Sample records for format adobe acrobat

  1. T-622: Adobe Acrobat and Reader Unspecified Memory Corruption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    versions 8.2.5 and prior Acrobat Professional Extended versions 9.4.1 and prior Acrobat 3D versions 8.2.5 and prior Adobe Flash Player versions 10.2.159.1 and prior for Windows,...

  2. T-577: Security Advisory for Adobe Flash Player, Adobe Reader and Acrobat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A critical vulnerability exists in Adobe Flash Player 10.2.152.33 and earlier versions (Adobe Flash Player 10.2.154.13 and earlier for Chrome users) for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Solaris operating systems, Adobe Flash Player 10.1.106.16 and earlier versions for Android, and the Authplay.dll component that ships with Adobe Reader and Acrobat X (10.0.1) and earlier 10.x and 9.x versions of Reader and Acrobat for Windows and Macintosh operating systems.

  3. U-054: Security Advisory for Adobe Reader and Acrobat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This U3D memory corruption vulnerability (CVE-2011-2462) could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. There are reports that the vulnerability is being actively exploited in the wild in limited, targeted attacks against Adobe Reader 9.x on Windows. Adobe Reader X Protected Mode and Acrobat X Protected View mitigations would prevent an exploit of this kind from executing.

  4. T-609: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09: Adobe AcrobatReader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType Library Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-609: Adobe AcrobatReader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType...

  5. T-600: Security Advisory for Adobe Flash Player, Adobe Reader and Acrobat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This vulnerability (CVE-2011-0611) could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. There are reports that this vulnerability is being exploited in the wild in targeted attacks via a Flash (.swf) file embedded in a Microsoft Word (.doc) file delivered as an email attachment, targeting the Windows platform. At this time, Adobe is not aware of any attacks via PDF targeting Adobe Reader and Acrobat. Adobe Reader X Protected Mode mitigations would prevent an exploit of this kind from executing.

  6. T-555: Adobe Acrobat and Reader Image Parsing Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical vulnerabilities have been identified in Adobe Reader X (10.0) for Windows and Macintosh; Adobe Reader 9.4.1 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX; and Adobe Acrobat X (10.0) and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh. These vulnerabilities could cause the application to crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. Risk for Adobe Reader X users is significantly lower, as none of these issues bypass Protected Mode mitigations.

  7. T-607: Update: Adobe Acrobat, Reader, and Flash Player SWF File...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PLATFORM: Adobe Flash Player versions prior to 10.2.153.1 for Microsoft Windows, Apple Macintosh, Linux, and Solaris systems Adobe Flash Player versions prior to 10.2.156.12...

  8. T-569: Adobe Flash SWF File Processing Memory Corruption Remote...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    at the following links: Update Adobe Flash Player 10.2.152.32 Flash Player 10.2 FreeBSD Ports Collection Index Addthis Related Articles T-607: Update: Adobe Acrobat, Reader, and...

  9. V-157: Adobe Reader / Acrobat Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartmentScripting Attacks | Department

  10. T-718:Adobe Acrobat/Reader Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can create a file that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system.

  11. V-066: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Multiple Flaws Lets Remote Users Execute

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scale Wind & SolarDepartmentArbitrary Code

  12. U-146: Adobe Reader/Acrobat Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track | Department ofLLCU-023: Debian|

  13. V-090: Adobe Flash Player / AIR Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0: Adobe Flash Player AIR Multiple Vulnerabilities V-090: Adobe Flash Player AIR Multiple Vulnerabilities February 13, 2013 - 12:14am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Flash Player AIR...

  14. U-187: Adobe Flash Player Multiple Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adobe released security updates for Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.235 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh and Linux, Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.8 and earlier versions for Android 4.x, and Adobe Flash Player 11.1.111.9 and earlier versions for Android 3.x and 2.x. These updates address vulnerabilities that could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.

  15. Adobe Premiere 129 Herring Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    together to generate a motion in a film. A single frame is a still image. There are typically 30 frames used in your project will be accessible and organized in the Project Window. #12;|3Video Editing Adobe: this is the window where you can visually lay out and manipulate the order and duration of your media clips

  16. Adobe Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil Jump to:Iowa ASHRAEAddis, LA)Adobe Solar Jump to:

  17. T-609: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType Library Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can create a specially crafted PDF file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error in the CoolType library and execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target user.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - adobe photoshop cs3 Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grafikbearbeitungssoftware: - Ulead DVD PowerTools 2 - Adobe Photoshop CS3 - Windows Media Encoder Wiedergabesoftware: - Windows Media... Grafikbearbeitungssoftware: - Adobe...

  19. U-104: Adobe Flash Player Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    have been reported in Adobe Flash Player, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting attacks, bypass certain security restrictions, and...

  20. Acrobat PDFMaker 5.0 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAbout ------------------------- ChapterSavingsAcrobat

  1. Mac Software Fall 2013 6/28/20136/28/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Adobe Acrobat Pro Alice Audacity Adobe Air Blender GarageBand Adobe Application Manager Google SketchUp

  2. ISSO Information Alert Multiple Vulnerabilities in Adobe Flash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    SHARING AND ANALYSIS CENTER CYBER SECURITY ADVISORY MS-ISAC ADVISORY NUMBER: 2012-014 DATE(S) ISSUED: 3 to take complete control of affected systems. Adobe Flash Player is a widely distributed multimedia or URL and distributes that file or URL to unsuspecting users via e-mail or some other means. When

  3. WHAT IS ADOBE CONNECT? Adobe Connect is a browser-based web conferencing tool used by instructors at the Carey Business School. It may be used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    . If problems passing the test persist, contact the Carey IT Help Desk (410) 234-9380 or Carey. ADOBE® CONNECTTM QUICK START GUIDE Student Edition 1 2 3 4 Need Help? Contact the IT Help Desk 410WHAT IS ADOBE CONNECT? Adobe Connect is a browser-based web conferencing tool used by instructors

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - adobe photoshop elements Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    video... identification logos and bumpers; and design graphics that use type, color and brand elements. Required textbook... : Adobe After Effects CS4: Classroom in a Book, by...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - adobe photoshop lightroom Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE GEOSCIENCES --FALL 2008 -- Summary: or to external media (DVD, USB stick, etc.) SECTION 2: ADOBE PHOTOSHOP PCs: Photoshop is located inside...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - adobe photoshop cs4 Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE GEOSCIENCES --FALL 2008 -- Summary: or to external media (DVD, USB stick, etc.) SECTION 2: ADOBE PHOTOSHOP PCs: Photoshop is located inside...

  7. T-627: Adobe Flash Player Memory Corruption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspectEnginesSystemsForgery7:|7: Adobe

  8. The development of a new edition of the gamma-ray spectrum catalogues designed for presentation in electronic format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, R.L.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New editions of the original Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogues are being prepared for publication in electronic format. The objective of this program is to produce versions of the Catalogues in CD-ROM format and as an Internet resource. Additions to the original content of the Catalogues will include integrated decay scheme drawings, tables of related decay data, and updated text on the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. Related decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) are then added, and all data converted to the Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format for CD-ROM production and availability on the Internet. At a later date the catalogues will be expanded to include spectra representing the response of large-volume Ge detectors, alpha-particle spectra, prompt neutron capture and inelastic scattering gamma-ray spectra, and gross fission product spectra characteristic of fuel cycle waste materials. Characterization of radioactivity in materials is a requirement in many phases of radioactive waste management. Movement, shipping, treatment, all activities which involve handling of mixed waste or TRU categories of waste at all DOE sites will require that measurements and assessment documentation utilize basic nuclear data which are tracable to internationally accepted standard values. This program will involve the identification of data needs unique to the development and application of specialized detector systems for radioactive waste characterization.

  9. T-604: Google Chrome updated version of the Adobe Flash player...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the Adobe Flash player April 15, 2011 - 4:30am Addthis PROBLEM: Chrome Stable and Beta channels have been updated to 10.0.648.134 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame...

  10. T-549: Adobe ColdFusion 9.0.1 CHF1 and earlier

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Adobe ColdFusion before 9.0.1 CHF1 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via vectors involving a "tag script.

  11. Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For the best experience, open this PDF portfolio in Acrobat 9 or Adobe Reader 9, or later. Get Adobe Reader Now...

  12. Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  13. Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  14. Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  15. Northeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  16. Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  17. AgNIC Pre-conference 2009 If Its Digital and In Google Then They Will Come

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGeachin, Robert B.

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncompressed raw image files Bitmap (.bmp) Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) (.tif) Digitization Concepts -- Image Quality Compressed derivative files Used for easier transmission over the web due to smaller size Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) (.jpg... or nothing Image too skewed, not straight Too much dark page gutter Adobe Acrobat Professional: Create New PDF from Multiple Files Browse to File Folder Select Multiple Files Using Control Key Added File List Processing into PDF File Save New File as Bull...

  18. Acrobat PDFMaker 5.0

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuideON STELLA EXPERIMENT

  19. Get Adobe Reader Now!

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of EnergyGeothermal Technologies Office

  20. Get Adobe Reader Now!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning FunNeuTel2011ProgrammaticUpdateScalingInnovationGet

  1. Get Adobe Reader Now!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning

  2. Adobe Photoshop PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T opAddress:

  3. U-120: RSA SecurID Software Token Converter Unspecified Buffer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Token for Windows DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-164: Apple QuickTime Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-066: Adobe Acrobat...

  4. acrobat distiller job: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 September 1999 Distillation Theory. by Ivar J. Halvorsen and Sigurd, Norway 12;2 DistillationTheory.fm 2 September 1999 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . ....

