reasons. Similarly, competent marine-based sedimentary rocks of the Caimito Formation were similar in resistivity values (ranging from 0.7 to 10 ? m) to sandstone conglomerate of the Bohio Formation. Consequently, it would be difficult to use the resistivity data alone to extrapolate more complex geotechnical parameters, such as the hardness or strength of the substrate. A necessary component for such analyses requires detailed objective information regarding the specific context from which the geotechnical parameters were derived. If these data from cored boreholes and detailed geological surveys are taken into account, however, then waterborne streaming resistivity surveying can be a powerful tool. In this case, it provided inexpensive and highly resolved quantitative information on the potential volume of loose suctionable material along the Gamboa Sub-reach, which could enable large cost savings to be made on a major engineering project involving modification of one of the most important navigable waterways in the world.

Dale F. Rucker; Gillian E. Noonan; William J. Greenwood

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Measurement and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Program Storage Program John Litynski, PE Carbon Storage Technology Manager Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting Nov 15-17, 2011 2 Sources: U.S. data from EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011; World data from IEA, World Energy Outlook 2010, Current Policies Scenario 716 QBtu / Year 79% Fossil Energy 114 QBtu / Year 78% Fossil Energy + 14% Energy Demand 2008 100 QBtu / Year 84% Fossil Energy 487 QBtu / Year 81% Fossil Energy 29,259 mmt CO 2 42,589 mmt CO 2 5,838 mmt CO 2 6,311 mmt CO 2 Energy Demand 2035 United States World + 47% * Primarily traditional biomass, wood, and waste. 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY CARBON STORAGE PROGRAM with ARRA Projects 2012 Structure Benefits

337

Numerical Modeling of CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations - Recent Results and Open Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feedback between Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer, Geophys. Res.coupling between fluid flow and heat transfer gives rise to

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enggeo.2013.05.021. CNX/GTI (2008). New Albany ShaleRVSP, New Albany Shale Gas Project, RVSP Seismic Projectisopach maps of the New Albany Shale, Illinois Basin. Figure

Dobson, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appalachian Basin, DOE/NETL-2011/1478. Burland, J.B. ,Laboratory Report, DOE/NETL-2011/1478. Cardott, B.J. , 2012.

Dobson, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

GEOLOGICAL CONTROLS IN THE FORMATIONS AND EXPANSIONS OF GULLIES OVER HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and subsurface water form a central pool for the sediment transported to the Sudanese plain. The objective drainage mechanisms with the usual soil and water conservation practices are of paramount importance ground water table distribution. Clay soil covering the middle area of the watershed and overlying

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Coalbed and Shale Gas Symposium, Paper 808.Shale RVSP, New Albany Shale Gas Project, RVSP SeismicWave Analysis from Antrim Shale Gas Play, Michigan Basin,

Dobson, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Forward Modeling of the Induction Log Response of a Fractured Geologic Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.1 Layered Earth Model The environment used for the induction log simulations is a layered Earth model. The model consists of six layers that are assigned different thicknesses and conductivities based on the desired induction log... Tx-Rx pair has a fixed separation and is moved along a vertical profile through the subsurface taking measurements at predetermined logging points. 20 The second change to the original Seatem code involves the surrounding environment. The code...

Bray, Steven Hunter

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Persian Gulf Basin: Geological history, sedimentary formations, and petroleum potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Persian Gulf Basin is the richest region of the ... Foredeep, which is a member of the Persian Gulf Basin. During the most part of the...

A. I. Konyuhov; B. Maleki

344

Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gray et al. , 1982 (METC/EGSP Series 313, 314, 318, 320)Gray et al. , 1982 (METC/EGSP Series 310, 311, 312, 316,

Dobson, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Stratigraphy, structural geology and metamorphism of the Inwood Marble Formation, northern Manhattan, NYC, NY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of recrystallized dolomite and subordinate calcite marble the Inwood Marble was used for quarrying and mineral of northern Manhattan and by the late 1700s commercial quarries were in full operation. This work continued

Merguerian, Charles

346

Geologic history of the Pettet Zone of the Sligo formation at Lisbon Field, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and eroded rubble deposits at the top of each shoal denotes upward shoaling to the point of emergence. Basinward of the shoals were the open marine, diverse skeletal mudstones and wackestones, and an open marine lagoon was present shoreward of the shoals... showing skeletal limestones and shales and representative sedimentary structures. . . . . . . . . 16 18 Legend for sedimentary structure symbols in Pettet rock properties plots (Figures 9-11). 9 Pettet rock properties of the TP 11-7 core. . 10...

Ford, James Patrick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

348

STATE OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OREGON OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES Portland, Oregon 97201 910 State Office Building r DOE/ID/12526--T2 OPEN-FILE REPORT 0-86-3 DE87 013077 INVESTIGATION OF THE TEIERMAL REGIME AND GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF THE DRILLING IN THE CASCADE RANGE CASCADE VOLCANIC ARC: FIRST PHASE OF A PROGRAM FOR SCIENTIFIC Prepared by George R . Priest Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Preparation and publication of this document were supported b the Ore on Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Grant No. DE-%G07-841&.2526 from the U . S . Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

349

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In recent years there has been interest in the possibility of generating electricity from geothermal steam in many countries. The initial stage is the preliminary evaluation of geothermal resources and, apart from economic considerations, the problem is essentially geological. This paper deals with the factors involved in the selection of areas that warrant expenditure on investigation and development. Preferred requirements in geothermal fields for power generation are temperatures above 200°C and permeable aquifers or zones within 2000 m from the surface. The existence

350

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

351

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

352

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir This part of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2) (Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS)

353

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

354

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

355

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The results of these projects (detailed below) will make a vital contribution to the scientific, technical, and institutional knowledge necessary to establish frameworks for the development of commercial CCS projects. These projects will produce a trained workforce necessary for the

356

Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada, in: Gold and Silver Deposits of Western Nevada Authors Hastings, J.S., Burkhart, T.H., and Richardson and R.E. Published Geological Society of Nevada 1993 fall field trip...

357

12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

358

Engineering geology at Imperial College London; 1907–2007  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Building Stones; Bricks and Clays, Limes, Cements and Plasters; Roads and Canals; Rivers; Coastal Erosion; Use of Minerals...and studentships were reduced and staff not replaced. To consolidate resources Dr de Freitas initiated a Centre for Geological...

M.H. de Freitas; M.S. Rosenbaum

359

High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Impacts of Geochemical Reactions on Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the face of increasing energy demands, geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to mitigate the adverse effects of climate change. To ensure the environmental sustainability of this option, we must understand the rates and mechanisms of ...

Young-Shin Jun; Daniel E. Giammar; Charles J. Werth

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...

362

Technical Geologic Overview of Long Valley Caldera for the Casa...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Technical Geologic Overview of Long Valley Caldera for the Casa Diablo IV Geothermal...

363

Geologic Map of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MexicoInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract Abstract unavailable Cartographers Robert Leland Smith, Roy A. Bailey and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1970 DOI Not...

364

Geologic Survey of the Ewing Bank, Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Located along the edge of the continental shelf in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, the Ewing Bank is a significant geologic feature: yet, little information about the bank is generally available. This thesis represents a preliminary survey...

