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1

JV Task 124 - Understanding Multi-Interactions of SO3, Mercury, Selenium, and Arsenic in Illinois Coal Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consisted of pilot-scale combustion testing with a representative Illinois basin coal to explore the multi-interactions of SO{sub 3}, mercury, selenium and arsenic. The parameters investigated for SO{sub 3} and mercury interactions included different flue gas conditions, i.e., temperature, moisture content, and particulate alkali content, both with and without activated carbon injection for mercury control. Measurements were also made to track the transformation of selenium and arsenic partitioning as a function of flue gas temperature through the system. The results from the mercury-SO{sub 3} testing support the concept that SO{sub 3} vapor is the predominant factor that impedes efficient mercury removal with activated carbon in an Illinois coal flue gas, while H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol has less impact on activated carbon injection performance. Injection of a suitably mobile and reactive additives such as sodium- or calcium-based sorbents was the most effective strategy tested to mitigate the effect of SO{sub 3}. Transformation measurements indicate a significant fraction of selenium was associated with the vapor phase at the electrostatic precipitator inlet temperature. Arsenic was primarily particulate-bound and should be captured effectively with existing particulate control technology.

Ye Zhuang; Christopher Martin; John Pavlish

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Topical report No. 2, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and conditioning agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

Control of scale in flue gas scrubbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a flue gas desulfurization system in which sulfur dioxide-containing flue gas is passed in countercurrent flow with an aqueous calcium-bearing scrubbing liquor whereby the sulfur dioxide is removed from the flue gas by being absorbed by the scrubbing liquor and converted to calcium sulfite and/or calcium sulfate. The improvement of minimizing the formation of calcium scale on the surfaces of the system comprises maintaining in the scrubbing liquor about 0.1-25 ppm of a 1:1 diisobutylene-maleic anhydride copolymer having an average molecular weight of 11000. The copolymer is incorporated in the scrubbing liquor as a 10-15% aqueous dispersion.

Thomas, P.A.; Dewitt-Dick, D.B.

1987-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

5

Star Formation in Mergers and Interacting Galaxies: Gathering the Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selected results from recent studies of star formation in galaxies at different stages of interaction are reviewed. Recent results from the Spitzer Space Telescope are highlighted. Ideas on how large-scale driving of star formation in interacting galaxies might mesh with our understanding of star formation in isolated galaxies and small scale mechanisms within galaxies are considered. In particular, there is evidence that on small scales star formation is determined by the same thermal and turbulent processes in cool compressed clouds as in isolated galaxies. If so, this affirms the notion that the primary role of large-scale dynamics is to gather and compress the gas fuel. In gas-rich interactions this is generally done with increasing efficiency through the merger process.

Curtis Struck

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Final Flue Gas Cleaning (FFGC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Flue Gas Cleaning (FFGC) Pilot Plant. The pilot plant (FFGC-PP) will be used to test and evaluate removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a 160 MW, Houston-area power plant operating on 100% petcoke. The two-week long test.... TABLE III FLUE GAS COMPOSITION PETCOKE FIRED POWER PLANT H 2 O 3.2 % O 2 4.9 % CO 2 17.7 % HCl 10 ppm SO 2 6800 ppm SO 3 300 ppm H2SO4 mist 690 ppm NOx 260 ppm...

Stinger, D. H.; Romero, M. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gasification technologies for heat and power . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.4 Waste incineration and waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Flue gases and fuel gases: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, incineration and other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . 3-5 3.4 Emission

Laughlin, Robert B.

8

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Flue gases and fuel gases: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, incineration and other and gasification technologies for heat and power . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.4 Waste incineration and waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . . 3-5 3.4 Emission

Zevenhoven, Ron

9

Interactive television format development - could participatory design bridge the gap?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an exploratory study, part of my Ph.D., focusing on 'viewer empowerment' in the audiovisual industry due to digitization and the emerging 'architecture of participation' [1] of Web2.0. In the 'traditional' broadcasting ... Keywords: broadcasting industry, end-user participation, interactive television format development, participatory design, web2.0

Skylla J. Janssen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

Klunder; ,Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Vortex Formation in a Plasma Interacting with Neutral Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, it has been observed that there exists a class of vortices which rotates in the opposite direction to ExB drift (referred to as anti-ExB vortex). This result suggests that a predominant force other than electric field is acting on ions. It is found that momentum transport and resultant force generation through the interaction between ions and neutral flow play an essential role on anti-ExB vortex formation. The existence of inward neutral flow, which drives the ions in the anti-ExB direction, has been confirmed using a newly-developed high-resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy system.

Tanaka, M. Y.; Ogiwara, K.; Etoh, S. [Department of High Energy Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga-koen 6-1, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Aramaki, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshimura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Varanjes, J. [Center for Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200 B 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Effect of Social Interaction on Economic Transactions: Evidence from Two Retail Format Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Social Interaction on Economic Transactions: Evidence from Two Retail Format Changes February 2014 Abstract Examining two different changes in retail format, we show that consumers alter their pur- chase behavior when the retail context changes. In both settings, the change in purchasing

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

14

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

those for selective catalytic reduction (SCR)), scrubbing liquors, flue gas or coal additives, combustion modifications, barrier discharges, and ultraviolet radiation....

15

Formation of Cooper pairs as a consequence of exchange interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pairing of two electrons with antiparallel spins may lead to energy minimization of each of the paired electrons. Thus the exchange interaction causes a bond between two valence electrons in a crystal. This can be proved analyzing the energy of each valence electron in the field of the one-valent metallic crystal on assumption that all other kinds of magnetic spin ordering in the crystal are negligible.

Dolgopolov, Stanislav

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Formation of Cooper pairs as a consequence of exchange interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pairing of two electrons with antiparallel spins may lead to energy minimization of each of the paired electrons. Thus the exchange interaction causes a bond between two valence electrons in a crystal. This can be proved analyzing the energy of each valence electron in the field of the one-valent metallic crystal on assumption that all other kinds of magnetic spin ordering in the crystal are negligible.

Stanislav Dolgopolov

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Saffman-Taylor streamers: Mutual finger interaction in spark formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bunches of streamers form the early stages of sparks and lightning but theory presently concentrates on single streamers or on coarse approximations of whole breakdown trees. Here a periodic array of interacting streamer discharges in a strong homogeneous electric field is studied in density or fluid approximation in two dimensions. If the period of the streamer array is small enough, the streamers do not branch, but approach uniform translation. When the streamers are close to the branching regime, the enhanced field at the tip of the streamer is close to 2E?, where E? is the homogeneous field applied between the electrodes. We discuss a moving boundary approximation to the density model. This moving boundary model turns out to be essentially the same as the one for two-fluid Hele-Shaw flows. In two dimensions, this model possesses a known analytical solution. The shape of the two-dimensional interacting streamers in uniform motion obtained from the PDE simulations is actually well fitted by the analytically known “selected Saffman-Taylor finger.” This finding helps to understand streamer interactions and raises new questions on the general theory of finger selection in moving boundary problems.

Alejandro Luque, Fabian Brau, and Ute Ebert

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

18

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

19

Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins, using techniques from the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of disordered many proteins are reaction partners from an ensemble of random graphs with an arbitrary degree distribution. WeGenerating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction

Coolen, ACC "Ton"

20

FlueGen Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FlueGen Inc FlueGen Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name FlueGen, Inc. Place Irvine, California Zip 92614 Product Irvine-based original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of air pollution control systems for the utility industry, including coal-fired power plants, in addition to financing client's projects, thereafter operating and maintaining the system for a fee. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

22

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,776,780 entitled "Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent are catalysts for the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas. These novel catalysts include iridium (Ir), platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir), and Thief carbons. The catalyst materials will adsorb the oxidizing agents HCl, Cl 2 , and other halogen species in the flue gas stream that are produced when fuel is combusted. These adsorbed oxidizing agents can then react with elemental mercury in the stream, which is difficult to capture, and oxidize it to form Hg (II) species,

23

Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Phase III experiments successfully addressed several issues needed to characterize a permeator system for application to a pulverized coal (PC) burning furnace/boiler assuming typical post-combustion cleanup devices in place. We completed key laboratory stage optimization and modeling efforts needed to move towards larger scale testing. The SOPO addressed six areas. Task 1--Post-Combustion Particle Cleanup--The first object was to determine if the Carbozyme permeator performance was likely to be reduced by particles (materials) in the flue gas stream that would either obstruct the mouth of the hollow fibers (HF) or stick to the HF bore wall surface. The second, based on the Acceptance Standards (see below), was to determine whether it would be preferable to clean the inlet gas stream (removing acid gases and particulates) or to develop methods to clean the Carbozyme permeator if performance declined due to HF block. We concluded that condensation of particle and particulate emissions, in the heat exchanger, could result in the formation of very sticky sulfate aerosols with a strong likelihood of obtruding the HF. These must be managed carefully and minimized to near-zero status before entering the permeator inlet stream. More extensive post-combustion cleanup is expected to be a necessary expense, independent of CO{sub 2} capture technology This finding is in agreement with views now emerging in the literature for a variety of CO{sub 2} capture methods. Task 2--Water Condensation--The key goal was to monitor and control temperature distributions within the permeator and between the permeator and its surroundings to determine whether water condensation in the pores or the HF bore would block flow, decreasing performance. A heat transfer fluid and delivery system were developed and employed. The result was near isothermal performance that avoided all instances of flow block. Direct thermocouple measurements provided the basis for developing a heat transfer model that supports prediction of heat transfer profiles for larger permeators Tasks 3. 4.1, 4.2--Temperature Range of Enzymes--The goal was to determine if the enzyme operating temperature would limit the range of thermal conditions available to the capture system. We demonstrated the ability of various isozymes (enzyme variants) to operate from 4-85 C. Consequently, the operating characteristics of the enzyme are not a controlling factor. Further, any isozyme whose upper temperature bound is at least 10 C greater than that of the planned inlet temperature will be stable under unanticipated, uncontrolled 'hiccups' in power plant operation. Task 4.4, 4.4--Examination of the Effects of SOx and NOx on Enzyme Activity (Development of Flue Gas Composition Acceptance Standards)--The purpose was to define the inlet gas profile boundaries. We examined the potential adverse effects of flue gas constituents including different acids from to develop an acceptance standard and compared these values to actual PC flue gas composition. Potential issues include changes in pH, accumulation of specific inhibitory anions and cations. A model was developed and validated by test with a SO{sub 2}-laden stream. The predicted and actual data very largely coincided. The model predicted feed stream requirements to allow continuous operation in excess of 2500 hours. We developed operational (physical and chemical) strategies to avoid or ameliorate these effects. Avoidance, the preferred strategy (noted above), is accomplished by more extensive cleanup of the flue gas stream. Task 5--Process Engineering Model--We developed a process-engineering model for two purposes. The first was to predict the physical and chemical status at each test point in the design as a basis for scale-up. The second was to model the capital and operating cost of the apparatus. These were accomplished and used to predict capex, opex and cost of energy. Task 6--Preliminary Commercialization Plan--We carried out analyses of the market and the competition by a variety of parameters. The conclusion was that there is a l

Michael C. Trachtenberg

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,255,842 entitled "Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia." This patent discloses a method for the removal of potential environmental-impacting compounds from flue gas streams. The method oxidizes some or all of the acid precursors such as sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitric oxides (NO x ) into sulfur trioxide and nitrogen dioxide, respectively. Following this step, the gas stream is then treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide to capture the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions where a fertilizer is formed.

25

Thief Process Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,521,021 entitled "Thief Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent is a novel process in which partially combusted coal is removed from the combustion chamber of a power plant using a lance (called a "thief"). This partially combusted coal acts as a thermally activated adsorbent for mercury. When it is in- jected into the duct work of the power plant downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber, mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury

26

Simulation of interaction between nickel and silicon carbide during the formation of ohmic contacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time, the quantitative model of interaction between silicide-forming metal Ni and single-crystalline SiC is developed on the basis of the mutual diffusion of components and the volume silicide-formation reaction. The model makes it possible to describe satisfactorily the basic properties of the redistribution of components during the thermal annealing and during the proton irradiation of the Ni-SiC system at elevated temperatures, specifically: the presence of an extended reaction zone, an excess of the carbon concentration over the silicon concentration at the interface with the SiC substrate, and the carbon accumulation near the surface. It is shown that the stimulation of the interaction between metal Ni and SiC by the proton irradiation at an elevated temperature occurs due to an increase in the metal diffusivity and in the constants of rates of reactions of solid-phase silicide-formation. An acceleration of metal diffusion is associated with the generation of elementary radiation defects (interstitial atoms and vacancies), while an increase in the constants of rates of solid-phase reactions is attributed to a generation of vacancies, which contribute free volume.

Aleksandrov, O. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University 'LETI' (Russian Federation)], E-mail: Aleksandr_ov@mail.ru; Kozlovski, V. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)], E-mail: Kozlovski@tuexph.stu.neva.ru

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of simultaneously removing SO/sub 2/ and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO/sub 2/ and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Wingender, R.J.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

28

Formation of electron kappa distributions due to interactions with parallel propagating whistler waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In space plasmas, charged particles are frequently observed to possess a high-energy tail, which is often modeled by a kappa-type distribution function. In this work, the formation of the electron kappa distribution in generation of parallel propagating whistler waves is investigated using fully nonlinear particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A previous research concluded that the bi-Maxwellian character of electron distributions is preserved in PIC simulations. We now demonstrate that for interactions between electrons and parallel propagating whistler waves, a non-Maxwellian high-energy tail can be formed, and a kappa distribution can be used to fit the electron distribution in time-asymptotic limit. The ?-parameter is found to decrease with increasing initial temperature anisotropy or decreasing ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency. The results might be helpful to understanding the origin of electron kappa distributions observed in space plasmas.

Tao, X., E-mail: xtao@ustc.edu.cn; Lu, Q. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China) [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Mengcheng National Geophysical Observatory, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Flue gas desulfurization: Physicochemical and biotechnological approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various flue gas desulfurization processes - physicochemical, biological, and chemobiological - for the reduction of emission of SO{sub 2} with recovery of an economic by-product have been reviewed. The physicochemical processes have been categorized as 'once-through' and 'regenerable.' The prominent once-through technologies include wet and dry scrubbing. The wet scrubbing technologies include wet limestone, lime-inhibited oxidation, limestone forced oxidation, and magnesium-enhanced lime and sodium scrubbing. The dry scrubbing constitutes lime spray drying, furnace sorbent injection, economizer sorbent injection, duct sorbent injection, HYPAS sorbent injection, and circulating fluidized bed treatment process. The regenerable wet and dry processes include the Wellman Lord's process, citrate process, sodium carbonate eutectic process, magnesium oxide process, amine process, aqueous ammonia process, Berglau Forchung's process, and Shell's process. Besides these, the recently developed technologies such as the COBRA process, the OSCAR process, and the emerging biotechnological and chemobiological processes are also discussed. A detailed outline of the chemistry, the advantages and disadvantages, and the future research and development needs for each of these commercially viable processes is also discussed.

Pandey, R.A.; Biswas, R.; Chakrabarti, T.; Devotta, S. [National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur (India)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Construction and testing of a flue-gas corrosion probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The selection of suitable materials for industrial, waste-heat- recovery systems requires assessment of corrosion of materials in various flue-gas environments. Such assessments involve exposing candidate materials to high-temperature flue gases and analyzing the effects of the exposure conditions. Because corrosion is related to flue-gas chemical composition and temperature, variations in temperature complicate the determination of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. Conversely, a relatively constant temperature allows a more accurate determination of the effects of exposure conditions. For this reason, controlled-temperature flue-gas corrosion probes were constructed and tested for exposure tests of materials. A prototype probe consisted of a silicon carbide tube specimen, supporting hardware, and instrumentation for controlling temperature by internal heating and cooling. An advanced probe included other tubular specimens. Testing of the probes in an industrial-type furnace at a nominal flue-gas temperature of 1200{degree}C revealed that temperature control was inadequate. The cooling mode imposed a substantial axial-temperature gradient on the specimens; while the heating mode imposed a smaller gradient, the heating capacity was very limited. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Federer, J.I.; McEvers, J.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Oxidation of No to No2 in Flue Gas Plumes of Power Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation of NO to NO2 in flue gas plumes takes place after release in the ... function of the turbulent mixing rate of flue gas plume and atmospheric air. The effects of ... are illustrated with the measurin...

A. J. Elshout; Dr. S. Beilke

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

RADIATIVE INTERACTION OF SHOCKS WITH SMALL INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS AS A PRE-STAGE TO STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud compression by external shocks is believed to be an important triggering mechanism for gravitational collapse and star formation in the interstellar medium. We have performed MHD simulations to investigate whether the radiative interaction between a shock wave and a small interstellar cloud can induce the conditions for Jeans instability and how the interaction is influenced by magnetic fields of different strengths and orientation. The simulations use the NIRVANA code in three dimensions with anisotropic heat conduction and radiative heating/cooling at an effective resolution of 100 cells per cloud radius. Our cloud has radius 1.5 pc, has density 17 cm{sup -3}, is embedded in a medium of density 0.17 cm{sup -3}, and is struck by a planar Mach 30 shock wave. The simulations produce dense, cold fragments similar to those of Mellema et al. and Fragile et al. We do not find any regions that are Jeans unstable but do record transient cloud density enhancements of factors {approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} for the bulk of the cloud mass, which then decline and converge toward seemingly stable net density enhancement factors {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 4}. Our run with a weak, initial magnetic field ({beta} = 10{sup 3}) perpendicular to the shock normal stands out as producing the most lasting density enhancements. We interpret this field strength as being the compromise between weak internal magnetic pressure preventing compression and sufficiently strong magnetic field to thermally insulate the condensations, thus helping them cool radiatively.

Johansson, Erik P. G.; Ziegler, Udo, E-mail: ejohansson@aip.de [Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)] [Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Evaluation of the Energy Saving Potential from Flue Gas Pressurization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

details the impact of providing a can be recovered at .1 inch wc. The work of com 500 r----------------------, FLUE GAS TEMPERATURES 200 COUNTER FLOW 100 50 _~,,_ CO-FLOW RECUPERATORS 20 10 SPECIFIC ENERGY, Btu/IbM AIR rl'-h~A:--WORK OF 5... consideration for a convective heat flue gas is entrained, the two are mixed in a exchanger is l600?F for the convective portion of the mixing section, and pressure is then recovered in recuperation equipment. It is significant that for a a diffuser...

Stanton, E. H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation was observed at SO{sub 2} concentrations of 400 ppmv and higher. In contrast, SO{sub 2} concentrations as low as 50 ppmv significantly reduced mercury oxidation by bromine, this reduction could be due to both gas and liquid phase interactions between SO{sub 2} and oxidized mercury species. The simultaneous presence of chlorine and bromine in the flue gas resulted in a slight increase in mercury oxidation above that obtained with bromine alone, the extent of the observed increase is proportional to the chlorine concentration. The results of this study can be used to understand the relative importance of gas-phase mercury oxidation by bromine and chlorine in combustion systems. Two temperature profiles were tested: a low quench (210 K/s) and a high quench (440 K/s). For chlorine the effects of quench rate were slight and hard to characterize with confidence. Oxidation with bromine proved sensitive to quench rate with significantly more oxidation at the lower rate. The data generated in this program are the first homogeneous laboratory-scale data on bromine-induced oxidation of mercury in a combustion system. Five Hg-Cl and three Hg-Br mechanisms, some published and others under development, were evaluated and compared to the new data. The Hg-halogen mechanisms were combined with submechanisms from Reaction Engineering International for NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. The homogeneous kinetics under-predicted the levels of mercury oxidation observed in full-scale systems. This shortcoming can be corrected by including heterogeneous kinetics in the model calculations.

Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Workshop on sulfur chemistry in flue gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Workshop was held at Morgantown, West Virginia, June 7-8, 1979. The presentations dealt with the chemistry of sulfur and calcium compounds in scrubbers. DOE and EPRI programs in this area are described. Ten papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Wallace, W.E. Jr.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Rubber linings as surface protection in flue gas desulfurization plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacturers of the German rubber lining industry have executed the rubber lining of over 1 million m{sup 2} of steel surfaces in over 150 scrubbers of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plants, thereby effectively protecting them against corrosion. The application of rubber linings as surface protection in FGD plants has proven effective.

Fenner, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Interaction of D2O with a Thick BaO Film: Formation of and Phase...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

readily converted to crystalline Ba(OD)2 phases during annealing in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The formation of crystalline hydroxide phases depends on the initial D2O exposure at...

38

Recovery of CO2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends Originally presented at the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers annual meeting October 4-6, 1999, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Authors: Dan G. Chapel (dan.chapel@fluor.com; 949-349-7530) Carl L. Mariz (carl.mariz@fluor.com; 949-349-7530) FluorDaniel One Fluor Drive Aliso Viejo CA, 92698 John Ernest (john.ernest@minimed.com; 818-576-4293) Advanced Quality Services Inc 11024 Balboa Blvd. PMB154, Granada Hills, CA 91344-5007 1 Recovery of CO 2 from Flue Gases: Commercial Trends Originally presented at the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers annual meeting October 4-6, 1999, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Authors: Dan Chapel - Fluor Daniel Inc., Senior Vice President Technology; Oil, Gas & Power John Ernest - Advanced Quality Services Inc., Validation Engineer

39

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biominetic Membrane for Co2 Capture from Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomimetic Membrane for CO Biomimetic Membrane for CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport, and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post

42

Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced flue gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 5 INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION AT WASTE-TO-ENERGY Summary: -Beam process is applied to flue gas compositions...

45

Analysis of a pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system for flue gas desulfurization wastewater.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coal-fired generation accounts for 45% of the United States electricity and generates harmful emissions, such as sulfur dioxide. With the implementation of Flue Gas Desulfurization… (more)

Talley, Mary Katherine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Structure and behavior of triad interactions for a Boussinesq system arising in a model for the formation sand ridges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boussinesq system describes weakly nonlinear dispersive long waves plasmas and incompressible irrotational fluids. This study presents some results regarding the structure and behavior of a system of equations that yield the spatial structure of triad interactions in the Boussinesq system. Such a system forms part of a model for the formation and evolution of sand ridges on the continental shelf. The aims of this study are to provide some insight into the behavior of the triad system and into the sand ridge model in particular.

Restrepo, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bona, J.L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Self-focusing, channel formation, and high-energy ion generation in interaction of an intense short laser pulse with a He jet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-focusing, channel formation, and high-energy ion generation in interaction of an intense short of interaction of a relativistically intense 4-TW, 400-fs laser pulse with a He gas jet. We observe a stable data, we reconstructed the axial profile of laser channel and on-axis laser intensity. The estimated

Umstadter, Donald

48

Separation of Mercury from Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Produced Gypsum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frontier Geosciences (Frontier; FGS) proposed for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER84669 that mercury control could be achieved in a wet scrubber by the addition of an amendment to the wet-FGD scrubber. To demonstrate this, a bench-scale scrubber and synthetic flue-gas supply was designed to simulate the limestone fed, wet-desulfurization units utilized by coal-fired power plants. Frontier maintains that the mercury released from these utilities can be controlled and reduced by modifying the existing equipment at installations where wet flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed. A key element of the proposal was FGS-PWN, a liquid-based mercury chelating agent, which can be employed as the amendment for removal of all mercury species which enter the wet-FGD scrubber. However, the equipment design presented in the proposal was inadequate to demonstrate these functions and no significant progress was made to substantiate these claims. As a result, funding for a Phase II continuation of this work will not be pursued. The key to implementing the technology as described in the proposal and report appears to be a high liquid-to-gas ratio (L/G) between the flue-gas and the scrubber liquor, a requirement not currently implemented in existing wet-FGD designs. It may be that this constraint can be reduced through parametric studies, but that was not apparent in this work. Unfortunately, the bench-scale system constructed for this project did not function as intended and the funds and time requested were exhausted before the separation studies could occur.

Hensman, Carl, E., P.h.D; Baker, Trevor

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project has investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests were conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit was used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months each at three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998; at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, in November 1999; and at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, in January 2001. Results of testing at each of the three sites were reported in previous technical notes. At Site 1, catalysts were tested only as powders dispersed in sand bed reactors. At Sites 2 and 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand and in commercially available forms such as extruded pellets and coated honeycomb structures. This final report summarizes and presents results from all three sites, for the various catalyst forms tested. Field testing was supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results are also summarized and discussed in this report.

Unknown

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Collimated Outflow Formation via Binary Stars. 3-D Simulations of AGB Wind and Disk Wind Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction of a slow wind from an asymptotic giant branch(AGB) star and a jet blown by an orbiting companion. The jet or "Collimated Fast Wind" is assumed to originate from an accretion disk which forms via Bondi accretion of the AGB wind or Roche lobe overflow. We present two distinct regimes in the wind-jet interaction determined by the ratio of the AGB wind to jet momentum flux. Our results show that when the wind momentum flux overwhelms the flux in the jet a more dis-ordered outflow outflow results with the jet assuming a corkscrew pattern and multiple shock structures driven into the AGB wind. In the opposite regime the jet dominates and will drive a highly collimated narrow waisted outflow. We compare our results with scenarios described by Soker & Rappaport (2000) and extrapolate the structures observed in PNe and Symbiotic stars.

F. Garcia-Arredondo; Adam Frank

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

On Magnetic Activity Band Overlap, Interaction, and the Formation of Complex Solar Active Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work has revealed an phenomenological picture of the how the $\\sim$11-year sunspot cycle of Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22-year magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particular susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown---producing flares and coronal mass ejections of most severe magnitude.

McIntosh, Scott W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Directed evolution of an ultrastable carbonic anhydrase for highly efficient carbon capture from flue gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...library generation, and high-throughput...year, coal-fired power plants are...natural-gas–fired power...1. Flue gas from a coal-fired power plant is piped...depleted flue gas is released into...strategy for the generation of very large...

Oscar Alvizo; Luan J. Nguyen; Christopher K. Savile; Jamie A. Bresson; Satish L. Lakhapatri; Earl O. P. Solis; Richard J. Fox; James M. Broering; Michael R. Benoit; Sabrina A. Zimmerman; Scott J. Novick; Jack Liang; James J. Lalonde

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Near-zero Emissions Oxy-combustion Flue Gas Purification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Near-zero Emissions Oxy-combustion Near-zero Emissions Oxy-combustion Flue Gas Purification Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) R&D Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D Program portfolio of post- and

55

Re-lining of scrubbers in flue gas desulfurization plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubber lining is used as corrosion protection material in scrubbers, tanks, pipe systems etc of European flue gas desulfurization plants. Although these rubber linings show in cases more than 15 years life, re-rubber lining is still necessary. Due to the expected higher availability of the power station units the time scale of such replacement must be kept to a minimum. As an efficient method for removal of the old lining the high pressure water systems has proven successful. Based on one such case of re-lining the working steps and time scale are demonstrated.

Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Relining of scrubbers in flue gas desulfurization plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubber lining is used as a corrosion protection material in European flue gas desulfurization plants, for scrubbers, tanks, pipe systems, etc. Although these rubber linings can last more than 15 years, relining still is necessary. The difficulty of shutting down power station units requires that the time scale of this replacement be kept to a minimum. High-pressure water systems have proven successful as an efficient method for removal of the old lining. The working steps and time scale are demonstrated for one such relining case.

Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH (Germany)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Acceleration of low energy nuclear reactions by formation of correlated states of interacting particles in dynamical systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work the most universal mechanism of essential acceleration of low energy nuclear reactions on the basis of correlated states of interacting particles is considered. This mechanism provides a giant increase of barrier penetrability under critical conditions (low energy, high barrier), where the effectiveness of “ordinary” tunneling effects is negligibly small, and can be applied to different experiments. The physical reason of an increased barrier penetrability in correlated states is connected to the modified uncertainty relation ? p ? q ? ? 2 / 4 1 - r pq 2 for correlated states and to the increase in momentum ?p and position ?q variances with increasing of correlation coefficient rpq. We have considered preconditions and methods of formation of correlated coherent states of interacting nuclei in non-stationary dynamical systems. It was shown that in real nuclear-physical systems at r pq 2 ? 1 very sharp growth (up to a factor of 1030–10100 and more!) of Coulomb barrier penetrability at very low energy of interacting particles is possible. Several successful low-energy correlated-induced fusion experiments are discussed.

Vladimir I. Vysotskii; Stanislav V. Adamenko; Mykhaylo V. Vysotskyy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Freeman, Mark C. (South Park Township, PA); Hargis, Richard A. (Canonsburg, PA); O'Dowd, William J. (Charleroi, PA)

2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interaction of D2O with a Thick BaO Film: Formation of and Phase Transitions in Barium Hydroxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of D2O with a thick BaO film (? 20 mono-layer equivalent (MLE)) on ultra-thin Al2O3/NiAl(110) was investigated with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Upon D2O exposure of a thick BaO film amorphous barium hydroxide formed at room temperature that readily converted to crystalline Ba(OD)2 phases during annealing in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The formation of crystalline hydroxide phases depends on the initial D2O exposure at 300 K. Following low D2O exposure at room temperature that results in the formation of amorphous barium hydroxide with no hydrating water, only the a-Ba(OD)2 phase was observed after 400 K annealing. The sample that was exposed to D2O extensively (i.e. hydrated amorphous barium hydroxide formed) showed a series of phase transformations as the sample was annealed to increasingly higher temperatures: amorphous- Ba(OD)2•xD2O (x>1)à b-Ba(OD)2.D2Oà b-Ba(OD)2àa-Ba(OD)2. The results of TPD experiments completely agreed with this phase transformation scheme: hydrating water molecules desorbed first at 425 K, allowing the formation of the b-Ba(OD)2.D2O phase. Desorption of water from b-Ba(OD)2.D2O at around 475 K leads to the formation of b-Ba(OD)2 and its subsequent conversion to a-Ba(OH)2. All the barium hydroxides thermally decomposed at T < 550 K. When the BaO film was exposed to D2O at 425 K crystalline b-Ba(OD)2 formed initially, which lead to the formation of a small amount of a-Ba(OD)2 as well at low D2O exposures. At high D2O exposures the dominant phase was b-Ba(OD)2.xD2O, and no a-phase was seen.