  5. SEIS-II - Instructions for Navigating through Acrobat Reader

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , onLightThePrices andSEE

  6. Brain Research Foundation: Scientific Innovations Award in Neuroscience The Brain Research Foundation has invited Wayne State University to nominate one senior faculty member

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Brain Research Foundation: Scientific Innovations Award in Neuroscience The Brain Research Foundation has invited Wayne State University to nominate one senior faculty member to submit a Letter the LOI, it must be opened in Adobe Acrobat). To learn more about the Brain Research Foundation, click

  7. Utility Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctional MaterialsRobertUtility-Formation

  8. Formatted: Footer, Left Formatted: Font: 10 pt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formatted: Space Before: 12 pt, Border: Bottom: (Single solid line, Auto, 0.5 pt Line width) Deleted: Angelis ­ Sacramento Municipal Utility District Anne Gillette ­ California Public Utilities Commission Steven Kelly

  9. HTML5 vs. Adobe Flash : from the end user standpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Alexandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For NetApp products to be the best in the market, NetApp has to make the correct technology decisions to insure it leads in innovation. In this thesis, I focus on a product called NetApp Unified Manager, examining whether ...

  10. V-131: Adobe Shockwave Player Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scale WindDepartment ofEnergy Multiple

  11. U-035: Adobe Flash Player Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New Energy Storage6 (07/03) OMB Control2:

  12. Casas Adobes, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacility |Carpentersville,Carver,

  13. U-002:Adobe Photoshop Elements Multiple Memory Corruption Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can create a file that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system.

  14. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  15. JPEG File Interchange Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Eric

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    interchange format compressed image representation PC or Mac or Unix workstation compatible Standard color space: one or three components. For three components, YCbCr (CCIR 601-256 levels) APP0 marker used to specify Units, X pixel density, Y pixel... by the Macintosh but not by PCs or workstations. JPEG File Interchange Format, Version 1.02 2 Standard color space The color space to be used is YCbCr as defined by CCIR 601 (256 levels). The RGB components calculated by linear conversion from YCbCr shall...

  16. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context.

  17. Introduction Format Proprietaire -Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnier, Stefan

    Code for Information Interchange) 4. Unicode IFT-1215 Stefan Monnier 7 #12;BCD IFT-1215 Stefan MonnierSOMMAIRE Introduction Format Propri´etaire -Standard Code Alphanum´erique Entr´ee Alphanum : !, ?, ", (, . . . · Caract`eres sp´eciaux : *, $, ¿, . . . Quelques standards utilis´es pour les coder en binaires 1. BCD

  18. Hair follicle Formation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    Hair follicle Formation of new follicles Bud Healed skin Hair bulge Open wound Epidermis a b Dermis 1950s and help to explain the controversy. What is the origin of the cells that make up these new hair follicles? Are they derived from existing hair follicles located at the wound edge

  19. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  20. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C HLester toRecalcitrantWhich format

  1. Planning and Search Exam format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    is the frame problem. Revision 5 #12;Exam topics: planning Classical planning. How the problem definitionPlanning and Search Revision Revision 1 #12;Outline Exam format Exam topics How to revise Revision 2 #12;Exam format 4 questions out of 6 same format as 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 exams (on G52PAS

  2. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

  3. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    produces significant quantities of methanol, although decomposition of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen remains the dominant reaction pathway. Simultaneous production...

  4. FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Universit de

    FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION La vie moderne et le stress : mettre en place des stratgies de gestion , tudier quelques aspects essentiels de la et cas cliniques composs par les participants ou fournis par le formateur . - Jeux de rle en sous

  5. Star Formation and Galaxy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. K. C. Yee

    2000-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of star formation rate on galaxian environment is a key issue in the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. However, the study of this subject is complex and observationally challenging. This paper reviews some of the current results, drawing mostly from recent large redshift surveys such the LCRS, the MORPH collaboration, and the CNOC1 and CNOC2 redshift surveys.

  6. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Use-driven concept formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Marie)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When faced with a complex task, humans often identify domain-specific concepts that make the task more tractable. In this thesis, I investigate the formation of domain-specific concepts of this sort. I propose a set of ...

  8. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

  9. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Thoul

    1994-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an accurate, one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, Lagrangian hydrodynamics/gravity code, designed to study the effects of radiative cooling and photo-ionization on the formation of protogalaxies. We examine the ability of collapsing perturbations to cool within the age of the universe. In contrast to some studies based on order-of-magnitude estimates, we find that cooling arguments alone cannot explain the sharp upper cutoff observed in the galaxy luminosity function. We also look at the effect of a photoionizing background on the formation of low-mass galaxies.

  10. Structurally Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Structurally connected secondary mirror EMFF secondary mirror EMFF Design Electromagnetic Formation for a smaller, simpler system. µEMFF investigates the use of conventional conductors, capacitors, and solar propellants that often limit lifetime, the EMFF system uses solar power to energize a magnetic field

  11. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  12. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  13. VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION MADALENA CHAVES, ROBERT DAY, LUCIA GOMEZ a network of vehicles exchanging information among themselves with the intention of achieving a specified the performance of the vehicle network. A stochastic model for information flow is also considered, allowing

  14. Method to inhibit deposit formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for inhibiting deposit formation on the contact surfaces of structures confining heated hydrocarbon fluid which exhibits substantial fouling. The process consists of introducing into the hydrocarbon fluid at least an inhibiting amount of thiophene-containing polycondensed aromatic/naphthenic compounds of number average molecular weight (M-bar n) from 200 to 1,000.

  15. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  16. Formation,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion like carbon nano-structures, also called carbon onions, using reactive force-fields, which include...

  17. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  18. Photophoresis boosts giant planet formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teiser, Jens

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the core accretion model of giant planet formation, a solid protoplanetary core begins to accrete gas directly from the nebula when its mass reaches about 5 earth masses. The protoplanet has at most a few million years to reach runaway gas accretion, as young stars lose their gas disks after 10 million years at the latest. Yet gas accretion also brings small dust grains entrained in the gas into the planetary atmosphere. Dust accretion creates an optically thick protoplanetary atmosphere that cannot efficiently radiate away the kinetic energy deposited by incoming planetesimals. A dust-rich atmosphere severely slows down atmospheric cooling, contraction, and inflow of new gas, in contradiction to the observed timescales of planet formation. Here we show that photophoresis is a strong mechanism for pushing dust out of the planetary atmosphere due to the momentum exchange between gas and dust grains. The thermal radiation from the heated inner atmosphere and core is sufficient to levitate dust grains and to ...

  19. Formation of polar ring galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bournaud; F. Combes

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Polar ring galaxies are peculiar systems in which a gas rich, nearly polar ring surrounds an early-type or elliptical host galaxy. Two formation scenarios for these objects have been proposed: they are thought to form either in major galaxy mergers or by tidal accretion of the polar material from a gas rich donor galaxy. Both scenarios are studied through N-body simulations including gas dynamics and star formation. Constraints on physical parameters are drawn out, in order to determine which scenario is the most likely to occur. Polar ring galaxies from each scenario are compared with observations and we discuss whether the accretion scenario and the merging scenario account for observational properties of polar ring galaxies. The conclusion of this study is that the accretion scenario is both the most likely and the most supported by observations. Even if the merging scenario is rather robust, most polar ring galaxies are shown to be the result of tidal gas accretion events.

  20. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  1. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  2. Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

  3. SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

  4. Proportional structural effects of formative indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, George R.; Preacher, K. J.; Rigdon, Ed E.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Formative constructs must influence two or more distinct outcome variables for meaningful tests of the formative conceptualization. Because the construct mediates the effects of its indicators, the indicators must have ...

  5. Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

  6. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  7. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  8. Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

    Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

  9. Format for Federal Register Notice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, Safety and HealthDepartmentFindings of NoFleetFood andDepartment ofFormat

  10. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  11. Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control Hoam Chung and S. Shankar Sastry are required to fly in tight formations and under harsh conditions. The starting point for safe autonomous into a formation, so that each vehicle can safely maintain sufficient space between it and all other vehicles

  12. Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays Daniel W. Kwon and David W. Miller February 2005 SSL # 2-05 #12;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays By DANIEL W. KWON S;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays by DANIEL W. KWON Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics

  13. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  15. A Random Walk through Star and Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maness, Holly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and its Neptune-Mass Planet 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . .of Low Mass Star Formation . . . . . 1.3 Planet FormationConstraining Theories of Planet Formation and Evolution .

  16. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this section, we examine the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence to inhomogeneous turbulence with zonal flows. Statistical equations of motion can be derived from the quasilinear approximation to the Hasegawa-Mima equation. We review recent work that finds a bifurcation of these equations and shows that the emergence of zonal flows mathematically follows a standard type of pattern formation. We also show that the dispersion relation of modulational instability can be extracted from the statistical equations of motion in a certain limit. The statistical formulation can thus be thought to offer a more general perspective on growth of coherent structures, namely through instability of a full turbulent spectrum. Finally, we offer a physical perspective on the growth of large-scale structures.

  17. The dynamics of fragment formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, D. [Kent State Univ., OH (United States); EOS Collaboration

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that in the Quantum Molecular Dynamics model, dynamical correlations can result in the production rate for final state nucleon clusters (and hence composite fragments) being higher than would be expected if statistics and the available phase space were dominant in determining composite formation. An intranuclear cascade or a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model, combined with a statistical approach in the late stage of the collision to determine composites, provides an equivalent description only under limited conditions of centrality and beam energy. We use data on participant fragment production in Au + Au collisions in the Bevalac`s BOS time projection chamber to map out the parameter space where statistical clustering provides a good description. In particular, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to {sup 4}He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity and beam energy.

  18. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  19. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - adobe Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or family, visit the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences on the World Wide Web at aces.nmsu.edu Summary: , Consumer and Environmental Sciences on the...