Brooks, Daniel M

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

host hydrocarbon reservoirs and oil and gas produc- tionthroat radius mm Radius (m) Reservoirs Oil Gas um GeologicalIn each of these reservoirs, oil fields have been dis-

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2006 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main accomplishments were analysis of Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' reservoir test results from the AEP No.1 well and design and feasibility support tasks. Reservoir test results indicate injection potential in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' may be significantly higher than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. In addition, organizational and scheduling issues were addressed to move the project toward an integrated carbon capture and storage system at the Mountaineer site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

Neeraj Gupta

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

367

Shock compression and dynamic fragmentation of geological materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The theory of fracture and fragmentation and previous fracture studies on geological materials are reviewed in Chap- ter 6. The dynamic fragmentation experiments on the geological materials and how their response compares with predictions from metal... of the cube exposed. The exposed surface was polished using Silicon Carbide paste on a polish- ing machine to create a flat specimen. Each specimen was viewed under 13 14 CHAPTER 2. COMPOSITION & MICROSTRUCTURE an optical microscope to preliminarily...

Kirk, Simon

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

A geologic study of Matagorda Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Locatron of & rston Cores, Jet fioles and Sirot Hole 33orintrs---------------i. 'nvelope LIST Ol' TABI~:S Table Pa; c Classification of Gulf Coast Pleistocene------- 17 2 Gulf Coast Formations Cor r elated &vita Glue ial Time Scale I 1&'at er Cont... Department, rail- road and pipeline companies, water well drillers, and geo- physical companies. These amounted to several uundred logs. His reports contain dozens of cross sections based on core- boring data, The sections illustrate the characteristics...

Fagg, David Bruce

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents geologic considerations that are pertinent to the Remedial Action Plan for Slick Rock mill tailings. Topics covered include regional geology, site geology, geologic stability, and geologic suitability.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of interrelated effects on plateau ecosystems. These may include UNDERSTANDING EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES AND GEOLOGY

371

Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stability, slope design, engineering geology, fault, open pit mines, SOMAIR uranium mine, OCP phosphate mine1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well

Boyer, Edmond

372

Geologic and tectonic characteristics of rockbursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern mining enterprises have attained such scales of engineering activity that their direct influence to a rock massif and in series of cases to the region seismic regime doesn`t provoke any doubts. Excavation and removal of large volumes of rock mass, industrial explosions and other technological factors during long time can lead to the accumulation of man-made changes in rock massifs capable to cause catastrophic consequences. The stress state changes in considerable domains of massif create dangerous concentration of stresses at large geological heterogeneities - faults localized in the mining works zone. External influence can lead in that case to such phenomena as tectonic rockbursts and man-made earthquakes. The rockbursts problem in world mining practice exists for more than two hundred years. So that its actuality not only doesn`t decrease but steadily mounts up as due to the mining works depth increase, enlargement of the useful minerals excavations volumes as due to the possibility of safe use of the rock massif potential energy for facilitating the mastering of the bowels of the Earth and for making that more cheap. The purpose of present work is to study the engineering activity influence to processes occurring in the upper part of Earth crust and in particular in a rock massif. The rock massif is treated in those studies as a geophysical medium - such approach takes into account the presence of block structure of medium and the continuous exchange of energy between parts of that structure. The idea ``geophysical medium`` is applied in geophysics sufficiently wide and stresses the difference of actual Earth crust and rock massifs from the continuous media models discussed in mechanics.

Adushkin, V.V. [Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Dynamics of the Geospheres; Charlamov, V.A.; Kondratyev, S.V.; Rybnov, Y.S.; Shemyakin, V.M.; Sisov, I.A.; Syrnikov, N.M.; Turuntaev, S.B.; Vasilyeva, T.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

French Geological Repository Project for High Level and Long-Lived Waste: Scientific Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility study presented in the Dossier 2005 Argile set out to evaluate the conditions for building, operating and managing a reversible disposal facility. The research was directed at demonstrating a potential for confining long-lived radioactive waste in a deep clay formation by establishing the feasibility of the disposal principle. Results have been enough convincing and a Planning Act was passed on 28 June, 2006. Decision in principle has been taken to dispose of intermediate and high level long-lived radioactive waste in a geological repository. An application file for a license to construct a disposal facility is requested by end of 2014 and its commissioning is planned for 2025. Based on previous results as well as on recommendations made by various Dossier 2005 evaluators, a new scientific programme for 2006-2015 has been defined. It gives details of what will be covered over the 2006-2015 period. Particular emphasis is placed on consolidating scientific data, increasing understanding of certain mechanisms and using a scientific and technical integration approach. It aims at integrating scientific developments and engineering advances. The scientific work envisaged beyond 2006 has the benefit of a unique context, which is direct access to the geological medium over long timescales. It naturally extends the research carried out to date, and incorporates additional investigations of the geological medium, and the preparation of demonstration work especially through full-scale tests. Results will aim at improving the representation of repository evolutions over time, extract the relevant parameters for monitoring during the reversibility phases, reduce the parametric uncertainties and enhance the robustness of models for performance calculations and safety analyses. Structure and main orientation of the ongoing scientific programme are presented. (author)

Landais, P.; Lebon, P.; Ouzounian, G. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The low cost of geological assessment for underground CO2 storage: Policy and economic implication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The costs for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) in geologic formations is estimated to be $6–75/t CO2. In the absence of a mandate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or some other significant incentive for CCS deployment, this cost effectively limits CCS technology deployment to small niche markets and stymies the potential for further technological development through learning by doing until these disincentives for the free venting of CO2 are in place. By far, the largest current fraction of these costs is capture (including compression and dehydration), commonly estimated at $25–60/t CO2 for power plant applications, followed byCO2 transport and storage, estimated at $0–15/tCO2.Of the storage costs, only a small fraction of the cost will go to accurate geological characterization. These one time costs are probably on the order of $0.1/t CO2 or less as these costs are spread out over the many millions of tons likely to be injected into a field over many decades. Geologic assessments include information central to capacity prediction, risk estimation for the target intervals and development facilities engineering. Since assessment costs are roughly two orders of magnitude smaller than capture costs, and assessment products carry other tangible societal benefits, such as improved accuracy in fossil fuel and ground water reserves estimates, government or joint private–public funding of major assessment initiatives should underpin early policy choices regarding CO2 storage deployment and should serve as a point of entry for policy makers and regulators. Early assessment is also likely to improve the knowledge base upon which the first commercial CCS deployments will rest.

Friedmann, S. J.; Dooley, James J.; Held, Herman; Ottmar, Edenhofer

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Spatial Trends and Factors of Pimple Mound Formation in East-Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been extensively mapped throughout East Texas as complexes covering over 1.0 million ha in 47 soil survey areas. About 600,000 ha are on Pleistocene-age geological formations. This study focused on 5,500 ha in Leon County, Texas, mapped as Rader...

Robinson, Chance

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

377

Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Queen Formation, Millard Field, Pecos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY OF THE QUEEN FORMATION, MILLARD FIELD, PECOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MATT BRIAN WILLIAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Geology SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY OF THE QUEEN FORMATION, MILLARD FIELD, PECOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MATT BRIAN WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: James M. Maz o (Chairman...

Williams, Matt Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

Environments of deposition of the Yegua Formation (Eocene), Brazos County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION OF THE YEGUA FORMATION (EOCENE), BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by RUFUS JOSEPH LEBLANC, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of ' Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1970 Major Subject: Geology ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION OF THE YEGUA FORMATION (EOCENE), BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by RUFUS JOSEPH LEBLANC, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Charrman o ominittee) (Head...

LeBlanc, Rufus Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Thermo-Poroelastic Fracture Propagation Modeling with Displacement Discontinuity Boundary Element Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The influence of pore pressure and temperature changes on the fracture propagation length and path, as well as on stress and pore pressure distribution near wellbores and fractures, was considered in isotropic and homogeneous rock formations. The BEM used...