Yi, Cheol-Woo; Szanyi, Janos

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

Influence of prepulse plasma formation on neutron production from the laser-target interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of an intense ultrashort pulse laser with a planar uniform target was studied with a two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell method to determine the acceleration of deuterons and production of neutrons. A Au-CD{sub 2} double-layer planar target with thickness of {approx}1 {mu}m and a preplasma of variable length was used to generate high-energy deuterons as a precursor for neutron production. The deuteron energy and angular distributions and the neutron production from D(d,n)-{sup 3}He nuclear fusion reactions were studied as a function of the preplasma scale length and target thickness. For very thin (submicron) targets the preplasma increases the neutron yield only marginally, but for realistic targets with thickness of a few microns the preplasma enhances the neutron yield by two orders of magnitude. Both the average deuteron energy and neutron yield peak at an optimum preplasma scale length L{sub p}{sup opt}{approx_equal}1/k{sub 0} (k{sub 0} laser wave vector), which is of the order of one inverse laser wave vector.

Davis, J.; Petrov, G. M. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Formation and interaction of resonance chains in the open 3-disk system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In ballistic open quantum systems one often observes that the resonances in the complex-energy plane form a clear chain structure. Taking the open 3-disk system as a paradigmatic model system, we investigate how this chain structure is reflected in the resonance states and how it is connected to the underlying classical dynamics. Using an efficient scattering approach we observe that resonance states along one chain are clearly correlated while resonance states of different chains show an anticorrelation. Studying the phase space representations of the resonance states we find that their localization in phase space oscillate between different regions of the classical trapped set as one moves along the chains and that these oscillations are connected to a modulation of the resonance spacing. A single resonance chain is thus no WKB quantization of a single periodic orbits, but the structure of several oscillating chains arises from the interaction of several periodic orbits. We illuminate the physical mechanism behind these findings by combining the semiclassical cycle expansion with a quantum graph model.

T. Weich; S. Barkhofen; U. Kuhl; C. Poli; H. Schomerus

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regenerating spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub 2} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The process will generate only marketable by-products. Our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high-efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water-soluble phthalocyanine compounds invented by SRI as well as polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media. The final novelty of our approach is the arrangement of the absorbers in cassette (stackable) form so that the NO{sub x} absorber can be on top of the SO{sub x} absorber. This arrangement is possible only because of the high efficiency of the hollow fiber scrubbing devices, as indicated by our preliminary laboratory data. This arrangement makes it possible for the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing chambers to be separate without incurring the large ducting and gas pressure drop costs necessary if a second conventional absorber vessel were used. Because we have separate scrubbers, we will have separate liquor loops and simplify the chemical complexity of simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} scrubbing.

Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Ventura, S. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hybrid heat exchange for the compression capture of CO2 from recirculated flue gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach proposed for removal of CO2 from flue gas cools and compresses a portion of a recirculated flue-gas stream, condensing its volatile materials for capture. Recirculating the flue gas concentrates SOx, H2O and CO2 while dramatically reducing N2 and NOx, enabling this approach, which uses readily available industrial components. A hybrid system of indirect and direct-contact heat exchange performs heat and mass transfer for pollutant removal and energy recovery. Computer modeling and experimentation combine to investigate the thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, chemistry and engineering design of this integrated pollutant removal (IPR) system.

Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Summers, Cathy A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

CO2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,842,126 entitled "Co 2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases." Disclosed in this patent are novel methods for processing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from combustion gas streams. Researchers at NETL are focused on the development of novel sorbent systems that can effectively remove CO 2 and other gases in an economically feasible manner with limited impact on energy production cost. The current invention will help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by using an improved, regenerable aqueous amine and soluble potassium carbonate sorbent system. This novel solvent system may be capable of achieving CO 2 capture from larger emission streams at lower overall cost. Overview Sequestration of CO

65

Biomimetric Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomimetic memBrane for co Biomimetic memBrane for co 2 capture from flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post combustion applications - absorption, adsorption, reaction and membranes chemically facilitated absorption promises to be the most cost-effective membrane solution for post combustion application. The Carbozyme technology extracts CO 2 from low concentration, low pressure sources by means of chemical facilitation of a polymer membrane. The chemical

66

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project A DOE Assessment August 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

67

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Membrane-based carbon capture from flue gas: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There has been an increasing interest in the application of membranes to flue gas separation, primarily driven by the need of carbon capture for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Historically, there has not been general consensus about the advantage of membranes against other methods such as liquid solvents for carbon capture. However, recent research indicates that advances in materials and process designs could significantly improve the separation performance of membrane capture systems, which make membrane technology competitive with other technologies for carbon capture. This paper mainly reviews membrane separation for the application to post-combustion CO2 capture with a focus on the developments and breakthroughs in membrane material design, process engineering, and engineering economics.

Rajab Khalilpour; Kathryn Mumford; Haibo Zhai; Ali Abbas; Geoff Stevens; Edward S. Rubin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Separation of CO2 from flue gas using electrochemical cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Past research with high temperature molten carbonate electrochemical cells has shown that carbon dioxide can be separated from flue gas streams produced by pulverized coal combustion for power generation, However, the presence of trace contaminants, i.e" sulfur dioxide and nitric oxides, will impact the electrolyte within the cell. If a lower temperature cell could be devised that would utilize the benefits of commercially-available, upstream desulfurization and denitrification in the power plant, then this CO2 separation technique can approach more viability in the carbon sequestration area, Recent work has led to the assembly and successful operation of a low temperature electrochemical cell. In the proof-of-concept testing with this cell, an anion exchange membrane was sandwiched between gas-diffusion electrodes consisting of nickel-based anode electrocatalysts on carbon paper. When a potential was applied across the cell and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide was flowed over the wetted electrolyte on the cathode side, a stream of CO2 to O2 was produced on the anode side, suggesting that carbonate/ bicarbonate ions are the CO2 carrier in the membrane. Since a mixture of CO 2 and 02 is produced, the possibility exists to use this stream in oxy-firing of additional fuel. From this research, a novel concept for efficiently producing a carbon dioxide rich effiuent from combustion of a fossil fuel was proposed. Carbon dioxide and oxygen are captured from the flue gas of a fossilfuel combustor by one or more electrochemical cells or cell stacks. The separated stream is then transferred to an oxy-fired combustor which uses the gas stream for ancillary combustion, ultimately resulting in an effluent rich in carbon dioxide, A portion of the resulting flow produced by the oxy-fired combustor may be continuously recycled back into the oxy-fired combustor for temperature control and an optimal carbon dioxide rich effluent.

Pennline, H.W; Granite, E.J.; Luebke, D.R; Kitchin, J.R; Landon, J.; Weiland, L.M.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

71

Membrane Process to Sequester CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MeMbrane Process to sequester co MeMbrane Process to sequester co 2 froM Power Plant flue Gas Background Carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to contribute significantly to global warming climate change. The direct approach to address this problem is to capture the carbon dioxide in flue gas and sequester it underground. However, the high cost of separating and capturing CO 2 with conventional technologies prevents the adoption of this approach. This project investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a new membrane process to capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. Description Direct CO 2 capture from power plant flue gas has been the subject of many studies. Currently, CO 2 capture with amine absorption seems to be the leading candidate technology-although membrane processes have been suggested. The principal

72

Flue gas desulfurization : cost and functional analysis of large-scale and proven plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flue Gas Desulfurization is a method of controlling the emission of sulfurs, which causes the acid rain. The following study is based on 26 utilities which burn coal, have a generating capacity of at least 50 Megawatts ...

Tilly, Jean

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine-Appended Metal-Organic Framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) Previous Next List Thomas M. McDonald, Woo Ram Lee, Jarad A....

74

New Developments in Closed Loop Combustion Control Using Flue Gas Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New developments in closed loop combustion control are causing radical changes in the way combustion control systems are implemented. The recent availability of in line flue gas analyzers and microprocessor technology are teaming up to produce...

Nelson, R. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue… (more)

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Using coke-battery flue gas to dry coal batch before coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The utilization of heat from coke-battery flue gases and other potential secondary energy resources in drying coal batch prior to coking is considered. The main factors that influence ... . The reduction in moist...

A. Ya. Eremin; V. G. Mishchikhin; S. G. Stakheev; R. R. Gilyazetdinov…

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cost-Effective Abatement of Acidifying Emissions with Flue Gas Cleaning Vs. Fuel Switching in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acidifying emissions from energy production and industry have decreased considerably during the...e.g. flue gas desulphurization. In this study the Finnish cost curves for SO2 and NOx...were first calculated to p...

N. Karvosenoja; P. Hillukkala; M. Johansson; S. Syril

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Environ.Speciation in a 100-MW Coal-Fired Boiler with Low-NOxControl Technologies for Coal-Fired Power Plants, DOE/NETL

Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Load Preheating Using Flue Gases from a Fuel-Fired Heating System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet discusses how the thermal efficiency of a process heating system can be improved significantly by using heat contained in furnace flue gases to preheat the furnace load.

80

CO2 Capture from Flue Gas Using SOlid Molecular Basket Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas Using Solid from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

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81

CO2 Removal from Flue Gas Using MIcroporous Metal Organic Frameworks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removal from Flue Gas Using Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D

82

Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multi-component removal in flue gas by aqua ammonia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new method for the removal of environmental compounds from gaseous streams, in particular, flue gas streams. The new method involves first oxidizing some or all of the acid anhydrides contained in the gas stream such as sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) and nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N.sub.2O) to sulfur trioxide (SO.sub.3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2). The gas stream is subsequently treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide which captures the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions. The products of the reactions can be collected as slurries, dewatered, and dried for use as fertilizers, or once the slurries have been dewatered, used directly as fertilizers. The ammonium hydroxide can be regenerated and recycled for use via thermal decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate, one of the products formed. There are alternative embodiments which entail stoichiometric scrubbing of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides with subsequent separate scrubbing of carbon dioxide.

Yeh, James T. (Bethel Park, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Inc. (CONSOL R and D) is teaming with SynAggs, Inc. and Duquesne Light to design, construct, and operate a 500 lb/h continuous pilot plant to produce road construction aggregate from a mixture of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, fly ash, and other components. The proposed project is divided into six tasks: (1) Project Management; (2) Mix Design Evaluation; (3) Process Design; (4) Construction; (5) Start-Up and Operation; and (6) Reporting. In this quarter, Tasks 1 and 2 were completed. A project management plan (Task 1) was issued to DOE on October 22, 1998 . The mix design evaluation (Task 2) with Duquesne Light Elrama Station FGD sludge and Allegheny Power Hatfields Ferry Station fly ash was completed. Eight semi-continuous bench-scale tests were conducted to examine the effects of mix formulation on aggregate properties. A suitable mix formulation was identified to produce aggregates that meet specifications of the American Association of State High Transport Officials (AASHTO) as Class A aggregate for use in highway construction. The mix formulation was used in designing the flow sheet of the pilot plant. The process design (Task 3) is approximately 80% completed. Equipment was evaluated to comply with design requirements. The design for the curing vessel was completed by an outside engineering firm. All major equipment items for the pilot plant, except the curing vessel, were ordered. Pilot plant construction (Task 4) was begun in October. The Hazardous Substance Plan was issued to DOE. The Allegheny County (PA) Heat Department determined that an air emission permit is not required for operation of the pilot plant.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to carry out an experimental program to enable development and design of near zero emissions (NZE) CO{sub 2} processing unit (CPU) for oxy-combustion plants burning high and low sulfur coals and to perform commercial viability assessment. The NZE CPU was proposed to produce high purity CO{sub 2} from the oxycombustion flue gas, to achieve > 95% CO{sub 2} capture rate and to achieve near zero atmospheric emissions of criteria pollutants. Two SOx/NOx removal technologies were proposed depending on the SOx levels in the flue gas. The activated carbon process was proposed for power plants burning low sulfur coal and the sulfuric acid process was proposed for power plants burning high sulfur coal. For plants burning high sulfur coal, the sulfuric acid process would convert SOx and NOx in to commercial grade sulfuric and nitric acid by-products, thus reducing operating costs associated with SOx/NOx removal. For plants burning low sulfur coal, investment in separate FGD and SCR equipment for producing high purity CO{sub 2} would not be needed. To achieve high CO{sub 2} capture rates, a hybrid process that combines cold box and VPSA (vacuum pressure swing adsorption) was proposed. In the proposed hybrid process, up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in the cold box vent stream would be recovered by CO{sub 2} VPSA and then it would be recycled and mixed with the flue gas stream upstream of the compressor. The overall recovery from the process will be > 95%. The activated carbon process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx, thus exceeding the performance targets of >99% and >95%, respectively. The process was also found to be suitable for power plants burning both low and high sulfur coals. Sulfuric acid process did not meet the performance expectations. Although it could achieve high SOx (>99%) and NOx (>90%) removal efficiencies, it could not produce by-product sulfuric and nitric acids that meet the commercial product specifications. The sulfuric acid will have to be disposed of by neutralization, thus lowering the value of the technology to same level as that of the activated carbon process. Therefore, it was decided to discontinue any further efforts on sulfuric acid process. Because of encouraging results on the activated carbon process, it was decided to add a new subtask on testing this process in a dual bed continuous unit. A 40 days long continuous operation test confirmed the excellent SOx/NOx removal efficiencies achieved in the batch operation. This test also indicated the need for further efforts on optimization of adsorption-regeneration cycle to maintain long term activity of activated carbon material at a higher level. The VPSA process was tested in a pilot unit. It achieved CO{sub 2} recovery of > 95% and CO{sub 2} purity of >80% (by vol.) from simulated cold box feed streams. The overall CO{sub 2} recovery from the cold box VPSA hybrid process was projected to be >99% for plants with low air ingress (2%) and >97% for plants with high air ingress (10%). Economic analysis was performed to assess value of the NZE CPU. The advantage of NZE CPU over conventional CPU is only apparent when CO{sub 2} capture and avoided costs are compared. For greenfield plants, cost of avoided CO{sub 2} and cost of captured CO{sub 2} are generally about 11-14% lower using the NZE CPU compared to using a conventional CPU. For older plants with high air intrusion, the cost of avoided CO{sub 2} and capture CO{sub 2} are about 18-24% lower using the NZE CPU. Lower capture costs for NZE CPU are due to lower capital investment in FGD/SCR and higher CO{sub 2} capture efficiency. In summary, as a result of this project, we now have developed one technology option for NZE CPU based on the activated carbon process and coldbox-VPSA hybrid process. This technology is projected to work for both low and high sulfur coal plants. The NZE CPU technology is projected to achieve near zero stack emissions

Minish Shah; Nich Degenstein; Monica Zanfir; Rahul Solunke; Ravi Kumar; Jennifer Bugayong; Ken Burgers

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Dynamic Tests and Results in an Oxy-fuel Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor with Warm Flue Gas Recycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic Tests and Results in an Oxy-fuel Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor with Warm Flue Gas Recycle ... Dynamic step change tests concerning the coal feed rate and coal type were conducted. ... In the dynamic tests, the oxygen concentration in the flue gas fluctuates in the form of a sinusoidal wave because of the fast volatile combustion and the delay in the char ignition. ...

Jian-xin Zhou; Zhuang Shao; Feng-qi Si; Zhi-gao Xu

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

CO{sub 2} Capture from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a new generation of solid, regenerable polymeric molecular basket sorbent (MBS) for more cost-efficient capture and separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The primary goal is to develop a cost-effective MBS sorbent with better thermal stability. To improve the cost-effectiveness of MBS, we have explored commercially available and inexpensive support to replace the more expensive mesoporous molecular sieves like MCM-41 and SBA- 15. In addition, we have developed some advanced sorbent materials with 3D pore structure such as hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) to improve the CO{sub 2} working capacity of MBS, which can also reduce the cost for the whole CO{sub 2} capture process. During the project duration, the concern regarding the desorption rate of MBS sorbents has been raised, because lower desorption rate increases the desorption time for complete regeneration of the sorbent which in turn leads to a lower working capacity if the regeneration time is limited. Thus, the improvement in the thermal stability of MBS became a vital task for later part of this project. The improvement in the thermal stability was performed via increasing the polymer density either using higher molecular weight PEI or PEI cross-linking with an organic compound. Moreover, we have used the computational approach to estimate the interaction of CO{sub 2} with different MBSs for the fundamental understanding of CO{sub 2} sorption, which may benefit the development, design and modification of the sorbents and the process.

Fillerup, Eric; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Wang, Dongxiang; Guo, Jiahua; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Average Reservoir Fluid Pro erties Before Break- Through Ultimate Economic Re cover Fraction OIP 1(a) (b) (c) 2(a) (b) (c) 3(a) (b) (c) (b) (c) (d) 5(*) (b) (c} 6(a) (b) (c) 3800 4200 4600 3800 4200 4600 3800 4ZOO 4600 3000...-through recovery of 75 per cent. Nitrogen resulted in an 81 per cent break- through recovery, after reaching miscibility at 4160 psi. Although nitrogen gave a higher break-through recovery than flue gas, flue gas 25 0. 80 4600 psi 4200 psi f4 0 0 0 'g 4...

Maxwell, H. D.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Impact of additives for enhanced sulfur dioxide removal on re-emissions of mercury in wet flue gas desulfurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The wet flue gas desulfurization process (FGD) in fossil fired power plants offers the advantage of simultaneously removing SO2 and other water soluble pollutants, such as certain oxidized mercury compounds (Hg2+). In order to maximize SO2 removal efficiency of installed FGD units, organic additives can be utilized. In the context of multi-pollutant control by wet FGD, the effect of formic and adipic acid on redox reactions of dissolved mercury compounds is investigated with a continuously operated lab-scale test-rig. For sulfite ( SO 3 2 - ) concentrations above a certain critical value, their potential as reducing agent leads to rapidly increasing formation and re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg0). Increasing chloride concentration and decreasing pH and slurry temperature have been identified as key factors for depressing Hg0 re-emissions. Both organic additives have a negative impact on Hg-retention and cause increased Hg0 re-emissions in the wet FGD process, with formic acid being the significantly stronger reducing agent. Different pathways of Hg2+ reduction were identified by qualitative interpretation of the pH-dependence and by comparison of activation enthalpies and activation entropies. While the first mechanism proposed identifies SO 3 2 - as reducing agent and is therefore relevant for any FGD process, the second mechanism involves the formate anion, thus being exclusively relevant for \\{FGDs\\} utilizing formic acid as additive.

Barna Heidel; Melanie Hilber; Günter Scheffknecht

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Mediating gel formation from structurally controlled poly(electrolytes) through multiple "head-to-body" electrostatic interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tuning the chain-end functionality of a short-chain cationic homopolymer, owing to the nature of the initiator used in the ATRP polymerisation step, can be used to mediate the formation of a gel of this poly(electrolyte) in water. While a neutral end group gives a solution of low viscosity, a highly homogeneous gel is obtained with a phosphonate anionic moiety, as characterized by rheometry and diffusion NMR. This novel type of supramolecular control over poly(electrolytic) gel formation could find potential use in a variety of applications in the field of electroactive materials.

Hassan Srour; Olivier Ratel; Mathieu Leocmach; Emma A. Adams; Sandrine Denis-Quanquin; Vinukrishnan Appukuttan; Nicolas Taberlet; Sébastien Manneville; Jean-Charles Majesté; Christian Carrot; Chantal Andraud; Cyrille Monnereau

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

Carbon dioxide absorber and regeneration assemblies useful for power plant flue gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are apparatus and method to treat large amounts of flue gas from a pulverized coal combustion power plant. The flue gas is contacted with solid sorbents to selectively absorb CO.sub.2, which is then released as a nearly pure CO.sub.2 gas stream upon regeneration at higher temperature. The method is capable of handling the necessary sorbent circulation rates of tens of millions of lbs/hr to separate CO.sub.2 from a power plant's flue gas stream. Because pressurizing large amounts of flue gas is cost prohibitive, the method of this invention minimizes the overall pressure drop in the absorption section to less than 25 inches of water column. The internal circulation of sorbent within the absorber assembly in the proposed method not only minimizes temperature increases in the absorber to less than 25.degree. F., but also increases the CO.sub.2 concentration in the sorbent to near saturation levels. Saturating the sorbent with CO.sub.2 in the absorber section minimizes the heat energy needed for sorbent regeneration. The commercial embodiments of the proposed method can be optimized for sorbents with slower or faster absorption kinetics, low or high heat release rates, low or high saturation capacities and slower or faster regeneration kinetics.

Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

Formation of methane on Mars by fluid-rock interaction in the crust James R. Lyons,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alteration of basaltic crust by carbon-bearing hydrothermal fluid can produce the required CH4 flux of 1 Ã? km intruded during the past 104 years is capable of driving the alteration, if all carbon is supplied and hydrothermal alteration on Mars. Citation: Lyons, J. R., C. Manning, and F. Nimmo (2005), Formation of methane

Nimmo, Francis

93

Integrated flue gas treatment for simulataneous emission control and heat rate improvement - demonstration project at Ravenswood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented for electric-utility, residual-oil fired, field demonstration testing of advanced-design, heat-recovery type, flue gas sub-coolers that incorporate sulfite-alkali-based wet scrubbing for efficient removal of volatile and semi-volatile trace elements, sub-micron solid particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. By innovative adaptation of wet collector system operation with methanol injection into the rear boiler cavity to convert flue-gas NO to No{sub 2}, simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} is also achieved. The focus of this integrated flue gas treatment (IFGT) technology development and demonstration-scale, continuous performance testing is an upward-gas-flow, indirectly water-cooled, condensing heat exchanger fitted with acid-proof, teflon-covered tubes and tubesheets and that provides a unique condensing (non-evaporative) wet-scrubbing mode to address air toxics control objectives of new Clean Air Act, Title III. Advantageous trace-metal condensation/nucleation/agglomeration along with substantially enhanced boiler efficiency is accomplished in the IFGT system by use of boiler makeup water as a heat sink in indirectly cooling boiler flue gas to a near-ambient-temperature, low-absolute-humidity, water-saturated state. Moreover, unique, innocuous, stack systems design encountered with conventional high-humidity, wet-scrubber operations. The mechanical design of this advanced flue-gas cooling/scrubbing equipment is based on more than ten years of commercial application of such units is downward-gas-flow design/operation for energy recovery, e.g. in preheating of makeup water, in residual-oil and natural-gas fired boiler operations.

Heaphy, J.; Carbonara, J.; Cressner, A. [Consolidated Edison Company, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Flue gas carbon dioxide sequestration during water softening with ion-exchange fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the use of ion-exchange fibers (IX fibers) to permanently sequester carbon dioxide present in flue gas into an aqueous phase as calcium or magnesium alkalinity while concurrently softening hard water. The only process inputs besides carbon dioxide (or flue gas) are snowmelt (or rainwater); no other chemicals are required for the regeneration of the IX fibers. Importantly, the process is not energy intensive and carbon dioxide does not need to be compressed to excessive pressures (>150 psi) for efficient use. Sources of carbon dioxide do not require concentration and, therefore, the use of raw flue gas (similar to 17% CO{sub 2}) is feasible with the rate of sequestration governed only by the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. While valid for flue gas obtained from any combustion process (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.), emissions from oil or gas combustion may be more appropriate for use in the described process due to the absence of mercury and particulates. It should also be noted that the presence of sulfur dioxide in flue gas would not adversely affect the process and may even enhance regeneration efficiency. The only product of the proposed process is an environmentally benign regenerant stream containing calcium and/or magnesium alkalinity. The unique property of IX fibers that makes the proposed process both environmentally sustainable and economically feasible is amenability to efficient regeneration with carbon dioxide and harvested snowmelt. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason why IX fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration using snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide; 95% calcium recovery was attained at a CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 6.8 atm. The energy balance for a typical electric utility shows that up to 1% of carbon dioxide emitted during combustion would be sequestered in the softening process.

Greenleaf, J.E.; SenGupta, A.K. [Lafayette College, Easton, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Methods for reducing emissions of dioxins and furans in flue gases at plants burning solid domestic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods are discussed for reducing emissions of toxic chlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and dibenzo-furans in flue gases at plants which burn solid domestic waste. Results are presented from a study of ... number of th...

A. N. Tugov; V. F. Moskvichev; L. G. Fedorov…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Life cycle considerations of the flue gas desulphurization system at a lignite-fired power plant in Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulphurization (FGD) system has been installed at the biggest lignite-fired power generation plant in Thailand to reduce the large...2...emission. In order to understand the costs and benefits, bot...

Sate Sampattagul; Seizo Kato…

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compressin of CO2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flue Gas Purification Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SO X /NO X Reactions During Compression of CO 2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion Background Oxy-combustion in a pulverized coal-fired power station produces a raw carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) product containing contaminants such as water vapor, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon from impurities in the oxygen used and any air leakage into the system. Acid gases are also produced as combustion products, such as sulfur oxides (SO

98

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

99

Advanced Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide Technology for the Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gases by Shrikar Chakravarti (shrikar_chakravarti@praxair.com; 716-879-4760) Amitabh Gupta (ami_gupta@praxair.com; 716-879-2194) Balazs Hunek (balazs_hunek@praxair.com; 716-879-2250) Praxair, Inc. Process & Systems R&D, CO 2 Technology 175 East Park Drive, P.O. Box 44 Tonawanda, NY 14150 USA key words: flue gas, carbon dioxide, separation, amine absorption, oxygen tolerant process, amine blends First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 15-17, 2001 Copyright 2001, Praxair Technology, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1 Abstract Cost effective carbon sequestration schemes have been identified as a key need for dealing with carbon dioxide's (CO 2 ) impact on global climate change. Two main

100

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP mercury control In low Sulfur eaStern bItumInouS coal flue GaS Background Full-scale field testing has demonstrated the effectiveness of activated carbon injection (ACI) as a mercury-specific control technology for certain coal-fired power plants, depending on the plant's coal feedstock and existing air pollution control device configuration. In a typical configuration, powdered activated carbon (PAC) is injected downstream of the plant's air heater and upstream of the existing particulate control device - either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter (FF). The PAC adsorbs the mercury from the combustion flue gas and is subsequently captured along with the fly ash in the ESP or FF. ACI can have some negative side

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101

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture from Flue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption Project No.: FG26-05NT42488 Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Hampton University researched a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption concept, phase transitional absorption, that utilizes a two-part proprietary absorbent consisting of an activated agent dissolved in a solvent. Phase separation of the activated agent from the chemical solvent occurs during CO2 absorption and physical separation of the two phases exiting the absorber reduces the volume of process liquid requiring thermal regeneration. This unique aspect of phase transitional absorption also decreases the amount of energy (i.e., steam) required to liberate the CO2. If the proper liquid

102

The Flakt-Hydro process: flue gas desulfurisation by use of seawater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABB's seawater scrubbing process (the Flakt-Hydro process) for flue gas desulfurisation has recently triggered much interest among power producers because of its simple operating principle and high reliability. The process uses seawater to absorb and neutralise sulfur dioxide in flue gases. The absorbed gas is oxidised and returned to the ocean in the form it originated in the first place, namely as dissolved sulfate salts. The process uses the seawater downstream of the power plant condensers. This paper gives an introduction to the basic principle of the process and presents some of the recent power plant applications, namely at the Paiton Private Power Project, Phase 1 (2 ? 670 Mwe) in Indonesia and at the Shenzhen West Power Plant, Unit 2 (300 MWe) in China.

Wu Zhao Xia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Membrane Process to Capture CO2 from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Membrane Process to Capture CO Membrane Process to Capture CO 2 from Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

104

MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEQUESTER CO2 FROM POWER PLANT FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of using a membrane process to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. During this program, MTR developed a novel membrane (Polaris™) with a CO2 permeance tenfold higher than commercial CO2-selective membranes used in natural gas treatment. The Polaris™ membrane, combined with a process design that uses a portion of combustion air as a sweep stream to generate driving force for CO2 permeation, meets DOE post-combustion CO2 capture targets. Initial studies indicate a CO2 separation and liquefaction cost of $20 - $30/ton CO2 using about 15% of the plant energy at 90% CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant. Production of the Polaris™ CO2 capture membrane was scaled up with MTR’s commercial casting and coating equipment. Parametric tests of cross-flow and countercurrent/sweep modules prepared from this membrane confirm their near-ideal performance under expected flue gas operating conditions. Commercial-scale, 8-inch diameter modules also show stable performance in field tests treating raw natural gas. These findings suggest that membranes are a viable option for flue gas CO2 capture. The next step will be to conduct a field demonstration treating a realworld power plant flue gas stream. The first such MTR field test will capture 1 ton CO2/day at Arizona Public Service’s Cholla coal-fired power plant, as part of a new DOE NETL funded program.