  1. U-050: Adobe Flex SDK Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flex applications created using the Flex SDK may not properly filter HTML code from user-supplied input before displaying the input.

  2. V-045: Adobe ColdFusion Lets Local Users Bypass Sandbox Restrictions |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scale Wind & Solar PowerDepartment of

  3. V-069: BlackBerry Tablet OS Adobe Flash Player and Samba Multiple

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scale Wind & SolarDepartmentArbitrary

  4. V-110: Adobe Flash Player Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment of EnergyProgram2-26TheUtility-Scale Wind &AppleDepartment ofDepartment of

  5. T-630: Security update available for Adobe Flash Player | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspectEnginesSystemsForgery7:|7:

  6. T-638: Security update available for Adobe Flash Player | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartmentChallengeCompliance7/109 TORNADO *Arbitrary

  7. T-638: Security update available for Adobe Flash Player | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at YoungSuspect| Department of Energy

  8. V-176: Adobe Flash Player Memory Corruption Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartmentScripting AttacksThere is a commandDepartment

  9. V-197: Adobe ColdFusion 10 WebSockets Security Bypass Vulnerability |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartmentScripting AttacksThereDepartment of

  10. U-241: Adobe Flash Player Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New Energy Storage6ScriptingURL Address| DepartmentObtain

  11. U-257: Adobe ColdFusion Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New Energy Storage6ScriptingURLDepartment of Energy 7:

  12. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  13. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  14. Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these...

  15. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  16. Threshold displacement energies and defect formation energies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energies and defect formation energies in Y2Ti2O7. Abstract: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to determine both the threshold displacement...

  17. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  18. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

  19. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  20. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  1. Formation of $??$ atoms in $K_{?4} decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Gevorkyan; A. V. Tarasov; O. O. Voskresenskaya

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the decay rate of $\\pi\\mu$ atom formation in $K_{\\mu 4}$ decay. Using the obtained expressions we calculate the decay rate of atom formation and point out that considered decay can give a noticeable contribution as a background to the fundamental decay $K^+\\to \\pi^+\

  2. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  3. The Star Formation History of NGC 6822

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted K. Wyder

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of five fields in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} in the F555W and F814W filters are presented. Photometry for the stars in these images was extracted using the Point-Spread-Function fitting program HSTPHOT/MULTIPHOT. The resulting color-magnitude diagrams reach down to $V\\approx26$, a level well below the red clump, and were used to solve quantitatively for the star formation history of NGC 6822. Assuming that stars began forming in this galaxy from low-metallicity gas and that there is little variation in the metallicity at each age, the distribution of stars along the red giant branch is best fit with star formation beginning in NGC 6822 12-15 Gyr ago. The best-fitting star formation histories for the old and intermediate age stars are similar among the five fields and show a constant or somewhat increasing star formation rate from 15 Gyr ago to the present except for a possible dip in the star formation rate from 3 to 5 Gyr ago. The main differences among the five fields are in the higher overall star formation rate per area in the bar fields as well as in the ratio of the recent star formation rate to the average past rate. These variations in the recent star formation rate imply that stars formed within the past 0.6 Gyr are not spatially very well mixed throughout the galaxy.

  4. DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE Submitted by Jonathan L. Vigh Department of Atmospheric OF THE HURRICANE EYE BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Schubert Department Head: Richard H. Johnson ii #12;ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

  5. Shell Formation and Bone Strength Laying Hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age, Daidzein and Exogenous Estrogen Cover aquarelle: E. Spörndly-Nees #12;Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age eggshells as shell quality declines with age during the laying period. This is a concern for food safety

  6. Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grtice J. Vincent Le logiciel Tigre en formation PLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grétice J. Vincent Le logiciel « Tigre » en formation PLC J. Vincent Le;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 2 Grétice J. Vincent 1.1. La lecture Voici l'écran d;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 3 Grétice J. Vincent Figure 3 1.2. La démonstration Voici l

  7. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  8. The Formation of the Hubble Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of galaxy formation via star formation and stellar mass assembly rates is now known with some certainty, yet the connection between high redshift and low redshift galaxy populations is not yet clear. By identifying and studying individual massive galaxies at high-redshifts, z > 1.5, we can possibly uncover the physical effects driving galaxy formation. Using the structures of high-z galaxies, as imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope, we argue that it is now possible to directly study the progenitors of ellipticals and disks. We also briefly describe early results that suggest many massive galaxies are forming at z > 2 through major mergers.

  9. REVIEW ARTIC LE MICROSCALE THERMAL BUBBLE FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    8 C a thermal diffusivity, m r s 8 C 2 F excess heat conduction shape factor e variable in the heat, and this article discusses microscale bubble formation by using polysilicon microheaters. Figure 1a shows

  10. MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MAES Project Review Procedures SEMINAR FORMAT The peer review seminar will be styled after oral the project's past accomplishments (if renewal) Discuss the new project proposal 2. Open Discussion ­ (approx

  11. Kinetics of acrylamide formation in potato chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granda, Claudia Esthela

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in potato chips. Seven potato cultivars were analyzed to determine their influence on acrylamide formation during traditional and vacuum frying. The White Rose cultivar produced the highest level of acrylamide during both traditional and vacuum frying...

  12. Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

  13. Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

  14. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, S.O. [University of Kansas; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  15. Triggered star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; Kenji Bekki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. We discuss how tidal interaction between the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and the Galaxy triggers galaxy-wide star formation in the Clouds for the last ? 0.2 Gyr based on our chemodynamical simulations on the Clouds. Our simulations demonstrate that the tidal interaction induces the formation of asymmetric spiral arms with high gas densities and consequently triggers star formation within the arms in the LMC. Star formation rate in the present LMC is significantly enhanced just above the eastern edge of the LMCs stellar bar owing to the tidal interaction. The location of the enhanced star formation is very similar to the observed location of 30 Doradus, which suggests that the formation of 30 Doradus is closely associated with the last Magellanic collision about 0.2 Gyr ago. The tidal interaction can dramatically compress gas initially within the outer part of the SMC so that new stars can be formed from the gas to become intergalactic young stars in the inter-Cloud region (e.g., the Magellanic Bridge). The metallicity distribution function of the newly formed stars in the Magellanic Bridge has a peak of [Fe/H] ? ?0.8, which is significantly lower than the stellar metallicity of the SMC.

  16. Star-formation history of the universe and its drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobral, David Ricardo Serrano

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the cosmic star formation history of the Universe is fundamental for our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. While surveys now suggest that the "epoch" of galaxy formation occurred more than 6 ...

  17. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, S. C.; Eells, J. T.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects Publisher version available: http://dmd.aspetjournals.org/content/33/2/282.full.pdf Author...s accepted manuscript, available through PubMed Central: http://dmd.aspetjournals.org/content/early/2004/11/16/dmd.104.001289 Full Citation of published version: Hanzlik RP, Fowler SC, Eells JT. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium...

  18. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  19. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  20. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive Layer Assisted Deposition. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive...

  1. ash formation deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deep-water depositional systems : the upper Miocene Upper Mount messenger formation, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand and Pliocene Repetto and Pico formations, Ventura Basin,...

  2. ash deposit formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deep-water depositional systems : the upper Miocene Upper Mount messenger formation, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand and Pliocene Repetto and Pico formations, Ventura Basin,...

  3. Atomistic Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam Catalyzed by Candida Antarctica Lipase B. Atomistic Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam Catalyzed by Candida...

  4. Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 . Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 ....

  5. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

  6. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

  7. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms...

  8. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Abstract:...

  9. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group December 12, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis News...

  10. Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

  11. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electroche...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Abstract: Many...

  12. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes. Abstract: Sources and chemical composition...

  13. The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Andr; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

  14. Unveiling the Formation of Massive Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive galaxies, such as nearby ellipticals, have relatively low number densities, yet they host the majority of the stellar mass in the universe. Understanding their origin is a central problem of galaxy formation. Age dating of stellar populations found in modern ellipticals, and observations of star formation in high redshift galaxies, allow us to determine roughly when these systems formed. These age diagnostics however do not tell us what triggered star formation, or how galaxies form as opposed to simply when. Recent analyses of the structures of z > 2 ultraviolet selected galaxies reveal that major galaxy mergers are a likely method for forming some massive galaxies. There are however galaxy populations at high redshift (z > 2), namely infrared and sub-millimeter bright systems, whose evolutionary relationship to modern ellipticals is still uncertain. An improved characterization of these and other high redshift galaxy populations is achievable with large infrared imaging and spectroscopic surveys.

  15. Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graziani, L; Schneider, R; Kawata, D; de Bennassuti, M; Maselli, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline which implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the redshift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the Milky Way formation and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along the merger-tree assembly. The resulting redshift evolution of the Local Group star formation rates, reionisation and metal enrichment along with the predicted Metallicity Distribution Function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We dis...

  16. In situ oxidation of subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

  17. Star formation bursts in isolated spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Clarke; D. Gittins

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the response of the gaseous component of a galactic disc to the time dependent potential generated by N-body simulations of a spiral galaxy. The results show significant variation of the spiral structure of the gas which might be expected to result in significant fluctuations in the Star Formation Rate (SFR). Pronounced local variations of the SFR are anticipated in all cases. Bursty histories for the global SFR, however, require that the mean surface density is much less (around an order of magnitude less) than the putative threshold for star formation. We thus suggest that bursty star formation histories, normally attributed to mergers and/or tidal interactions, may be a normal pattern for gas poor isolated spiral galaxies.