Chun, Kwang Hee

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Density Functional Theory for Fractional Particle Number: Derivative Discontinuity of the Energy at the Maximum Number of Bound Electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The derivative discontinuity in the exact exchange-correlation potential of ensemble Density Functional Theory (DFT) is investigated at the specific integer number that corresponds to the maximum number of bound electrons, $J_{max}$. A recently developed complex-scaled analog of DFT is extended to fractional particle numbers and used to study ensembles of both bound and metastable states. It is found that the exact exchange-correlation potential experiences discontinuous jumps at integer particle numbers including $J_{max}$. For integers below $J_{max}$ the jump is purely real because of the real shift in the chemical potential. At $J_{max}$, the jump has a non-zero imaginary component reflecting the finite lifetime of the $(J_{max}+1)$ state.

Daniel L. Whitenack; Yu Zhang; Adam Wasserman

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Influence of continuous and discontinuous supplemental lighting on the daily variation in gaseous exchange in greenhouse cucumber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stomatal conductance, transpiration, net photosynthesis and internal CO2 concentration were measured on the fifth leaf of 36- to 43-day-old cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants. Three series of measurements followed the variations during a diurnal period in gaseous exchange of plants under three light regimes. One group of plants received supplemental lighting split into two periods (04:00–08:00 and 16:00–22:00) for a continuous 18-h photoperiod. A second group was illuminated between 19:00 and 05:00 for a discontinuous 18-h photoperiod. The last group received only natural light (control). Supplemental lighting increased the stomatal conductance and transpiration. Extending the photoperiod with supplemental lighting increased the net photosynthesis rate and extended the period of CO2 assimilation. The internal CO2 concentration varied inversely with the CO2 assimilation rate. The continuity or discontinuity of the photoperiod did not affect gaseous exchange.

Gilles Turcotte; André Gosselin

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Geologic and Hydrogeologic Setting of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a mined repository constructed by the US Department of Energy for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes generated since 1970 by activities related to national defense. The WIPP is located 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in bedded salt (primarily halite) of the Late Permian (approximately 255 million years old) Salado Formation 655 m below the land surface. Characterization of the site began in the mid-1970s. Construction of the underground disposal facilities began in the early 1980s, and the facility received final certification from the US Environmental Protection Agency in May 1998. Disposal operations are planned to begin following receipt of a final permit from the State of New Mexico and resolution of legal issues. Like other proposed geologic repositories for radioactive waste, the WIPP relies on a combination of engineered and natural barriers to isolate the waste from the biosphere. Engineered barriers at the WIPP, including the seals that will be emplaced in the access shafts when the facility is decommissioned, are discussed in the context of facility design elsewhere in this volume. Physical properties of the natural barriers that contribute to the isolation of radionuclides are discussed here in the context of the physiographic, geologic, and hydrogeologic setting of the site.

Swift, P.N.; Corbet, T.F.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Geological characterization of a sandstone reservoir in Eastern Kansas: Savonburg NE field, Allen County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production on the Nelson leases of the Savonburg NE oil field in eastern Kansas is from sandstone that is part of the fill of a paleovalley that was eroded after deposition of the Tebo coal but before deposition of the Scammon coal. Sandstone in this interval is called the Chelsea Sandstone; the interval is referred to as the Skinner interval. (That interval is part of the Cabaniss Formation, Cherokee Group, and assigned to the Desmoinesian stage of the Middle Pennsylvanian). In addition to determining the stratigraphic relationships of the reservoir, geological characterization helped to understand the distribution of the most productive areas of the field and led to specific recommendations for abandonment of wells, workovers, well treatments, well conversions from producers to injectors, and drilling of new wells, all with the aim of increasing productivity and decreasing costs for the operator. The reservoir characterization used information routinely gathered in the course of oil field operations in eastern Kansas. Gamma-neutron logs indicated lithology as well as stratigraphy, while core descriptions provided insight into stratigraphic distinctions and depositional processes. Core analysis of porosity, permeability, and fluid saturations permitted depiction of the distribution of such attributes throughout the productive region. Key geological concepts of regional marker intervals and incised valley fills provided the theoretical framework for analyzing the reservoir.

Walton, A.W.; Beaty, D.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Performance assessment for the geological disposal of Deep Burn spent fuel using TTBX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of Deep Burn Modular High Temperature Reactor Spent Fuel (DBSF) is investigated in the Yucca Mountain geological repository (YMR) with respect to the annual dose (Sv/yr) delivered to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) from the transport of radionuclides released from the graphite waste matrix. Transport calculations are performed with a novel computer code, TTBX which is capable of modeling transport pathways that pass through heterogeneous geological formations. TTBX is a multi-region extension of the existing single region TTB transport code. Overall the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is seen to be four orders of magnitude lower than the regulatory threshold for exposure, even under pessimistic scenarios. A number of factors contribute to the favorable performance of DBSF. A reduction of one order of magnitude in the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is observed for every order of magnitude increase in the waste matrix lifetime, highlighting the importance of the waste matrix durability and suggesting graphite's utility as a potential waste matrix for the disposal of high-level waste. Furthermore, we see that by incorporating a higher fidelity far-field model the peak annual dose calculated to be received by the RMEI is reduced by two orders of magnitude. By accounting for the heterogeneities of the far field we have simultaneously removed unnecessary conservatisms and improved the fidelity of the transport model. (authors)

Van den Akker, B.P.; Ahn, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Simulations of Fracture and Fragmentation of Geologic Materials using Combined FEM/DEM Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geological media using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses with large numbers of intact polyhedral blocks. However, underground structures in jointed rock subjected to explosive loading can fail due to both rock motion along preexisting interfaces and fracture of the intact rock mass itself. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model these types of problems, we have implemented Cosserat point theory and cohesive element formulations into the current version of LDEC, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture and combined finite element/discrete element simulations. Results of a large-scale LLNL simulation of an explosive shock wave impacting an elaborate underground facility are also discussed. It is confirmed that persistent joints lead to an underestimation of the impact energy needed to fill the tunnel systems with rubble. Non-persistent joint patterns, which are typical of real geologies, inhibit shear within the surrounding rock mass and significantly increase the load required to collapse a tunnel.

Morris, J P; Rubin, M B; Block, G I; Bonner, M P

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection and movement/saturation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a geological formation will cause changes in seismic velocities. We investigate the capability of coda-wave interferometry technique for estimating CO2-induced seismic velocity changes using time-lapse synthetic vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data and the field VSP datasets acquired for monitoring injected CO2 in a brine aquifer in Texas, USA. Synthetic VSP data are calculated using a finite-difference elastic-wave equation scheme and a layered model based on the elastic Marmousi model. A possible leakage scenario is simulated by introducing seismic velocity changes in a layer above the CO2 injection layer. We find that the leakage can be detected by the detection of a difference in seismograms recorded after the injection compared to those recorded before the injection at an earlier time in the seismogram than would be expected if there was no leakage. The absolute values of estimated mean velocity changes, from both synthetic and field VSP data, increase significantly for receiver positions approaching the top of a CO2 reservoir. Our results from field data suggest that the velocity changes caused by CO2 injection could be more than 10% and are consistent with results from a crosswell tomogram study. This study demonstrates that time-lapse VSP with coda-wave interferometry analysis can reliably and effectively monitor geological carbon sequestration.

Zhou, R.; Huang, L.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fehler, M.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Discontinuation of Secondary Prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia in Patients with HIV Infection Who Have a Response to Antiretroviral Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the immune system is more profoundly compromised in patients in whom pneumonia has already developed, and to the presence of residual P. carinii organisms in the lungs despite a clinical response to therapy. Thus, recommendations regarding the safety of discontinuing primary prophylaxis cannot simply... The life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has dramatically improved,1–4 and the risk of opportunistic infections, including Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, has markedly declined in industrialized countries since ...