Tim Merkel; Karl Amo; Richard Baker; Ramin Daniels; Bilgen Friat; Zhenjie He; Haiqing Lin; Adrian Serbanescu

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. Progress report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants like SO2 NOx HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan the USA Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

Andrzej G. Chmielewski; Bogdan Tyminski; Zbigniew Zimek; Andrzej Pawelec; Janusz Licki

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This topical report covers Phase 2b, which is the construction phase of pilot demonstration subsystems that make up the integrated plant. The subsystems included are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant is now capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The topical report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. At the end of Phase 2b, the CCMP pilot demonstration is fully ready for testing.

Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Analysis of CO2 Separation from Flue Gas, Pipeline Transportation, and Sequestration in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was written to satisfy a milestone of the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration task of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration project. The report begins to assess the costs associated with separating the CO2 from flue gas and then injecting it into an unminable coal seam. The technical challenges and costs associated with CO2 separation from flue gas and transportation of the separated CO2 from the point source to an appropriate sequestration target was analyzed. The report includes the selection of a specific coal-fired power plant for the application of CO2 separation technology. An appropriate CO2 separation technology was identified from existing commercial technologies. The report also includes a process design for the chosen technology tailored to the selected power plant that used to obtain accurate costs of separating the CO2 from the flue gas. In addition, an analysis of the costs for compression and transportation of the CO2 from the point-source to an appropriate coal bed sequestration site was included in the report.

Eric P. Robertson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Corrosion protection by means of rubber linings in a flue gas scrubber made of concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rubber linings have been applied as a corrosion protection measure for steel surfaces, particularly in the absorbers, in the flue gas desulfurization plants of a large number of power stations in Europe and have decidedly proven their effectiveness. The rubber linings applied consist of either precured and/or cold-curing rubber sheets. In the course of the past five to seven years, the eastern European states have also begun retro-fitting their existing power stations with flue gas desulfurization plants. As the first of its kind, a scrubber in the flue gas desulfurization plant of the Konin Power Station in Poland, which operates on the basis of the limestone-gypsum process, was constructed of concrete. In this case also, the corrosion protection measures implemented consisted in the application of a precured rubber lining on the basis of butyl rubber. A surface area measuring 1,500 m{sup 2} of the concrete absorber was protected by means of this corrosion protection system.

Fenner, J.; Matos, A.; Seiffert, W. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, installation of a liquid flue gas conditioning system was completed at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant, Unit 3. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, will be evaluated. In addition, ammonia conditioning will also be compared.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

114

Flue-gas sulfur-recovery plant for a multifuel boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1991, a Finnish fluting mill brought on stream a flue-gas desulfurization plant with an SO{sub 2} reduction capacity of 99%. The desulfurization plant enabled the mill to discontinue the use of its sulfur burner for SO{sub 2} production. The required makeup sulfur is now obtained in the form of sulfuric acid used by the acetic acid plant, which operates in conjunction with the evaporating plant. The mill`s sulfur consumption has decreased by about 6,000 tons/year (13.2 million lb/year) because of sulfur recycling.

Miettunen, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland); Aitlahti, S. [Savon Sellu Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reducing the cost of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases using membrane technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of CO{sub 2} capture using membrane technology from coal-fired power-plant flue gas typically assume compression of the feed to achieve a driving force across the membrane. The high CO{sub 2} capture cost of these systems reflects the need to compress the low-pressure feed gas (1 bar) and the low CO{sub 2} purity of the product stream. This article investigates how costs for CO{sub 2} capture using membranes can be reduced by operating under vacuum conditions. The flue gas is pressurized to 1.5 bar, whereas the permeate stream is at 0.08 bar. Under these operating conditions, the capture cost is U.S. $54/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided compared to U.S. $82/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided using membrane processes with a pressurized feed. This is a. reduction of 35%. The article also investigates the effect on the capture cost of improvements in CO{sub 2} permeability and selectivity. The results show that the capture cost can be reduced to less than U.S. $25/tonne CO{sub 2} avoided when the CO{sub 2} permeability is 300 bar, CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity is 250, and the membrane cost is U.S. $10/m{sup 2}.

Ho, M.T.; Allinson, G.W.; Wiley, D.E. [University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (Australia)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Quarterly technical report No. 8, [January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first quarter of 1994, we continued work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. We also began work on Task 7. In Task 2, we incorporated 4.5% O{sub 2} into our simulated flue gas stream during this quarter`s NO{sub x}-absorption experiments. We also ran experiments using Cobalt (II)-phthalocyanine as an absorbing agent We observed higher absorption capacities when using this solution with the simulated flue gas containing O{sub 2}. In Task 3, we synthesized a few EDTA polymer analogs. We also began scaled up synthesis of Co(II)-phthalocyanine for use in Task 5. In Task 4, we performed experiments for measuring distribution coefficients (m{sub i}) Of SO{sub 2} between aqueous and organic phases. This was done using the liquor regenerating apparatus described in Task 6. In Task 5, we began working with Co(II)-phthalocyanine in the 301 fiber hollow fiber contactor. We also calculated mass transfer coefficients (K{sub olm}) for these runs, and we observed that the gas side resistance dominates mass transfer. In Task 6, in the liquor regeneration apparatus, we observed 90% recovery of SO{sub 2} by DMA from water used as the scrubbing solution. We also calculated the distribution of coefficients (m{sub i}). In Task 7, we established and began implementing a methodology for completing this task.

Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Ventura, S. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumick, D. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States)] [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant, and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.

DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States). Department of Soil Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Flue gas cleaning with ammonia reduces SO{sub 2} emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the technical and commercial development and basis for application in North America for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) of the AMASOX{reg_sign} (i.e. Ammonia Absorbs Sulfur Oxides) Process of Krupp Uhde (Germany) employing ammonia reagent. This process technology has been emerging slowly and stepwise over a twenty-year period in reaching the present stage of commercial applicability. The discussion herein considers the need for accommodating to and advantageously addressing the increasing number of applications with high and ultra-high flue-gas concentrations of SO{sub 2} at the boiler outlet accompanied by significant levels of other pollutants. Key measures in accomplishing this include use of important process innovations. This, as well, calls for the effective use, when applicable, of wet electrostatic precipitator mist-elimination means to gain low/minimum-opacity stack plume trailoff in wet scrubber use together with reduction of air toxics to low concentrations. With cost-effectiveness in electric utility service, detailed herein, superior to FGD processes commonly used to date in high-sulfur service, utilization of this technology is expanding. Important, potentially trend-setting types of powerplant applications of ammonia FGD are reviewed to identify foreseen market sectors and procurement trends that will at the same time serve to substantially broaden lowest-cost coal utilization.

Emish, G.J. [Krupp Wilputte Corp., Bridgeville, PA (United States); Schulte, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany); Ellison, W. [Ellison Consultants, Monrovia, MD (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA. This topical report covers Subphase 2a which is the design phase of pilot demonstration subsystems. Materials of construction have been selected and proven in both lab scale and prototype testing to be acceptable for the reagent conditions of interest. The target application for the reactive carbonate material has been selected based upon small-scale feasibility studies and the design of a continuous fiber board production line has been completed. The electrochemical cell architecture and components have been selected based upon both lab scale and prototype testing. The appropriate quality control and diagnostic techniques have been developed and tested along with the required instrumentation and controls. Finally the demonstrate site infrastructure, NEPA categorical exclusion, and permitting is all ready for the construction and installation of the new units and upgrades.

Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs consists of infinite-rod secondary building units bound by DOBDC resulting in 1D hexagonal pores about 11 angstroms in diameter. Surface areas range from 800 to 1500 sq m/g for the different MOFs. Mg/DOBDC outperformed all MOF and zeolite materials evaluated to date, with about 25 wt% CO{sub 2} captured by this MOF at flue gas conditions ({approx}0.13 atm CO{sub 2} pressure, 311K). In simulated flue gas without oxygen, the zero-length (ZLC) system was very useful in quickly simulating the effect of long term exposure to impurities on the MOFs. Detailed adsorption studies on MOF pellets have shown that water does not inhibit CO{sub 2} adsorption for MOFs as much as it does for typical zeolites. Moreover, some MOFs retain a substantial CO{sub 2} capacity even with a modest water loading at room temperature. Molecular modeling was a key activity in three areas of our earlier DOE/NETL-sponsored MOF-based research on CC. First, the team was able to effectively simulate CO{sub 2} and other gas adsorption isotherms for more than 20 MOFs, and the knowledge obtained was used to help predict new MOF structures that should be effective for CO{sub 2} adsorption at low pressure. The team also showed that molecular modeling could be utilized to predict the hydrothermal stability of a given MOF. Finally, the team showed that low moisture level exposure actually enhanced the CO{sub 2} adsorption performance of a particular MOF, HKUST-1.

David A Lesch

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture ... The buffered solution is then sent back to the top of the tower, where it is sprayed into the upflowing oxyfuel gas stream, condensing and cleaning the ash-laden gas. ...

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen Gerdemann; John Clark; Cathy Summers

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was underway at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. This represents the first long-term full-scale testing of this class of products. Modifications to the flue gas conditioning system at Jim Bridger, including development of alternate injection lances, was also undertaken to improve chemical spray distribution and to avoid spray deposition to duct interior surfaces. Also in this quarter, a firm commitment was received for another long-term test of the cohesivity additives. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, performance testing of flue gas conditioning was completed at the PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. The product tested, ADA-43, was a combination resistivity modifier with cohesivity polymers. The product was effective as a flue gas conditioner. However, ongoing problems with in-duct deposition resulting from the flue gas conditioning were not entirely resolved. Primarily these problems were the result of difficulties encountered with retrofit of an existing spray humidification system. Eventually it proved necessary to replace all of the original injection lances and to manually bypass the PLC-based air/liquid feed control. This yielded substantial improvement in spray atomization and system reliability. However, the plant opted not to install a permanent system. Also in this quarter, preparations continued for a test of the cohesivity additives at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant, Unit 3. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning is employed here on one unit, but there is interest in liquid cohesivity additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cement kiln flue dust as a source of lime and potassium in four East Texas soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the blight encountered the previous year. Forage sorghum (DeKalb SX-11) was planted 5/1/73, 4/26/74 and, 6/9/75) . Yield of corn grain, corn forage, and sorghum forage were determined for the three growing seasons. Leaf samples were also taken... by rate and source of lime, de th, and time. Treatment k /ha 0 mo. 3 mo. 8 mo. 11 mo. 17 mo. 0 to 15 cm depth 8000 flue dust 2000 5QQ II II S. 6 a s. s a 5. 6 a 6. 9 c 6. 1 ab 5. 7 a 7. 2 c 6. 5 bc 5. 9 ab 6. 5 bc 7. 0 c 6. 0 abc 6. 4 b 5. 6 a...

Poole, Warren David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Management of dry flue gas dsulfurization by-products in underground mines - an update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, the U.S. produced about 100 million tons of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) primarily from conventional coal-fired boilers. The requirement to reduce SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions to comply with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) force utilities to adopt advanced combustion and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, such as wet scrubbers, fluidized bed combustion (FBC), dry sorbent duct or furnace injection. These technologies will double to triple the amount of FGD by-products while only slightly increasing the amounts of conventional combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag. This paper describes a program concerned with the underground disposal of combustion products in abandoned underground coal mines.

Chugh, Y.P.; Thomasson, E.M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The desulfurization of flue gas at the Mae Moh Power Plant Units 12 and 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As pollution of air, water and ground increasingly raises worldwide concern, the responsible national and international authorities establish and issue stringent regulations in order to maintain an acceptable air quality in the environment. In Thailand, the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) takes full responsibility in environmental protection matters as well as in generating the electricity needed to supply the country`s very rapid power demand growth. Due to the rapidly increasing electricity demand of the country, EGAT had decided to install two further lignite-fired units of 300 MW each (Units 12 and 13) at the Mae Moh power generation station and they are now under construction. The arrangement and the capacity of all the power plant units are as shown. In 1989, EGAT started the work on the flue gas desulfurization system of Mae Moh power plant units 12 and 13 as planned. A study has been conducted to select the most suitable and most economical process for flue gas desulfurization. The wet scrubbing limestone process was finally selected for the two new units. Local limestone will be utilized in the process, producing a by-product of gypsum. Unfortunately, natural gypsum is found in abundance in Thailand, so the produced gypsum will be treated as landfill by mixing it with ash from the boilers of the power plants and then carrying it to the ash dumping area. The water from the waste ash water lake is utilized in the process as much as possible to minimize the requirement of service water, which is a limited resource. The Mae Moh power generation station is situated in the northern region of Thailand, 600 km north of Bangkok and about 30 km east of the town of Lampang, close to the Mae Moh lignite mine. Three lignite-fired units (Units 1-3) of 75 MW each, four units (Units 4-7) of 150 MW each and four units (Units 8-11) of 300 MW each are in operation.

Haemapun, C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

Robert Patton

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is leading an effort to find novel approaches to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources. The Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to encourage development of processes that

132

Separation of Fine Particles from Gases in Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System Using a Cascade of Double Towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Separation of Fine Particles from Gases in Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization System Using a Cascade of Double Towers ... The authors thank the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (No. 2008AA05Z306), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (No. BK2008283), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University for their financial support. ... with high performance by cascading packed columns. ...

Jingjing Bao; Linjun Yang; Shijuan Song; Guilong Xiong

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, installation of a flue gas conditioning system was completed at PacifiCorp Jim Bridger Power Plant. Performance testing was underway. Results will be detailed in the next quarterly and subsequent technical summary reports. Also in this quarter, discussions were initiated with a prospective long-term candidate plant. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Ammonia conditioning has been proposed here, but there is interest in liquid additives as a safer alternative.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. This quarterly report summarizes project activity for the period April-June, 2003. In this period there was limited activity and no active field trials. Results of ash analysis from the AEP Conesville demonstration were received. In addition, a site visit was made to We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant and a proposal extended for a flue gas conditioning trial with the ADA-51 cohesivity additive. It is expected that this will be the final full-scale evaluation on the project.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Pattern formation properties of a system of interaction-diffusion equations relevant to a mussel-algae ecosystem in a quiescent marine layer .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A particular interaction-diffusion mussel-algae model system for the development of spontaneous stationary young mussel bed patterning on a homogeneous substrate covered by a quiescent marine… (more)

[No author

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification - Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technical feasibility assessment was performed for retrofitting oxy-fuel technology to an existing power plant burning low sulfur PRB fuel and high sulfur bituminous fuel. The focus of this study was on the boiler/power generation island of a subcritical steam cycle power plant. The power plant performance in air and oxy-firing modes was estimated and modifications required for oxy-firing capabilities were identified. A 460 MWe (gross) reference subcritical PC power plant was modeled. The reference air-fired plant has a boiler efficiency (PRB/Bituminous) of 86.7%/89.3% and a plant net efficiency of 35.8/36.7%. Net efficiency for oxy-fuel firing including ASU/CPU duty is 25.6%/26.6% (PRB/Bituminous). The oxy-fuel flue gas recirculation flow to the boiler is 68%/72% (PRB/bituminous) of the flue gas (average O{sub 2} in feed gas is 27.4%/26.4%v (PRB/bituminous)). Maximum increase in tube wall temperature is less than 10ºF for oxy-fuel firing. For oxy-fuel firing, ammonia injected to the SCR was shut-off and the FGD is applied to remove SOx from the recycled primary gas stream and a portion of the SOx from the secondary stream for the high sulfur bituminous coal. Based on CFD simulations it was determined that at the furnace outlet compared to air-firing, SO{sub 3}/SO{sub 2} mole ratio is about the same, NOx ppmv level is about the same for PRB-firing and 2.5 times for bituminous-firing due to shutting off the OFA, and CO mole fraction is approximately double. A conceptual level cost estimate was performed for the incremental equipment and installation cost of the oxyfuel retrofit in the boiler island and steam system. The cost of the retrofit is estimated to be approximately 81 M$ for PRB low sulfur fuel and 84 M$ for bituminous high sulfur fuel.

Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CO2 separation from flue gas using hollow fiber membrane contactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research on CO Research on CO 2 Separation from Flue Gas Prof. Mengxiang Fang State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, China Global CO 2 Emissions Country CO 2 Emission (MtCO2) 1990 2003 2004 2010 USA 4,989 5,800 5,923 6,156 China 2,241 3,898 4,707 6,432 Russia 2,334 1,602 1,685 1,840 Japan 1,015 1,244 1,262 1,260 World 21,246 25,508 26,922 30,670 Source: Energy Information Administration/International Energy Outlook 2004 with High Oil Price Case CO 2 Emission in China Year Total Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Mt CO2 Mtc % Mtc % Mtc % 1990 2,241 1,886 84.2 325 14.5 30 1.34 2003 3,898 3,117 80.0 711 18.2 70 1.80 2004 4,707 3,809 80.9 816 17.3 83 1.76 2010 6,432 5,103 79.3 1,151 17.9 178 2.76 2015 7,376 5,946 80.6 1,184 16.1 246 3.33 Source: Energy Information Administration/International Energy Outlook 2004 with High Oil Price Case.

138

Reducing the cost of CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases using pressure swing adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure swing adsorption (PSA) processes have been used extensively for gas separation, especially in the separation of hydrogen from CO{sub 2}, and in air purification. The objective of this paper is to examine the economic feasibility of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) for recovering CO{sub 2} from postcombustion power plant flue gas. The analysis considers both high-pressure feed and vacuum desorption using commercial adsorbent 13X, which has a working capacity of 2.2 mol/kg and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 54. The results show that using vacuum desorption reduces the capture cost from US$57 to US$51 per ton of CO{sub 2} avoided and is comparable in cost to CO{sub 2} capture using conventional MEA absorption of US$49 per ton of CO{sub 2} avoided. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is also presented showing the effect on the capture cost with changes in process cycle; feed pressure and evacuation pressure; improvements the adsorbent characteristics; and selectivity and working capacity. The results show that a hypothetical adsorbent with a working capacity of 4.3 mol/kg and a CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 150 can reduce the capture cost to US$30 per ton of CO{sub 2} avoided.

Ho, M.T.; Allinson, G.W.; Wiley, D.E. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

Separation of the components of flue-gas scrubber sludge by froth flotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. Currently, the major markets for scrubber sludge are for manufacture of gypsum products, such as wallboard and plaster, and for cement. However, the quality of the raw sludge is often not high enough or consistent enough to satisfy manufacturers, and so the material is difficult to sell. Other markets, such as paper manufacture and plastics fillers, have even more stringent quality requirements and will not accept raw sludge at all. In the work described in this paper, several reagents have been examined to determine their ability to selectively improve the flotation of the unreacted limestone contaminant away from the desirable products (calcium sulfite and gypsum). The most success has been achieved using a cationic collector, which shows a higher selectivity between calcium sulfite and calcium carbonate than do the anionic collectors that were studied.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Next Generation Pressurized Oxy-Coal Combustion: High Efficiency and No Flue Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has developed a pressurized oxy-coal fired molten bed boiler (MBB) concept, in which coal and oxygen are fired directly into a bed of molten coal slag through burners located on the bottom of the boiler and fired upward. Circulation of heat by the molten slag eliminates the need for a flue gas recirculation loop and provides excellent heat transfer to steam tubes in the boiler walls. Advantages of the MBB technology over other boilers include higher efficiency (from eliminating flue gas recirculation), a smaller and less expensive boiler, modular design leading to direct scalability, decreased fines carryover and handling costs, smaller exhaust duct size, and smaller emissions control equipment sizes. The objective of this project was to conduct techno-economic analyses and an engineering design of the MBB project and to support this work with thermodynamic analyses and oxy-coal burner testing. Techno-economic analyses of GTI’s pressurized oxy-coal fired MBB technology found that the overall plant with compressed CO2 has an efficiency of 31.6%. This is a significant increase over calculated 29.2% efficiency of first generation oxy-coal plants. Cost of electricity (COE) for the pressurized MBB supercritical steam power plant with CO2 capture and compression was calculated to be 134% of the COE for an air-coal supercritical steam power plant with no CO2 capture. This compares positively with a calculated COE for first generation oxy-coal supercritical steam power plants with CO2 capture and compression of 164%. The COE for the MBB power plant is found to meet the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) target of 135%, before any plant optimization. The MBB power plant was also determined to be simpler than other oxy-coal power plants with a 17% lower capital cost. No other known combustion technology can produce higher efficiencies or lower COE when CO2 capture and compression are included. A thermodynamic enthalpy and exergy analysis found a number of modifications and adjustments that could provide higher efficiency and better use of available work. Conclusions from this analysis will help guide the analyses and CFD modeling in future process development. The MBB technology has the potential to be a disruptive technology that will enable coal combustion power plants to be built and operated in a cost effective way, cleanly with no carbon dioxide emissions. A large amount of work is needed to quantify and confirm the great promise of the MBB technology. A Phase 2 proposal was submitted to DOE and other sponsors to address the most critical MBB process technical gaps. The Phase 2 proposal was not accepted for current DOE support.

Rue, David

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Data Formats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter provides a taxonomy of existing data formats for power power system analysis. These include most commonly used formats of free and proprietary software packages as well as the IEC common informati...

Federico Milano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO{sub 2} will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Bolinsky, F.T. (Pure Air, Allentown, PA (United States)); Ross, J. (Northern Indiana Public Service Co., Hammond, IN (United States)); Dennis, D.S. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (United States). Stearns-Roger Div.); Huston, J.S. (Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Warren NJ (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, further laboratory-screening tests of additive formulations were completed. For these tests, the electrostatic tensiometer method was used for determination of fly ash cohesivity. Resistivity was measured for each screening test with a multi-cell laboratory fly ash resistivity furnace constructed for this project. Also during this quarter chemical formulation testing was undertaken to identify stable and compatible resistivity/cohesivity liquid products.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, were evaluated in a full-scale trial at the American Electric Power Conesville plant. Ammonia conditioning was also evaluated for comparison. ADA-51 and ammonia conditioning significantly reduced rapping and non-rapped particulate re-entrainment based on stack opacity monitor data. Based on the successful tests to date, ADA-51 will be evaluated in a long-term test.

Kenneth E. Baldrey

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Formation of acidic sulfates in kraft recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acidic sulfates (NaHSO[sub 4] and Na[sub 2]S[sub 2]O[sub 7]) have been suggested as the cause of corrosive sticky deposits in recovery boilers. Recovery-boiler precipitator dusts and pure Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] were examined for their tendency to form acidic sulfates in simulated flue gases. Formation was strongly influenced by temperature and by gas-phase concentrations of SO[sub x] and H[sub 2]O. Liquid NaHSO[sub 4] formed readily at 250 C at SO[sub x] concentration above 150 ppm. Formation reactions were hindered by Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3]. Under appropriate conditions, acidic sulfates can exist at tube surfaces near the furnace roof, at the upper screen tubes, and in the generating bank and economizer.

Poon, W.; Barham, D.; Tran, H. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Current status of MHI CO2 capture plant technology, large scale demonstration project and road map to commercialization for coal fired flue gas application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) It is becoming increasingly evident that the prolonged utilization of fossil fuels for primary energy production, especially coal which is relatively cheap and abundant, is inevitable and that Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology can significantly reduce CO2 emissions from this sector thus allowing the continued environmentally sustainable use of this important energy commodity on a global basis. (2) MHI has co-developed the Kansai Mitsubishi Carbon Dioxide Recovery Process (KM-CDR Process™) and KS-1™ absorbent, which has been deployed in seven CO2 capture plants, now under commercial operation operating at a CO2 capture capacity of 450 metric tons per day (tpd). In addition, a further two commercial plants are now under construction all of which capture CO2 from natural gas fired flue gas boilers and steam reformers. Accordingly this technology is now available for commercial scale CO2 capture for gas boiler and gas turbine application. (3) However before offering commercial CO2 capture plants for coal fired flue gas application, it is necessary to verify the influence of, and develop countermeasures for, related impurities contained in coal fired flue gas. This includes the influence on both the absorbent and the entire system of the CO2 capture plant to achieve high operational reliability and minimize maintenance requirements. (4) Preventing the accumulation of impurities, especially the build up of dust, is very important when treating coal fired flue gas and MHI has undertaken significant work to understand the impact of impurities in order to achieve reliable and stable operating conditions and to efficiently optimize integration between the CO2 capture plant, the coal fired power plant and the flue gas clean up equipment. (5) To achieve this purpose, MHI constructed a 10 tpd CO2 capture demonstration plant at the Matsushima 1000 MW Power Station and confirmed successful, long term demonstration following ?5000 hours of operation in 2006–07 with 50% financial support by RITE, as a joint program to promote technological development with the private sector, and cooperation from J-POWER. (6) Following successful demonstration testing at Matsushima, additional testing was undertaken in 2008 to examine the impact of entrainment of higher levels of flue gas impurities (primarily \\{SOx\\} and dust by bypassing the existing FGD) and to determine which components of the CO2 recovery process are responsible for the removal of these impurities. Following an additional 1000 demonstration hours, results indicated stable operational performance in relation to the following impurities; (1) SO2: Even at higher SO2 concentrations were almost completely removed from the flue gas before entering the CO2 absorber. (2) Dust: The accumulation of dust in the absorbent was higher, leading to an advanced understanding of the behavior of dust in the CO2 capture plant and the dust removal efficiency of each component within the CO2 recovery system. The data obtained is useful for the design of large-scale units and confirms the operating robustness of the CO2 capture plant accounting for wide fluctuations in impurity concentrations. (7) This important coal fired flue gas testing showed categorically that minimizing the accumulation of large concentrations of impurities, and to suppress dust concentrations below a prescribed level, is important to achieve long-term stable operation and to minimize maintenance work for the CO2 capture plant. To comply with the above requirement, various countermeasures have been developed which include the optimization of the impurity removal technology, flue gas pre treatment and improved optimization with the flue gas desulfurization facility. (8) In case of a commercial scale CO2 capture plant applied for coal fired flue gas, its respective size will be several thousand tpd which represents a considerable scale-up from the 10 tpd demonstration plant. In order to ensure the operational reliability and to accurately confirm the influence and the behavior of the impurities in coal fired fl

Takahiko Endo; Yoshinori Kajiya; Hiromitsu Nagayasu; Masaki Iijima; Tsuyoshi Ohishi; Hiroshi Tanaka; Ronald Mitchell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

File Formats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

150

Utility Formation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amounts See detailed discussion of these standards. For more information regarding tribal utility formation, contact the Power Service Line Account Executives: Eastern Power...

151

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine-Appended Metal-Organic Framework mmen-Mg2(dobpdc)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine- Appended Metal-Organic Framework, stationary sources like coal-fired power plants, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has been proposed.4 viable absorbents for carbon capture under the aforementioned conditions, and they are presently used

152

Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

154

Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) has successfully completed a research and development program granted by the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to develop a family of non-toxic flue gas conditioning agents to provide utilities and industries with a cost-effective means of complying with environmental regulations on particulate emissions and opacity. An extensive laboratory screening of potential additives was completed followed by full-scale trials at four utility power plants. The developed cohesivity additives have been demonstrated on a 175 MW utility boiler that exhibited poor collection of unburned carbon in the electrostatic precipitator. With cohesivity conditioning, opacity spiking caused by rapping reentrainment was reduced and total particulate emissions were reduced by more than 30%. Ammonia conditioning was also successful in reducing reentrainment on the same unit. Conditioned fly ash from the process is expected to be suitable for dry or wet disposal and for concrete admixture.

C. Jean Bustard

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy and Economic Analysis of the CO2 Capture from Flue Gas of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage is considered as one of the key strategies for reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide from power generation facilities. Although post-combustion capture via chemical absorption is now a mature technology, the separation of CO2 from flue gases shows many issues, including the solvent degradation and the high regeneration energy requirement, that in turn reduces the power plant performances. Focusing on a triple pressure and reheat combined cycle with exhaust gas recirculation, this paper aims to evaluate the potential impacts of integrating a post-combustion capture system, based on an absorption process with monoethanolamine solvent. Energy and economic performances of the integrated system are evaluated varying the exhaust gas recirculation fraction and the CO2 capture ratio. The different configurations examined are then compared in terms of efficiency and rated capacity of the integrated system, as well as considering the cost of electricity generated and the cost of CO2 avoided.

Maura Vaccarelli; Roberto Carapellucci; Lorena Giordano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Recycling of Flue Gas Desulfurization residues in gneiss based hot mix asphalt: Materials characterization and performances evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract On the one hand, huge amount of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) residues, produced during scrubbing flue gas, is discarded as solid waste. Such solid waste would cause serious environmental problems. One the other hand, high quality aggregates, such as limestone and basalt, are running out due to the rapid development of highway construction. Ungraded aggregates such as gneiss are therefore considered in China to replace the high quality aggregates. The application of FGD residues as a filler in gneiss based asphalt mixture has benefits both in environmental and economic sides. The main objective of this research was to visualize the raw materials characterization and evaluate the effect of FGD residues on the performance of gneiss based asphalt mixture. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Differential Scanning Calorimetric & Thermal gravimetric (DSC–TG) were used to investigate the features of raw materials. The performance of gneiss based asphalt mixture including high-temperature deformation resistance, low-temperature crack resistance and moisture-induced damage resistance were evaluated. Dynamic creep test, three-point bending test, Retained Marshall Stability (RMS), Tensile Strength Ratio (TSR), Indirect Tensile (IDT) strength and Resilient Modulus (MR) test were conducted and analyzed. Dissipated Creep Strain Energy to fracture (DCSEf) ratio, fracture energy and model analysis were also used to evaluate moisture resistance, crack resistance and deformation resistance of asphalt mixture respectively. Research results indicate that FGD residues can partly improve the moisture resistance and crack resistance of gneiss asphalt mixture, while it might worse the high-temperature deformation resistance.