  18. Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

  19. Astronomy 9603B -Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Astronomy 9603B - Star Formation Star Formation: Astronomy 9603B (Winter 2012) Lecturer: Prof below. Contact information: Martin Houde Associate Professor Department of Physics and Astronomy Room 207, Physics and Astronomy Building E-mail: mhoude2@uwo.ca Phone: (519) 661-2111 x: 86711 (office) Fax

  20. Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Robert R.

    Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar Nebula 1.1. Nebula collapses into a disk 2000 KTemperatures near the Sun reach 2000 K #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar

  1. The Efficiency of Globular Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged): The total populations of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are discussed in terms of their connection to the efficiency of globular cluster formation---the mass fraction of star-forming gas that was able to form bound stellar clusters rather than isolated stars or unbound associations---in galaxy halos. Observed variations in GCS specific frequencies (S_N=N_gc/L_gal), both as a function of galactocentric radius in individual systems and globally between entire galaxies, are reviewed in this light. It is argued that trends in S_N do not reflect any real variation in the underlying efficiency of cluster formation; rather, they result from ignoring the hot gas in many large ellipticals. This claim is checked and confirmed in each of M87, M49, and NGC 1399, for which existing data are combined to show that the volume density profile of globular clusters, rho_cl, is directly proportional to the sum of (rho_gas+rho_stars) at large radii. The constant of proportionality is the same in each case: epsilon=0.0026 +/- 0.0005 in the mean. This is identified with the globular cluster formation efficiency. The implication that epsilon might have had a universal value is supported by data on the GCSs of 97 early-type galaxies, on the GCS of the Milky Way, and on the ongoing formation of open clusters. These results have specific implications for some issues in GCS and galaxy formation, and they should serve as a strong constraint on more general theories of star and cluster formation.

  2. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  3. On Superheavy Element Formation and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrebaev, Valery [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reaction, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Greiner, Walter [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J.W. Goethe-Universitaet, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low energy collisions of very heavy nuclei (238U+238U, 232Th+250Cf and 238U+248Cm) have been studied within the realistic dynamical model based on multi-dimensional Langevin equations. Large charge and mass transfer was found due to the ''inverse quasi-fission'' process leading to formation of survived superheavy long-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In many events lifetime of the composite system consisting of two touching nuclei turns out to be rather long; sufficient for spontaneous positron formation from super-strong electric field, a fundamental QED process.

  4. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  5. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  6. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  7. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  8. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  9. UAV Flight Formation Control Jose Alfredo GUERRERO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    UAV Flight Formation Control Jose Alfredo GUERRERO Rogelio LOZANO Version 0.5, hal-00923127,version. Modeling and Control of Mini UAV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 G. Flores , J.A. Guerrero , J2014 #12;x hal-00923127,version1-2Jan2014 #12;Chapter 1 Modeling and Control of Mini UAV This Chapter

  10. The formation of the solar system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfalzner, S; Gounelle, M; Johansen, A; Muenker, C; Lacerda, P; Zwart, S Portegies; Testi, L; Trieloff, M; Veras, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar system started to form about 4.56 Gyr ago and despite the long intervening time span, there still exist several clues about its formation. The three major sources for this information are meteorites, the present solar system structure and the planet-forming systems around young stars. In this introduction we give an overview of the current understanding of the solar system formation from all these different research fields. This includes the question of the lifetime of the solar protoplanetary disc, the different stages of planet formation, their duration, and their relative importance. We consider whether meteorite evidence and observations of protoplanetary discs point in the same direction. This will tell us whether our solar system had a typical formation history or an exceptional one. There are also many indications that the solar system formed as part of a star cluster. Here we examine the types of cluster the Sun could have formed in, especially whether its stellar density was at any stage hi...

  11. Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

  12. Format: A4_20070715 Press Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    delivery, global warming. Over the 20 year history of INCOSE Systems Engineering has developed and matured and valued for projects of all sizes and at all levels of problem solving from providing integrated to enabling holistic solutions to global challenges. INCOSE has grown significantly since its formation

  13. MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

  14. Star Formation Histories in the Local Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep color magnitude diagrams extending to the main sequence provide the most direct measure of the detailed star formation history in a stellar population. With large investments of observing time, HST can obtain such data for populations out to 1 Mpc, but its field of view is extremely small in comparison to the size of Local Group galaxies. This limitation severely constrains our understanding of galaxy formation. For example, the largest galaxy in the Local Group, Andromeda, offers an ideal laboratory for studying the formation of large spiral galaxies, but the galaxy shows substructure on a variety of scales, presumably due to its violent merger history. Within its remaining lifetime, HST can only sample a few sight-lines through this complex galaxy. In contrast, a wide field imager could provide a map of Andromeda's halo, outer disk, and tidal streams, revealing the spatially-dependent star formation history in each structure. The same data would enable many secondary studies, such as the age variation in Andromeda's globular cluster system, gigantic samples of variable stars, and microlensing tracers of the galaxy's dark matter distribution.

  15. Stellar Content and Star Formation Histories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tosi

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of irregular galaxies is examined from two points of view: on the one hand, models of galactic chemical evolution have been computed and their predictions compared with the corresponding observational data on the element abundances, and on the other hand, the results of a new method to derive the star formation history in the last 1 Gyr in nearby irregulars are presented.

  16. Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

  17. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have attempted to hydrogenate adsorbed formate species on copper catalysts to probe the importance of this postulated mechanistic step in methanol synthesis. Surface formate coverages up to 0.25 were produced at temperatures between 413K and 453K on supported (Cu/SiO2) copper and unsupported copper catalysts. The adlayers were produced by various methods including (1) steady state catalytic conditions in CO2-H2 (3:1, 6 bar) atmospheres, and (2) by exposure of the catalysts to formic acid. As reported in earlier work, the catalytic surface at steady state contains bidentate formate species with coverages up to saturation levels of ~ 0.25 at the low temperatures of this study. The reactivity of these formate adlayers was investigated at relevant reaction temperatures in atmospheres containing up to 6 bar H2 partial pressure by simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy measurements. The yield of methanol during the attempted hydrogenation (titration) of these adlayers was insignificant (<0.2 mol % of the formate adlayer) even in dry hydrogen partial pressures up to 6 bar. Hydrogen titration of formate species produced from formic acid also failed to produce significant quantities of methanol, and attempted titration in gases consisting of CO-hydrogen mixtures or dry CO2 were also unproductive. The formate decomposition kinetics, measured by IR, were also unaffected by these changes in the gas composition. Similar experiments on unsupported copper also failed to show any methanol. From these results, we conclude that methanol synthesis on copper cannot result from the direct hydrogenation of (bidentate) formate species in simple steps involving adsorbed H species alone. Furthermore, experiments performed on both supported (Cu/SiO2) and unsupported copper catalysts gave similar results implying that the methanol synthesis reaction mechanism only involves metal surface chemistry. Pre-exposure of the bidentate formate adlayer to oxidation by O2 or N2O produces a change to a monodentate configuration. Attempted titration of this monodentate formate/O coadsorbed layer in dry hydrogen produces significant quantities of methanol, although decomposition of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen remains the dominant reaction pathway. Simultaneous production of water is also observed during this titration as the copper surface is re-reduced. These results indicate that co-adsorbates related to surface oxygen or water-derived species may be critical to methanol production on copper, perhaps assisting in the hydrogenation of adsorbed formate to adsorbed methoxyl.

  18. Reconstructing the Star Formation Histories of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uta Fritze; Thomas Lilly

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a methodological study to find out how far back and to what precision star formation histories of galaxies can be reconstructed from CMDs, from integrated spectra and Lick indices, and from integrated multi-band photometry. Our evolutionary synthesis models GALEV allow to describe the evolution of galaxies in terms of all three approaches and we have assumed typical observational uncertainties for each of them and then investigated to what extent and accuracy different star formation histories can be discriminated. For a field in the LMC bar region with both a deep CMD from HST observations and a trailing slit spectrum across exactly the same field of view we could test our modelling results against real data.

  19. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  20. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  1. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  2. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Dickson, T.J.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0 and 80 C in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  3. Physical regimes for feedback in galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Monaco

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new (semi-)analytic model for feedback in galaxy formation. The ISM is modeled as a two-phase medium in pressure equilibrium. The remnants of exploding type II SNe percolate into super-bubbles (SBs) that sweep the ISM, heating the hot phase (if the SB is adiabatic) or cooling it (in the snowplow stage, when the interior gas of the SB has cooled). The resulting feedback regimes occur in well-defined regions of the space defined by vertical scale-length and surface density of the structure. When SBs blow out in the adiabatic regime, the efficiency of SNe in heating the ISM is ~5 per cent, with \\~80 per cent of the energy budget injected into the external halo, and the outcoming ISM is self-regulated to a state similar to that found in the Milky Way. Feedback is most efficient when SBs are pressure-confined in the adiabatic regime. In some significant regions of the parameter space confinement takes place in the snowplow stage; then the hot phase has a lower temperature and star formation is quicker. In some critical cases, the hot phase is strongly depleted and the cold phase percolates the whole volume, giving rise to a sudden burst of star formation. Strong galactic winds are predicted to happen only in critical cases. This model provides a starting point for constructing a realistic grid of feedback solutions to be used in galaxy formation codes. The predictive power of this model extends to many properties of the ISM, so that most parameters can be constrained by reproducing the main properties of the Milky Way. (Abridged)

  4. Galactosynthesis: Halo Histories, Star Formation, and Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Buchalter; Raul Jimenez; Marc Kamionkowski

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of a variety of ingredients that must enter into a realistic model for disk-galaxy formation, focusing primarily on the Tully-Fisher (TF) relation and its scatter in several wavebands. Our main findings are: (a) the slope, normalization, and scatter of the TF relation across various wavebands is determined {\\em both} by halo properties and star formation in the disk; (b) TF scatter owes primarily to the spread in formation redshifts. The scatter can be measurably reduced by chemical evolution, and also in some cases by the weak anti-correlation between peak height and spin; (c) multi-wavelength constraints can be important in distinguishing between models which appear to fit the TF relation in I or K; (d) successful models seem to require that the bulk of disk formation cannot occur too early (z>2) or too late (z<0.5), and are inconsistent with high values of $\\Omega_0$; (e) a realistic model with the above ingredients can reasonably reproduce the observed z=0 TF relation in {\\em all} bands (B, R, I, and K). It can also account for the z=1 B-band TF relation and yield rough agreement with the local B and K luminosity functions and B-band surface-brightness--magnitude relation. The remarkable agreement with observations suggests that the amount of gas that is expelled or poured into a disk galaxy must be small, and that the specific angular momentum of the baryons must roughly equal that of the halo; there is little room for angular momentum transfer. In an appendix we present analytic fits to stellar-population synthesis models.