Ledergerber B.; Mocroft A.; Reiss P.

2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

388

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Comparison of three options for geologic sequestration of CO2 - a case study for California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Options for sequestration of CO{sub 2} are best viewed in light of the regional distribution of CO{sub 2} sources and potential sequestration sites. This study examines the distribution of carbon emissions from fossil fuel power plants in California and their proximity to three types of reservoirs that may be suitable for sequestration: (1) active or depleted oil fields, (2) active or depleted gas fields, and (3) brine formations. This paper also presents a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of sequestering CO{sub 2} generated from large fossil-fuel fired power plants in California and discusses the comparative advantages of three different types of reservoirs for this purpose. Based on a volumetric analysis of sequestration capacity and current CO{sub 2} emission rates from oil/gas fired power plants, this analysis suggests that oil reservoirs, gas fields and brine formations can all contribute significantly to sequestration in California. Together they could offer the opportunity to meet both short and long term needs. In the near term, oil and gas reservoirs are the most promising because the trapping structures have already stood the test of time and opportunities for offsetting the cost of sequestration with revenues from enhanced oil and gas production. In the long term, if the trapping mechanisms are adequately understood and deemed adequate, brine formations may provide an even larger capacity for geologic sequestration over much of California.

Benson, S.M.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geological Disposal Concept Selection Aligned with a Voluntarism Process - 13538  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UK's Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD) is currently at a generic stage in its implementation programme. The UK site selection process is a voluntarist process and, as yet, no communities have decided to participate. RWMD has set out a process to describe how a geological disposal concept would be selected for the range of higher activity wastes in the UK inventory, including major steps and decision making points, aligned with the stages of the UK site selection process. A platform of information is being developed on geological disposal concepts at various stages of implementation internationally and, in order to build on international experience, RWMD is developing its approach to technology transfer. The UK has a range of different types of higher activity wastes with different characteristics; therefore a range of geological disposal concepts may be needed. In addition to identifying key aspects for considering the compatibility of different engineered barrier systems for different types of waste, RWMD is developing a methodology to determine minimum separation distances between disposal modules in a co-located geological disposal facility. RWMD's approach to geological disposal concept selection is intended to be flexible, recognising the long term nature of the project. RWMD is also committed to keeping alternative radioactive waste management options under review; an approach has been developed and periodic reviews of alternative options will be published. (authors)

Crockett, Glenda; King, Samantha [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)] [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Data base dictionary for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base dictionary describes the data contained in the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base structure, conventions, contents, and use.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

FMI-HD High-Definition Formation Microimager | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FMI-HD High-Definition Formation Microimager FMI-HD High-Definition Formation Microimager Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FMI-HD High-Definition Formation Microimager Author Schlumberger Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for FMI-HD High-Definition Formation Microimager Citation Schlumberger. FMI-HD High-Definition Formation Microimager [Internet]. 2013. [cited 2013/10/09]. Available from: http://www.slb.com/services/characterization/geology/wireline/fullbore_formation_microimager_hd.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=FMI-HD_High-Definition_Formation_Microimager&oldid=687993" Categories: References Geothermal References Uncited References

394

Reference Design Description for a Geologic Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the current major national environmental problems is the safe disposal of large quantities of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials, which are rapidly accumulating throughout the country. These radioactive byproducts are generated as the result of national defense activities and from the generation of electricity by commercial nuclear power plants. At present, spent nuclear fuel is accumulating at over 70 power plant sites distributed throughout 33 states. The safe disposal of these high-level radioactive materials at a central disposal facility is a high national priority. This Reference Design Description explains the current design for a potential geologic repository that may be located at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials. This document describes a possible design for the three fundamental parts of a repository: a surface facility, subsurface repository, and waste packaging. It also presents the current conceptual design of the key engineering systems for the final four phases of repository processes: operations, monitoring, closure, and postclosure. In accordance with current law, this design does not include an interim storage option. In addition, this Reference Design Description reviews the expected long-term performance of the potential repository. It describes the natural barrier system which, together with the engineered systems, achieves the repository objectives. This design will protect the public and the environment by allowing the safe disposal of radioactive waste received from government-owned custodial spent fuel sites, high-level radioactive waste sites, and commercial power reactor sites. All design elements meet or exceed applicable regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The design will provide safe disposal of waste materials for at least a 10,000 year period. During this time interval, natural radioactive decay of the waste materials will result in fission products that pose a minimal radiological hazard to the public afterward. For example, after 100 years, the relative hazard from the waste fission products will have diminished approximately 90 percent. After 1,000 years, the hazard will have diminished 99 percent, and after 10,000 years it will have diminished 99.9 percent. The resulting radiological hazard after 10,000 years is minimal, being of the same order of magnitude as that posed by 0.2 percent uranium ore, which is equivalent to that which was used to originally produce the nuclear fuel. Because developing such a repository is extremely complex, the design will move forward in three stages: Site Recommendation, License Application, and Construction. This document presents the design as it will be submitted in the Site Recommendation Consideration Report; the design will be updated as the design process moves forward. As more cost-effective solutions, technical advancements, or changes to requirements occur, the design may evolve. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing a system that includes this potential repository. This waste management system integrates acceptance, transportation, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Acceptance and transportation will be handled by regional servicing contractors under contract to the DOE. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission will conduct an in-depth and thorough licensing review to determine the acceptability of the proposed waste management system. Eight sections of this document follow. Section 2 discusses the design requirements for the proposed repository. Section 3 describes the physical layout of the proposed repository. Section 4 describes the evolutionary phases of the development of the proposed repository. Section 5 describes the receipt of waste. Section 6 details the various systems that will package the waste and move it below ground, as well as safety monitoring and closure. Section 7 describes the syst

NA

2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Studies of the geology, geochemistry of thermal waters, and of one exploratory geothermal well show that two related hot spring systems discharge in Canon de San Diego at Soda Dam (48°C) and Jemez Springs (72°C). The hot springs discharge from separate strands of the Jemez fault zone which trends northeastward towards the center of Valles Caldera. Exploration drilling to Precambrian basement beneath Jemez Springs

396

Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mines and Geology Mines and Geology Jump to: navigation, search State Nevada Name Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Address University of Nevada/178 City, State Reno, Nevada Zip 89557 Website http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/Oil&Ga Coordinates 39.5440601°, -119.8136573° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5440601,"lon":-119.8136573,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

398

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Abstract This report presents a stratigraphic study of an area of about 860 square miles in the southern part of the Carson Desert, near Fallen, Churchill County, Nev. The exposed rocks and surficial sediments range in age from early Tertiary (?) to Recent. The late Quaternary sediments and soils were especially studied: they furnish a detailed history of the fluctuations of Lake Lahontan (a huge but intermittent late Pleistocene lake) and of younger lakes, as well as a history of late Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, soil development, and climatic change that probably is

399

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

400

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Nevada Rail - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env The Summary of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geologic considerations in underground coal mining system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic characteristics of coal resources which may impact new extraction technologies are identified and described to aid system designers and planners in their task of designing advanced coal extraction systems for the central Appalachian region. These geologic conditions are then organized into a matrix identified as the baseline mine concept. A sample region, eastern Kentucky, is next analyzed, using both the new baseline mine concept and traditional geologic investigative approach. The baseline mine concept presented is intended as a framework, providing a consistent basis for further analyses to be subsequently conducted in other geographic regions. The baseline mine concept is intended as a tool to give system designers a more realistic feel of the mine environment and will hopefully lead to acceptable alternatives for advanced coal extraction system.