Zongwu Chen; Shaopeng Wu; Fuzhou Li; Juyong Chen; Zhehuan Qin; Ling Pang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Demonstration of and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO 2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

160

Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Application of a low pressure economizer for waste heat recovery from the exhaust flue gas in a 600 MW power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of recovering the waste heat of the exhaust flue gas before entering a flue gas desulphurizer (FGD) in a 600 MW power plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing a low pressure economizer (LPE) to heat the condensed water which can save the steam extracted from the steam turbine for heating the condensed water and then extra work can be obtained. The energy and water savings and the reduction of CO2 emission resulted from the LPE installation are assessed for three cases in a 600 MW coal-fired power plant with wet stack. Serpentine pipes with quadrate finned extensions are selected for the LPE heat exchanger which has an overall coefficient of heat transfer of 37 W/m2·K and the static pressure loss of 781 Pa in the optimized case. Analysis results show that it is feasible to install \\{LPEs\\} in the exhaust flue gas system between the pressurizing fan and the FGD, which has little negative impacts on the unit. The benefits generated include saving of standard coal equivalent (SCE) at 2–4 g/(kW·h) and saving of water at 25–35 t/h under full load operation with corresponding reduction of CO2 emission.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Shaoyang Sun; Ying Wu; Na Yan; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effect of gaseous inhibitors on PCDD/F formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from municipal waste incineration are currently a subject of considerable public concern because of their extreme toxicity. PCDD/F formation in incineration processes is being studied widely, but studies on inhibition are quite sparse, especially in a pilot-plant scale. In this work, the effect of four gaseous inhibitors (sulfur dioxide, ammonia, dimethylamine, and methyl mercaptan) on PCDD/PCDF formation in the combustion of liquid fuel was studied using a pilot-scale plant. The inhibitors were injected into the flue gas stream after the first economizer at a temperature of 670 C and just before the second economizer at 410 C. Both the chlorophenol and PCDD and PCDF concentrations decreased when inhibitors were added. Particle-phase PCDD/F concentrations in particular decreased by up to 98%. The results suggest that the formation of PCDD/Fs is hindered in the particle phase at the early stages of the PCDD/F formation chain, probably even before precursors such as chlorophenols have been formed.

Ruokojaervi, P.H.; Halonen, I.A.; Tuppurainen, K.A.; Tarhanen, J.; Ruuskanen, J. [Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)] [Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Flue Gas Purification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compression of CO{sub 2} Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States wishes to decrease foreign energy dependence by utilizing the country’s significant coal reserves, while stemming the effects of global warming from greenhouse gases. In response to these needs, Air Products has developed a patented process for the compression and purification of the CO{sub 2} stream from oxyfuel combustion of pulverized coal. The purpose of this project was the development and performance of a comprehensive experimental and engineering evaluation to determine the feasibility of purifying CO{sub 2} derived from the flue gas generated in a tangentially fired coal combustion unit operated in the oxy-combustion mode. Following the design and construction of a 15 bar reactor system, Air Products conducted two test campaigns using the slip stream from the tangentially fired oxy-coal combustion unit. During the first test campaign, Air Products evaluated the reactor performance based on both the liquid and gaseous reactor effluents. The data obtained from the test run has enabled Air Products to determine the reaction and mass transfer rates, as well as the effectiveness of the reactor system. During the second test campaign, Air Products evaluated reactor performance based on effluents for different reactor pressures, as well as water recycle rates. Analysis of the reaction equations indicates that both pressure and water flow rate affect the process reaction rates, as well as the overall reactor performance.

Fogash, Kevin

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Flue Gas Perification Utilizing SOx/NOx Reactions During Compression of CO2 Derived from Oxyfuel Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States wishes to decrease foreign energy dependence by utilizing the country’s significant coal reserves, while stemming the effects of global warming from greenhouse gases. In response to these needs, Air Products has developed a patented process for the compression and purification of the CO2 stream from oxyfuel combustion of pulverized coal. The purpose of this project was the development and performance of a comprehensive experimental and engineering evaluation to determine the feasibility of purifying CO2 derived from the flue gas generated in a tangentially fired coal combustion unit operated in the oxy-combustion mode. Following the design and construction of a 15 bar reactor system, Air Products conducted two test campaigns using the slip stream from the tangentially fired oxy-coal combustion unit. During the first test campaign, Air Products evaluated the reactor performance based on both the liquid and gaseous reactor effluents. The data obtained from the test run has enabled Air Products to determine the reaction and mass transfer rates, as well as the effectiveness of the reactor system. During the second test campaign, Air Products evaluated reactor performance based on effluents for different reactor pressures, as well as water recycle rates. Analysis of the reaction equations indicates that both pressure and water flow rate affect the process reaction rates, as well as the overall reactor performance.

Kevin Fogash

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Adsorption separation of CO2 from simulated flue gas mixtures by novel CO2 ''molecular basket'' adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption separation of CO2 from simulated flue gas mixtures containing CO2, O2, and N2 by using a novel CO2 ''molecular basket'' adsorbent was investigated in a flow adsorption separation system. The novel CO2 ''molecular basket'' adsorbents were developed by synthesising mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 and modifying it with polyethylenimine (PEI). The influence of operation conditions, including feed flow rate, temperature, feed CO2 concentration, and sweep gas flow rate, on the CO2 adsorption/desorption separation performance and CO2 breakthrough were examined. The CO2 adsorption capacity was 91.0 ml (STP)/g-PEI, which was 27 times higher than that of the MCM-41 alone. Further, the adsorbent showed separation selectivity of greater than 1000 for CO2/N2 ratio and approximately 180 for CO2/O2, which are significantly higher than those of the MCM-41, zeolites, and activated carbons. Cyclic adsorption/desorption measurements showed that the CO2 ''molecular basket'' adsorbent was stable at 75°C. However, the CO2 ''molecular basket'' adsorbent was not stable when the operation temperature was higher than 100°C.

Xiaochun Xu; Chunshan Song; John M. Andresen; Bruce G. Miller; Alan W. Scaroni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Optimization and heat integration of hollow fiber based thermal swing adsorption process for CO2 capture from flue gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work studies the optimization of a hollow fiber contactor operated in a rapid temperature swing adsorption (RTSA) mode for CO2 capture from flue gas. A hollow fiber contactor enables rapid heat and mass transfer and an efficient heat integration whereby parasitic loads on power plants can be reduced significantly compared to the traditional thermal swing adsorption processes. In this paper we employ a dynamic optimization strategy to predict the optimal operating conditions of a hollow fiber RTSA process for different process design objectives. The objective function considered was to maximize the feed throughput of the process with constraints for the required CO2 purity and recovery. Furthermore, the external heat and cold utilities must be minimized. The optimization requires a dynamic heat integration i.e. redistributing the hot and cold stream outlet between different parts of a cycle which is challenging and unconventional. This has been performed using a binary decision variable which switches the outlet water stream between hot and cold tanks. We also show that a multi- objective optimization approach can be employed to determine the optimal trade-off between heat duty and process throughput. Optimization was performed using a single discretization approach within gPROMS.

Subramanian Swernath; Fateme Rezaei; Jayashree Kalyanaraman; Ryan. P. Lively; Matthew J. Realff; Yoshiaki Kawajiri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy - Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned underground coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement, using virtually dry materials, and (2) hydraulic placement, using a {open_quotes}paste{close_quotes} mixture of materials with about 70% solids. Phase II of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase II is to develop and fabricate the equipment for placing the coal combustion by-products underground, and to conduct a demonstration of the technologies on the surface. Therefore, this quarter has been largely devoted to developing specifications for equipment components, visiting fabrication plants throughout Southern Illinois to determine their capability for building the equipment components in compliance with the specifications, and delivering the components in a timely manner.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Advances of flue gas desulfurization technology for coal-fired boilers and strategies for sulfur dioxide pollution prevention in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is one of the most important kinds of energy resources at the present time and in the immediate future in China. Sulfur dioxide resulting from combustion of coal is one of the principle pollutants in the air. Control of SO{sub 2} discharge is still a major challenge for environmental protection in developing China. In this paper, research, development and application of technology of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired boilers in China will be reviewed with emphasis on cost-effective technology, and the development trends of FGD technology, as well as the strategy for SO{sub 2} discharge control in China, will be analyzed. A practical technology for middle-small-sized boilers developed by the primary author and the field investigation results will also be presented. At present, there are four major kinds of FGD technologies that are practical to be applied in China for their cost-effectiveness and efficiency to middle-small-sized boilers. An important development trend of the FGD technology for middle-small-sized boilers for the next decade is improvement of the existing cost-effective wet-type FGD technology, and in the future it will be the development of dry-type FGD technology. For middle-sized generating boilers, the development direction of the FGD technology is the spraying and drying process. For large-sized generating boilers, the wet-type limestone-plaster process will still be applied in the immediate future, and dry-type FGD technologies, such as ammonia with electron beam irradiation, will be developed in the future. State strategies for the control of SO{sub 2} discharge will involve the development and popularization of efficient coal-fired devices, extension of gas coal and liquefied coal, spreading coal washing, and centralized heating systems.

Yang, C.; Zeng, G.; Li, G.; Qiu, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Adsorption and desorption of sulfur dioxide on novel adsorbents for flue gas desulfurization. Final report, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sol-gel granulation method was developed to prepare spherical {gamma}-alumina granular supports and supported CuO granular sorbents for flue gas desulfurization. The prepared {gamma}-alumina supported CuO sorbents exhibit desirable pore structure and excellent mechanical properties. The sorbents contain higher loading (30-40 wt. %) of CuO dispersed in the monolayer or sub-monolayer form, giving rise to a larger SO{sub 2} sorption capacity ({gt}20 wt.%) and a faster sorption rate as compared to similar sorbents reported in the literature. With these excellent sulfation and mechanical properties, the sol-gel derived {gamma}-alumina supported CuO granular sorbents offer great potential for use in the dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization process. Research efforts were also made to prepare DAY zeolite supported sorbents with various CuO contents by the microwave and conventional thermal dispersion methods at different conditions. Monolayer or sub-monolayer coating of Cu(NO{sub 3})sub 2 or CuO was achieved on several DAY supported sorbents by the microwave heating method but not by the conventional thermal dispersion method. The DAY zeolite supported CuO sorbents prepared by the microwave heating method can adsorb up to 15 wt.% of SO{sub 2}. The results obtained have demonstrated the feasibility of effective preparation of zeolite supported CuO sorbents by the microwave heating method.

Lin, Y.S.; Deng, S.G.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second year, second quarterly technical progress report, Quarter No. 6, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{sm_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}O), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{sm_bullet}2H{sub 2}O), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silica, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. This project is studying the characteristics of flue-gas scrubber sludges from several sources, which is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather than landfilling them. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product.

KAwatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A review of NO[sub x] formation mechanisms in recovery furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of NOx formation studies shows that NO forms in recovery furnaces primarily by two independent mechanisms, thermal and fuel. Thermal NO formation is extremely temperature-sensitive. However, theoretical predictions indicate that recovery furnace temperatures are not high enough to form significant thermal NO. Fuel NO formation is less temperature-sensitive, and is related to fuel nitrogen content. Black liquors are shown to contain 0.05 to 0.24 weight percent fuel nitrogen. Conversion of just 20% of this would yield approximately 25-120 ppm NOx (at 8% 0[sub 2]) in the flue gas, enough to represent the majority of the total NOx. Data from operating recovery furnaces show NOx emissions ranging from near zero to over 100 ppm at 8% 0[sub 2]. An apparent increase in recovery furnace NOx emissions was observed with increasing solids. This increase is much less than predicted by thermal NO formation theory, indicating that other NO formation/destruction mechanisms, such as fuel NO formation, are important. No data are available to show the relative importance of thermal and fuel NO to total NOx during black liquor combustion.

Nichols, K.M.; Thompson, L.M.; Empie, H.J (Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Quarterly technical report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial pilot-scale testing of two additives was completed at CONSOL`s research coal combustor. The results and conclusions from this test series and subsequent analysis of the data are presented in this report. Table 1 summarizes the conditions tested. During the tests, the research combustor was firing a medium-sulfur coal. The combustor had recently been retrofitted with low-NOx burners for a DOE Clean Coal test program. Operation of the low-NOx burners required a reduced flow rate in the combustor, resulting in lower flow and velocity in the ESP. A comprehensive baseline condition was tested, followed by initial screening runs for several additives. It was discovered that the flyash exhibited properties characteristic of a high-resistivity ash. In-situ measurements at the ESP inlet confirmed that the resistivity was in the 10{sup 10} -- 10{sup 12} ohm-cm range. In addition, the ESP plate rappers were not able to remove ash buildup on the first section during normal operation. Power off rapping was periodically required to fully clean the plates; this is a clear indication of high-resistivity conditions. Since the major benefit of ESP additives will be to reduce reentrainment at low to midrange resistivity, this operating condition was undesirable for performance testing. It was decided to continue the program with SO{sub 3} conditioning of the flue gas to reduce particle resistivity. It was also decided to operate with two rather than three electrical fields energized. By reducing the ESP collection area, it was hoped that it would be easier to measure changes in ESP performance and to see an immediate indication of the effectiveness Of SO{sub 3} conditioning. The ESP was reconfigured with two electrical sections energized and SO{sub 3} conditioning at a rate of approximately 20 ppM. An additional baseline was run, followed by extended tests with two additives referred to in this report as Additive ``C`` and Additive ``D.``

Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.

1994-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Interactive Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Batch Jobs The login nodes on Genepool should not be used for heavy interactive work. These login nodes are shared amoungst all Genepool users so heavy CPU or memory usage will affect other Genepool users. 10 nodes have been reserved on Genepool for high priority and interactive work. Each user can use up to 2 slots at a time in the high priority queue. Use the qlogin command to run jobs interactively. The example below shows how to request an interactive session on Genepool . genepool:$~> qlogin -l high.c This will put you directly onto a node where you can do interactive work. kmfagnan@genepool01:~$ qlogin -l high.c Your job 1459021 ("QLOGIN") has been submitted waiting for interactive job to be scheduled ......

175

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 3: SOx/NOx/Hg Removal for Low Sulfur Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxycombustion technology. The objective of Task 3 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning low sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was to conduct an experimental investigation and to develop a novel process for simultaneously removal of SOx and NOx from power plants that would operate on low sulfur coal without the need for wet-FGD & SCRs. A novel purification process operating at high pressures and ambient temperatures was developed. Activated carbonâ??s catalytic and adsorbent capabilities are used to oxidize the sulfur and nitrous oxides to SO{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} species, which are adsorbed on the activated carbon and removed from the gas phase. Activated carbon is regenerated by water wash followed by drying. The development effort commenced with the screening of commercially available activated carbon materials for their capability to remove SO{sub 2}. A bench-unit operating in batch mode was constructed to conduct an experimental investigation of simultaneous SOx and NOx removal from a simulated oxyfuel flue gas mixture. Optimal operating conditions and the capacity of the activated carbon to remove the contaminants were identified. The process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx. In the longevity tests performed on a batch unit, the retention capacity could be maintained at high level over 20 cycles. This process was able to effectively remove up to 4000 ppm SOx from the simulated feeds corresponding to oxyfuel flue gas from high sulfur coal plants. A dual bed continuous unit with five times the capacity of the batch unit was constructed to test continuous operation and longevity. Full-automation was implemented to enable continuous operation (24/7) with minimum operator supervision. Continuous run was carried out for 40 days. Very high SOx (>99.9%) and NOx (98%) removal efficiencies were also achieved in a continuous unit. However, the retention capacity of carbon beds for SOx and NOx was decreased from ~20 hours to ~10 hours over a 40 day period of operation, which was in contrast to the results obtained in a batch unit. These contradictory results indicate the need for optimization of adsorption-regeneration cycle to maintain long term activity of activated carbon material at a higher level and thus minimize the capital cost of the system. In summary, the activated carbon process exceeded performance targets for SOx and NOx removal efficiencies and it was found to be suitable for power plants burning both low and high sulfur coals. More efforts are needed to optimize the system performance.

Monica Zanfir; Rahul Solunke; Minish Shah

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Bar Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the various mechanisms for creating bars in rotating stellar disks, and conclude that the swing-amplified feed-back loop, which produces rapidly tumbling bars, remains the most probable. The bar continues to evolve after its formation in a number of ways; here I discuss what appears to be inevitable thickening normal to the plane, continued spiral activity in the outer disk and also underscore the increasingly important problem presented by angular momentum loss to the halo. Finally, I examine possible means, excluding interaction, by which bars in galaxies could be destroyed.

J A Sellwood

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

Cyrus K Aidun

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Numerical modeling of combustion processes and pollutant formations in direct-injection diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF) concept has been applied to numerically simulate the combustion processes and pollutant formation in the direct injection...X formation including thermal NO path, pro...

Seong-Ku Kim; Joon Kyu Lee; Yong-Mo Kim; Jae-Hyun Ahn

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Commercial demonstration of the NOXSO SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal flue gas cleanup system. Quarterly technical progress report No. 13, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NOXSO process is a dry, post-combustion flue gas treatment technology which uses a regenerable sorbent to simultaneously adsorb sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from the flue gas of a coal-fired utility boiler. In the process, the SO{sub 2} is converted to a sulfur by-product and the NO{sub x} is converted to nitrogen and oxygen. It is predicted that the process can economically remove 90% of the acid rain precursor gases from the flue gas stream in a retrofit or new facility. The objective of the NOXSO Demonstration Project is to design, construct, and operate a flue gas treatment system utilizing the NOXSO process. The effectiveness of the process will be demonstrated by achieving significant reductions in emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. In addition, sufficient operating data will be obtained to confirm the process economics and provide a basis to guarantee performance on a commercial scale. The project is presently in the project definition and preliminary design phase. Data obtained during pilot plant testing which was completed on July 30, 1993 is being incorporated in the design of the commercial size plant. A suitable host site to demonstrate the NOXSO process on a commercial scale is presently being sought. Preliminary engineering activities involved evaluating various design options for the major process vessels with the principal focus being on the sorbent heater vessel, which is operated at the highest temperature. Additionally, the impact of the NOXSO system on power plant particulate emissions and opacity was estimated. It is predicted that particulate emissions will decrease slightly while opacity will increase slightly. Neither change will be significant enough to have an impact on emissions compliance. Advertised performance of the proposed adsorber separator is being verified by laboratory testing. Process studies activities included POC equipment inspection and materials evaluations.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Sulfate formation in oil-fired power plant plumes. Volume 1. Parameters affecting primary sulfate emissions and a model for predicting emissions and plume opacity. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High sulfuric acid emissions with concomitant acid smuts and plume opacity concerns at oil fired utility boilers has been associated with combustion of high sulfur-, high vanadium-containing fuel. The purpose of this program was to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the formation of flue gas H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and metal sulfates (MSO/sub 4/) and to determine the extent by which operating and controls parameters as well as the composition of the fuel affected those emissions. More than 200 flue gas measurements were made at a number of oil fired units and one coal fired unit, providing emissions levels of SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, MSO/sub 4/, total suspended particulate, and NO/sub x/. Parameters shown to significantly affect H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions were furnace O/sub 2/ level, sulfur and vanadium content of the fuel, the amount of corrosion inhibitor added to the oil, power level, and the composition of the fly ash. Correlations were developed which related the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions at oil fired units with the parameters above; predictions of emissions appear to be accurate to within +-25%. Based on limited data from the literature, the correlations were extended to include a means for predicting plume opacity and in-stack opacity. Recommendations for controlling the levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions as well as maintaining utility units in compliance with opacity regulations were made. Future research needs were indicated, including more studies relating H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ levels in flue gas with plume opacity and emissions studies at coal fired units. 85 references, 27 figures, 23 tables.

Dietz, R.N.; Wieser, R.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Fuel saving, carbon dioxide emission avoidance, and syngas production by tri-reforming of flue gases from coal- and gas-fired power stations, and by the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flue gases from coal, gas, or oil-fired power stations, as well as from several heavy industries, such as the production of iron, lime and cement, are major anthropogenic sources of global CO2 emissions. The newly proposed process for syngas production based on the tri-reforming of such flue gases with natural gas could be an important route for CO2 emission avoidance. In addition, by combining the carbothermic reduction of iron oxide with the partial oxidation of the carbon source, an overall thermoneutral process can be designed for the co-production of iron and syngas rich in CO. Water-gas shift (WGS) of CO to H2 enables the production of useful syngas. The reaction process heat, or the conditions for thermoneutrality, are derived by thermochemical equilibrium calculations. The thermodynamic constraints are determined for the production of syngas suitable for methanol, hydrogen, or ammonia synthesis. The environmental and economic consequences are assessed for large-scale commercial production of these chemical commodities. Preliminary evaluations with natural gas, coke, or coal as carbon source indicate that such combined processes should be economically competitive, as well as promising significant fuel saving and CO2 emission avoidance. The production of ammonia in the above processes seems particularly attractive, as it consumes the nitrogen in the flue gases.

M. Halmann; A. Steinfeld

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

184

Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Simulated Flue Gas Mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An amine-based solid sorbent process to remove CO2 from flue gas has been investigated. The sorbent consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) immobilized onto silica (SiO2) support. Experiments were conducted in a packed-bed reactor and exit gas composition was monitored using mass spectrometry. The effects of feed gas composition (CO2 and H2O), temperature, and simulated steam regeneration were examined for both the silica support as well as the PEI-based sorbent. The artifact of the empty reactor was also quantified. Sorbent CO2 capacity loading was compared to thermogravimetric (TGA) results to further characterize adsorption isotherms and better define CO2 working capacity. Sorbent stability was monitored by periodically repeating baseline conditions throughout the parametric testing and replacing with fresh sorbent as needed. The concept of the Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process using this sorbent within a system where sorbent continuously flows between the absorber and regenerator was introduced. The basic tenet is to manipulate or control the level of moisture on the sorbent as it travels around the sorbent circulation path between absorption and regeneration stages to minimize its effect on regeneration heat duty.

Hoffman, James S.; Hammache, Sonia; Gray, McMahan L.; Fauth Daniel J.; Pennline, Henry W.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Simulation study on lignite-fired power system integrated with flue gas drying and waste heat recovery – Performances under variable power loads coupled with off-design parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignite is a kind of low rank coal with high moisture content and low net heating value, which is mainly used for electric power generation. However, the thermal efficiency of power plants firing lignite directly is very low. Pre-drying is a proactive option, dehydrating raw lignite to raise its heating value, to improve the power plant thermal efficiency. A pre-dried lignite-fired power system integrated with boiler flue gas drying and waste heat recovery was proposed in this paper. The plant thermal efficiency could be improved by 1.51% at benchmark condition due to pre-drying and waste heat recovery. The main system performances under variable power loads were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results show that the improvement of plant thermal efficiency reduced to 1.36% at 50% full load. Moreover, the influences of drying system off-design parameters were simulated coupled with power loads. The variation tendencies of main system parameters were obtained. The influence of pre-drying degree (including moisture content of pre-dried lignite and raw lignite) on the plant thermal efficiency diminishes gradually with the decreasing power load. The dryer thermal efficiency and dryer exhaust temperature are also main factors and the influences on system parameters have been quantitatively analyzed.

Xiaoqu Han; Ming Liu; Jinshi Wang; Junjie Yan; Jiping Liu; Feng Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package: Volume 2, User's guide to the EFLOW groundwater flow code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a two-dimensional finite element code, EFLOW, developed to simulate water flow in fully or variably saturated porous media. This code is one component in the FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. For variably saturated flow problems, nonlinearities caused by unsaturated soil properties, atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage faces), and water uptake by plant roots are treated using Picard or Newton-Raphson methods. For fully saturated unconfined flow problems, the governing equations are formulated in an areal plane, and nonlinear water-table boundary conditions are treated using the Picard method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. 24 refs., 39 figs., 27 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nanobubbles [3,4,11,14]. 2. A decrease in surface tension from 72 to 68 dyn/cm [11]. 3. Increase nanobubble network is the out come of a self organization process due to the collective effect of bubble-bubble term stability of water structure is resulted from the formation of dense array of stable gas

Jacob, Eshel Ben

188

Interacting Compasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of multiple compasses to map and visualize magnetic fields is well-known. The magnetic field exerts a torque on the compasses aligning them along the lines of force. Some science museums show the field of a magnet using a table with many compasses in a closely packed arrangement. However the very interesting interactions that occur between the compasses themselves are frequently neglected. In this paper we describe demonstrations using arrays of compasses that show these interactions and model magnetic domains in ferromagnetic materials.

Héctor G. Riveros; Julián Betancourt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Study of Flue Gas Desulfurization Absorbent Prepared from Coal Fly Ash:? Effects of the Composition of the Absorbent on the Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The formation of calcium silicate is suggested to be predominant in a high concentration of silica, while the formation of ettringite was observed by the XRD only for the absorbent containing silica below 30%. ... ettringite ... With sample 1 containing no silica, the formation of ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12) was obvious. ...

Hiroaki Tsuchiai; Tomohiro Ishizuka; Hideki Nakamura; Tsutomu Ueno; Hideshi Hattori

1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Novel technologies for SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal from flue gas; Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to develop a low temperature deNO{sub x} catalyst with activity high enough for boiler retrofit applications. Cu-ZrO{sub 2} is a promising low temperature catalyst for the selective reduction of No by propene. At NO = 1000 ppm, propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) = 1000 ppm and 0{sub 2} = 1% and a space velocity of 13,000 h{sup {minus}1}, the NO conversion to N{sub 2} is 64% at 265{degrees}C. The performance of the catalyst, however, does not fulfill the requirement when used for flue gas clean up where the feed is composed of 4% O{sub 2} and 10% H{sub 2}O, and the temperature is 150{degrees}C. Methods to improve the performance of the catalyst are being sought. These include modification of the preparation method such as varying the aging time of the gel after precipitation, and addition of promoters like Pd and Nd to increase the catalytic activity at lower temperatures and higher 0{sub 2} concentrations. Using ethanol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) instead of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} as a reductant improves the performance of the catalyst when H{sub 2}O is present. Interestingly, methanol is not an effective reductant. Some modified carbon catalysts are also tested. Results on Cu impregnated ASC whetlerite carbon catalyst show 100% N{sub 2} selectivity and 35 % NO conversion at 200{degrees}C. However, the catalyst is unstable and deactivates rapidly. Work planned for the next quarter is to continue to investigate methods to improve the catalytic activity.

Kung, M.; Yang, B. [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Spivey, J.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.W. [Research Triangle Inst., Durham, NC (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Star Formation in Las Campanas Compact Groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact groups (CGs) of galaxies offer an exceptional laboratory for the study of dense galaxian environments --- where interactions, tidally induced activity, and mergers are expected to be at their highest rate of occurrence. Here, we present first results from a new catalogue of compact groups, one based upon the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). Using the equivalent width of [OII]3727, we have studied the star formation activity in LCRS CGs: we find strong evidence of depressed star formation in CGs relative to that in loose groups or the field. Although much of this effect can be ascribed to morphological mix (CGs contain a high fraction of early-type galaxies), there is some evidence that the star formation rate in late-type galaxies is particularly deficient --- perhaps only one-half to one-third that of field spirals. We conclude that gas stripping mechanisms may play a role in CG environments.

Sahar S. Allam; Douglas L. Tucker; Huan Lin; Yasuhiro Hashimoto

1999-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Star formation triggered by SNR impact into magnetized neutral clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considering the physical conditions that are relevant for triggering star formation in interactions involving SN shocks and neutral clouds, we have built diagrams of the SNR radius versus the cloud density in which these conditions constrain a shaded zone where star formation is allowed. The diagrams are also tested with fully 3-D MHD radiative cooling simulations involving a SNR and a self-gravitating cloud and we find that the numerical analysis is consistent with the results predicted by the diagrams. While the inclusion of a homogeneous magnetic field approximately perpendicular to the impact velocity of the SNR with an intensity ~1 $mu$G results only a small shrinking of the star formation zone in the diagrams, a larger magnetic field (~10 $\\mu$G) causes a significant shrinking, as expected. Applications of our results to real star formation regions in our own galaxy have revealed that their formation could have been triggered by a SN shock wave. Finally, we have evaluated the effective global star formation efficiency of this sort of interactions and found that it is smaller than the observed values in our Galaxy (SFE ~0.01-0.3). This result is consistent with previous work in the literature and also suggests that the mechanism presently investigated, though very powerful to drive structure formation, supersonic turbulence and eventually, local star formation, does not seem to be sufficient to drive global star formation in normal star forming galaxies.

M. R. M. Leao; E. M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; D. Falceta-Goncalves; C. Melioli; F. G. Geraissate

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

3 D interactive pictorial maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of simplififcation and exaggeration.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 8 3 D polygonal text in Maya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 9 Final 3 D model of Italy with text. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 10 Top view of 3 D model of France... the files in a format that is suitable for web viewing. 15 CHAPTER IV METHODOLOGY There are three major steps to making an interactive pictorial map. The fifrst step is to build the 3 D model using a modeling software, Maya. The second step is to apply...