  5. Dissipation, noise and DCC domain formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of friction on domain formation in disoriented chiral condensate. We solve the equation of motion of the linear sigma model, in the Hartree approximation, including a friction and a white noise term. For quenched initial condition, we find that even in presence of noise and dissipation domain like structure emerges after a few fermi of evolution. Domain size as large as 5 fm can be formed.

  6. Bubble formation in Rangely Field, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, J. W

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tc Determine the Effect of Times Of. Standing on Time &equired for Bubble Formation at 67 psi Supersaturaticns. Page 20 Tests to Determine Bubble Frequency. Average Bubble Frequency Data. 23 27 The data reported in this thesis deal... if present, or would tend to form one. However, as the pressure on the saturated oil declines, the oil becomes supersatur- ated, except as bubbles may form and diffusion take place tc eliminate the supersaturation. This research is devoted to a study...

  7. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, Gerald Charles (Kingsport, TN); Dickson, Todd Jay (Kingsport, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0.degree. and 80.degree. C. in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  8. Defect formation in long Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordeeva, Anna V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, B309, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Pankratov, Andrey L. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, RAS, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according to the power law with the exponent of either 0.25 or 0.5 depending on the temperature variation in the critical current density.

  9. Dynamical Constraints on Disk Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacy McGaugh

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotation curves of disk galaxies exhibit a number of striking regularities. The amplitude of the rotation is correlated with luminosity (Tully-Fisher), the shape of the rotation curve is well predicted by the luminous mass distribution, and the magnitude of the mass discrepancy increases systematically with decreasing centripetal acceleration. These properties indicate a tight connection between light and mass, and impose strong constraints on theories of galaxy formation.

  10. Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form.GuizhouCategories JumpFormattingResults

  11. Magnetic phase formation in irradiated austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL] [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL] [ORNL; Tan, Lizhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Garner, Francis A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA] [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Austenitic alloys are often observed to develop magnetic properties during irradiation, possibly associated with radiation-induced acceleration of the ferrite phase. Some of the parametric sensitivities of this phenomenon have been addressed using a series of alloys irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor at 593K. The rate of development of magnetic phase appears to be sensitive to alloy composition. To the first order, the largest sensitivities to accelerate ferrite formation, as explored in this experiment, are associated with silicon, carbon and manganese and chromium. Si, C, and Mn are thought to influence diffusion rates of point defects while Cr plays a prominent role in defining the chromium equivalent and therefore the amount of ferrite at equilibrium. Pre-irradiation cold working was found to accelerate ferrite formation, but it can play many roles including an effect on diffusion, but on the basis of these results the dominant role or roles of cold-work cannot be identified. Based on the data available, ferrite formation is most probably associated with diffusion.

  12. ANALYTICAL STAR FORMATION RATE FROM GRAVOTURBULENT FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, Ecole Normale Superieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Chabrier, Gilles [Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CRAL, UMR CNRS 5574, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analytical determination of the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds, based on a time-dependent extension of our analytical theory of the stellar initial mass function. The theory yields SFRs in good agreement with observations, suggesting that turbulence is the dominant, initial process responsible for star formation. In contrast to previous SFR theories, the present one does not invoke an ad hoc density threshold for star formation; instead, the SFR continuously increases with gas density, naturally yielding two different characteristic regimes, thus two different slopes in the SFR versus gas density relationship, in agreement with observational determinations. Besides the complete SFR derivation, we also provide a simplified expression, which reproduces the complete calculations reasonably well and can easily be used for quick determinations of SFRs in cloud environments. A key property at the heart of both our complete and simplified theory is that the SFR involves a density-dependent dynamical time, characteristic of each collapsing (prestellar) overdense region in the cloud, instead of one single mean or critical freefall timescale. Unfortunately, the SFR also depends on some ill-determined parameters, such as the core-to-star mass conversion efficiency and the crossing timescale. Although we provide estimates for these parameters, their uncertainty hampers a precise quantitative determination of the SFR, within less than a factor of a few.

  13. The Formation History of Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of old globular cluster systems in galaxy halos are used to infer quantitative constraints on aspects of generic star (cluster) formation. First, the spatial distribution of globulars in three large galaxies, together with trends in total cluster population vs. galaxy luminosity for 97 early-type systems plus the halo of the Milky Way, imply that bound stellar clusters formed with a universal efficiency throughout early protogalaxies: by mass, always 0.26% of star-forming gas was converted into globulars rather than halo field stars. That this fraction is so robust in the face of extreme variations in local and global galaxy environment suggests that any parcel of gas needs primarily to exceed a relative density threshold in order to form a bound cluster of stars. Second, it is shown that a strict, empirical scaling of total binding energy with luminosity and Galactocentric position is a defining equation for a fundamental plane of Galactic globular clusters. The characteristics of this plane, which subsumes all other observable correlations between the structural parameters of globulars, provide a small but complete set of facts that must be explained by theories of cluster formation and evolution in the Milky Way. It is suggested that the E_b(L,r_{\\rm gc}) relation specifically resulted from star formation efficiencies having been systematically higher inside more massive protoglobular gas clumps.

  14. Black holes, cuspy atmospheres, and galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In cuspy atmospheres, jets driven by supermassive black holes (BHs) offset radiative cooling. The jets fire episodically, but often enough that the cuspy atmosphere does not move very far towards a cooling catastrophe in the intervals of jet inactivity. The ability of energy released on the sub-parsec scale of the BH to balance cooling on scales of several tens of kiloparsecs arises through a combination of the temperature sensitivity of the accretion rate and the way in which the radius of jet disruption varies with ambient density. Accretion of hot gas does not significantly increase BH masses, which are determined by periods of rapid BH growth and star formation when cold gas is briefly abundant at the galactic centre. Hot gas does not accumulate in shallow potential wells. As the Universe ages, deeper wells form, and eventually hot gas accumulates. This gas soon prevents the formation of further stars, since jets powered by the BH prevent it from cooling, and it mops up most cold infalling gas before many stars can form. Thus BHs set the upper limit to the masses of galaxies. The formation of low-mass galaxies is inhibited by a combination of photo-heating and supernova-driven galactic winds. Working in tandem these mechanisms can probably explain the profound difference between the galaxy luminosity function and the mass function of dark halos expected in the cold dark matter cosmology.

  15. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  16. Practical Issues in Formation Control of Multi-Robot Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junjie

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Considered in this research is a framework for effective formation control of multirobot systems in dynamic environments. The basic formation control involves two important considerations: (1) Real-time trajectory generation algorithms...

  17. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

  18. Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Wednesday, 25 June 2008 00:00 The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor,...

  19. allograft neointima formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bykowski; Johnny Huard, Ph.D.; Lee E. Weiss, Ph.D.; Joseph E. Losee; Phil G. Campbell, Ph.D. 26 Ateliers de formation > FORMATION EN PHOTOGRAPHIE Chemistry Websites Summary: ....

  20. Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2SiO2Si Interfaces . Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at...

  1. Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for OSTI: 1) Searchable image PDFs, 2) Formatted text and graphics PDFs, and 3) Hybrid PDFs (a mix of searchable image and formatted text and graphics pages). PDFs from...

  2. Galaxy Formation and Evolution. II. Energy Balance, Star Formation and Feed-back

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Buonomo; Giovanni Carraro; Cesare Chiosi; Cesario Lia

    1999-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a critical discussion of the algorithms commonly used in N-body simulations of Galaxy Formation to deal with the energy equation governing heating and cooling, to model star formation and the star formation rate, and to account for energy feed-back from stars. First, we propose our technique for solving the energy equation in presence of heating and cooling, which includes some difference with respect to the standard semi-implicit technique. Second, we examine the current criteria for the onset of the star formation activity. We suggest a new approach, in which star formaiton is let depend on the total mass density - baryonic (gas and stars) and dark matter - of the system and on the metal-dependent cooling efficiency. Third, we check and discuss the separate effects of energy (and mass) feed-back from several sources - namely supernovae, stellar winds from massive stars, and UV flux from the same objects. All the simulations are performed in the framework of the formation and evolution of a disk galaxy. We show that the inclusion of these physical phenomena has a signigicant impact on the evolution of the galaxy model.