Camilli, F.A.; Maynard, D.P.; Mangolds, A.; Harris, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration identified hardware and software solutions to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of field work. The goal of the research was to find a lightweight hardware-software system that allows the user to build a digital map from field observations in much the same way as pen and paper methods. The focus of the research was to minimize the size and weight of computer systems. Systems identified consist of a wearable PC or handheld

403

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a

404

Geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources. Part 1. San Juan Basin. Annual report, August 1988-July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the San Juan Basin, Fruitland Formation coal seams contain an estimated 43 to 49 Tcf of methane. With more than 500 producing coalbed methane wells and approximately 1,000 wells scheduled for drilling in 1990, the basin is one of the most active areas of coalbed methane exploration and production in the United States. Among the most important geologic factors affecting the occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane are depositional setting, structural attitude and fracturing of the coal, and regional hydraulic setting. In the second year of the study, the Bureau of Economic Geology evaluated the depositional setting and structure of Fruitland coal seams, which are both source rocks and reservoirs for coalbed methane, throughout the basin. The report summarizes the regional tectonic setting of the San Juan Basin; describes the Cretaceous stratigraphy, structure, and basin evolution; relates these factors to Fruitland coal and coalbed methane occurrence; describes studies of lineaments, fractures, and cleats; presents hydrodynamic controls on the producibility of coalbed methane from the Fruitland Formation; summarizes production from the Fruitland Formation; and evaluates geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility.

Ayers, W.B.; Kaiser, W.R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Swartz, T.E.; Laubach, S.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: areal geology; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; clastic rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravity methods; Idaho; igneous rocks; lithostratigraphy; magnetic methods; pyroclastics; Raft River Valley; resources; sedimentary rocks; seismic methods; stratigraphy; structural geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks

406

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watrous Formation, Williston Basin, Canada: a preliminaryaccumulation in the northern Williston Basin. The Watrous

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Caustic formation in expanding condensates of cold atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the evolution of density in an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate that initially has a spatially varying phase, concentrating on behavior when these phase variations are large. In this regime large density fluctuations develop during expansion. Maxima have a characteristic density that diverges with the amplitude of phase variations and their formation is analogous to that of caustics in geometrical optics. We analyze in detail caustic formation in a quasi-one-dimensional condensate, which before expansion is subject to a periodic or random optical potential, and we discuss the equivalent problem for a quasi-two-dimensional system. We also examine the influence of many-body correlations in the initial state on caustic formation for a Bose gas expanding from a strictly one-dimensional trap. In addition, we study a similar arrangement for noninteracting fermions, showing that Fermi surface discontinuities in the momentum distribution give rise in that case to sharp peaks in the spatial derivative of the density. We discuss recent experiments and argue that fringes reported in time of flight images [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. A 77, 033632 (2008)] are an example of caustic formation.

Chalker, J. T. [Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Shapiro, B. [Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

NETL: News Release - Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19, 2004 19, 2004 Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide Researchers Perform Small Scale, Short Term Carbon Sequestration Field Test HOUSTON, TX - In the first U.S. field test to investigate the ability of brine formations to store greenhouse gasses, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy are closely monitoring 1,600 tons of carbon dioxide that were injected into a mile-deep well in Texas in October. The test is providing unique data to help investigators understand the viability of geologic sequestration as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Frio Brine Pilot experimental site is 30 miles northeast of Houston, in the South Liberty oilfield. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology drilled a 5,753 foot injection well earlier this year, and developed a nearby observation well to study the ability of the high-porosity Frio sandstone formation to store carbon dioxide.

409

Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Name Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Address Ste. 965 Northeast Oregon Street Place Portland, OR Zip 97232 Website http://www.oregongeology.org/s Coordinates 45.5286301°, -122.656652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5286301,"lon":-122.656652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

410

Scaled Experimental Modeling of Geologic Structures Rutgers University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uncertainty associated with hydrocarbon exploration and production. Furthermore, experimental models allow us in the Department of Geological Sciences at Rutgers University. She has thirty years of experience in the oil & gas experimental models provide valuable information about structural processes, especially those not observed

411

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 26, Part 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................Lake City, Utah Mark A. Solien, William A. Morgan, and David L. Clark, at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, on April 28-May 2, 1978 Charles A. Sandberg and David L. Clark. Gardner Issue Editors Charles A. Sandberg David L Clark B e a m Young Unzveraty Geology Studzes

Seamons, Kent E.

412

Changing Global Sea Levels as a Geologic Index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...level as geologic benchmarks, was an unexpected...Even other major oil com-panies are...crucial to oil exploration. The beauty ofthe...limestone for the oil found in the Bu...eventually trapped the oil in the weathered...Armentrout of Mobil Exploration and Producing...stratigraphic test (COST) wells drilled...

RICHARD A. KERR

1980-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

Geologic map of the Mount Adams Quadrangle, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

415

Edward "Ned" K. Vizy Department of Geological Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for research efforts. · Assist in external grant writing process. · Manage the in-house computer cluster. · Manage in-house computer cluster and observational database. · Assist in external grant writing. WeatherEdward "Ned" K. Vizy Department of Geological Sciences Jackson School of Geosciences phone: (512

Yang, Zong-Liang

416

SCALING OF FRACTURE SYSTEMS IN GEOLOGICAL MEDIA E. Bonnet,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCALING OF FRACTURE SYSTEMS IN GEOLOGICAL MEDIA E. Bonnet,1 O. Bour,2 N. E. Odling,1,3 P. Davy,2 I. Main,4 P. Cowie,4 and B. Berkowitz5 Abstract. Scaling in fracture systems has become an active field spread widely through the literature. Although it is rec- ognized that some fracture systems are best

Cowie, Patience

417

Geologic map of the Hood River Quadrangle, Washington and Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History Geology Assignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rocks is the energy of the environment: that is, how fast the water (or wind) was moving. EssentiallyName: 1 GEOL 104 Dinosaurs: A Natural History Geology Assignment DUE: Mon. Sept. 18 Part I, the higher the energy, the larger the size of the particles of sediment. Slow moving water can only move

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

419

Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Jordan, T. H., H. W. Menard, and D.K. Smith, Density and size distribution of seamounts in the eastern. Smith, H. W. Menard, J. A. Orcutt and T. H. Jordan, Seismic reflection site survey: correlation

Smith, Deborah K.

420

State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal Data System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Deploy and populate the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) with state-specific data by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermal-relevant data that operates as an integral compliant component of NGDS.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Advancing the Science of Geologic Carbon Sequestration (Registration: www.earthsciences.osu.edu/~jeff/carbseq/carbseq 2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing the Science of Geologic Carbon Sequestration (Registration: www & American Electric Power Agenda March 9 ­ Morning Session 1 ­ Geological Carbon Sequestration: Introductions, AEP) 3. Field Testing: The Laboratory for Geological Carbon Sequestration (Neeraj Gupta, Battelle

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

422

Geological Causes of Local Variation in Coastal Bluff Recession Rates, Northeast Ohio Shoreline of Lake Erie  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 Scott...Geology at Bowling Green State University. Through an internship at the Ohio Geological...professor at Bowling Green State University...erosion include wave energy (shoreline orientation...bathymetry), currents, surface and...

Scott A. Dawson; James E. Evans

423

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Abstract...