Naz, Asma

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

194

Flame/Wall interactions : laminar study of unburnt HC formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an important part to the sources of hydrocarbon (HC) emission in a combustion chamber. The aim of this work in gasoline engine. A skeletal mechanism (29 species and 48 reactions) mimicking iso-octane combustion is used, wall heat flux, quench distances as well as HC families are investigated by varying parameters like

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994 (Quarter No. 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{lg_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}0), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{lg_bullet}2H{sub 2}0), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides; silica; and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. Currently, the only market for scrubber sludge is for manufacture of gypsum products, such as wallboard and plaster, and for cement. However, the quality of the raw sludge is often not high enough or consistent enough to satisfy manufacturers, and so the material is difficult to sell. This project is developing a process that can produce a high-quality calcium sulfite or gypsum product while keeping process costs low enough that the material produced will be competitive with that from other, more conventional sources. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified gypsum or calcium sulfite product. The separated limestone will be a useful by-product, as it can be recycled to the scrubber, thus boosting the limestone utilization and improving process efficiency. Calcium sulfite will then be oxidized to gypsum, or separated as a salable product in its own right from sludges where it is present in sufficient quantity. The main product of the process will be either gypsum or calcium sulfite, depending on the characteristics of the sludge being processed. These products will be sufficiently pure to be easily marketed, rather that being landfilled.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

Monnier, Stefan

197

Hierarchical galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as the cooling of gas in haloes, the formation...effects on interstellar gas of energy released by young stars, the production of heavy elements, the...dynamics of the cooling gas are calculated in full...relatively small computational cost. The major disadvantage......

Shaun Cole; Cedric G. Lacey; Carlton M. Baugh; Carlos S. Frenk

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

SO3 Formation under Oxyfuel Combustion Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-temperature corrosion (HTC) or fireside corrosion in solid-fuel-fired boilers is caused by low-melting deposits, especially by alkali salts and, consequently, the sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl), and alkali content of the fuel are critical parameters. ... Otsuka, N.Effects of fuel impurities on the fireside corrosion of boiler tubes in advanced power generating systems—A thermodynamic calculation of deposit chemistry Corros. ... In a few boilers both SA 312 stainless steel (18% Cr, 8% Ni, Ti-stabilized) and low-Cr ferritic-alloy tubing corroded at faster rates than expected from flue-gas attack at operating skin temps. ...

Daniel Fleig; Klas Andersson; Fredrik Normann; Filip Johnsson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Carrier cooling and exciton formation in GaSe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial cooling of hot carriers and the subsequent exciton formation in GaSe are studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) using femtosecond up-conversion techniques. From the time-resolved PL spectra of this layered III-VI semiconductor two different energy relaxation channels are derived. After an initial subpicosecond cooling due to Fröhlich-type interaction of carriers with longitudinal optical E?(22) phonons a slower regime follows, which is dominated by deformation potential interaction with the nonpolar optical A1?(12) phonons. The coupling constant for nonpolar optical phonon scattering is derived. The subsequent formation of excitons is studied at different carrier densities and detection energies. A cross section for the free-exciton formation is determined based on a rate equation model.

S. Nüsse; P. Haring Bolivar; H. Kurz; V. Klimov; F. Levy

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin...

202

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

203

Structuring interactive TV documents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interactive video technology is meant to support user-interaction with video in scene objects associated with navigation in video segments and access to text-based metadata. Interactive TV is one of the most important applications of this area, ... Keywords: MPEG-7, XLink, interactive TV, media descriptions, metadata

Rudinei Goularte; Edson dos Santos Moreira; Maria da Graça C. Pimentel

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mesophase Formation in Heavy Oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coke formation is a major problem in the petroleum industry because of its effect on liquid yield, catalyst deactivation, and fouling of reactor internals and… (more)

Bagheri, Seyed Reza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Important Roles of Enthalpic and Entropic Contributions to CO2 Capture from Simulated Flue Gas and Ambient Air Using Mesoporous Silica Grafted Amines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The measurement of isosteric heats of adsorption of silica supported amine materials in the low pressure range (0–0.1 bar) is critical for understanding the interactions between CO2 and amine sites at low coverage and hence to the development of efficient ...

Mustafa A. Alkhabbaz; Praveen Bollini; Guo Shiou Foo; Carsten Sievers; Christopher W. Jones

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

206

Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

208

Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

Centurion, Martin [Physics Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Pu Ye; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri [Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

Martin Centurion; Ye Pu; Mankei Tsang; Demetri Psaltis

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

210

RKKY interaction in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider RKKY interaction between two magnetic impurities in graphene. The consideration is based on the perturbation theory for the thermodynamic potential in the imaginary time representation. We analyze the symmetry of the RKKY interaction on the bipartite lattice at half filling. Our analytical calculation of the interaction is based on direct evaluation of real space spin susceptibility.

E. Kogan

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Quintessence with Yukawa Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a quintessence model for dark energy interacting with dark matter via a Yukawa interaction. To put constraints on this model we use the CMB measurements from the Planck satellite together with BAO, SNIa and $H_0$ data. We conclude that this is a viable model and an appropriate scalar potential can favor the interacting scenario.

Costa, André A; Abdalla, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Bond formation at the Ni/ZrO2 interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the formation of strong chemical bonds at the Ni(100)/cubic-ZrO2(100) polar interfaces. Ab initio density functional theory calculations demonstrate that both Zr/Ni and O/Ni junctions are energetically stable, and predict that two different interactions determine the interface adhesion. Our results reveal that O-Ni ionic bonds are formed by Ni electron donation, while the Zr-Ni bonds show a mixed character with ionic and electron hybridization contributions.

J. I. Beltrán; S. Gallego; J. Cerdá; J. S. Moya; M. C. Muñoz

2003-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Study of spin-polaron formation in 1D systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study numerically the formation of spin-polarons in low-dimensional systems. We consider a ferromagnetic Kondo lattice model with Hund coupling J{sub H} and localized spins interacting antiferromagnetically with coupling constant J. We investigate the ground state phase diagram as a function of the exchange couplings J{sub H} and J and as a function of the band filling, since it has been observed that doping either on the ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic regime lead to formation of magnetic domains [1]. We explore the quasi-particle formation and phase separation using the density-matrix renormalization group method, which is a highly efficient method to investigate quasi-one-dimensional strongly correlated systems.

Arredondo, Y.; Navarro, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-360, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Vallejo, E. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, Carretera Torreón-Matamoros Km. 7.5 Ciudad Universitaria, 27276 Torreón, Coahuila (Mexico)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cobalt Nanocrystals as Starting Materials for Shape Modificationand Assembly Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactant-coated cobalt nanocrystals can be prepared with areasonable degree of control over particle size and shape using athermolytic route. The small crystallite size, enhanced reactivity andtunable interparticle interactions enable use of this material asstarting material for demonstration of achievement of novel structuresusing extremely simple solution-based approaches. In particular,formation of hollow cobalt sulfide nanocrystals upon chemicalmodification and emergence of long-range orientational order upondrying-mediated assembly of cobalt nanocrystals is reportedhere.Colloidal preparation of Co nanocrystals has been well-studied.Here, we emphasize general principles and crystallographic/morphologicalcharacterization of disk-shaped hcp-Co nanocrystals. Use of surfactantmolecules enables achievement of multiple morphologies in one syntheticsystem.Formation of hollow structures upon in-solution sulfidation of Conanocrystals is presented and discussed. A Kirkendall-type effect,involving dominant outward mass transport during formation of the ionicshell material explains the results naturally. It is expected that thisphenomenon will generalize extensively to formation of hollow structuresof an enormous variety of compositions. Detailed study of particlemorphology as a function of reaction conditions suggest phenomena likelyto be generally relevant to use of this approach. A short report ofcrystallographic co-alignment into vortex-like structures is alsoprovided. Our current best picture of this process involves an interplayof packing and magnetic interactions between facetedparticles.

Erdonmez, Can Kerem

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effect of V2O5 additive on simultaneous SO2 and NO removal from flue gas over a monolithic cordierite-based CuO/Al2O3 catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A monolithic cordierite-based CuO/Al2O3 catalyst showed industrial potential for simultaneous SO2 and NO removal from flue gases at 350–400 °C. However, it is still a challenge to prevent CuO from aggregation and to keep it in an active state during the removal and regeneration processes. This work shows that addition of V2O5 to the catalyst can significantly reduce CuO particle size and improve SO2 removal activity, and maintain a high selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity for NO removal. Furthermore, V2O5 additive prevents aggregation of SiO2 in the cordierite with the coated Al2O3, and inhibits over reduction of the SO2 removal product, CuSO4, during the regeneration by NH3, which are important to the catalyst's stability. V2O5 additive changes the regeneration product from Cu3N to CuO and thus may avoid the temperature rise and \\{NOx\\} release in the subsequent removal process.

Qingya Liu; Zhenyu Liu; Weize Wu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

PDSF Interactive Nodes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive (login) Nodes Interactive (login) Nodes Interactive (login) Nodes There are 4 interactive nodes at PDSF, pdsf[1-4].nersc.gov, that should be accessed via ssh to pdsf.nersc.gov. These are the gateways to accessing the rest of PDSF. Users can submit batch jobs as well as view and manipulate their files and directories from the interactive nodes. The configuration of the interactive nodes is shown in the table below. Processor Clock Speed (GHz) Architecture Cores Total Memory (GB) Scratch Space (GB) Intel Xeon X5650 2.67 x86_64 12 47 184 Because these nodes are shared by many users anything disruptive you might do affects not only your work but their work, too. Please take a look at the Best Practices page for guidance about what you should and should not do on the interactive nodes.

218

Supernova Explosions and Neutron Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current picture of the collapse and explosion of massive stars and the formation of neutron stars is reviewed. According to the favored scenario, however by no means proven and undisputed, neutrinos deposit the energy of the explosion in the stellar medium which surrounds the nascent neutron star. Observations, in particular of Supernova~1987A, suggest that mixing processes play an important role in the expanding star, and multi-dimensional simulations show that these are linked to convective instabilities in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star. Convectively enhanced energy transport inside the neutron star can have important consequences for the neutrino emission and thus the neutrino-heating mechanism. This also holds for a suppression of the neutrino interactions at nuclear densities. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, general relativity, and a better understanding of the neutrino interactions in neutron star matter may be crucial to resolve the problem that state-of-the-art spherical models do not yield explosions even with a very accurate treatment of neutrino transport by solving the Boltzmann equation.

H. -Th. Janka; K. Kifonidis; M. Rampp

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Interaction of a potyviral VPg with anionic phospholipid vesicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viral genome-linked protein (VPg) of Potato virus A (PVA) is a multifunctional protein that belongs to a class of intrinsically disordered proteins. Typically, this type of protein gains a more stable structure upon interactions or posttranslational modifications. In a membrane lipid strip overlay binding assay, PVA VPg was found to bind phosphatidylserine (PS), but not phosphatidylcholine (PC). According to circular dichroism spectroscopy, the secondary structure of PVA VPg was stabilized upon interactions with PS and phosphatidylglycerol (PG), but not with PC vesicles. It is possible that this stabilization favored the formation of alpha-helical structures. Limited tryptic digestion showed that the interaction with anionic vesicles protected certain, otherwise accessible, trypsin cleavage sites. An electron microscopy study revealed that interaction with VPg substantially increased the vesicle diameter and caused the formation of pore or plaque-like electron dense spots on the vesicle surface, which gradually led to disruption of the vesicles.

Rantalainen, Kimmo I. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, PO Box 27, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Christensen, Peter A. [The Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Centre, Department of Molecular Biology, Gustav Wieds vej 10 C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hafren, Anders [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, PO Box 27, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland); Otzen, Daniel E. [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Centre, Department of Molecular Biology, Gustav Wieds vej 10 C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Kalkkinen, Nisse [Institute of Biotechnology, PO Box 65, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Maekinen, Kristiina, E-mail: kristiina.makinen@helsinki.f [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, PO Box 27, FIN-00014, University of Helsinki (Finland)

2009-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

KIS Press Release -April 1, 2010 (in german March 9, 2010) First Observation of the Formation of a Sunspot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years ago, the American George Ellery Hale discovered that a strong magnetic field is present of the interaction of gas-dynamic and magnetic forces. Radial filaments develop there, the formation of which has

Schlichenmaier, Rolf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Revealing Look Inside Passive and Active DPF Regeneration: In-Situ Optical Analysis of Ash Formation and Transport  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents results from comprehensive evaluations with optically accessibleDPFs showing the processes controlling formation, transport, and interaction of the soot and ash deposits over range of DPF regeneration conditions

222

2010 Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) Interactive Data and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) Interactive Data and 2010 Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) Interactive Data and Mapping Tool Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data 2010 Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) Interactive Data and Mapping Tool Dataset Summary Description The Interactive Data and Mapping Tool provides users a way to access all post-2005 SAHIE data; in multiple formats; in a sleek, organized, and innovative way. Currently, data can be downloaded as a Pdf, CSV or screenshot. Tags {"small area",model,"health insurance",uninsured,"interactive maps","interactive data"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet

223

Chemical factors affecting insolubles formation in shale derived diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detrimental changes in fuel properties with time have been a continuing problem in the use of middle distillate fuels. Instability of diesel fuels is usually defined by the formation of insoluble sediments and gums. Gravimetric stability tests have been conducted at 43/sup 0/ and 80/sup 0/C, respectively, using three model nitrogen heterocycles, 2-methylpyridine, 2,6-di methyl quinoline, and dodecahydrocarbazole, as dopants in an otherwise stable shale diesel fuel. Potential interactive effects have been defined for these three model nitrogen heterocycles in the stable fuel in the presence of a second model dopant, t-butyl hydroperoxide. 2-Methyl pyridine and 2,6-dimethyl quinoline were inactive and only 2-methyl pyridine showed slight positive interactive effects. Dodecahydrocarbazole formed large amounts of insolubles by itself and exhibited positive interactive effects.

Beal, E.J.; Mushrush, G.W.; Cooney, J.V. (Fuels Section, Code 6180 Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (US)); Watkins, J.M. (Geo-Centers, Ft. Washington, MD (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Batch Jobs Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin or qsh. This can be useful if you are doing something that is potentially disruptive or if the interactive nodes are overloaded. qlogin will give you an interactive session in the same window as your original session on PDSF, however, you must have your ssh keys in place. Due to system limitations there is a small (but important) difference in the user environment you get when you use qlogin. When you receive a shell prompt with qlogin, your CHOS environment is not set up for you. In order to set up the CHOS environment of your choice you will need to manually chos into the chos environment of your choice:

225

Star formation triggered by SNR impact into magnetized neutral clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considering the physical conditions that are relevant for triggering star formation in interactions involving SN shocks and neutral clouds, we have built diagrams of the SNR radius versus the cloud density in which these conditions constrain a shaded zone where star formation is allowed. The diagrams are also tested with fully 3-D MHD radiative cooling simulations involving a SNR and a self-gravitating cloud and we find that the numerical analysis is consistent with the results predicted by the diagrams. While the inclusion of a homogeneous magnetic field approximately perpendicular to the impact velocity of the SNR with an intensity ~1 $mu$G results only a small shrinking of the star formation zone in the diagrams, a larger magnetic field (~10 $\\mu$G) causes a significant shrinking, as expected. Applications of our results to real star formation regions in our own galaxy have revealed that their formation could have been triggered by a SN shock wave. Finally, we have evaluated the effective global star forma...

Leao, M R M; Falceta-Goncalves, D; Melioli, C; Geraissate, F G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Coherence Controlled Soliton Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate theoretically and subsequently observe in experiment a novel type of soliton interaction when a pair of closely spaced spatial optical solitons as a whole is made partially incoherent. We explain how the character of the soliton interaction can be controlled by the total partial incoherence, and show a possibility to change the soliton interaction from attractive to repulsive, or vice versa, near a certain threshold in the coherence parameter.

Ting-Sen Ku; Ming-Feng Shih; Andrey A. Sukhorukov; Yuri S. Kivshar

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

Beam-Bem interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Numerical modeling of the interaction between an electric arc and a gas flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between an equilibrium arc discharge and a gas (air or argon) ... The dynamics and the special features of the electric arc formation are studied for both gases. In the air the electrically conduc...

E. N. Vasil’ev; D. A. Nesterov

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Interactive Television News.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We design and evaluate a way to modify television news to make it interactive for viewers. We allow them to get more of what they… (more)

Bunn, Derek L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effect of hexafluoroisopropanol on the thermodynamics of peptide secondary structure formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides additional evidence for the importance of hydrophobic interactions in peptide secondary structure formation. For the hydrophobically driven {beta} hairpin formation examined, the addition of HFIP to the 8% level increases hairpin formation and increases {Delta}C{sub p} by nearly a factor of 3. Surprisingly, {alpha} helices bearing a few non-interacting hydrophobic residues can display even larger {Delta}C{sub p} values. The initial phase of secondary structure induction during fluoroalcohol titrations of peptides appears to be largely the result of these effects rather than differential stabilization (or destabilization) of the folded versus coil conformation by alcohol/peptide binding interactions, as the latter would be reflected predominantly in the enthalpy term. The addition of limited quantities of fluoroalcohol may mimic the early hydrophobic collapse stage of protein folding.

Andersen, N.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Fesinmeyer, R.M.; Gai, F.; Liu, Z.; Neidigh, J.W.; Tong, H.

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

Towards interactive smart spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, we have been witnessing how various social applications and networking services are being integrated more deeply into our daily lives. Until now, social interaction has been attributed exclusively to humans, while resources and the smart space ... Keywords: Context-Awareness, Knowledge-Based Systems, Smart Spaces, Social Interaction

Ekaterina Gilman; Oleg Davidyuk; Xiang Su; Jukka Riekki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Method to inhibit deposit formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for inhibiting deposit formation on the contact surfaces of structures confining heated hydrocarbon fluid which exhibits substantial fouling. The process consists of introducing into the hydrocarbon fluid at least an inhibiting amount of thiophene-containing polycondensed aromatic/naphthenic compounds of number average molecular weight (M-bar n) from 200 to 1,000.

Dickakian, G.B.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Plasma Rotation during Spheromak Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe Doppler shifts of a CIII impurity line in a spheromak plasma showing toroidal rotation during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration but not during the equilibrium or decay phase. The evolution of the velocity fields is consistent with the estimated rate of cross-helicity decay given the viscosity and resistivity of the plasma.

T. Peyser and G. C. Goldenbaum

1988-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

235

Method of protecting a permeable formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of drilling a well bore through subsurface formations including a permeable formation. It comprises: drilling a well bore through the permeable formation to at least the lower boundary thereof; filling the bore in the permeable formation with liquid composition capable of gelling, the liquid composition containing a gel breaker; allowing the gel to mature; drilling through the gel so as to open the well bore in the permeable formation, some of the gel remaining to plug the permeable formation in the well bore; installing a casing in the well bore in the permeable formation; and allowing the remaining gel to revert to a liquid.

Falk, D.O.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

236

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Touch & Interact: touch-based interaction with a tourist application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Touch & Interact is an interaction technique which combines mobile phones and public displays. The motivation for the project is to overcome the intrinsic output limitations of mobile phones. Touch & Interact extends the phone output to a public display ... Keywords: dynamic display, mobile interaction, touch & interact

Robert Hardy; Enrico Rukzio

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Interaction of Plutonium with Bacteria in the Repository Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (1) sorption, (2) intracellular accumulation, and (3) transformation speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a {gamma}-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland.

Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A.; Papenguth, H. W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Mapping galaxy encounters in numerical simulations: The spatial extent of induced star formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ a suite of 75 simulations of galaxies in idealised major mergers (stellar mass ratio ~2.5:1), with a wide range of orbital parameters, to investigate the spatial extent of interaction-induced star formation. Although the total star formation in galaxy encounters is generally elevated relative to isolated galaxies, we find that this elevation is a combination of intense enhancements within the central kpc and moderately suppressed activity at large galacto-centric radii. The radial dependence of the star formation enhancement is stronger in the less massive galaxy than in the primary, and is also more pronounced in mergers of more closely aligned disc spin orientations. Conversely, these trends are almost entirely independent of the encounter's impact parameter and orbital eccentricity. Our predictions of the radial dependence of triggered star formation, and specifically the suppression of star formation beyond kph-scales, will be testable with the next generation of integral-field spectroscopic sur...

Moreno, Jorge; Ellison, Sara L; Patton, David R; Bluck, Asa F L; Bansal, Gunjan; Hernquist, Lars

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does stellar feedback result in cloud death?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stellar feedback, star formation and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localised thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localised thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the low...

Tasker, Elizabeth J; Pudritz, Ralph

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formatting Formatting Jump to: navigation, search You can format your text using wiki markup. This consists of normal characters like asterisks, single quotes or equation marks which have a special function in the wiki, sometimes depending on their position. For example, to format a word in italic, you include it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character formatting - applies anywhere Italic text ''italic'' italic Bold text '''bold''' bold Bold and italic '''''bold & italic''''' bold & italic Escape wiki markup no ''markup'' no ''markup'' section formatting - only at the beginning of the line Headings of different levels

242

Biological Interactions and Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PNNL-20717 Biological Interactions and Dynamics Science Theme Advisory Panel (BID-STAP) May 2011 Report: September 2011 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of...

243

Strongly interacting Fermi gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision ...

Bakr, W.

244

Interactions V3 Composite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Physics The science of matter, space and time INTERACTIONS The science of matter, space and time High Energy Physics is the Science of Interactions s "Since we (and everything in the universe) are made mostly of empty space, and even particles of matter are just vibrating chunks of energy, what is it that makes us essentially us? It's all about relationships-the way the particles and forces interact. It's all of a piece, a tapestry of relationships woven in space and time." -K.C. Cole, science writer, Los Angeles Times " Every cubic inch of space is a miracle." -Walt Whitman The deepest secrets of the universe The science of matter, space and time INTERACTIONS: Unlocking the deepest secrets of the universe s What is the universe made of ?

245

Measuring Neutrino Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Neutrino Interactions with MiniBooNE R. Tayloe for the MiniBooNE collaboration Physics Department, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405, USA Abstract. The MiniBooNE...

246

Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

472 Federal Register 472 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 83 / Monday, April 30, 2012 / Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document

247

Formation control for cooperative surveillance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

>>> >>>> >>> >>>> >>>> >>> >>>> >>> >>>: _xi = vi cos i cos`i _yi = vi sin i cos`i _zi = vi sinfii _ i = !i _`i = ?i _vi = ui (2.10) Formation Constraints can be deflned by Qi = [r?i]I ?[bi]I = 0 and formation errors are represented byEi = [ri]I?[r?i]I. Let us deflne the error vector... velocity of the second virtual agent was determined 24 from Eq.(2.17). Also, Fig.6 shows that all errors are stabilized exponentially by the controllers ui in Eq.(2.9). The ith row in Fig.6 shows the errors between [ri]I and [r?i]I. The convergence rate...

Woo, Sang-Bum

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Human-machine interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Haze Formation and Behavior in Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous haze formation and behavior was studied in the liquid-liquid system tri-n-butyl phosphate in odorless kerosene and 3M nitric acid with uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate representing the major solute and an impurity, respectively. A pulsed column, mixer-settler and centrifugal contactor were chosen to investigate the effect of different turbulence characteristics on the manifestation of haze since these contactors exhibit distinct mixing phenomena. The dispersive processes of drop coalescence and breakage, and water precipitation in the organic phase were observed to lead to the formation of haze drops of {approx}1 um in diameter. The interaction between the haze and primary drops of the dispersion was critical to the separation efficiency of the liquid-liquid extraction equipment. Conditions of high power input and spatially homogeneous mixing enabled the haze drops to become rapidly assimilated within the dispersion to maximize the scrub performance and separation efficiency of the equipment.

Arm, Stuart T.; Jenkins, J. A.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

251

CO2 interaction with geomaterials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2 molecules may remain trapped for several months following several hours of exposure to high pressure (supercritical conditions), high temperature (above boiling point of water) or both. Such trapping is well preserved in either inert gas or the ambient environment and appears to eventually result in carbonate formation. We performed computer simulations of CO2 interaction with free cations (normal modes of CO2 and Na+CO2 were calculated using B3LYP / aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2 / aug-cc-pVDZ methods) and with clay structures containing interlayer cations (MD simulations with Clayff potentials for clay and a modified CO2 potential). Additionally, interaction of CO2 with hydrated Na-montmorillonite was studied using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. The sorption energies and the swelling behavior were investigated. Preliminary modeling results and experimental observations indicate that the presence of water molecules in the interlayer region is necessary for intercalation of CO2. Our preliminary conclusion is that CO2 molecules may intercalate into interlayer region of swelling clay and stay there via coordination to the interlayer cations.

Guthrie, George D. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Al-Saidi, Wissam A. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Jordan, Kenneth D. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Voora, Vamsee, K. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lopano, Christina L (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Myshakin, Eugene M. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Hur, Tae Bong (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Warzinski, Robert P. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lynn, Ronald J. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Howard, Bret H. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Interacting With the Pharmaceutical Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERACTING WITH THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY Stephen R.to interactions with the pharmaceutical industry! This is ancome from the pharmaceutical industry. It is also reality

Hayden, Stephen R

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Wednesday, 31 October 2007 00:00 Until now, the world's electronics have...

254

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

255

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Proportional structural effects of formative indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formative constructs must influence two or more distinct outcome variables for meaningful tests of the formative conceptualization. Because the construct mediates the effects of its indicators, the indicators must have ...

Franke, George R.; Preacher, K. J.; Rigdon, Ed E.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

T. Padmanabhan

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

259

Interchange format for hybrid systems: abstract semantics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In [1] we advocated the need for an interchange format for hybrid systems that enables the integration of design tools coming from many different research communities. In deriving such interchange format the main challenge is to define a language that, ...

Alessandro Pinto; Luca P. Carloni; Roberto Passerone; Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Formation of Membrane Networks In Vitro by Kinesin-driven Microtubule Movement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but do not interact with micro- tubules or form polygonal networks, suggesting that such phenomena mayFormation of Membrane Networks In Vitro by Kinesin-driven Microtubule Movement Ronald D. Vale. USA. 84:1921-1925) form tubular networks that are closely aligned with microtubules. Here we describe

Vale, Ronald D.

262

An agent-based computational model for bank formation and interbank networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An agent-based computational model for bank formation and interbank networks Matheus R. Grasselli, interdependence, interaction, networks, and trust", all of which are absent from economic models where utility) intellectual history of the quest to base macroeconomic theory on solid micro foundation, culminating

Tesfatsion, Leigh

263

What controls surface tension and cell sorting in tissue formation and morphogenesis?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What controls surface tension and cell sorting in tissue formation and morphogenesis? Living as an emergent material property called surface tension. Similarly, cohesive interactions between cells, mediated surface tension of cohesive cells is, however, more complex than conventional surface tension. Like

Mather, Patrick T.

264

Formation of Two-Dimensional Concentration Pulses on Microdesigned Composite Catalyst Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the effect of microdesigned composite geometries on pattern formation during the catalytic oxidation of CO on Pt-Ti, Pt-Rh, and Pt-Pd composite catalysts. In particular, we find experimentally (and rationalize through modeling) that adsorbate surface transport through the second (active) component drastically affects the shapes and interactions of concentration patterns (traveling pulses) observed on pure Pt.

Michael Pollmann; Harm Hinrich Rotermund; Gerhard Ertl; Xiujiang Li; Ioannis G. Kevrekidis

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

265

Dynamics of plasma formation during quasicontinuous laser irradiation of metals in high-pressure nitrogen atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is a study of target destruction and the dynamics of surface plasma formation during the interaction of quasicontinuous laser...q = 1–7 MW/cm2..., ? ? 1.5 msec) with D16T duraluminum and bismuth in nitrogen

V. I. Nasonov; Yu. A. Chivel

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Prediction of nickel mobility in a clayey formation requires accurate knowledge of the mineralogical assemblage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3640, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany. Introduction In the perspective of nuclear waste storage, 63 Ni is one as representative of 63 Ni distribution after long-term interaction. The present study aimed at elucidating formation from Bure. To achieve this goal, we combined (i) short and long-term (up to 180 days) 63 Ni batch

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

CD-ROMs et cours en ligne : de nouveaux outils de formation en traitement du signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CD-ROMs et cours en ligne : de nouveaux outils de formation en traitement du signal Kheira Sahli in data processing topics. Educational CD-ROMs and Web based on-line modules based on the signal of animations and their high degree of interactivity, CD-ROMs and Web based on-line modules are useful tools

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

Rio, Yvon [CEA/IRFU/Sap, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Experimental studies of spheromak formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies in the PS?1 spheromak configuration can be effectively formed by a combined z? and ??pinch technique on both a fast (?formation??Alfvén) and a much slower timescale. The gross tilt and shift instability of the toroid can be suppressed by a combination of conduction walls shaping the separatrix by externally applied fields and the use of ‘‘figure?eight’’ coils. Optimum stabilty is obtained for almost spherical toroids. Maximum field?reversal times for stable well?confined toroids are ?40 /?sec consistent with resistive decay. Temperatures during the stable decay are 5–10 eV; impurity radiation is an important energy?loss mechanism.