  3. FORMAT PED PHENO Software Documentation Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Soma

    Box 357232 Seattle, WA 98195-7232 email: tathornt@u.washington.edu 2 #12;Contents 1 Overview of FORMAT

  4. STAR FORMATION NEAR BERKELEY 59: EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosvick, J. M. [Department of Physical Sciences, Thompson Rivers University, 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, BC V2C 0C8 (Canada); Majaess, D. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (?2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mgantic, {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 ?m) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v {sub LSR} = 15 to 17 km s{sup 1}, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (15.7 km s{sup 1}), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction A{sub V} and distance of 15 2 mag and 830 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

  5. Dimensionality effects in Turing pattern formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teemu Leppanen; Mikko Karttunen; Kimmo Kaski; Rafael A. Barrio

    2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of morphogenesis and Turing instability are revisited from the point of view of dimensionality effects. First the linear analysis of a generic Turing model is elaborated to the case of multiple stationary states, which may lead the system to bistability. The difference between two- and three-dimensional pattern formation with respect to pattern selection and robustness is discussed. Preliminary results concerning the transition between quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures are presented and their relation to experimental results are addressed.

  6. Star Formation in the Local Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniela Calzetti; Jason Harris

    2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results of a long-term study aimed at answering a number of open questions on the evolution of starbursts in local galaxies. The project employes mainly HST data from the ultraviolet to the red of the stellar continuum and of the nebular emission from the galaxies. Here we concentrate on NGC5253 and NGC5236 (M83), that form a dwarf--massive galaxy pair at about 4 Mpc distance. The recent star formation history of the centers of the two galaxies is investigated in order to identify similarities and differences in the evolution of their central starbursts.

  7. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  8. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  9. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  10. I/O Formats at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasics Hydropower BasicsDepartmentBrisbinFormats

  11. Property:DataFormat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug PowerAddressDataFormat Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  12. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  13. Molecular Cell R-Loop Formation Is a Distinctive Characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chédin, Frédéric

    Molecular Cell Article R-Loop Formation Is a Distinctive Characteristic of Unmethylated Human Cp of GC skew leads to the formation of long R loop structures. Furthermore, we show that GC skew and R, we provide evidence that R loop formation protects from DNMT3B1, the primary de novo DNA

  14. Pressure-transient test design in tight gas formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, W.J.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines a procedure for pre- and postfracture pressure-transient test design in low-permeability (tight) gas formations. The procedures proposed are based on many years' experience in evaluating low-permeability formations, and particularly on recent experience with Gas Research Inst. (GRI) programs in eastern Devonian gas shales and in western tight-gas formations.

  15. RESEARCH PAPER Phase transition induced formation of hollow structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Yiguang

    such as stabilized nano- particles and an oxidation species are usually required to participate in the void formationRESEARCH PAPER Phase transition induced formation of hollow structures in colloidal lanthanide 2009 ? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract Formation of colloidal hollow structures

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems F. Zonca - Complex behaviors ENEA, Frascati, Italy #12;Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems F. Zonca-heating) of charged fusion products balances power losses #12;Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes NA D'souza1,3 , Y evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment

  18. Mineralogical constraints on the paleoenvironments of the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Ganqing

    Mineralogical constraints on the paleoenvironments of the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation Thomas F. In this paper, the clay mineralogy of the Doushan- tuo Formation in South China is documented, providing document the clay mineralogy of the Dou- shantuo Formation with the aim of providing information about

  19. The Premature Formation of High Redshift Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melia, Fulvio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations with WFC3/IR on the Hubble Space Telescope and the use of gravitational lensing techniques have facilitated the discovery of galaxies as far back as z ~ 10-12, a truly remarkable achievement. However, this rapid emergence of high-z galaxies, barely ~ 200 Myr after the transition from Population III star formation to Population II, appears to be in conflict with the standard view of how the early Universe evolved. This problem has much in common with the better known (and probably related) premature appearance of supermassive black holes at z ~ 6. It is difficult to understand how ~ 10^9 solar-mass black holes could have appeared so quickly after the big bang without invoking non-standard accretion physics and the formation of massive seeds, neither of which is seen in the local Universe. In earlier work, we showed that the appearance of high-z quasars could instead be understood more reasonably in the context of the R_h=ct Universe, which does not suffer from the same time compression issues as L...

  20. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yujun [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)] [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Li, Jian-Dong [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yan, Chen, E-mail: Chen_Yan@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)] [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  1. Kinetics and morphology of erbium silicide formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Wu, C.S.; Lau, S.S.

    1985-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth kinetics and surface morphology of erbium silicide formation from Er layers on Si(100) substrates are examined using both fast e-beam annealing and furnace annealing. Very smooth erbium silicide layers have been grown using a line-source e beam to heat and react the Er overlayers with the substrate. This contrasts to the severe pitting observed when Er layers are reacted with Si in conventional furnace annealing. The pitting phenomenon can be explained by a thin contaminant layer at the interface between Er and Si. Our results suggest the contamination barrier is not due to oxygen, as usually assumed, but may be related to the presence of carbon. Rapid e-beam heating to reaction temperatures of approx.1200 K permits dispersion of the barrier layer before substantial silicide growth can occur, allowing smooth silicide growth. Heating to shorter times to just disperse the interface barrier allows uniform layer growth by subsequent furnace annealing and has permitted measurement of the kinetics of erbium silicide formation on crystalline Si. The reaction obeys (time)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/ kinetics but is shown to be not totally diffusion limited by the ability to sustain multiple interface growth from a single Si source. The growth rates are nearly an order of magnitude slower for the Er/Si(100) interface than for the Er/amorphous-Si, but with a similar activation energy near 1.75 eV in both cases.

  2. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  3. On water ice formation in interstellar clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaud Papoular

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is proposed for the formation of water ice mantles on grains in interstellar clouds. This occurs by direct accretion of monomers from the gas, be they formed by gas or surface reactions. The model predicts the existence of a threshold in interstellar light extinction, A(v), which is mainly determined by the adsorption energy of water molecules on the grain material; for hydrocarbon material, chemical simulation places this energy between 0.5 and 2 kcal/mole, which sets the visible exctinction threshold at a few magnitudes, as observed. Once the threshold is crossed, all available water molecules in the gas are quickly adsorbed, forming an ice mantle, because the grain cools down and the adsorption energy on ice is higher than on bare grain. The model also predicts that the thickness of the mantle, and, hence, the optical thickness at 3 mu, grow linearly with A(v), as observed, with a slope which depends upon the total amount of water in the gas. Chemical simulation was also used to determine the adsorption sites and energies of O and OH on hydrocarbons, and study the dynamics of formation of water molecules by surface reactions with gaseous H atoms, as well as their chances of sticking in situ.

  4. Geologic Study of the Coso Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

  5. Pattern formation and propagation during microwave breakdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhury, Bhaskar [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Boeuf, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); LAPLACE, CNRS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Zhu, Guo Qiang [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Northwestern Polytechnique University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During microwave breakdown at atmospheric pressure, a sharp plasma front forms and propagates toward the microwave source at high velocities. Experiments show that the plasma front may exhibit a complex dynamical structure or pattern composed of plasma filaments aligned with the wave electric field and apparently moving toward the source. In this paper, we present a model of the pattern formation and propagation under conditions close to recent experiments. Maxwell's equations are solved together with plasma fluid equations in two dimensions to describe the space and time evolution of the wave field and plasma density. The simulation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. The model provides a physical interpretation of the pattern formation and dynamics in terms of ionization-diffusion and absorption-reflection mechanisms. The simulations allow a good qualitative and quantitative understanding of different features such as plasma front velocity, spacing between filaments, maximum plasma density in the filaments, and influence of the discharge parameters on the development of well-defined filamentary plasma arrays or more diffuse plasma fronts.

  6. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  7. The Formation of Primordial Luminous Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific belief that the universe evolves in time is one of the legacies of the theory of the Big Bang. The concept that the universe has an history started to attract the interest of cosmologists soon after the first formulation of the theory: already Gamow (1948; 1949) investigated how and when galaxies could have been formed in the context of the expanding Universe. However, the specific topic of the formation (and of the fate) of the first objects dates to two decades later, when no objects with metallicities as low as those predicted by primordial nucleosynthesis (Z {approx}< 10{sup -10} {approx} 10{sup -8}Z{sub {circle_dot}}) were found. Such concerns were addressed in two seminal papers by Peebles & Dicke (1968; hereafter PD68) and by Doroshkevich, Zel'Dovich & Novikov (1967; hereafter DZN67), introducing the idea that some objects could have formed before the stars we presently observe. (1) Both PD68 and DZN67 suggest a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} for the first generation of bound systems, based on the considerations on the cosmological Jeans length (Gamow 1948; Peebles 1965) and the possible shape of the power spectrum. (2) They point out the role of thermal instabilities in the formation of the proto-galactic bound object, and of the cooling of the gas inside it; in particular, PD68 introduces H{sub 2} cooling and chemistry in the calculations about the contraction of the gas. (3) Even if they do not specifically address the occurrence of fragmentation, these papers make two very different assumptions: PD68 assumes that the gas will fragment into ''normal'' stars to form globular clusters, while DZN67 assumes that fragmentation does not occur, and that a single ''super-star'' forms. (4) Finally, some feedback effects as considered (e.g. Peebles & Dicke considered the effects of supernovae). Today most of the research focuses on the issues when fragmentation may occur, what objects are formed and how they influence subsequent structure formation. In these notes we will leave the discussion of feedback to lecture notes by Ferrara & Salvaterra and by Madau & Haardt in this same book and focus only on the aspects of the formation of the first objects. The advent of cosmological numerical hydrodynamics in particular allow a fresh new look at these questions. Hence, these notes will touch on aspects of theoretical cosmology to chemistry, computer science, hydrodynamics and atomic physics. For further reading and more references on the subject we refer the reader to other relevant reviews such as Barkana & Loeb 2001, and more recently Ciardi & Ferrara 2004, Glover 2004 and Bromm & Larson 2004. In these notes, we try to give a brief introduction to only the most relevant aspects. We will start with a brief overview of the relevant cosmological concepts in section 2, followed by a discussion of the properties of primordial material (with particular emphasis to its cooling and its chemistry) in section 3. We will then review the technique and the results of numerical simulations in sections 4 and 5: the former will deal with detailed 3D simulations of the formation of gaseous clouds which are likely to transform into luminous objects, while the latter will examine results (mostly from 1D codes) about the modalities of such transformation. Finally, in section 6 we will critically discuss the results of the previous sections, examining their consequences and comparing them to our present knowledge of the universe.