424

Geologic spatial analysis. 1988 performance report, August 30, 1987--January 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of geologic spatial analysis research which focuses on conducting comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of regions using geologic data sets that can be referenced by latitude, longitude, and elevation/depth. (CBS)

Thiessen, R.L.; Eliason, J.R.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra, Australia waste disposal safety assessment studies. The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers region weathering over several million years, during which many climatological, hydrological, and geological changes

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

426

Transition from the Farallon Plate subduction to the collision between South and Central America: Geological evolution of the Panama Isthmus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents new geological constraints on the collision of southern Central America with South America, and the resulting deformational episodes that have affected the Panama Isthmus since the Late Cretaceous. The Panama Isthmus is located in southwestern Central America, and it represents the zone of contact between the two land masses: Central America and South America. This collision event is still active today. It has resulted in regional uplift since the Late Miocene/Pliocene and is responsible for the Great American Biotic Interchange between South and North America. Depending on the methods of investigation used, and due to the lack of data available, the time when this collision began is still widely debated and poorly constrained. To better constrain this age, we have studied the rock formations and the tectonic deformations in central and eastern Panama that have occurred since the Late Cretaceous. This study presents new rock ages, field-work documentation and analyses, and seismic-line interpretations, and it is complemented by spatial images for the eastern Panama area. During the Middle Eocene, a number of changes suddenly appeared in the geological records that were synchronous with the break-up of southern Central America into two smaller blocks: Chorotega and Chocó. Our main results identify the prevalence of an extensional tectonic regime from the Middle Eocene to the Middle Miocene that caused the formation of horst and graben structures with thick sedimentary basin fills, and a synchronous clockwise block rotation. Here, we propose that these geologic events are associated with the initiation of the oblique collision of southern Central America with South America. The first contact of the southeastern extremity of Central America occurred around 40 Ma to 38 Ma, and then propagated northwestwards. We describe here this long-term collision episode in relation to the history of the Panama Isthmus.

Flore Barat; Bernard Mercier de Lépinay; Marc Sosson; Carla Müller; Peter O. Baumgartner; Claudia Baumgartner-Mora

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Discontinuous Galerkin method for the spherically reduced Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura system with second-order operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin method for evolving the spherically reduced Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura (BSSN) system expressed in terms of second-order spatial operators. Our multidomain method achieves global spectral accuracy and longtime stability on short computational domains. We discuss in detail both our scheme for the BSSN system and its implementation. After a theoretical and computational verification of the proposed scheme, we conclude with a brief discussion of issues likely to arise when one considers the full BSSN system.

Field, Scott E. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Hesthaven, Jan S. [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Lau, Stephen R. [Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Mroue, Abdul H. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Geological Society of America Centennial Field Guide--Northeastern Section, 1987 The Geology of Cameron's Line, West Torrington, Connecticut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cameron's Line, West Torrington, Connecticut Charles Merguerian, Geology Department, Hofstra University, Connecticut, and consists of two stops in the West Torrington 7 ½-minute quadrangle (Fig. 1). They can be reached from Exit 44 of Connecticut 8 by traveling southwestward on Connecticut 202 (East Main Street

Merguerian, Charles

431

Evaluation of radionuclide migration in the homogeneous system of a geological repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to study radionuclide migration and release from a deep underground repository situated in a clay formation. An insight into the processes influencing the radionuclide transport in the near field and far field will be presented. For the calculation, a set of radionuclides has been chosen, considering the half-life, decay chains, capacity of the sorption, solubility limits and diffusion coefficients. The migration of radionuclides is dependent on transport properties of the particular nuclide. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of the backfill material and clay geological formation, the transport in the repository occurs mainly by diffusion. The migration rate will be influenced by the water chemistry, solubility, retardation and diffusive properties of the nuclides, and the water flow rate in the clay. The release rates of radionuclides from the geosphere to the biosphere will be converted into the indicative dose rates using dose conversion factors for ingestion. The impact of the critical group is considered via consumption of meat, root vegetables and drinking water from wells.

S. Prvakova; J. Duran; V. Necas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration J. L the success of geologic carbon sequestration projects. To detect subtle CO2 leakage signals, we present), An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res

Hilley, George

433

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES · For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to understand Material Characterization for Intermediate-scale Testing to Develop Strategies for Geologic Sequestration to generate comprehensive data sets. Due to the nature of the CO2 geological sequestration where supercritical

434

University of Calgary, Department of Geoscience Sessional Instructor Position in Petroleum Engineering Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will focus on seismic methods used in petroleum exploration but will also include an overview of gravity in Petroleum Engineering Geology The Department of Geoscience at the University of Calgary is seeking a Sessional Instructor to fill 1/3 of course as lecturer for Geology 377 (Petroleum Engineering Geology

Garousi, Vahid

435

3D/4D MODELLING, VISUALIZATION AND INFORMATION FRAMEWORKS: CURRENT U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PRACTICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

33 3D/4D MODELLING, VISUALIZATION AND INFORMATION FRAMEWORKS: CURRENT U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY to visualize and model geologic data and information in 3 spatial dimensions (3D) and sometimes adding time in visualizing and coupling geologic, hydrologic, atmospheric, and biologic processes together into 3D/4D

436

GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 -GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 - GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS Description: Investigation of the geological and geotechnical aspects of offshore wind projects. Emphasis will be designed around geological and geotechnical topics that are relevant to the development of offshore wind

Firestone, Jeremy

437

Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nanobubbles [3,4,11,14]. 2. A decrease in surface tension from 72 to 68 dyn/cm [11]. 3. Increase nanobubble network is the out come of a self organization process due to the collective effect of bubble-bubble term stability of water structure is resulted from the formation of dense array of stable gas

Jacob, Eshel Ben

438

potential function derived from the original weak membrane energy function that promotes formation of discontinuities, through the variation of a control parameter.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

131 potential function derived from the original weak membrane energy function that promotes function is approached rather than being approximated, the original intent of the objective function a sequence of objective functions that more closely approximate the original objective function

Duncan, James S.

439

Depositional environments in the Oligocene Frio Formation, McAllen-Pharr Field Area, Hidalgo-County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS IN THE OLIGOCENE FRIO FORMATION, MCALLEN-PHARR FIELD AREA, HIDALGO COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MICHEAL DON MCGHEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS IN THE OLIGOCENE FRIO FORMATION, MCALLEN-PHARR FIELD AREA, HIDALGO COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MICHEAL DON MCGHEE Approved as to style...

McGhee, Micheal Don

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on “CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources” in Berkeley, June 1–2, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPA’s mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}–brine might occur.

Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

442

STOMP-ECKEChem: An Engineering Perspective on Reactive Transport in Geologic Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ECKEChem (Equilibrium, Conservation, Kinetic Equation Chemistry) is a reactive transport module for the STOMP suite of multifluid subsurface flow and transport simulators that was developed from an engineering perspective. STOMP comprises a suite of operational modes that are distinguished by the solved coupled conservation equations with capabilities for a variety of subsurface applications (e.g., environmental remediation and stewardship, geologic sequestration of greenhouse gases, gas hydrate production, and oil shale production). The ECKEChem module was designed to provide integrated reactive transport capabilities across the suite of STOMP simulator operational modes. The initial application for the ECKEChem module was in the simulation of the mineralization reactions that occurred with the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into deep Columbia River basalt formations, where it was implemented in the STOMP-CO2 simulator. The STOMP-ECKEChem solution approach to modeling reactive transport in multifluid geologic media is founded on an engineering perspective: (1) sequential non-iterative coupling between the flow and reactive transport is sufficient, (2) reactive transport can be modeled by operator splitting with local geochemistry and global transport, (3) geochemistry can be expressed as a system of coupled nonlinear equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, (4) a limited number of kinetic equation forms are used in geochemical practice. This chapter describes the conceptual approach to converting a geochemical reaction network into a series of equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, the implementation of ECKEChem in STOMP, the numerical solution approach, and a demonstration of the simulator on a complex application involving desorption of uranium from contaminated field-textured sediments.