H. Bruhns; C. Chin?Fatt; Y. P. Chong; A. W. DeSilva; G. C. Goldenbaum; H. R. Griem; G. W. Hart; R. A. Hess; J. H. Irby; R. S. Shaw

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Zonal flow as pattern formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Electrochemical formation of field emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Summerwood formation in loblolly pine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of products of anaerobic respiration. He supported his view by experimental data showing a high r espiratory quotient during the summer. In an attempt to clarify the relation between dormancy and auxin 10 Gouwentak (1941) studied the interaction of auxin... in phloroglucinol and hydrochloric acid. In early studies they were mounted in glycerin, but in later studies they were dehydrated on the slide with some absolute alcohol, saturated with xylene, and mounted in technic on. Even in technioon the stain would fade...

Van Buijtenen, Johannes Petrus

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Dike/Drift Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

E. Gaffiney

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Long- and short-period nanostructure formation on semiconductor surfaces at different ambient conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of studies of nanoripples formation during interaction of the 800 nm, 120, and 35 fs pulses with semiconductor surfaces. Simultaneous appearance of the ripples with the period (700 nm) close to the wavelength of interacting radiation and considerably smaller period (180 nm) was achieved. We discuss the experimental conditions for the formation of these nanoripples (incidence angle, polarization, number of shots, etc.). We show a decisive role of surrounding medium on the quality of nanoripples formation. The self-organization of high-quality nanoripples was clearly shown in the case of dense surrounding medium (methanol), while in the case of insufficient amount of surrounding material (i.e., at different vacuum conditions), the quality of ripples considerably decreased.

Ganeev, R. A. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Institute of Electronics, Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, 33, Dormon Yoli Street, Tashkent 100125 (Uzbekistan); Baba, M.; Kuroda, H. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, 38 Hongou, Moro, Moroyama, Iruma, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Ozaki, T. [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Neutron-Neutron Interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present status of the problem of charge dependence is discussed. The information about the neutron-neutron interaction derived from the two-neutron system, three-nucleon systems, final-state interactions in multiparticle reactions, and peripheral processes is critically evaluated. The experimental data indicate the breakdown of charge independence by about 3-5%. Evidence concerning the violation of charge symmetry is inconclusive, but it seems that most of the data are consistent with the assumption that charge symmetry is satisfied within 0.5-1%. The most suitable studies which might improve the knowledge of the neutron-neutron forces are indicated.

IVO ŠLAUS

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

Being Interactive Services and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for engineering software and more than sufficient justification for all the inter- est in services. AlthoughBeing Interactive Services and Situations 4 SEPTEMBER · OCTOBER 2001 http the Editor in Chief ... F orget objects. The killer buzzword of our era is now services. And who isn

279

The Digital Interactive Video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Digital Interactive Video Exploration and Reflection (Diver) system lets users create virtual pathways through existing video content using a virtual camera and an annotation window for commentary repurposing, and discussion. W ith the inexorable growth of low-cost consumer video elec- tronics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

280

Interaction with deformable displays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technological developments in display technologies allow us to explore the design of mobile devices that extend beyond the rigid, flat screen surfaces with which we are familiar. The next generation mobile devices will instead include deformable displays ... Keywords: deformable displays, display surfaces, interaction, shape-changing displays

Jason Alexander; Johan Kildal; Kasper Hornbaek; Viljakaisa Aaltonen; Andrés Lucero; Sriram Subramanian

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Being Interactive Health Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Being Interactive Treating Health Care T he numbers are staggering. In a chilling report, the U care, training staff, and accrediting staff and health-care facilities, which involve determin- ing.ahrq.gov/clinic/ptsafety/summary.htm). Pressures on Health Care To come up with a credible approach for improv- ing patient safety, we need

282

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

283

Program Abstracts: Formation and Growth of Atmospheric Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE provided $11,000 to sponsor the Workshop on New Particle Formation in the Atmosphere, which was held at The Riverwood Inn and Conference Center near Minneapolis, MN from September 7 to 9, 2006. Recent work has shown that new particle formation is an important atmospheric process that must be better understood due to its impact on cloud cover and the Earth's radiation balance. The conference was an informal gathering of atmospheric and basic scientists with expertise pertinent to this topic. The workshop included discussions of: • atmospheric modeling; • computational chemistry pertinent to clustering; • ions and ion induced nucleation; • basic laboratory and theoretical studies of nucleation; • studies on neutral molecular clusters; • interactions of organic compounds and sulfuric acid; • composition of freshly nucleated particles. Fifty six scientists attended the conference. They included 27 senior scientists, 9 younger independent scientists (assistant professor or young associate professor level), 7 postdocs, 13 graduate students, 10 women, 35 North Americans (34 from the U.S.), 1 Asian, and 20 Europeans. This was an excellent informal workshop on an important topic. An effort was made to include individuals from communities that do not regularly interact. A number of participants have provided informal feedback indicating that the workshop led to research ideas and possible future collaborations.

Peter H. McMurry; Markku Kulmala

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Steven Weinberg, Weak Interactions, and Electromagnetic Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Steven Weinberg and Steven Weinberg and Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions Resources with Additional Information Steven Weinberg Courtesy Dr. Steven Weinberg Steven "Weinberg is a professor of physics and astronomy at UT [The University of Texas] Austin and is founding director of the Theory Group in the College of Natural Sciences. [He is] well known for his development of a field theory that unifies the electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces, and for other major contributions to physics and cosmology ... Weinberg's work has been honored with numerous prizes, including the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1979 and the National Medal of Science in 1991. Weinberg is the author of the prize-winning book The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (which has been translated into 22 foreign languages) as well as Gravitation and Cosmology, The Discovery of Subatomic Particles, Dreams of a Final Theory and The Quantum Theory of Fields. ... Weinberg was the recipient of the Scientist as Poet prize from Rockefeller University for "extraordinary achievements in conveying - with passionate clarity - the ideas, history, explanatory power and aesthetic dimensions of fundamental physics." The citation mentioned two of Weinberg's books.

285

Dynamic interactions of proteins in complex networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in techniques such as NMR and EPR spectroscopy have enabled the elucidation of how proteins undergo structural changes to act in concert in complex networks. The three minireviews in this series highlight current findings and the capabilities of new methodologies for unraveling the dynamic changes controlling diverse cellular functions. They represent a sampling of the cutting-edge research presented at the 17th Meeting of Methods in Protein Structure Analysis, MPSA2008, in Sapporo, Japan, 26-29 August, 2008 (http://www.iapsap.bnl.gov). The first minireview, by Christensen and Klevit, reports on a structure-based yeast two-hybrid method for identifying E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that interact with the E3 BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer ligase to generate either mono- or polyubiquitinated products. This method demonstrated for the first time that the BRCA1/BARD1 E3 can interact with 10 different E2 enzymes. Interestingly, the interaction with multiple E2 enzymes displayed unique ubiquitin-transfer properties, a feature expected to be common among other RING and U-box E3s. Further characterization of new E3 ligases and the E2 enzymes that interact with them will greatly enhance our understanding of ubiquitin transfer and facilitate studies of roles of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins in protein processing and trafficking. Stein et al., in the second minireview, describe recent progress in defining the binding specificity of different peptide-binding domains. The authors clearly point out that transient peptide interactions mediated by both post-translational modifications and disordered regions ensure a high level of specificity. They postulate that a regulatory code may dictate the number of combinations of domains and post-translational modifications needed to achieve the required level of interaction specificity. Moreover, recognition alone is not enough to obtain a stable complex, especially in a complex cellular environment. Increasing evidence indicates that disordered domains can acquire structural features that modulate the binding and strength of the signaling cascade. Whereas the first two minireviews describe ways in which protein interactions are modulated, the third, by Tompa, focuses on the importance of protein disorder in a subset of amyloid proteins. It is apparent that within this group, part of the polypeptide chain remains disordered during amyloid formation. Moreover, the disordered segments have different amino acid composition and physicochemical characteristics, which suggests that they may play a role in amyloid stability. The disordered region may serve as a linker to connect the ordered core and a globular domain, maintaining the stability and structure of the globular domain and minimizing protein refolding upon amyloid formation. As techniques in protein chemistry advance, we are learning more and more about the mechanisms that regulate and are regulated by protein interactions. The three minireviews in this series offer a glimpse of the complex dynamics fundamental to protein-protein interactions. In the future, we expect that the knowledge gained will help to augment our ability to control complex pathologies and treat diverse diseases states.

Appella, E.; Anderson, C.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Galaxy Formation, Bars and QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model that accounts for the brief flaring of QSOs in the early stages of galaxy formation is proposed. I argue that a bar must develop early in the life of nearly every galaxy and that gas to create and fuel the QSO is driven into the center of the galaxy by the bar. The QSO lifetime, and the mass of its central engine, are also controlled by large-scale dynamics, since the fuel supply is shut off after a short period by the development of an inner Lindblad resonance. This resonance causes the gas inflow along the bar to stall at a distance of a few hundred parsecs from the center. The ILR develops as a result of previous inflow, making quasar activity self-limiting. The bars are weakened and can be destroyed by the central mass concentration formed in this way.

J. A. Sellwood

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

The dynamics of fragment formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac`s BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to {sup 4}He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy.

Keane, D. [Kent State Univ., OH (United States); EOS Collaboration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electrochemical formation of field emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

Bernhardt, A.F.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Direct fired absorption machine flue gas recuperator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A recuperator which recovers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine. The recuperator includes a housing with liquid flowing therethrough, the liquid being in direct contact with the combustion gas for increasing the effectiveness of the heat transfer between the gas and the liquid.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involves both experimental and modeling efforts. The team is comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective is to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters to be studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. This report summarizes Year 2 results for the experimental and modeling tasks. Experiments in the mercury reactor are underway and interesting results suggested that a more comprehensive look at catalyzed surface reactions was needed. Therefore, much of the work has focused on the heterogeneous reactions. In addition, various chemical kinetic models have been explored in an attempt to explain some discrepancies between this modeling effort and others.

JoAnn S. Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Andrew Fry; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 5260 of 28,905 results. 51 - 5260 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000439: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actualistic and Geomechanical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, Carbon Dioxide and Formation Flue Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 11/20/2009 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000439-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000440: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actualistic and Geomechanical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, Carbon Dioxide and Formation Flue Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 11/20/2009 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000440-categorical-exclusion-determination

294

Interaction Region Papers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IR (Interaction Region) Magnets with Ramesh Gupta IR (Interaction Region) Magnets with Ramesh Gupta as the major author (unless noted): R. Gupta, et. al, "React & Wind Nb3Sn Common Coil Dipole", ASC 2006, August 27- September 1, 2006 in Seattle, WA, USA . *** Click Here for Talk ***. R. Gupta, "Modular Design and Modular Program for High Gradient Quadrupoles", ASC 2006, August 27- September 1, 2006 in Seattle, WA, USA. *** Click Here for Poster ***. Racetrack Magnet Designs and Technologies, WAMDO@CERN, April 2-6, 2006 (Click here for the oral presentation). R. Gupta, et. al, "Optimization of Open Midplane Dipole Design for LHC IR Upgrade," Presented at the 2005 Particle Accelerator Conference, Knoxville, TN, USA (2005). *** Click Here for Poster *** R. Gupta, et al., “Open Midplane Dipole Design for LHC IR

295

Magnetism of Interacting Donors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic susceptibility of donor centers in semiconductors is calculated for the case of small interactions between closely adjacent donors. A hydrogenic model is assumed for the donor centers. The random distribution of the centers, as well as the variation of the energy of interaction with separation distance of pairs of donors, is taken into consideration. A twofold modification to the Curie law (which is correct for independent donors) is predicted by the resulting expression, namely, a curvature as well as a decrease of the slope of the Curie plot of the susceptibility versus inverse temperature. Both of these effects increase with the donor density, becoming appreciable in silicon with 1017-1018 donors/cm3 and in germanium in the range around 1016 donors/cm3. The theory is in good agreement with results of measurements.

E. Sonder and H. C. Schweinler

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NO?A”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

298

Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

300

Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Simulations of pulsar wind formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present initial results of the first self-consistent numerical model of the outer magnetosphere of a pulsar. By using the relativistic ``particle-in-cell'' method with special boundary conditions to represent plasma dynamics in 3D, we are able to follow magnetospheric plasma through the light cylinder into the wind zone for arbitrary magnetic inclination angles. For aligned rotators we confirm the ``disk-dome'' charge-separated structure of the magnetosphere and find that this configuration is unstable to a 3D nonaxisymmetric diocotron instability. This instability allows plasma to move across the field lines and approach the corotating Goldreich-Julian solution within several rotation periods. For oblique rotators formation of the spiral ``striped wind'' in the equatorial direction is demonstrated and the acceleration of the wind and its magnetization is discussed. We find that the wind properties vary with stellar latitude; however, whether injection conditions at the pulsar are responsible for the observed jet-equator geometry of Crab and Vela is currently under investigation. We also comment on the electrodynamics of the simulated magnetospheres, their current closure, and future simulations.

Anatoly Spitkovsky; Jonathan Arons

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dark Matter Gravitational Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that the conjectured dark mater in the Universe may be endowed with a new kind of gravitational charge that couples to a short range gravitational interaction mediated by a massive vector field. A model is constructed that assimilates this concept into ideas of current inflationary cosmology. The model is also consistent with the observed behaviour of galactic rotation curves according to Newtonian dynamics. The essential idea is that stars composed of ordinary (as opposed to dark matter) experience Newtonian forces due to the presence of an all pervading background of massive gravitationally charged cold dark matter. The novel gravitational interactions are predicted to have a significant influence on pre-inflationary cosmology. The precise details depend on the nature of a gravitational Proca interaction and the description of matter. A gravitational Proca field configuration that gives rise to attractive forces between dark matter charges of like polarity exhibits homogeneous isotropic eternal cosmologies that are free of cosmological curvature singularities thus eliminating the horizon problem associated with the standard big-bang scenario. Such solutions do however admit dense hot pre-inflationary epochs each with a characteristic scale factor that may be correlated with the dark matter density in the current era of expansion. The model is based on a theory in which a modification of Einsteinian gravity at very short distances can be expressed in terms of the gradient of the Einstein metric and the torsion of a non-Riemannian connection on the bundle of linear frames over spacetime. Indeed we demonstrate that the genesis of the model resides in a remarkable simplification that occurs when one analyses the variational equations associated with a broad class of non-Riemannian actions.

R. W. Tucker; C. Wang

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

305

Massive Stellar Clusters in Interacting Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive clusters are now seen to form easily in interacting and merging galaxies, making these excellent environments for studying the properties of young clusters. New observations of the Antennae (NGC 4038/39) show that the most luminous young clusters do not have a measurable tidal radius. Most observations suggest that the luminosity function (LF) and mass functions of young clusters are single power laws. However, there are many uncertainties at the faint end of the LF. For example, contamination from massive stars may be important. The shape and evolution of the LF, and more fundamentally, the mass function, of massive clusters had implications for our understanding of both the formation and the destruction of massive stellar clusters.

B. W. Miller

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Networks within networks - interaction in bioenergy business  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Collaboration is seen as one of the most important means for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to compete and innovate in dynamic business environments. This paper approaches this phenomenon by studying a group of Finnish biomass heating firms and their interaction in the bioenergy business. In this paper, two frameworks are combined into a practical two-level tool for relationship and network analysis. This paper offers detailed information on the formation of partnerships and networks around the bioenergy business. Moreover, it speculates about the motives and mechanisms behind an actor's business relations. This study confirms that it is often profitable for SMEs to act simultaneously in different types of networks. In these networks, the firms form relationships that are different in breadth and depth.

Kirsi Kokkonen; Tuomo Kässi; Ville Ojanen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

DUST-PLASMA INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

Dr. M. Rosenberg

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

308

Formation of phases in the films of a Ag-In-Se system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processes of electron-diffraction structure analysis have been used to study the processes of phase formation and phase transitions in thin layers of a Ag-In-Se system. The phases formed at the onset of interaction between the films and phase transformations occurring during annealing of the samples in vacuum are established. It is found that thin films of the AgInSe{sub 2} compound formed as a result of simultaneous or consecutive deposition of components are amorphous, and crystallization brings about the formation of textured films with high structural quality

Ismayilov, D. I.; Kerimova, N. K., E-mail: kerimova-nurlana@mail.ru [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Nanometer-scale tunnel formation in metallic glass by helium ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have shown that upon high fluence helium ion irradiation, metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 45}Ti{sub 5} becomes highly porous at the depth of the helium projected range. The resulting porous region is characterized by the formation of a tunnel like structure and self-linkage of nanometer size gas bubbles. Furthermore, the irradiation leads to the formation of nanometer size Cu{sub x}Zr{sub y} crystals that are randomly distributed. The results of this study indicate that the He-filled bubbles have attractive interactions and experience considerable mobility. Movement of the bubbles is believed to be assisted by ballistic collisions.

Shao Lin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Gorman, Brian P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Aitkaliyeva, Assel [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); David Theodore, N. [CHD-Fab, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States); Xie Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

310

Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published abstract: Calcium formate is a water-soluble salt of an essential mineral nutrient with potential for use as a dietary calcium supplement. Formate ion is a product of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism, but ...

Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, S. C.; Eells, J. T.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The dark side of galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...formation. | I discuss the discovery of a population of extremely...rsta.2002.1088 The dark side of galaxy formation...October 2002 I discuss the discovery of a population of extremely...Galaxy which creates the dark lanes in our view of...schematic of the spectral energy distribution of a luminous...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format Program Duration 12 months Program Format Cohort (lockstep) Class Requirements · Application Form and $55 fee. · Resume · Essay outlining why you wish to join the Bridge MBA program, and how you expect the Bridge to aid your future job search (500 words or less) · Official

Carter, John

313

Formation of $??$ atoms in $K_{?4} decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the decay rate of $\\pi\\mu$ atom formation in $K_{\\mu 4}$ decay. Using the obtained expressions we calculate the decay rate of atom formation and point out that considered decay can give a noticeable contribution as a background to the fundamental decay $K^+\\to \\pi^+\

S. R. Gevorkyan; A. V. Tarasov; O. O. Voskresenskaya

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Star Formation History of NGC 6822  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Images of five fields in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} in the F555W and F814W filters are presented. Photometry for the stars in these images was extracted using the Point-Spread-Function fitting program HSTPHOT/MULTIPHOT. The resulting color-magnitude diagrams reach down to $V\\approx26$, a level well below the red clump, and were used to solve quantitatively for the star formation history of NGC 6822. Assuming that stars began forming in this galaxy from low-metallicity gas and that there is little variation in the metallicity at each age, the distribution of stars along the red giant branch is best fit with star formation beginning in NGC 6822 12-15 Gyr ago. The best-fitting star formation histories for the old and intermediate age stars are similar among the five fields and show a constant or somewhat increasing star formation rate from 15 Gyr ago to the present except for a possible dip in the star formation rate from 3 to 5 Gyr ago. The main differences among the five fields are in the higher overall star formation rate per area in the bar fields as well as in the ratio of the recent star formation rate to the average past rate. These variations in the recent star formation rate imply that stars formed within the past 0.6 Gyr are not spatially very well mixed throughout the galaxy.

Ted K. Wyder

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Tafel Musik: Formatting algorithm of tables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides a description on the formatting algorithm of tables that the authors have developed. This algorithm is an important component of the so called TafeMusik (Tafel Musik) environment. TafeMusikprovides the user with an environment to ... Keywords: First-fit algorithm, Linear programming, Optimization, Tables, Tabular formatting, Tabular layout

K. -H. Shin; K. Kobayashi; A. Suzuki

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Domain formation on oxidized graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we demonstrate that the adsorption of a single oxygen atom results in significant electron transfer from graphene to oxygen. This strongly disturbs the charge landscape of the C-C bonds at the proximity. Additional oxygen atoms adsorbing to graphene prefer always the C-C bonds having the highest charge density and, consequently, they have the tendency to form domain structure. While oxygen adsorption to one side of graphene ends with significant buckling, the adsorption to both sides with similar domain pattern is favored. The binding energy displays an oscillatory variation and the band gap widens with increasing oxygen coverage. While a single oxygen atom migrates over the C-C bonds on the graphene surface, a repulsive interaction prevents two oxygen adatoms from forming an oxygen molecule. Our first-principles study together with finite-temperature ab initio molecular dynamics calculations conclude that oxygen adatoms on graphene can not desorb easily without the influence of external agents.

M. Topsakal and S. Ciraci

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grtice J. Vincent Le logiciel Tigre en formation PLC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grétice J. Vincent Le logiciel « Tigre » en formation PLC J. Vincent Le;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 2 Grétice J. Vincent 1.1. La lecture Voici l'écran d;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 3 Grétice J. Vincent Figure 3 1.2. La démonstration Voici l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

I/O Formats at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I/O Formats I/O Formats I/O Formats Software I/O continues to be one of the main bottlenecks for scientific applications. Here are two software packages that many application developers use to manage input/output of heterogeneous types of binary application data used on many different platforms. HDF5 and NETCDF are both implemented on top of MPI-IO and have gained popularity as alternatives to basic POSIX API. HDF5 is a machine-independent and self-documenting file format. Each HDF5 file "looks" like a directory tree, with subdirectories, and leaf nodes that contain the actual data. This means that data can be found in a file by referring to its name, rather than its location in the file. NetCDF is a file format and support library developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

320

Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

322

Jet?vortex Interaction: A Numerical Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of a vortex and a jet plays an important role for many industrial processes such as Carbon Black formation or combustion in diesel engines. The knowledge of physics of these phenomena is crucial for engineers but also for scientists who wish to reveal many interesting and complex issues hidden there. In this research we numerically investigate cases where a cylindrical reactor is charged with gas injected through five ports. The first one is located along the main axis of the cylinder and this leads to the formation of the main jet. The other four ports are situated along the side walls such that the gas entering the cylinder tangentially through them causes a vortex to be formed. The objective of this paper is to show the fundamental physical phenomena and also how the initial and boundary conditions influence the results. Our most important observation at this stage is that the mixing process is more intense if the vortex is inclined towards x?axis. The results are mainly shown as snapshots of gas velocity.

Catalin G. Ilea; Pawel Kosinski; Alex C. Hoffmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

RKKY interaction between extended magnetic defect lines in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of fundamental interest in the field of spintronics is the mechanism of indirect exchange coupling between magnetic impurities embedded in metallic hosts. A range of physical features, such as magnetotransport and overall magnetic moment formation, are predicated upon this magnetic coupling, often referred to as the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction. Recent theoretical studies on the RKKY in graphene have been motivated by possible spintronic applications of magnetically doped graphene systems. In this paper a combination of analytic and numerical techniques are used to examine the effects of defect dimensionality on such an interaction. We show, in a mathematically transparent manner, that moving from single magnetic impurities to extended lines of impurities effectively reduces the dimensionality of the system and increases the range of the interaction. This has important consequences for the spintronic application of magnetically-doped systems, and we illustrate this with a simple magnetoresistance device.

P. D. Gorman; J. M. Duffy; S. R. Power; M. S. Ferreira

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

324

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

325

Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system. Results (i.e., degree of saturation with respect to calcite, dolomite, halite, gypsum, and anhydrite) were integrated with a graphical matrix analysis program to produce color-coded maps that depict potential precipitation-dissolution boundaries...

Spicer, James Frank

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - aberration formation interaction Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Rochester Collection: Engineering 46 Modeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of theModeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of the Human EyeHuman Eye Summary: be...

327

Induction of androgen receptor formation by epithelium-mesenchyme interaction in embryonic mouse mammary gland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The eptelu in the' uppe center'" aglan wit Loalizadheiongi of [~epidsermi tp) oethtte...D.ih a o a explant 3asi associato wit salivar eihiu Inaotne thr of such combination...London) New Biol. 232, 5-7. 20. Price, D. & Ortiz, E. (1965) in Organogenesis...

B Heuberger; I Fitzka; G Wasner; K Kratochwil

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Williston Basin is located in the northern Great Plains of the United States. This area includes eastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota, and western North… (more)

Spicer, James Frank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Formation of Chiral Interdigitated Multilayers at the Air-Liquid Interface Through Acid-Base Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of p-chloro-benzaldehyde. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance...57%. We deter-mined this value by nuclear magnetic resonanceScheme 2. SCIENCE...process aids, cleaning agents, and dispersants (1), and solvent-intensive industries...

Ivan Kuzmenko; Ronith Buller; Wim G. Bouwman; Kristian Kjær; Jens Als-Nielsen; Meir Lahav; Leslie Leiserowitz

1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Flame–vortex interaction in a reacting vortex ring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations are used to study the flame–vortex interaction in a laminar reacting vortex ring. The chemical reaction occurs by a one-step Arrhenius-type reaction that mimics the combustion of typical hydrocarbon and air. The ring is generated by an axisymmetric jet that is impulsed to emit a cold fuel through a nozzle. The fuel enters a quiescent ambient at a much higher temperature. By adjusting the ratio of the ambient and fuel temperatures the ignition either occurs during the formation or post-formation phase of the ring. When ignition occurs during the formation phase of the ring the bulk of combustion is by a flame at the front of the vortex bubble. When ignition is delayed until after the formation phase most of the reaction occurs inside the vortex ring. It is found that premixing the fuel and the oxidizer enhances the amount of product formation. The heat released from the reaction significantly affects production redistribution and diffusion of the vorticity throughout the field. The results of the simulations also reveal that the heat of reaction affects the strain rate fields differently depending on when the ignition of the ring occurs.

J. S. Hewett; C. K. Madnia

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Running Interactive Jobs on Carver  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Overview There are two types of interactive jobs. The first type runs on a login node. These applications are typically pre- and post-processing jobs, data management programs, or some other type of "tool". Note that it is not possible to run any MPI application on Carver login nodes. The second type of interactive job runs on one or more Carver compute nodes. Because the only way to gain access to the compute nodes is through the batch system, these types of jobs may more accurately be called "interactive batch" jobs. The remainder of this section focuses on these types of jobs. Usage Basic usage: carver% qsub -I The above command creates an interactive shell on a compute node, in the user's home directory. As a batch job, it has default values for batch

332

Running Interactive Jobs on Hopper  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Hopper's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the interactive queue. hopper% qsub -I -V -q interactive -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the umber of cores per node. On Hopper, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one more if

333

The impact of cement parameters on Delayed Ettringite Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) in concrete is likely to lead to swelling and cracking in structures which have undergone early age heating to a temperature of over 65 °C. Application of a method that accelerates this process has made it possible to study the impact of cement properties on DEF. For two temperatures reached by the concrete (75 °C or 85 °C), the study considers a domain defined by the sulphate content [2.6–3.6%], the alkali content [0.5–1%] and the Blaine specific area [3330–4635 cm2/g] of the cement. The impact of these parameters and the interactions between them on swelling are discussed. Monitoring of the dynamic elastic modulus of the concretes shows that this property may be reduced by DEF, but that it may increase again once the swelling process has ceased, probably due to the gradual filling of voids by ettringite formed under conditions of limited supersaturation.

A. Pavoine; X. Brunetaud; L. Divet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

On Damage Propagation in a Soft Low-Permeability Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we develop a mathematical model of fluid flow with changing formation properties. The modification of formation permeability is caused by development of a connected system of fractures. As the fluids are injected or withdrawn from the reservoir, the balance between the pore pressure and the geostatic formation stresses is destroyed. If the strength of the rock is not sufficient to accommodate such an imbalance, the cementing bonds between the rock grains become broken. Such a process is called damage propagation. The micromechanics and the basic mathematical model of damage propagation have been studied in [7]. The theory was further developed in [3], where new nonlocal damage propagation model has been studied. In [2] this theory has been enhanced by incorporation of the coupling between damage propagation and fluid flow. As it has been described above, the forced fluid flow causes changes in the rock properties including formation permeability. At the same time, changing permeability facilitates fluid flow and, therefore, enhances damage propagation. One of the principle concepts introduced in [3] and [2] is the characterization of damage by a dimensionless ratio of the number of broken bonds to the number of bonds in pristine rock per unit volume. It turns out, that the resulting mathematical model consist of a system of two nonlinear parabolic equations. As it has been shown in [6] using modeling of micromechanical properties of sedimentary rocks, at increasing stress the broken bonds coalesce into a system of cracks surrounding practically intact matrix blocks. These blocks have some characteristic size and a regular geometry. The initial microcracks expand, interact with each other, coalesce and form bigger fractures, etc. Therefore, as the damage is accumulated, the growing system of connected fractures determines the permeability of the reservoir rock. Significant oil deposits are stored in low-permeability soft rock reservoirs such as shales, chalks and diatomites [9, 10]. The permeability of the pristine formation matrix in such reservoirs is so low that oil production was impossible until hydraulic fracturing was applied. For development of correct production policy, it is very significant to adequately understand and predict how fast and to what extend the initial damage induced by drilling and hydrofracturing will propagate into the reservoir. The importance of fractures for rock flow properties is a well-established and recognized fact [4, 9, 5]. Different conceptual models have been developed [8]. In this study, we propose a damage propagation model based on a combination of the model of double-porosity and double-permeability medium [4] and a modification of the model of damage propagation developed in [2].

Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Barenblatt, G.I.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Gallium interactions with Zircaloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the effects of gallium ion implantation into zircaloy cladding material to investigate the effects that gallium may have in a reactor. High fluence ion implantation of Ga ions was conducted on heated Zircaloy-4 in the range of 10{sup 16}--10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm2. Surface effects were studied using SEM and electron microprobe analysis. The depth profile of Ga in the Zircaloy was characterized with Rutherford backscattering and SIMS techniques. Results indicate that the Zirc-4 is little affected up to a fluence of 10{sup 17} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation of 10{sup 18} Ga ions/cm{sup 2}, sub-grain features on the order of 2 {micro}m were observed which may be due to intermetallic compound formation between Ga and Zr. For the highest fluence implant, Ga content in the Zirc-4 reached a saturation value of between 30 and 40 atomic %; significant enhanced diffusion was observed but gallium was not seen to concentrate at grain boundaries.