  8. Formation of nanofilament field emission devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR); Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating a nanofilament field emission device. The process enables the formation of high aspect ratio, electroplated nanofilament structure devices for field emission displays wherein a via is formed in a dielectric layer and is self-aligned to a via in the gate metal structure on top of the dielectric layer. The desired diameter of the via in the dielectric layer is on the order of 50-200 nm, with an aspect ratio of 5-10. In one embodiment, after forming the via in the dielectric layer, the gate metal is passivated, after which a plating enhancement layer is deposited in the bottom of the via, where necessary. The nanofilament is then electroplated in the via, followed by removal of the gate passification layer, etch back of the dielectric, and sharpening of the nanofilament. A hard mask layer may be deposited on top of the gate metal and removed following electroplating of the nanofilament.

  9. The Star Formation Density at z=7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mannucci

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-infrared VLT data of the GOODS-South area were used to look for galaxies at z=7 down to a limiting magnitude of (J+Ks)AB=25.5. No high-redshift candidates were detected, and this provides clear evidence for a strong evolution of the luminosity function between z=6 and z=7, i.e. over a time interval of only 170 Myr. Our constraints provide evidence of a significant decline in the total star formation rate at z=7, which must be less than 40% of that at z=3 and 40-80% of that at z=6. The resulting upper limit to the ionizing flux at z=7 is only marginally consistent with what is required to completely ionize the Universe.

  10. Star-Formation Knots in IRAS Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Hutchings

    1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of IRAS galaxies with a range of IR properties are examined for bright knots, both within and outside the galaxy. These are found almost exclusively in galaxies with steep IR spectra, but over a wide range of IR luminosity, and usually without strong nuclear activity. In most cases, the knots are likely to be star-formation induced by tidal interactions, and are seen in the early stages of such interactions. Detailed photometry is presented of knots in six representative galaxies. The knots appear to have a wide range of colour and luminosity, but it is argued that many are heavily reddened. Knots formed outside the parent galaxy may be a new generation of what later become globular clusters, but they appear to have a wide range of luminosities.

  11. Abundance ratios in hierarchical galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical enrichment and stellar abundance ratios of galaxies which form in a hierarchical clustering scheme are calculated. For this purpose I adopt the star formation histories (SFH) as they are delivered by semi-analytic models in Kauffmann (1996}. It turns out that the average SFH of cluster ellipticals does not yield globally alpha-enhanced stellar populations. The star burst that occurs when the elliptical forms in the major merger plays therefore a crucial role in producing alpha-enhancement. Only under the assumption that the IMF is significantly flattened with respect to the Salpeter value during the burst, a Mg/Fe overabundant population can be obtained. In particular for the interpretation of radial gradients in metallicity and alpha-enhancement, the mixing of global and burst populations are of great importance. The model predicts bright field galaxies to be less alpha-enhanced than their counterparts in clusters.

  12. Mental Representations Formed From Educational Website Formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth T. Cady; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Tuan Q. Tran; Bernardo de la Garza; Peter D. Elgin

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing popularity of web-based distance education places high demand on distance educators to format web pages to facilitate learning. However, limited guidelines exist regarding appropriate writing styles for web-based distance education. This study investigated the effect of four different writing styles on readers mental representation of hypertext. Participants studied hypertext written in one of four web-writing styles (e.g., concise, scannable, objective, and combined) and were then administered a cued association task intended to measure their mental representations of the hypertext. It is hypothesized that the scannable and combined styles will bias readers to scan rather than elaborately read, which may result in less dense mental representations (as identified through Pathfinder analysis) relative to the objective and concise writing styles. Further, the use of more descriptors in the objective writing style will lead to better integration of ideas and more dense mental representations than the concise writing style.

  13. The Premature Formation of High Redshift Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Melia

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations with WFC3/IR on the Hubble Space Telescope and the use of gravitational lensing techniques have facilitated the discovery of galaxies as far back as z ~ 10-12, a truly remarkable achievement. However, this rapid emergence of high-z galaxies, barely ~ 200 Myr after the transition from Population III star formation to Population II, appears to be in conflict with the standard view of how the early Universe evolved. This problem has much in common with the better known (and probably related) premature appearance of supermassive black holes at z ~ 6. It is difficult to understand how ~ 10^9 solar-mass black holes could have appeared so quickly after the big bang without invoking non-standard accretion physics and the formation of massive seeds, neither of which is seen in the local Universe. In earlier work, we showed that the appearance of high-z quasars could instead be understood more reasonably in the context of the R_h=ct Universe, which does not suffer from the same time compression issues as LCDM does at early epochs. Here, we build on that work by demonstrating that the evolutionary growth of primordial galaxies was consistent with the current view of how the first stars formed, but only with the timeline afforded by the R_h=ct cosmology. We also show that the growth of high-z quasars was mutually consistent with that of the earliest galaxies, though it is not yet clear whether the former grew from 5-20 solar-mass seeds created in Population III or Population II supernova explosions.

  14. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

  15. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  16. The Formation of Constellation III in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Harris; Dennis Zaritsky

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed reconstruction of the star-formation history of the Constellation III region in the Large Magellanic Cloud, to constrain the formation mechanism of this enigmatic feature. Star formation in Constellation III seems to have taken place during two distinct epochs: there is the 8-15 Myr epoch that had previously been recognized, but we also see strong evidence for a separate "burst" of star formation 25-30 Myr ago. The "super-supernova" or GRB blast wave model for the formation of Constellation III is difficult to reconcile with such an extended, two-epoch star formation history, because the shock wave should have induced star formation throughout the structure simultaneously, and any unconsumed gas would quickly be dissipated, leaving nothing from which to form a subsequent burst of activity. We propose a "truly stochastic" self-propagating star formation model, distinct from the canonical model in which star formation proceeds in a radially-directed wave from the center of Constellation III to its perimeter. As others have noted, and we now confirm, the bulk age gradients demanded by such a model are simply not present in Constellation III. In our scenario, the prestellar gas is somehow pushed into these large-scale arc structures, without simultaneously triggering immediate and violent star formation throughout the structure. Rather, star formation proceeds in the arc according to the local physical conditions of the gas. Self-propagating star formation is certainly possible, but in a truly stochastic manner, without a directed, large scale pattern.

  17. Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

  18. Method and apparatus for vibrating a substrate during material formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeffrey A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Roger, Johnson N. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; John, Munley T. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Walter, Park R. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for affecting the properties of a material include vibrating the material during its formation (i.e., "surface sifting"). The method includes the steps of providing a material formation device and applying a plurality of vibrations to the material during formation, which vibrations are oscillations having dissimilar, non-harmonic frequencies and at least two different directions. The apparatus includes a plurality of vibration sources that impart vibrations to the material.

  19. FOURNET, M. & BEDIN, V. (1998). L'ingnierie de formation entre traditionalisme et modernisme ; les nouvelles formes de formation continue vues par des dirigeants de PME-PMI. Formation Emploi, n 63, 43-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; les nouvelles formes de formation continue vues par des dirigeants de PME-PMI. Formation Emploi, n 63 modernisme Les nouvelles formes de formation continue vues par des dirigeants de PME-PMI Michel Fournet et

  20. Frost formation and ice adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varanasi, Kripa K.

    We study frost formation and its impact on icephobic properties of superhydrophobic surfaces. Using an environmental scanning electron microscope, we show that frost nucleation occurs indiscriminately on superhydrophobic ...

  1. Histamine Formation and Honeycombing During Decomposition of Skipjack Tuna,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Histamine Formation and Honeycombing During Decomposition of Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis pelamis, caught in Hawaiian waters. Fresh skipjack tuna tis- sue was practically devoid of histamine

  2. ampx anisn format: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unusual places such as the debris of colliding galaxies expelled into the intergalactic medium. Determining whether star-formation proceeds in the latter environment, far from...

  3. ascaris suum formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unusual places such as the debris of colliding galaxies expelled into the intergalactic medium. Determining whether star-formation proceeds in the latter environment, far from...

  4. argillaceous formations reactivite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unusual places such as the debris of colliding galaxies expelled into the intergalactic medium. Determining whether star-formation proceeds in the latter environment, far from...

  5. Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based...

  6. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of Methanol and Ethanol. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of...

  7. Atomistic Simulation of Track Formation by Energetic Recoils...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and nuclear waste immobilization. Citation: Moreira PA, R Devanathan, and WJ Weber.2010."Atomistic Simulation of Track Formation by Energetic Recoils in Zircon."Journal...

  8. Formation enthalpies by mixing GGA and GGA + U calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Anubhav

    Standard approximations to the density functional theory exchange-correlation functional have been extraordinary successful, but calculating formation enthalpies of reactions involving compounds with both localized and ...

  9. International Human Capital Formation, Brain Drain and Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    systems, individuals' abilities, sunk educational investment costs, government grants, and expected capital formation, brain gain, brain drain, international migration, sunk costs, educational grants

  10. Remarks on the formation and decay of multidimensional shock waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Danilov

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a formula describing the formation and decay of shock wave type solutions in some special cases.

  11. accelerate thrombus formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a function of time as structure formation proceeds, which mimics the effect of "dark energy" with negative pressure. Hence, the "acceleration" may be merely a mirage. We...