White, Mark D.; Fang, Yilin

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Methodology for the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage Program September 2010 Summary of the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide 2 Authors: U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D John Litynski U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D/Sequestration Division Dawn Deel Traci Rodosta U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Office of Research and Development George Guthrie U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/

444

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

445

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

446

An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 1 An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration Gardiner Hill, BP Craig Lewis, Chevron 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 2 Disclaimer * The following may not be the only Industry Perspective on Storage & Sequestration * It represents the opinions of BP and Chevron and some other energy companies that we have talked to 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 3 Overview * Potential New Business Impact * Business Drivers for R&D * Technology Objectives * Definitions of Storage & Sequestration * Break-down of Geologic Storage R&D Categories * Where We Think Industry (and others) are already strong * Where We Think Additional R&D Gaps Still

447

I I Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams, Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected Prior to Re-Entry . , Drilling, Project Rulison-6, 197 1 HGS 7 ' DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Prepared Under Agreement No. AT(29-2)-474 f o r the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission PROPERTY OF U. S. GOVERNMENT -UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - F e d e r a l . C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS, WELLS, SPRINGS, AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED PRIOR TO REENTRY DRILLING, PROJECT RULISON I , BY Paul T. - V o e g e l i

448

Geologic factors in coal mines roof stability: a progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 10 selected United States Bureau of Mines research contract reports produced from 1970 to 1980 that consist largely of geologic studies of coal-mine roof-support problems. The reports focus on the Appalachian and Illinois coal-mining regions. In the Appalachian region two geologic structures, roof rolls and slickensides, predominate as features that directly contribute to roof falls. Studies of these and other structures are reviewed, and improved methods of utilizing drill core and core logs to prepare hazard maps are presented. Among the reports described are several on the weakening effects of moisture on shale roof, as determined from both laboratory and underground measurements, and an assessment of air tempering as a humidity-control method. Also summarized are findings concerning the time lapse between roof exposure and permanent support installation as a factor in the effectiveness of roof bolting.

Moebs, N.N.; Stateham, R.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Mountains of northwestern Utah expose a detachment fault that separates a hanging wall of Paleozoic rocks from Proterozoic and Archean rocks of the footwall. Beneath the detachment lies a 100 to 300m-thick top-to-the-east extensional shear zone. Geologic mapping, strain and kinematic analysis, and 40Ar/39 Ar thermochronology suggest that the shear zone and detachment fault had an initial low-angle regional

450

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO2 storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO2. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO2 pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO2 emissions from large point sources across the Arches Province) may be feasible,

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO{sub 2}. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO{sub 2} pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions from large point sources across the Arches Pr

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Geology of the Cedar Mountain area, Llano County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the west side of Cedar Mountain. Numerous minor faults branch off the major fractures. These "adjustment" faults are generally short and have relatively small displacements. The Llano uplift is the strongly uplifted and deformed south- eastern end... Mountain area. Geologic and cultural data were inscribed on the photographs and later trans- ferred to a transparent overlay from which the finished map was made. The photographs are of series DMH-7V, numbers 127-130, 178-184, and 191-198, dated...

Dewitt, Gary Ray

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library : Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, HawaiiInfo Graphic/Map/Chart Authors Frank A. Trusdell and Richard B. Moore Published U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Frank A. Trusdell,Richard B. Moore. Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. []. Place of publication not provided. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 2006. Available from: http://pubs.usgs.gov/imap/2614/downloads/pdf/2614map_508.pdf.

454

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE SECOND PRODUCTION-TEST FLARING, PROJECT RULISON ( R u l i s o n - 1 0 ) a 1 9 7 1 P r e p a r e d U n d e r A g r e e m e n t No. A T ( 2 9 - 2 ) -474 '. f o r the N e v a d a Operations Office . . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . . USGS -474 - 1 2 2 R u l i sdn- 10 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 8 0 2 2 5 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE S EC OND PRODUCTION- TES T FLARING,

455

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report catalogs the existing geologic data that can be found in various databases, published and unpublished reports, and in individuals' technical files. The scope of this catalog is primarily on the 100, 200, and 300 Areas, with a particular emphasis on the 200 Areas. Over 2,922 wells are included in the catalog. Nearly all of these wells (2,459) have some form of driller's or geologist's log. Archived samples are available for 1,742 wells. Particle size data are available from 1,078 wells and moisture data are available from 356 wells. Some form of chemical property data is available from 588 wells. However, this catalog is by no means complete. Numerous individuals have been involved in various geologic-related studies of the Hanford Site. The true extent of unpublished data retained in their technical files is unknown. However, this data catalog is believed to represent the majority (>90%) of the geologic data that is currently retrievable.

Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

Lignite resources of Turkey: Geology, reserves, and exploration history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article aims to emphasize the importance of lignite, which is the mostly used domestic energy source in the Turkish energy mix, by briefly overviewing its geology, reserves, and exploration. Lignites are distributed in mostly continental sedimentary basins of Tertiary age all over the country. The lignite-bearing basins display the characteristics of different geological settings, of which grabens and half-grabens are the most common ones especially in western Anatolia. The geological and chemical characteristics of Turkish lignites do not only create some important problems during mining and coal preparation but also make them unfavorable for consumption. However, since they are the most valuable energy resource of the country they should benefit the economy in the most efficient and environmentally friendly way. Moreover, two most important conclusions of this study are as follows: firstly, reserve estimation practices in the country should definitely be revised to provide a more realistic evaluation of the country's lignite potential for developing medium- and long-term energy strategies and policies for decision- and policy-makers. Secondly, exploration and development activities should be coordinated by a single institution, most likely a government institution, as has been the case for some 50 years.

Volkan ?. Ediger; Istemi Berk; Ayhan Kösebalaban

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reprint of "3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines" [Comput. Geosci. 34 (2008) 278-290  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Depositional facies and environments of the lower Mineral Wells formation, Pennsylvanian Strawn group, north central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation to exclude the Thurber coal, the Mingus shale, and the Brazos River sandstone and conglomerate (Plummer and Hornberger, 1935; Hendricks, 1957). In their publication on the geology of Palo Pinto County, Plummer and Hornberger (1935) followed... boundary was lowered and redefined as the unconformity at the base of the Lake Pinto sandstone. Some workers have continued to use the earlier nomenclature followed by Sellards (1932) and Plummer and Hornberger (1935), while others use the nomenclature...

Bradshaw, Susan Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and limestone; extensive halite beds in SE Black Mesa basindeposits include gypsum and halite. The fine-grained unitsParadox Formation shale, halite, and anhydrite serve as

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Subtask 2.17 - CO{sub 2} Storage Efficiency in Deep Saline Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) continues to advance, and large-scale implementation of geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage progresses, it will be important to understand the potential of geologic formations to store meaningful amounts of CO{sub 2}. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline formations (DSFs) has been suggested as one of the best potential methods for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere, and as such, updated storage resource estimation methods will continue to be an important component for the widespread deployment of CCS around the world. While there have been several methodologies suggested in the literature, most of these methods are based on a volumetric calculation of the pore volume of the DSF multiplied by a storage efficiency term and do not consider the effect of site-specific dynamic factors such as injection rate, injection pattern, timing of injection, pressure interference between injection locations, and overall formation pressure buildup. These volumetric methods may be excellent for comparing the potential between particular formations or basins, but they have not been validated through real-world experience or full-formation injection simulations. Several studies have also suggested that the dynamic components of geologic storage may play the most important role in storing CO{sub 2} in DSFs but until now have not directly compared CO{sub 2} storage resource estimates made with volumetric methodologies to estimates made using dynamic CO{sub 2} storage methodologies. In this study, two DSFs, in geographically separate areas with geologically diverse properties, were evaluated with both volumetric and dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource estimation methodologies to compare the results and determine the applicability of both approaches. In the end, it was determined that the dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource potential is timedependent and it asymptotically approaches the volumetric CO{sub 2} storage resource potential over very long periods of time in the two systems that were evaluated. These results indicate that the volumetric assessments can be used as long as the appropriate storage efficiency terms are used and it is understood that it will take many wells over very long periods of time to fully realize the storage potential of a target formation. This subtask was funded through the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)– U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme.