Woods, A.L. [ed.; West, M.K. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Formation of nanostructures at the glass-carbon surface exposed to laser radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental technique for obtaining nanostructures in the field of high-power laser radiation at the surface of carbon materials is developed. A specific feature of this technique is the formation of liquid carbon inside the region of laser action in the sample exposed to radiation in air at a pressure of {approx}1 atm. Several types of nanostructures (quasi-domains and nanopeaks) are detected in the laser cavern and beyond the range of laser action. Mechanisms of formation of such structures are proposed. The formation of quasi-domains is related to crystallisation of the melt. The nanopeak groups are formed outside the laser action region during the deposition of hot vapours of the material escaping from this region. The dependences of the variation in morphological properties of the nanostructures on the duration of laser action and the radii of typical cavern zones on the laser radiation power are obtained. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

Abramov, D V; Gerke, M N; Kucherik, A O; Kutrovskaya, S V; Prokoshev, V G; Arakelyan, S M [Vladimir State University, Vladimir (Russian Federation)

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Post-translational modification of osteopontin: Effects on in vitro hydroxyapatite formation and growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thrombin-cleaved fragments of milk-osteopontin effect hydroxyapatite formation differently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N- and C-terminal fragments promoted hydroxyapatite formation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A central fragment inhibited hydroxyapatite formation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding to collagen or hydroxyapatite seed crystals modified these effects. -- Abstract: The manuscript tests the hypothesis that posttranslational modification of the SIBLING family of proteins in general and osteopontin in particular modify the abilities of these proteins to regulate in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Osteopontin has diverse effects on hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral crystallite formation and growth depending on the extent of phosphorylation. We hypothesized that different regions of full-length OPN would also have distinct effects on the mineralization process. Thrombin fragmentation of milk OPN (mOPN) was used to test this hypothesis. Three fragments were tested in a de novo HA formation assay; an N-terminal fragment (aa 1-147), a central fragment (aa 148-204) denoted SKK-fragment and a C-terminal fragment (aa 205-262). Compared to intact mOPN the C- and N-terminal fragments behaved comparably, promoting HA formation and growth, but the central SKK-fragment acted as a mineralization inhibitor. In a seeded growth experiment all fragments inhibited mineral proliferation, but the SKK-fragment was the most effective inhibitor. These effects, seen in HA-formation and seeded growth assays in a gelatin gel system and in a pH-stat experiment were lost when the protein or fragments were dephosphorylated. Effects of the fully phosphorylated protein and fragments were also altered in the presence of fibrillar collagen. The diverse effects can be explained in terms of the intrinsically disordered nature of OPN and its fragments which enable them to interact with their multiple partners.

Boskey, Adele L., E-mail: boskeya@hss.edu [Musculoskeletal Integrity Program, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Christensen, Brian, E-mail: bc@mb.au.dk [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University (Denmark)] [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University (Denmark); Taleb, Hayat, E-mail: Talebh@hss.edu [Musculoskeletal Integrity Program, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)] [Musculoskeletal Integrity Program, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Sorensen, Esben S., E-mail: ess@mb.au.dk [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University (Denmark)

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

Local Star formation triggered by SN shocks in magnetized diffuse neutral clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, considering the impact of a SNR with a neutral magnetized cloud we derived analytically a set of conditions which are favorable for driving gravitational instability in the cloud and thus star formation. We have built diagrams of the SNR radius, versus the cloud density, that constrain a domain in the parameter space where star formation is allowed. The diagrams are also tested with fully 3-D MHD simulations involving a SNR and a self-gravitating cloud and we find that the numerical analysis is consistent with the results predicted by the diagrams. While the inclusion of a homogeneous magnetic field approximately perpendicular to the impact velocity of the SNR with an intensity ~1 $ mu$G results only a small shrinking of the star formation triggering zone in the diagrams, a larger magnetic field (~10 $ mu$G) causes a significant shrinking, as expected. Applications of the diagrams to a few regions of our own galaxy have revealed that star formation in those sites could have been triggered by shock waves from SNRs. Finally, we have evaluated the effective star formation efficiency for this sort of interaction and found that it is smaller than the observed values in our own Galaxy (sfe ~0.01-0.3). This result is consistent with previous work in the literature and also suggests that the mechanism presently investigated, though very powerful to drive structure formation, supersonic turbulence and eventually, local star formation, does not seem to be sufficient to drive global star formation in normal star forming galaxies, not even when the magnetic field in the neutral clouds is neglected. (abridged)

M. R. M. Leao; E. M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; D. Falceta-Goncalves; C. Melioli; F. G. Geraissate

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Design and Analysis of a Test Rig for Modeling the Bit/Formation Interface in Petroleum Drilling Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and horizontal wells and measuring the effects of various factors on the stability of perturbations on the system. A test rig concept has been developed to accurately measure the interaction forces and torques between the bit, formation and fluids during drilling...

Wilson, Joshua Kyle

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

342

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT The peer review seminar will be styled after oral the project's past accomplishments (if renewal) Discuss the new project proposal 2. Open Discussion ­ (approx

Maxwell, Bruce D.

344

Gas hydrate formation in fine sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrate formation from two types of dissolved gas (methane and mixed gas) was studied under varying thermodynamic conditions in ... Sea. The testing media consisted of silica sand particles with diameters of ...

XiaoYa Zang; DeQing Liang; NengYou Wu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Kinetics of acrylamide formation in potato chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in potato chips. Seven potato cultivars were analyzed to determine their influence on acrylamide formation during traditional and vacuum frying. The White Rose cultivar produced the highest level of acrylamide during both traditional and vacuum frying...

Granda, Claudia Esthela

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Procurement System Procurement System (IIPS) (IIPS) Douglas Baptist, Project Manager Information Management Systems Division US Department of Energy IIPS Functions Issue synopses, solicitations and related documents via the Internet Receive and Respond to Solicitation Specific Questions Receive proposal, bid or application information electronically Provide access to proposal information to authorized personnel through a web browser Conduct negotiations or obtain clarifications Issue award documents IIPS Security Security Plan in place and approved by DOE's Chief Information Officer System security tested by DOE's Computer Incident Advisory Capability team Security measures include: - Encryption on the IIPS server

347

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit...

348

Interactive Grid | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to promote better understanding of the operation of the power grid. Congressional Testimony Recovery Act Educational Resources Electricity 101 Interactive Grid Smart Grid Primer...

349

Theoretical studies of molecular interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

Lester, W.A. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on DOE’s Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) presented at the PEM fuel cell pre-solicitation meeting held May 26, 2005 in Arlington, VA.

351

Electrons and Nuclei: Fundamental Interactions and Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examples are given of the usefulness of electrons in interaction with nuclei for probing fundamental interactions and structure

Ernest M. Henley

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

352

Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

Kang, S.O. [University of Kansas; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Entanglement of formation from optimal decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new method of analytically deriving the entanglement of formation of the bipartite mixed state. The method realizes the optimal decomposition families of states. Our method can lead to many new results concerning entanglement of formation, its additivity and entanglement cost. We illustrate it by investigating the two-qubit state, the separable state, the maximally correlated state, the isotropic state and the Werner state.

Lin Chen; Yi-Xin Chen

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

COSMIC EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ENHANCEMENT IN CLOSE MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY PAIRS SINCE z = 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared (IR) emission of 'M {sub *} galaxies' (10{sup 10.4} {<=} M {sub star} {<=} 10{sup 11.0} M {sub Sun }) in galaxy pairs, derived using data obtained in Herschel (PEP/HerMES) and Spitzer (S-COSMOS) surveys, is compared to that of single-disk galaxies in well-matched control samples to study the cosmic evolution of the star formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR spectral energy distribution and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 < z < 1 are consistent with no star formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 < z < 0.6 show marginal evidence for a weak star formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z = 0 and z = 1, this decline of interaction-induced star formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of {approx}10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both of which can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher-z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the dark matter halos hosting these pairs.

Xu, C. K.; Shupe, D. L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Cooray, A.; Lu, N.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bethermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Riguccini, L. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Franceschini, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, vicolo Osservatorio, 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Marsden, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Oliver, S. J. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Pozzi, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); and others

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Mapping Protein Family Interactions: Intramolecular and Intermolecular Protein Family Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping Protein Family Interactions: Intramolecular and Intermolecular Protein Family Interaction of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology University College London Darwin Building, Gower Street London WC1E 6BT, UK: in multi-domain polypeptide chains, in multi-subunit proteins and in transient complexes between proteins

Teichmann, Sarah

356

Interaction and audience analysis in interactive digital TV systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes and compares two approaches for data capture to support the analysis of user interaction and audience measurement in Interactive digital TV (IDTV) systems. The first approach relies on the development of extensions to existent standards ... Keywords: TV digital, audi?ncia, ginga, intera??o, medi??o

Samuel da Costa Alves Basilio; Marcelo Ferreira Moreno; Eduardo Barrére

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Four Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cuatro Interacciones Cuatro Interacciones Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO! El universo que conocemos y amamos existe debido a que las partículas fundamentales interactúan, ya sea porque decaen o se aniquilan, o bien porque responden a una fuerza debida a la presencia de otra partícula (por ejemplo, durante una colisión). Hay cuatro interacciones entre partículas: Fuerte, débil, gravitatoria, electromagnética Para aclarar las cosas, damos a continuación dos definiciones: Fuerza: El efecto que aparece sobre una partícula debido a la presencia de otra partícula. Interacción: Las fuerzas y los decaimientos que afectan a una partícula dada. Una Interacción no es lo mismo que una fuerza dado que a la palabra "interacción" se le asigna un significado más amplio. A pesar que los dos

358

Ettringite formation and behaviour in clayey soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failures in soil stabilization have been reported previously as being due to the formation of ettringite, an expansive mineral which develops in the presence of sulfate, calcium, and aluminum compounds of clay fraction in high pH levels between 10.36 and 14. By comparing the pattern of formation of ettringite, formed from different possible sources and specifically in stabilized soil, it is expected that a clearer picture of the kinetics of ettringite formation from different sources will be obtained. In this paper, a set of physico-chemical experiments and XRD tests were performed to investigate the process of ettringite formation and to explore its possible performance in clayey soils. The growth of the ettringite XRD peaks was used as a measure of the rate and its formation pattern. It is shown that the rate of ettringite formation in soil stabilization is much slower than that of artificial ettringite. Furthermore, it is shown that ettringite swells to the order of 50% and its fluid retention is significantly higher (by as much as 400%) than that of the soil sample studied in this research.

Vahid R. Ouhadi; Raymond N. Yong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

UV emission and Star Formation in Stephan's Quintet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

we present the first GALEX UV images of the well known interacting group of galaxies, Stephan's Quintet (SQ). We detect widespread UV emission throughout the group. However, there is no consistent coincidence between UV structure and emission in the optical, H\\alpha, or HI. Excluding the foreground galaxy NGC7320 (Sd), most of the UV emission is found in regions associated with the two spiral members of the group, NGC7319 and NGC7318b, and the intragroup medium starburst SQ-A. The extinction corrected UV data are analyzed to investigate the overall star formation activity in SQ. It is found that the total star formation rate (SFR) of SQ is 6.69+-0.65 M_\\sun/yr. Among this, 1.34+-0.16 M_sun/yr is due to SQ-A. This is in excellent agreement with that derived from extinction corrected H\\alpha luminosity of SQ-A. The SFR in regions related to NGC 7319 is 1.98+-0.58 M_\\sun/yr, most of which(68%) is contributed by the disk. The contribution from the 'young tail' is only 15%. In the UV, the 'young tail' is more extended (~100 kpc) and shows a loop-like structure, including the optical tail, the extragalactic HII regions recently discovered in H\\alpha, and other UV emission regions discovered for the first time. The UV and optical colors of the 'old tail' are consistent with a single stellar population of age t ~10^{8.5+-0.4} yrs. The UV emission associated with NGC 7318b is found in a very large (~80 kpc) disk, with a net SFR of 3.37+-0.25 M_sun/yr. Several large UV emission regions are 30 -- 40 kpc away from the nucleus of NGC7318b. Although both NGC7319 and NGC7318b show peculiar UV morphology, their SFR is consistent with that of normal Sbc galaxies, indicating that the strength of star formation activity is not enhenced by interactions.

C. Kevin Xu; Jorge Iglesias-Paramo; Denis Burgarella; R. Michael Rich; Susan G. Neff; Sebastien Lauger; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; D. Christopher Martin; Bruno Milliard; Patrick Morrissey; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Ted K. Wyder

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

Astrophysical fuel-coolant interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Initially the bubble expands and, provided the radiation escapes, it then collapses. Departure from mirror symmetry can result in the formation of a jet of matter, say, if the ... about % and y2 respectively. Thus the inequality (6) becomes

D. E. T. F. ASHBY; D. J. BUCHANAN; R. S. PECKOVER

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Interactive Video Cubism Sidney Fels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactive Video Cubism Sidney Fels Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University@mic.atr.co.jp ABSTRACT This paper presents an interactive video visualization system. In this visualization video data is considered to be a block of three dimensional data where frames of video data comprise the third dimension

Fels, Sidney S.

362

Carbon dioxide capture from power or process plant gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention are methods for removing preselected substances from a mixed flue gas stream characterized by cooling said mixed flue gas by direct contact with a quench liquid to condense at least one preselected substance and form a cooled flue gas without substantial ice formation on a heat exchanger. After cooling additional process methods utilizing a cryogenic approach and physical concentration and separation or pressurization and sorbent capture may be utilized to selectively remove these materials from the mixed flue gas resulting in a clean flue gas.

Bearden, Mark D; Humble, Paul H

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one

365

Dynamic RKKY interaction in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growing interest in carbon-based spintronics has stimulated a number of recent theoretical studies on the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction in graphene, based on which the energetically favorable alignment between magnetic moments embedded in this material can be calculated. The general consensus is that the strength of the RKKY interaction in undoped graphene decays as 1/D3 or faster, where D is the separation between magnetic moments. Such an unusually fast decay for a two-dimensional system suggests that the RKKY interaction may be too short ranged to be experimentally observed in graphene. Here we show in a mathematically transparent form that a far more long ranged interaction arises when the magnetic moments are taken out of their equilibrium positions and set in motion. We not only show that this dynamic version of the RKKY interaction in graphene decays far more slowly but also propose how it can be observed with currently available experimental methods.

S. R. Power; F. S. M. Guimarães; A. T. Costa; R. B. Muniz; M. S. Ferreira

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Interaction of "rigid" quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce the notion of a "rigid" quantum system as a system with constant relative positions of its nuclei and constant relative distribution of the electrons with respect to the nuclei. In accordance with this definition, a molecule which does not interact with other objects, is a "rigid" quantum system. Molecule is also "rigid" if it interacts with other objects, but the interaction does not change the intrinsic structure of the molecule (or this change can be neglected). Several "rigid" quantum systems interact one with another in the quantum manner. The interaction is ruled by the Schr{\\"o}dinger equation [1] written for all the particles of the systems under consideration. We consider the case when the external potential is zero.

A. A. Kolpakov; A. G. Kolpakov

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=32 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 16 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/16 plus one

368

Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

369

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

370

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

371

Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Abstract:...

372

Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms...

373

Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 . Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 ....

374

Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive Layer Assisted Deposition. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive...

375

Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electroche...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Abstract: Many...

376

Energetic particle production, cavition formation, and nonlinear development at a plasma density maximum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated several phenomena of importance to laser-plasma interactions. In our studies, these are modeled by microwave and rf-plasma interactions. Our focus has been on resonant absorption of intense electromagnetic radiation at the plasma critical layer. Electron plasma wave (EPW) growth and caviton formation have been shown to be most efficient for shallow density gradients at the critical layer, where EPW convection losses are minimized. EPW electric field energies of 5000 times the plasma thermal energy, and energetic electron tails out to 5000T{sub e}, have been observed at the top of an inverse parabolic density profile. Ions receive delta-function-like impulses from localized electron plasma waves and wave-breaking electron ejection; the disruption of the ion fluid can only partially be described by the ponderomotive force. Our attempt is to test and illuminate some of the fundamental concepts of strong turbulence and EM wave-plasma interaction. 7 refs.

Wong, A.Y.; Bauer, B.S. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

377

Itinerant ferromagnetism in an interacting Fermi gas with mass imbalance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the emergence of itinerant ferromagnetism in an ultracold atomic gas with a variable mass ratio between the up- and down-spin species. Mass imbalance breaks the SU(2) spin symmetry, leading to a modified Stoner criterion. We first elucidate the phase behavior in both the grand canonical and canonical ensembles. Second, we apply the formalism to a harmonic trap to demonstrate how a mass imbalance delivers unique experimental signatures of ferromagnetism. These could help future experiments to better identify the putative ferromagnetic state. Furthermore, we highlight how a mass imbalance suppresses the three-body loss processes that handicap the formation of a ferromagnetic state. Finally, we study the time-dependent formation of the ferromagnetic phase following a quench in the interaction strength.

C. W. von Keyserlingk and G. J. Conduit

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Formation of a flux core spheromak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An alternate design for compact tori specifically of the spheromak type is studied. In this design the ‘‘flux core spheromak’’ [Nucl. Fusion 29 219 (1989)] the externally imposed bias field links the confinement region of closed flux surfaces. The advantages of this configuration are: (i) it enjoys greater stability to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes particularly the tilt and shift; (ii) it has a poloidal divertor and an amount of poloidal flux separating the closed flux surface region from the walls; and (iii) it might be sustained by helicity injection. Results are presented showing the dependence of the geometry on the distribution of bias flux on the conducting walls and showing the optimization of the 2?D formation scheme to minimize the contact of the plasma with coils electrodes and walls. This last topic involves taking advantage of current sheet formation and subsequent tearing as in formation of the MS spheromak [Phys. Fluids 28 3154 (1985)]. The parameters which can be varied to produce this favorable formation scheme via tearing rather than a formation that proceeds off the reversal coils are explored. In addition it is found that there is strong viscous heating of the ions in this early reconnection phase.

John M. Finn; Parvez N. Guzdar

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Final state interactions in the (nuclear) FRITIOF string interaction scenario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the final state reinteraction of the produced hadrons in a scenario with the initial high energy nuclear interaction provided by the FRITIOF Model. The basic idea is that any produced hadron is abl...

B. Andersson; A. Tai; Ben-Hao Sa

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Category:Formatting Templates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Formatting Templates Jump to: navigation, search Formatting Templates are Templates used primarily to achieve a certian layout or style on a wiki page. They can be generic, like Template:Clear or specific, like Template:Definition. For help on creating templates, see Help:Templates. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. Q [×] Query Results Templates‎ 4 pages Pages in category "Formatting Templates" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 465 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

In situ oxidation of subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Astronomy 9603B -Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomy 9603B - Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012) Lecturer: Prof below. Contact information: Martin Houde Associate Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy Room 207, Physics and Astronomy Building E-mail: mhoude2@uwo.ca Phone: (519) 661-2111 x: 86711 (office) Fax

Lennard, William N.

383

The simplest model of galaxy formation – I. A formation history model of galaxy stellar mass growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......parametrizing the physics function as a simple...derived star formation rates as a function of...simple form of the physics function provides...haloes grow, they pass through the region...of the peak of the physics function and its...the star formation rate-halo mass relation......

Simon J. Mutch; Darren J. Croton; Gregory B. Poole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar Nebula 1.1. Nebula collapses into a disk 2000 KTemperatures near the Sun reach 2000 K #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar

Herrick, Robert R.

385

Coulomb interactions in carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of electron-electron interactions on the electronic properties of nonchiral single-wall carbon nanotubes is investigated by an extended Hubbard model resolved within the generalized unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. On-site U and nearest-neighbor u Coulomb interactions are considered in tubules with different geometries at half-filling. A phase diagram is obtained in the coordinates U and u. For the electron-electron interaction strength estimated to hold for graphite, carbon nanotubes would lie close to the boundary region between metallic and insulator density wave states. Therefore, any small external perturbation can substantially modify their electronic properties.

M. P. López Sancho; M. C. Muñoz; L. Chico

2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

386

Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy {le}20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2}complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*{sub 2}YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P{sub 2}PtH){sub 2} complexes from cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2} complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with phosphines, R{sub 3}PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and toluene.

Schwartz, D.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Isotope Evidence for Ozone Formation on Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remarkably, the gas-phase recombination or association reaction of ozone has an unusually large (?10%) isotope effect and shows almost equal enrichments of the ozone molecules containing two different oxygen isotopes. ... For a better understanding of the pressure and temperature dependence of ozone isotopic composition in oxygen discharges, we developed a relatively simple isotope kinetic model that accounts for the processes of (i) heterogeneous ozone formation at the reactor walls, (ii) isotope exchange of oxygen atoms with O2 molecules, and (iii) ozone formation in the gas phase. ...

Christof Janssen; Béla Tuzson

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

388

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

On Superheavy Element Formation and Beyond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei (238U+238U, 232Th+250Cf and 238U+248Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multi-dimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found due to the ''inverse quasi-fission'' process leading to formation of survived superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficient for spontaneous positron formation from super-strong electric field, a fundamental QED process.

Zagrebaev, Valery [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

Modelling and control of satellite formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING AND CONTROL OF SATELLITE FORMATIONS A Dissertation by VEERA VENKATA SESHA SAI VADDI Submitted to the O±ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful¯llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2003... Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering MODELLING AND CONTROL OF SATELLITE FORMATIONS A Dissertation by VEERA VENKATA SESHA SAI VADDI Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial ful¯llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved...

Vaddi, Veera Venkata Sesha Sai

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

PII S0016-7037(01)00595-6 Spectroscopic studies of Pb(II)-sulfate interactions at the goethite-water interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PII S0016-7037(01)00595-6 Spectroscopic studies of Pb(II)-sulfate interactions at the goethite molecular scale studies on Pb(II)-sulfate interactions at the solid-water interface of goethite at pH 4.5, 5 the formation Pb-SO4 ternary complexes at the goethite surface. Based on the combined information from the IR

Sparks, Donald L.

394

Interactive splatting of nonrectilinear volumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes various techniques for achieving interactive direct volume rendering of nonrectilinear data sets using fast projection (splatting) methods. The use of graphics hardware, rendering approximations, parallelization and reduced resolution ...

Peter L. Williams

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Non-standard Neutrino Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theories beyond the Standard Model must respect its gauge symmetry. This implies strict constraints on the possible models of Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions (NSIs). We review here the present status of NSIs from the point of view of effective field theory. Our recent work on the restrictions implied by Standard Model gauge invariance is provided along with some examples of possible gauge invariant models featuring non-standard interactions.

D. Hernandez

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Cost Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example | The Ames...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Share-Cost Reimbursement Invoice Format Example Effective Date: 102014 File (public): Cost Share-Cost...

397

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Erratum: Formation Control of Multiple Mobile Robots Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper entitled “Formation Control of Multiple Mobile Robots Systems” by Zhanfeng Li, Youliang Ma...

Zhanfeng Li; Youliang Ma; Tong Ren

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation? Henry Throop John Bally SWRI Univ.Colorado / CASA DPS 12-Oct-2004 #12;Orion Nebula Photo-evaporation by extr 4 O/B stars, UV-bright, 105 solar luminosities 2000 solar-type stars with disks Photo-evaporation (PE) by external O/B stars removes disks on 105

Throop, Henry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

6 - Fundamentals of ferrite formation in steels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The diffusional formation of ferrite at low undercoolings has, historically, been extensively researched, which has led to well-established mechanisms for nucleation and growth. These have been verified against experimental data to allow modelling with good agreement to experiment, often as transformation diagrams. These mechanisms are summarised here and opportunities for improvement through advances in experimentation and computation are highlighted.

M. Strangwood

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

UAV Flight Formation Control Jose Alfredo GUERRERO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UAV Flight Formation Control Jose Alfredo GUERRERO Rogelio LOZANO Version 0.5, hal-00923127,version. Modeling and Control of Mini UAV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 G. Flores , J.A. Guerrero , J2014 #12;x hal-00923127,version1-2Jan2014 #12;Chapter 1 Modeling and Control of Mini UAV This Chapter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

403

The formation of the solar system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar system started to form about 4.56 Gyr ago and despite the long intervening time span, there still exist several clues about its formation. The three major sources for this information are meteorites, the present solar system structure and the planet-forming systems around young stars. In this introduction we give an overview of the current understanding of the solar system formation from all these different research fields. This includes the question of the lifetime of the solar protoplanetary disc, the different stages of planet formation, their duration, and their relative importance. We consider whether meteorite evidence and observations of protoplanetary discs point in the same direction. This will tell us whether our solar system had a typical formation history or an exceptional one. There are also many indications that the solar system formed as part of a star cluster. Here we examine the types of cluster the Sun could have formed in, especially whether its stellar density was at any stage hi...

Pfalzner, S; Gounelle, M; Johansen, A; Muenker, C; Lacerda, P; Zwart, S Portegies; Testi, L; Trieloff, M; Veras, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Quasistatic Formation of the Spheromak Plasma Configuration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method for creating the spheromak configuration has been proposed and verified experimentally. The scheme is based on a transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes into a plasma from a "flux core." We present the first experimental verification of this quasistatic (?Alfve´n??formformation scheme, which is suitable for future scaleup to fusion-reactor parameters.

M. Yamada; H. P. Furth; W. Hsu; A. Janos; S. Jardin; M. Okabayashi; J. Sinnis; T. H. Stix; K. Yamazaki

1981-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vertebrate development: Multiple phases to endoderm formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent results support a two-step model for endoderm formation in amphibian embryos, in which endoderm is initially specified by localised maternal factors, including the transcription factor VegT, but is then maintained by extracellular signalling molecules of the transforming growth factor-? family.

Leslie Dale

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

part-timemba evening & Weekend Formats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

part-timemba the ross part-time mba evening & Weekend Formats #12;2 welcome #12;1 welcome welcome emphasize leadership. most make a point of connecting theory to practice. So, you may ask, why ross? the ross difference is action-based learning, an approach that is significantly different from other mba

Michigan, University of

408

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

409

Star Formation Histories in the Local Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep color magnitude diagrams extending to the main sequence provide the most direct measure of the detailed star formation history in a stellar population. With large investments of observing time, HST can obtain such data for populations out to 1 Mpc, but its field of view is extremely small in comparison to the size of Local Group galaxies. This limitation severely constrains our understanding of galaxy formation. For example, the largest galaxy in the Local Group, Andromeda, offers an ideal laboratory for studying the formation of large spiral galaxies, but the galaxy shows substructure on a variety of scales, presumably due to its violent merger history. Within its remaining lifetime, HST can only sample a few sight-lines through this complex galaxy. In contrast, a wide field imager could provide a map of Andromeda's halo, outer disk, and tidal streams, revealing the spatially-dependent star formation history in each structure. The same data would enable many secondary studies, such as the age variation in Andromeda's globular cluster system, gigantic samples of variable stars, and microlensing tracers of the galaxy's dark matter distribution.

Thomas M. Brown

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

Interchange Format for Hybrid Systems: Abstract Semantics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of implicit equations [4, 5]. The language is object-oriented and objects can be instantiated inside otherInterchange Format for Hybrid Systems: Abstract Semantics Alessandro Pinto1 , Luca P. Carloni3 general enough to accommodate the translation across the various modeling approaches used in the ex

Carloni, Luca

411

Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The empirical laws of star formation suggest that galactic-scale gravity is involved, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many other triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws too, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the small scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters look triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multi-scale star formation avoids most of these problems. Ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures, while localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae triggers new clusters in pre-existing clouds. The hierarchical structure in the gas made by turbulence ensures that the triggering time scales with size, giving the Schmidt law over a wide range of scales and the size-duration correlation for young star fields. The efficiency of star formation is determined by the fraction of the gas above a critical density of around 10^5 m(H2)/cc. Star formation is saturated to its largest possible value given the fractal nature of the interstellar medium.

Bruce G. Elmegreen

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

412

Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

Mahajan, Devinder (Selden, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Grand unified strings and galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility that topologically stable strings formed at a grand unification phase transition led to galaxy formation is discussed. A large class of solutions describing non-self-intersecting loops is presented. The gravitational field and power radiated from a simple class of oscillating configurations of string is calculated, and the possibility of its detection discussed. Unique features of the string scenario are emphasized.

Neil Turok

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon ECS University of Southampton interaction framework to help design technology to support communication between people and improve interactions between people, technology and objects, particularly in complex situations. A review of existing

415

Bovine binder-of-sperm protein BSP1 promotes protrusion and nanotube formation from liposomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Binder-of-sperm protein 1 (BSP1) modifies the morphology of lipidic vesicles inducing bead necklace-like and thread-like structures. {yields} In the presence of multilamellar liposomes, BSP1 leads to the formation of long nanotubes. {yields} The insertion of BSP1 in the external lipid leaflet of membranes induces local changes in bilayer curvature. -- Abstract: Binder-of-sperm (BSP) proteins interact with sperm membranes and are proposed to extract selectively phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from these. This change in lipid composition is a key step in sperm capacitation. The present work demonstrates that the interactions between the protein BSP1 and model membranes composed with phosphatidylcholine lead to drastic changes in the morphology of the lipidic self-assemblies. Using cryo-electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, we show that, in the presence of the protein, the lipid vesicles elongate, and form bead necklace-like structures that evolve toward small vesicles or thread-like structures. In the presence of multilamellar vesicles, where a large reservoir of lipid is available, the presence of BSP proteins lead to the formation of long nanotubes. Long spiral-like threads, associated with lipid/protein complexes, are also observed. The local curvature of lipid membranes induced by the BSP proteins may be involved in lipid domain formation and the extraction of some lipids during the sperm maturation process.

Lafleur, Michel, E-mail: michel.lafleur@umontreal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Courtemanche, Lesley [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry, Center for Self-Assembled Chemical Systems, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Karlsson, Goeran; Edwards, Katarina [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 579, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 579, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Schwartz, Jean-Louis [Department of Physiology, Groupe d'etude des Proteines Membranaires, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada)] [Department of Physiology, Groupe d'etude des Proteines Membranaires, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7 (Canada); Manjunath, Puttaswamy [Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center and Faculty of Medecine, Universite de Montreal, 5415 L'Assomption Blvd, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 2M4 (Canada)] [Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center and Faculty of Medecine, Universite de Montreal, 5415 L'Assomption Blvd, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H1T 2M4 (Canada)

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

Towards an understanding of the rapid decline of the cosmic star formation rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a first analysis of deep 24 micron observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope of a sample of nearly 1500 galaxies in a thin redshift slice, 0.65projects. To characterize the decline in star-formation rate (SFR) since z~0.7, we estimate the total thermal infrared (IR) luminosities, SFRs, and stellar masses for the galaxies in this sample. At z~0.7, nearly 40% of intermediate and high-mass galaxies (with stellar masses >2x10^10 solar masses) are undergoing a period of intense star formation above their past-averaged SFR. In contrast, less than 1% of equally-massive galaxies in the local universe have similarly intense star formation activity. Morphologically-undisturbed galaxies dominate the total infrared luminosity density and SFR density: at z~0.7, more than half of the intensely star-forming galaxies have spiral morphologies, whereas less than \\~30% are strongly interacting. Thus, a decline in major-merger rate is not the underlying cause of the rapid decline in cosmic SFR since z~0.7. Physical properties that do not strongly affect galaxy morphology - for example, gas consumption and weak interactions with small satellite galaxies - appear to be responsible.

Eric F. Bell; Casey Papovich; Christian Wolf; Emeric Le Floc'h; John A. R. Caldwell; Marco Barden; Eiichi Egami; Daniel H. McIntosh; Klaus Meisenheimer; Pablo G. P. Perez-Gonzalez; George H. Rieke; Marcia J. Rieke; Jane R. Rigby; Hans-Walter Rix

2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

417

Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal composites by a surface-controlled anisotropic phase separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal (PLC) composites using a surface-controlled phase separation method. The binary nature of the PLC phase gratings is produced by employing a single step photo-ablation through an amplitude photomask which precisely controls the interfacial interactions between the LC and the photopolymer on the alignment layer. A subsequent illumination of the ultraviolet light onto the whole PLC promotes an anisotropic phase separation resulting in the formation of distinct binary patterns for the PLC structure. The electrically tunable diffraction properties of the binary phase gratings are presented.

Park, Jae-Hong; Khoo, Iam Choon; Yu, Chang-Jae; Jung, Min-Sik; Lee, Sin-Doo [216 Electrical Engineering East, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); School of Electrical Engineering no. 32, Seoul National University, Kwanak P.O. Box 34, Seoul 151-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

419

Coupled-cluster approach for studying the singlet and triplet exciton formation rates in conjugated polymer LED’s  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coupled-cluster equation of motion approach is applied to describe positively and negatively charged states as well as exciton states in conjugated polymers. The formation rates for singlet and triplet excitons associated with intermolecular charge-transfer processes are calculated. It is found that the interchain bond-charge correlation has a strong influence on the singlet/triplet ratio, since the charge-transfer configuration contributes differently to the singlet and triplet excitons. In addition, we find that the range of electron interaction potential has a strong influence on the formation rates. The ratio between the electroluminescence and photoluminescence quantum yields can exceed the 25% spin-degeneracy statistical limit.

A. Ye; Z. Shuai; J. L. Brédas

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

X-ray Structure in Cluster Cooling Flows and Its Relationship to Star Formation and Powerful Radio Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analyses of Chandra's first images of cooling flow clusters find smaller cooling rates than previously thought. Cooling may be occurring preferentially near regions of star formation in central cluster galaxies, where the local cooling and star formation rates agree to within factors of a few. The radio sources in central cluster galaxies are interacting with and are often displacing the hot, intracluster gas. X-ray ``bubbles'' seen in Chandra images are used to measure the amount of energy radio sources deposit into their surroundings, and they may survive as fossil records of ancient radio activity. The bubbles are vessels that transport magnetic fields from giant black holes to the outskirts of clusters.

B. R. McNamara

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A General Framework for Interactive Television News.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We design a complete interactive television news system. We develop a news production system that allows for the creation of flexible, content-rich interactive news. This… (more)

Sellers, Benjamin Bart

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fundamentals of Laser-Material Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The following chapter illustrates the basic physical processes occurring during laser-material interaction. It considers fundamentals of electrodynamics in relation to electron–phonon interaction, electromagne...

Ettore Carpene; Daniel Höche; Peter Schaaf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Halo Formation Rate and its link to the Global Star Formation Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The star formation history of the universe shows strong evolution with cosmological epoch. Although we know mergers between galaxies can cause luminous bursts of star formation, the relative importance of such mergers to the global star formation rate (SFR) is unknown. We present a simple analytic formula for the rate at which halos merge to form higher-mass systems, derived from Press-Schechter theory and confirmed by numerical simulations (for high halo masses). A comparison of the evolution in halo formation rate with the observed evolution in the global SFR indicates that the latter is largely driven by halo mergers at z>1. Recent numerical simulations by Kolatt et al. (1999) and Knebe & Muller (1999) show how merging systems are strongly biased tracers of mass fluctuations, thereby explaining the strong clustering observed for Lyman-break galaxies without any need to assume that Lyman-break galaxies are associated only with the most massive systems at z~3.

W. J. Percival; L. Miller; W. E. Ballinger

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Enhancing online forms: Use format specifications for fields with format restrictions to help respondents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......variables differed between the format restrictions, a Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA was conducted. The nonparametric...restrictions used, but also between the different tasks. Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA indicates that the factor task shows......

Javier A. Bargas-Avila; Sébastien Orsini; Hannah Piosczyk; Dominic Urwyler; Klaus Opwis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Fundamental Interactions Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fundamental Interactions Images Fundamental Interactions Images These images may be used freely as long as they are accompanied by a statement that they were used "Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory" (see disclaimer). To download a larger or high-resolution version of each picture, right-click on the "Download high-resolution image" text beneath the picture and select "Save Link/Image As..." from the resulting pop-up menu. Shock Tube with Joe Michael and Raghu Sivaramakrishnan Joe Michael (left) and Raghu Sivaramakrishnan stand in front of a shock tube developed for the study of the kinetics of chemical reactions at the high temperatures relevant for combusion. Download high resolution image. Thermochemical subnetwork diagram Shown is a thermochemical subnetwork relevant to the determination of the heat of formation of the OH radical. Vertices of the graph indicate thermochemical quantities, such as the heats of formation, while the lines of the graph represent the measurements connecting these quantities for different species. The Active Tables approach developed by Branko Ruscic at Argonne simultaneously optimizes the thermochemical quantities for all species in the graph, taking into account all of the existing experimental and theoretical results, and weighting them by their uncertainties. Download high resolution image.

426

Running Interactive Jobs on Franklin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Serial Code or Commands Franklin is a massively parallel high-performance computing platform and is intended and designed to run large parallel codes. While it is possible to run serial jobs on Franklin, it is discouraged. Any code or command that is not preceeded by the aprun command will execute serially on a service (usually login) node. The login nodes are for executing general UNIX shell commands, building code, and submitting jobs intended to run on the compute nodes. The service nodes are shared by many users, so. please do not run your compute- or memory-intensive jobs on these nodes. NERSC may kill running processes that severely degrade service node performance. If your job will run for more than 5 minutes, or use more than 1 GB of memory it should not

427

Interactions between comoving magnetic microswimmers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The artificial microswimmer [R. Dreyfus et al., Nature (London) 437, 862 (2005)] whose mechanism of propulsion is the magnetically driven undulation of a flagellum-like tail composed of chemically linked paramagnetic beads can be used as a physical model with which to study low-Reynolds-number swimming. Understanding how such swimmers interact provides insight into the related problem of quantifying the hydrodynamic interactions between microorganisms. In this study, particle-based numerical simulations are conducted of two comoving artificial swimmers. The resulting swimming speeds are determined over a range of separations for swimmers driven by planar and rotational magnetic fields. The far-field hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed and found to decay as h?2 where h is the separation distance. Additionally, the role of the interswimmer magnetic forces is determined.

Eric E. Keaveny and Martin R. Maxey

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, R.S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

Hawke, R.S.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Scaling studies of spheromak formation and equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Formation and equilibrium studies have been performed on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Spheromaks are formed with a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and equilibrium is established in both small (d small =0.16 m) and large (d large =3d small =0.50 m) copper flux conservers. Using magnetic probe arrays it has been verified that spheromak formation is governed solely by gun physics (in particular the ratio of gun current to flux ? 0 I gun /? gun ) and is independent of the flux conserver dimensions. It has also been verified that equilibrium is well described by the force free condition ?× B =? B (?= constant) particularly early in decay. Departures from the force-free state are due to current profile effects described by a quadratic function ?=?(?) . Force-free SSX spheromaks will be merged to study magnetic reconnection in simple magnetofluid structures.

C. G. R. Geddes; T. W. Kornack; M. R. Brown

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Can photo-evaporation trigger planetesimal formation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that UV radiation can stimulate the formation of planetesimals in externally-illuminated protoplanetary disks. We present a numerical model of disk evolution including vertical sedimentation and photo-evaporation by an external O or B star. As solid material grows and settles toward the disk midplane, the outer layers of the disk become dust depleted. When such a disk is exposed to UV radiation, heating drives photo-evaporative mass-loss from its surface, generating a dust-depleted outflow. The dust:gas surface density ratio in the disk interior grows until dust in the disk midplane becomes gravitationally unstable. Thus, UV radiation fields may induce the rapid formation of planetesimals in disks where sedimentation has occurred.

Henry B. Throop; John Bally

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

On Star Formation Rates in Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present evolutionary synthesis models of starbursts on top of old stellar populations to investigate in detailed time evolution the relation between Ha luminosity and star formation rate (SFR). The models show that several effects have an impact on the ratio between L(Ha) and SFR. Metallicity different from solar abundance, a time delay between star formation and maximum Ha-luminosity, and a varying stellar initial mass function give rise to strong variations in the ratio of Ha luminosity to SFR and can cause large errors in the determination of the SFR when employing well-known calibrations. When studying star-bursting dwarf galaxies, and sub-galactic fragments at high redshift, which show SFR fluctuating on short timescales, these effects can add up to errors of two orders of magnitude compared with the calibrations. To accurately determine the true current SFR additional data in combination with models for the spectral energy distribution are needed.

Peter M. Weilbacher; Uta Fritze-v. Alvensleben

2001-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

434

Practical exploration model for Smackover Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Smackover Formation has been an important exploration target for many years, with production coming from a variety of structural, stratigraphic, diagenetic, and combination traps. The Smackover is also one of the most studied of Gulf Coast formations. The resulting exploration models have either been rigid in their applications, or have been based on core and thin-section analysis not readily available to the prospect-generating geologist. A proposed model looks at the Smackover as a lithology rather than a time unit. The model uses primarily subsurface logs, and can be applied either to wildcat or exploitation drilling. The Smackover is a mature exploration target, but with enhanced understanding it is still an economically attractive objective.

Lieber, R.B. (First Energy Corp., Houston, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Reconstructing the Star Formation Histories of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a methodological study to find out how far back and to what precision star formation histories of galaxies can be reconstructed from CMDs, from integrated spectra and Lick indices, and from integrated multi-band photometry. Our evolutionary synthesis models GALEV allow to describe the evolution of galaxies in terms of all three approaches and we have assumed typical observational uncertainties for each of them and then investigated to what extent and accuracy different star formation histories can be discriminated. For a field in the LMC bar region with both a deep CMD from HST observations and a trailing slit spectrum across exactly the same field of view we could test our modelling results against real data.

Uta Fritze; Thomas Lilly

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Defect formation in long Josephson junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according to the power law with the exponent of either 0.25 or 0.5 depending on the temperature variation in the critical current density.

Gordeeva, Anna V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, B309, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Pankratov, Andrey L. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0 and 80 C in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

Tustin, G.C.; Dickson, T.J.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

Bubble formation in Rangely Field, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tc Determine the Effect of Times Of. Standing on Time &equired for Bubble Formation at 67 psi Supersaturaticns. Page 20 Tests to Determine Bubble Frequency. Average Bubble Frequency Data. 23 27 The data reported in this thesis deal... if present, or would tend to form one. However, as the pressure on the saturated oil declines, the oil becomes supersatur- ated, except as bubbles may form and diffusion take place tc eliminate the supersaturation. This research is devoted to a study...

Wood, J. W

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

"El Torito" Bootable CD-ROM Format  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"El Torito" Bootable CD-ROM Format Specification Version 1.0 January 25, 1995 Curtis E. Stevens WITHOUT CHARGE FOR USE IN DEVELOPING COMPUTER SYSTEMS AND CD-ROM DRIVES. THE DEVELOPERS OF THIS DOCUMENT.0 THE INT 13 ACCESSIBLE IMAGE 14 4.0 INT 13 AND CD-ROMS 14 4.1 INT 13 Function 08 14 4.2 INT 13 Function 48

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

440

Brucite formation mediated by the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Walls of microorganisms constitute an interface with their environment. Under stress, excreted polymers can modify the cell wall surface and the interactions with the surrounding medium. In the present work, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was shown to form microbialite in response to alkalinization of its growth medium. After four days of growth in an air-bubbled culture, the pH of the medium reached 10, due to the photosynthetic activity of the microalgae, causing brucite crystals to appear around the cells. At the same time, ionization of dissolved silicates occurred and led to Si sorption on brucite crystals. The chemical composition of the cell walls was investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. During crystal growth, the appearance of absorption bands at 450, 550 and 3695 cm? 1, typical of Mg(OH)2, was correlated with an increase in bands at around 1000, 1400 and 1250 cm? 1 revealing the presence of acidic polysaccharides. The involvement of sulfated and carboxylated polysaccharides in the initial sorption of magnesium on cells is interpreted as a biologically-mediated process. It is suggested that carboxyl groups of the cell walls form sorption sites for Mg nucleation. Brucite crystals were characterized by Selected Area Electron Diffraction. The ultrastructure of the Mg capsule was revealed by Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy, showing a tight association with the cell walls. Our results suggest that diatoms can take part in microbialite formation and contribute to geological processes.

Benoit Tesson; C. Gaillard; V. Martin-Jézéquel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "formation flue interaction" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Crater formation by single ions, cluster ions and ion "showers"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The various craters formed by giant objects, macroscopic collisions and nanoscale impacts exhibit an intriguing resemblance in shapes. At the same time, the arc plasma built up in the presence of sufficiently high electric fields at close look causes very similar damage on the surfaces. Although the plasma–wall interaction is far from a single heavy ion impact over dense metal surfaces or the one of a cluster ion, the craters seen on metal surfaces after a plasma discharge make it possible to link this event to the known mechanisms of the crater formations. During the plasma discharge in a high electric field the surface is subject to high fluxes (~1025 cm-2s-1) of ions with roughly equal energies typically of the order of a few keV. To simulate such a process it is possible to use a cloud of ions of the same energy. In the present work we follow the effect of such a flux of ions impinging the surface in the ‘‘shower’’ manner, to find the transition between the different mechanisms of crater formati...

Djurabekova, Flyura; Timko, Helga; Nordlund, Kai; Calatroni, Sergio; Taborelli, Mauro; Wuensch, Walter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Suppression of star formation in early-type galaxies by feedback from supermassive black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed high-resolution observations of the innermost regions of nearby galaxies have revealed the presence of supermassive black holes1. These black holes may interact with their host galaxies by means of 'feedback' in the form of energy and material jets; this feedback affects the evolution of the host and gives rise to observed relations between the black hole and the host. Here we report observations of the ultraviolet emissions of massive early-type galaxies. We derive an empirical relation for a critical black-hole mass (as a function of velocity dispersion) above which the outflows from these black holes suppress star formation in their hosts by heating and expelling all available cold gas. Supermassive black holes are negligible in mass compared to their hosts but nevertheless seem to play a critical role in the star formation history of galaxies.

Kevin Schawinski; Sadegh Khochfar; Sugata Kaviraj; Sukyoung K. Yi; Alessandro Boselli; Tom Barlow; Tim Conrow; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; D. Chris Martin; Patrick Morrissey; Susan Neff; David Schiminovich; Mark Seibert; Todd Small; Ted K. Wyder; Luciana Bianchi; Jose Donas; Tim Heckman; Young-Wook Lee; Barry Madore; Bruno Milliard; R. Michael Rich; Alex Szalay

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ising Chain with Competing Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The one-dimensional spin-½ Ising model is solved exactly with very long-range, equivalent-neighbor ferromagnetic interactions of strength JLR superimposed on nearest-neighbor anti-ferromagnetic interactions of strength -Jsr. For -JlrJsr >R=3. 1532... there is a critical point of classical type in zero field. For 2-JlrJsr=R the critical exponents take the values ?=14, ?=1=??, ?=5, and 0=????=12. For 2is of first order, and the critical points which occur in finite field are of classical type. For 0is no phase transition in zero field, although there are classical critical points in a field.

John F. Nagle

1970-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Dynamical Properties of Interaction Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Network dynamics are typically presented as a time series of network properties captured at each period. The current approach examines the dynamical properties of transmission via novel measures on an integrated, temporally extended network representation of interaction data across time. Because it encodes time and interactions as network connections, static network measures can be applied to this "temporal web" to reveal features of the dynamics themselves. Here we provide the technical details and apply it to agent-based implementations of the well-known SEIR and SEIS epidemiological models.

Bramson, Aaron

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

446

ANALYTICAL STAR FORMATION RATE FROM GRAVOTURBULENT FRAGMENTATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analytical determination of the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds, based on a time-dependent extension of our analytical theory of the stellar initial mass function. The theory yields SFRs in good agreement with observations, suggesting that turbulence is the dominant, initial process responsible for star formation. In contrast to previous SFR theories, the present one does not invoke an ad hoc density threshold for star formation; instead, the SFR continuously increases with gas density, naturally yielding two different characteristic regimes, thus two different slopes in the SFR versus gas density relationship, in agreement with observational determinations. Besides the complete SFR derivation, we also provide a simplified expression, which reproduces the complete calculations reasonably well and can easily be used for quick determinations of SFRs in cloud environments. A key property at the heart of both our complete and simplified theory is that the SFR involves a density-dependent dynamical time, characteristic of each collapsing (prestellar) overdense region in the cloud, instead of one single mean or critical freefall timescale. Unfortunately, the SFR also depends on some ill-determined parameters, such as the core-to-star mass conversion efficiency and the crossing timescale. Although we provide estimates for these parameters, their uncertainty hampers a precise quantitative determination of the SFR, within less than a factor of a few.

Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, Ecole Normale Superieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Chabrier, Gilles [Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CRAL, UMR CNRS 5574, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Boron mullite: Formation and basic characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Decrease of B-mullite formation temperature with increasing boron content. ? Decrease of lattice parameters b and c with increasing boron content. ? Significant reduction of thermal expansion (?15%) due to incorporation of boron. ? Decomposition of B-mullite at 1400 °C, long-term stability at 800 °C. -- Abstract: A series of boron doped mullites (B-mullite) was prepared from single-phase gels with initial compositions based on a 1:1 isomorphous substitution of Si by B, starting from a 3:2 mullite composition (Al{sub 4.5}Si{sub 1.5}O{sub 9.75}). A high amount of boron (>10 mol.%) can be incorporated into the crystal structure of mullite where it most likely replaces Si. In situ phase formation of B-mullites was studied with high temperature X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. A decrease of the formation temperature for B-mullite with increasing boron content was observed. With increasing boron content lattice parameters b and c significantly decrease, while no systematic evolution of a is observed. Long annealing at 1400 °C results in decomposition of B-mullite to boron free mullite and ?-alumina. At 800 °C B-mullite appears to be stable over a period of at least 12 days. The mean thermal expansion coefficient was reduced by 15% upon incorporation of boron which makes the material technologically interesting.

Lührs, Hanna, E-mail: hanna.luehrs@uni-bremen.de [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Fischer, Reinhard X. [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Schneider, Hartmut [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany) [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Universität Köln, Institut für Kristallographie, Greinstraße 6, D-50939 Kölm (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Voids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the detection of molecular gas using CO(1-0) line emission and follow up Halpha imaging observations of galaxies located in nearby voids. The CO(1-0) observations were done using the 45m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) and the optical observations were done using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). Although void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe, a significant fraction of them are gas rich, spiral galaxies that show signatures of ongoing star formation. Not much is known about their cold gas content or star formation properties. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies using the NRO. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively higher IRAS fluxes or Halpha line luminosities. CO(1--0) emission was detected in four galaxies and the derived molecular gas masses lie between (1 - 8)E+9 Msun. The H$\\alpha$ imaging observations of three galaxies detected in CO emission indicates ongoing star formation and the derived star forma...

Das, M; Iono, D; Honey, M; Ramya, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Predictions from star formation in the multiverse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compute trivariate probability distributions in the landscape, scanning simultaneously over the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, and spatial curvature. We consider two different measures for regulating the divergences of eternal inflation, and three different models for observers. In one model, observers are assumed to arise in proportion to the entropy produced by stars; in the others, they arise at a fixed time (5 or 10x10{sup 9} years) after star formation. The star formation rate, which underlies all our observer models, depends sensitively on the three scanning parameters. We employ a recently developed model of star formation in the multiverse, a considerable refinement over previous treatments of the astrophysical and cosmological properties of different pocket universes. For each combination of observer model and measure, we display all single and bivariate probability distributions, both with the remaining parameter(s) held fixed and marginalized. Our results depend only weakly on the observer model but more strongly on the measure. Using the causal diamond measure, the observed parameter values (or bounds) lie within the central 2{sigma} of nearly all probability distributions we compute, and always within 3{sigma}. This success is encouraging and rather nontrivial, considering the large size and dimension of the parameter space. The causal patch measure gives similar results as long as curvature is negligible. If curvature dominates, the causal patch leads to a novel runaway: it prefers a negative value of the cosmological constant, with the smallest magnitude available in the landscape.

Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8162 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Galaxy Formation with Self-Consistently Modeled Stars and Massive Black Holes. I: Feedback-Regulated Star Formation and Black Hole Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is mounting evidence for the coevolution of galaxies and their embedded massive black holes (MBHs) in a hierarchical structure formation paradigm. To tackle the nonlinear processes of galaxy-MBH interaction, we describe a self-consistent numerical framework which incorporates both galaxies and MBHs. The high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code Enzo is modified to model the formation and feedback of molecular clouds at their characteristic scale of 15.2 pc and the accretion of gas onto an MBH. Two major channels of MBH feedback, radiative feedback (X-ray photons followed through full three-dimensional adaptive ray tracing) and mechanical feedback (bipolar jets resolved in high-resolution AMR), are employed. We investigate the coevolution of a 9.2 x 10{sup 11} M {circle_dot} galactic halo and its 10{sup 5} {circle_dot} M embedded MBH at redshift 3 in a cosmological CDM simulation. The MBH feedback heats the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) up to 10{sup 6} K through photoionization and Compton heating and locally suppresses star formation in the galactic inner core. The feedback considerably changes the stellar distribution there. This new channel of feedback from a slowly growing MBH is particularly interesting because it is only locally dominant and does not require the heating of gas globally on the disk. The MBH also self-regulates its growth by keeping the surrounding ISM hot for an extended period of time.

Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To analyze the lithium ion interaction with realistic graphene surfaces, we carried out dispersion corrected DFT-D3 studies on graphene with common point defects and chemisorbed oxygen containing functional groups along with defect free graphene surface. Our study reveals that, the interaction between lithium ion (Li+) and graphene is mainly through the delocalized ? electron of pure graphene layer. However, the oxygen containing functional groups pose high adsorption energy for lithium ion due to the Li-O ionic bond formation. Similarly, the point defect groups interact with lithium ion through possible carbon dangling bonds and/or cation-? type interactions. Overall these defect sites render a preferential site for lithium ions compared with pure graphene layer. Based on these findings, the role of graphene surface defects in lithium battery performance were discussed.

Vijayakumar, M.; Hu, Jian Z.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Toolkit support for interactive projected displays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a software toolkit designed to enable the rapid development of multimedia-rich, multi-touch enabled, and interactive projection-based displays. For instance: door displays, floor displays, wall displays, and interactive tables. Despite ... Keywords: deployments, experimentation, interaction, interactive surface, multi-touch, projection mapping, toolkit, ubiquitous displays

John Hardy; Jason Alexander

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND INTERACTION Kaj Grnbk, Professor,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

actuator based interaction >"Gamification" of training >Performance measurement >In near future also focus

455

Numerical Modelling of Interaction between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma in arc furnace used in toxic waste destruction Plasma etching semiconductor High intensity arc lamp Electrode temperature after 1ms of arcing with power density of 3x109 W.m-2 Electrode temperatureNumerical Modelling of Interaction between the Electric Arc and Electrodes Principal researcher: W

Sóbester, András

456

Precision Tests of Electroweak Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the precision tests of the electroweak interactions is reviewed in this paper. An emphasis is put on the Standard Model analysis based on measurements at LEP/SLC and the Tevatron. The results of the measurements of the electroweak mixing angle in the NuTeV experiment and the future prospects are discussed.

Akhundov, Arif [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, 370143 Baku (Azerbaijan); Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, 46100 Valencia (Spain)

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Interacting new generalized Chaplygin gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have presented a model in which the new generalized Chaplygin gas interacts with matter. We find that there exists a stable scaling solution at late times in the evolution of the universe. Moreover, the phantom crossing scenario is observed in this model.

Mubasher Jamil

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

458

Mapping Interactions Within the Evolving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory School of Library and Information Science Indiana University, Bloomington, IN http://cns.iu.edu 13 #12;Research Questions · What interactions are made visible by analysis of formal communication messages over 2 years (Jan. `09 to Jan. `11) ­ Subscription lists, retrieved toward the middle and end

Menczer, Filippo

459

Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics of ash deposition on utility boilers have been studied. A heated tube furnace system was used in the study. Areas of consideration in the deposition mechanics were: close space knowledge of chemical composition and distribution of inorganic constituents in coal, transformations and reactions of the inorganic constituents in the flame, ash transport mechanisms, initial adhesion of ash particles to heat transfer surfaces and subsequently to each other to form a deposit, and further interactions of the deposited ash to grow a strong deposit. Interactions of deposited ash that cause changes in physical and chemical properties in an aged deposit are due to processes such as sintering, chemical reactions, and melting. The degree of these changes increases as the deposit grows from the heat transfer surfaces where it forms. All of these changes during the deposit formation process are coal-specific and are strongly dependent on the boiler configuration and operating conditions. 18 refs., 55 figs., 42 tabs.

Austin, L.G.; Benson, S.; Rabinovich, A.; Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Schobert H.H.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

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461

Tracer stirring around a meddy: The formation of layering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of the formation of layering surrounding meddy-like vortex lenses is investigated using Primitive Equation (PE), Quasi Geostrophic (QG) and tracer advection models. Recent in situ data inside a meddy confirmed the formation of highly ...

Thomas Meunier; Claire Ménesguen; Richard Schopp; Sylvie Le Gentil

462

The mechanism of the formation and transformation of ettringite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The formation and transformation of ettringite were studied by measuring the ion concentration...3A, gypsum, lime and C?S?H gel on ettringite formation and transformation were also investigated. The ... compositi...

Peng Jiahui; Zhang Jianxin; Qu Jindong

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Interchange formats for hybrid systems: review and proposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interchange formats have been the backbone of the EDA industry for several years. They are used as a way of helping the development of design flows that integrate foreign tools using formats with different syntax and, more importantly, different semantics. ...

Alessandro Pinto; Alberto L. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli; Luca P. Carloni; Roberto Passerone

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2SiO2Si Interfaces . Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at...

465

The plate is not available in electronic format  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The plate is not available in electronic format. Please email lm.records@lm.doe.gov to request the plate....

466

Grazing resistance allows bloom formation and may explain ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grazing resistance allows bloom formation and may explain invasion success of Gonyostomum semen. Karen Lebret, María Fernández Fernández, Camilla ...

467

Competitive positioning through strategic alliance formation: review and synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores competitive positioning through network competition on the basis of alliance formation (strategic alliances, joint ventures). From a strategic perspective, technological competition will be refined and expanded into new markets, or new markets will be created through alliance formation. Alliance formation could speed up competitive positioning and technological leadership in strategically important, though geographically diverse, markets. Revenue management tools can help in linking alliance formation to better competitive outcomes, thereby improving strategic directions.