Gorecki, Charles; Liu, Guoxiang; Braunberger, Jason; Klenner, Robert; Ayash, Scott; Dotzenrod, Neil; Steadman, Edward; Harju, John

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Geology of the Homer Martin Ranch Area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

angle bend in the Llano River~ the southwest corner i. s a right angle bend in the east fork of Panther Creek O?3 of a mile east of the Junction of the east and west forks~ the northeast corner is the ]unction of Comanche Creek with the Llano River... geologic study of an area that Joins the Homer Martin Ranch crea on the north, Bryant (1959) did a similar study of the Schep-Panther Creek area that )oins the Homer Martin Ranch area on the west. After a study of the Hickory sandstone, Goolsby (lo57...

Pool, Alexander Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N. [Univ. of Newcastle (Australia); Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

R.E. Sweeney

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

468

Interdisciplinary Investigation of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project investigates the feasibility of geologic sequestration of CO2 in depleted shale gas reservoirs from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. It is anticipated that over the next two decades, tens of thousands of wells will be drilled in the 23 states in which organic-rich shale gas deposits are found. This research investigates the feasibility of using these formations for sequestration. If feasible, the number of sites where CO2 can be sequestered increases dramatically. The research embraces a broad array of length scales ranging from the ~10 nanometer scale of the pores in the shale formations to reservoir scale through a series of integrated laboratory and theoretical studies.

Zoback, Mark; Kovscek, Anthony; Wilcox, Jennifer

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

470

Comparisons of hydrocarbon and nitrogen distributions in geologically diverse tar sand bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of bitumens from different tar sand deposits are generally significantly different and affect the utilization of the resource. The chemical and physical properties of bitumen are a result of maturation reactions on the varied organic sediments. For example, saturated hydrocarbon distributions have been related to the geochemical history of organic matter. Very paraffinic or sometimes paraffinic-naphthenic distributions in organic matter are derived from a nonmarine depositional environment. More aromatic and paraffinic-naphthenic hydrocarbon distributions are derived from organic matter deposited in a marine environment. The characteristics of the bitumen also influence the potential for recovery and subsequent processing of the material. For example, saturated hydrocarbons contribute to the high pour points of recovered oils. The origin and composition of an oil influence its viscosity, API gravity, and coke formation during processing, particularly under low-temperature oxidation conditions. The objective of this work is to determine the chemical and physical properties of several samples of bitumen from geologically diverse tar sand deposits. The compound-type distributions and LTD properties of these bitumens are discussed relative to the depositional environment and processing potential of the organic matter.

Holmes, S.A.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Approved as to style and content by: Chris pher C. Mathewson...

Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Engineering geologic feasibility of lignite mining in alluvial valleys by hydraulic dredging methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENGINEERING GEOLOGIC FEASIBILITY OF LIGNITE MINING IN ALLUVIAL VALLEYS BY HYDRAULIC DREDGING METHODS A Thesis by CYNTHIA LYNN CASON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Niajor Subject: Geology ENGINEERING GEOLOGIC FEASIBILITY OF LIGNITE MINING IN ALLUVIAL VALLEYS BY HYDRAULIC DREDGING METHODS A Thesis by CYNTHIA LYNN CASON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Cason, Cynthia Lynn

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-1-2013_Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide_20130312.electronic.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of Publicly Available Comparison of Publicly Available Methods for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide in Saline Formations 12 March 2013 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-1-2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its

475

Projects Selected for Safe and Permanent Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of 13 projects to develop technologies and methodologies for geologic storage of carbon dioxide.

476

CO2 leakage in a Geological Carbon Sequestration system: Scenario development and analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this project was to study the leakage of CO2 in a Geological Carbon Sequestration (GCS) system. To define the GCS system,… (more)

Basirat, Farzad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The emerging field of geogenomics: Constraining geological problems with genetic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2014 Keywords: Genomics Molecular phylogenetics Neotropics Phylogeography Andes Amazon The development of a genomics-derived discipline within geology is timely, as a result of major advances

Battisti, David

478

Mining methods and geology of the Boston Consolidated Mine at Bingham, Utah .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??"This thesis does not so much attempt a detailed report on the geology of the disseminates ores of Bingham Canyon as a more particular description… (more)

Boucher, James Leonidas

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development of a Geological and Geomechanical Framwork for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of a Geological and Geomechanical Framwork for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

480

Nuclear fuel corrosion over millennia interpreted using geologic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion of nuclear fuel over the 10,000 year regulatory period in a geologic repository will be a function of physical characteristics (e.g., crystallinity, crystal sizes, crystal forms) and chemical characteristics (e.g., crystal composition, compositional variability, accessory phases). Natural uraninite (nominally UO{sub 2+x}) which has undergone long-term corrosion can be studied to infer the long-term behavior of nuclear fuel. Previously, uraninite from the Nopal I deposit, Pena Blanca district, Chihuahua, Mexico, has been shown to constitute an outstanding analog material for comparison with nuclear fuel. Similarities between Nopal I uraninite and nuclear fuel have been shown to include bulk composition, general crystal structure, and total trace element content. Data presented here suggest that, as a bulk material, Nopal I uraninite compares favorably with irradiated nuclear fuel. Nevertheless, some fine-scale differences are noted between Nopal I uraninite and irradiated nuclear fuel with respect to both internal structures and compositions. These observations suggest that whereas the long-term responses of the two materials to oxidative alteration in a geologic repository may be similar, the detailed mechanisms of initial oxidant penetration and the short-term oxidative alternation of Nopal I uraninite and irradiated nuclear fuel are likely to be different.

Pearcy, E.C.; Manaktala, H.K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formations geological discontinuities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

483

Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

Goff, F.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

Monnier, Stefan

485

Hierarchical galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as the cooling of gas in haloes, the formation...effects on interstellar gas of energy released by young stars, the production of heavy elements, the...dynamics of the cooling gas are calculated in full...relatively small computational cost. The major disadvantage......

Shaun Cole; Cedric G. Lacey; Carlton M. Baugh; Carlos S. Frenk

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

486

formation at the Riley Ridge Unit on the LaBarge Platform in Southwest  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

formation at the Riley Ridge Unit on the LaBarge Platform in Southwest formation at the Riley Ridge Unit on the LaBarge Platform in Southwest Wyoming. The test will demonstrate the ability of a geological formation to safely, permanently, and economically store more than 2 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ); examine the entire CO 2 injection process from pre-injection characterization, injection process monitoring, and post-injection monitoring; and provide the groundwork for future carbon capture and storage (CCS) opportunities in the region. The eolian sandstone formations present throughout the region offer the opportunity to store more than 100 years of CO 2 emissions from regional point sources. BSCSP plans to drill a CO 2 injection well and inject up to 1 million tons of CO 2 per year into the Nugget Sandstone