  12. Investigation of White Etching Crack (WEC) Formation Mechanisms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation of White Etching Crack (WEC) Formation Mechanisms Under Non-hydrogen Charged Test Conditions Presented by Alex Richardson, Afton Chemical (representing University of...

  13. Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds Accelerated by Evaporation of Water from Secondary Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds...

  14. aggregation rosette formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formed from an ensemble of charged proteins. The model predicts the formation of multi-fractal structures with the geometry of the growth determined by the electrostatic...

  15. Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

  16. Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (formation and oxidation) * Intake pressure (boost) increases - EGR reduces intake oxygen mole fraction - Compensate by using boost to deliver needed oxygen PM (gkWh) Cooled...

  17. Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash properties deer12kamp.pdf More Documents...

  18. COLD BUBBLE FORMATION DURING TOKAMAK DENSITY LIMIT DISRUPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John

    COLD BUBBLE FORMATION DURING TOKAMAK DENSITY LIMIT DISRUPTIONS J. HOWARD, M. PERSSON* Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra

  19. Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE's) Coal Program...

  20. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Overall Project Goal: To research, develop and demonstrate large format lithium ion cells with energy density > 500 WhL Barriers addressed: - Low energy density - Cost -...

  1. A hybrid genetic algorithm for manufacturing cell formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jos F. Gonalves

    ... in cellular manufacturing is the formation of product families and machine cells. ... Computational experience with the algorithm on a set of group technology...

  2. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Altieri, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Andreani, Paola [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, Bat.709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bongiovanni, Angel; Cepa, Jordi; Garcia, Ana Perez [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna (Spain); Cimatti, Andrea [Departamento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Maiolino, Roberto [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); McGrath, Elizabeth J. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  3. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  4. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  5. Planet Formation in the Outer Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott J. Kenyon

    2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews coagulation models for planet formation in the Kuiper Belt, emphasizing links to recent observations of our and other solar systems. At heliocentric distances of 35-50 AU, single annulus and multiannulus planetesimal accretion calculations produce several 1000 km or larger planets and many 50-500 km objects on timescales of 10-30 Myr in a Minimum Mass Solar Nebula. Planets form more rapidly in more massive nebulae. All models yield two power law cumulative size distributions, N_C propto r^{-q} with q = 3.0-3.5 for radii larger than 10 km and N_C propto r^{-2.5} for radii less than 1 km. These size distributions are consistent with observations of Kuiper Belt objects acquired during the past decade. Once large objects form at 35-50 AU, gravitational stirring leads to a collisional cascade where 0.1-10 km objects are ground to dust. The collisional cascade removes 80% to 90% of the initial mass in the nebula in roughly 1 Gyr. This dust production rate is comparable to rates inferred for alpha Lyr, beta Pic, and other extrasolar debris disk systems.

  6. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  7. The Parameter Space of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bower, R G; Goldstein, M; Benson, A J; Lacey, C G; Baugh, C M; Cole, S; Frenk, C S; .,

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-analytic models are a powerful tool for studying the formation of galaxies. However, these models inevitably involve a significant number of poorly constrained parameters that must be adjusted to provide an acceptable match to the observed universe. In this paper, we set out to quantify the degree to which observational data-sets can constrain the model parameters. By revealing degeneracies in the parameter space we can hope to better understand the key physical processes probed by the data. We use novel mathematical techniques to explore the parameter space of the GALFORM semi-analytic model. We base our investigation on the Bower et al. 2006 version of GALFORM, adopting the same methodology of selecting model parameters based on an acceptable match to the local bJ and K luminosity functions. The model contains 16 parameters that are poorly constrained, and we investigate this parameter space using the Model Emulator technique, constructing a Bayesian approximation to the GALFORM model that can be rapid...

  8. Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

  9. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  10. Ni-Pt Silicide Formation Through Ti Mediating Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besser,P.; Lavoie, C.; Ozcan, A.; Murray, C.; Strane, J.; Wong, K.; Gribelyuk, M.; Wang, Y.; Parks, C.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Ni1-xPtxSi, the variation in queue time between the final surface cleaning and Ni-Pt deposition represents a significant manufacturability issue. A short queue time is often difficult to maintain, leading to the formation of an oxide layer on the Si substrate prior to Ni-Pt deposition that can affect the formation of Ni1-xPtxSi and its texture. In this manuscript, it will be shown that an extended queue time prior to Ni-Pt deposition leads to morphological changes in the Ni1-xPtxSi formation sequence. A layer of Ti deposited between Ni-Pt and Si reduces the native oxide and may facilitate Ni1-xPtxSi formation. With increasing Ti thickness, the presence of metal-rich phases is gradually reduced and the formation temperature of Ni1-xPtxSi increases, suggesting a direct formation of Ni1-xPtxSi from Ni-Pt. In the presence of an interfacial oxide, an increase in formation temperature is also observed with increasing Ti interlayer thickness. When the Ti layer is sufficiently thick, the phase formation sequence becomes relatively insensitive to the presence of an interfacial oxide or extended queue time.

  11. FORMATION OF ROLL WAVES IN LAMINAR SHEET FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    with the wave kinematic viscosity of water distance downslope critical distance at which roll waves are formedFORMATION OF ROLL WAVES IN LAMINAR SHEET FLOW by Pierre Y. Julien and David M. Hartley January 1985 required for the formation of roll waves . . . . 5 2.3.1 Celerityofrollwaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

  12. CURRICULUM VITAE FORMAT FOR PROMOTION AND TENURE DOSSIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    CURRICULUM VITAE FORMAT FOR PROMOTION AND TENURE DOSSIERS NAME: (Last) (First) (Initial) EDUCATION in curriculum vitae, including international activities not listed elsewhere. This sectio n can be used received. #12;Page 2 Curriculum Vitae Format PRINT AND ELECTRONIC PUBLICATIONS: Divide publications

  13. The Effect of Collision Avoidance for Autonomous Robot Team Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Yang, Shanchieh

    on robot team formation focuses on theoretical analysis where real-world factors, such as the size advance to the era of cooperative robots, many autonomous robot team algorithms have emerged. Shape formation is a common and critical task in many cooperative robot applications. While theoretical studies

  14. Regeneration and pattern formation -an interview with Susan Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    Regeneration and pattern formation - an interview with Susan Bryant MICHAEL K. RICHARDSON*,1 Susan Bryant is one of the leading researchers in regeneration and pattern formation. Born in England, are seen by Susan Bryant as central to patterning. She argues that fibroblasts express positional values

  15. Formation of the Solar System What properties of our solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crenshaw, Michael

    to the nebular theory What caused the orderly patterns of motion in our solar system? #12;3 Conservation major types of planet? As gravity causes cloud to contract, it heats up Conservation of Energy Inner1 Chapter 8 Formation of the Solar System What properties of our solar system must a formation

  16. Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting Antonio J. Melendez, Kent D. Carlson the formation of reoxidation inclusions in carbon and low-alloy steel castings. A model is developed are conducted using radiographs of cast steel weld plates. The limit of resolution in the radiographs is about 1

  17. Permeability Evaluation in Heterogcmecw Formations Eiocldy of Petroleum Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ~ SPE 26060 Permeability Evaluation in Heterogcmecw Formations Eiocldy of Petroleum Engineers Lking for reservoir characterization. The permeability of the formation is usually evaluated from the cores and of permeability from well log data represents a significant technical as weli as economic advantage

  18. Hydrothermal plume dynamics on Europa: Implications for chaos formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Hydrothermal plume dynamics on Europa: Implications for chaos formation Jason C. Goodman,1 Geoffrey December 2003; accepted 12 January 2004; published 20 March 2004. [1] Hydrothermal plumes may a liquid ocean to the base of its ice shell. This process has been implicated in the formation of chaos

  19. UFO (UnFold Operator) default data format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L.; Biggs, F. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Marking, T.R. (Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The default format for the storage of x,y data for use with the UFO code is described. The format assumes that the data stored in a file is a matrix of values; two columns of this matrix are selected to define a function of the form y = f(x). This format is specifically designed to allow for easy importation of data obtained from other sources, or easy entry of data using a text editor, with a minimum of reformatting. This format is flexible and extensible through the use of inline directives stored in the optional header of the file. A special extension of the format implements encoded data which significantly reduces the storage required as compared wth the unencoded form. UFO supports several extensions to the file specification that implement execute-time operations, such as, transformation of the x and/or y values, selection of specific columns of the matrix for association with the x and y values, input of data directly from other formats (e.g., DAMP and PFF), and a simple type of library-structured file format. Several examples of the use of the format are given.

  20. Modelling new particle formation events in the South African savannah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Buekes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction of these systems with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scales, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study, measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There already are some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first detailed simulation that includes all the main processes relevant to particle formation. The results show that both of the particle formation mechanisms investigated overestimated the dependency of the formation rates on sulphuric acid. From the two particle formation mechanisms tested in this work, the approach that included low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events than the approach that did not. To obtain a reliable estimate of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa. This work is the first step in developing a more comprehensive new particle formation model applicable to the unique environment in southern Africa. Such a model will assist in better understanding and predicting new particle formation knowledge which could ultimately be used to mitigate impacts of climate change and air quality.

  1. Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing Junction Michinao Hashimoto the stable formation of trains of mono-, bi-, and tri-disperse bubbles in microfluidic flow- focusing (FF-assembly through the patterns of flow created by the bubbles. 1.1 Bubbles and Droplets in Microfluidics

  2. Video Digests: A Browsable, Skimmable Format for Informational Lecture Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    Video Digests: A Browsable, Skimmable Format for Informational Lecture Videos Amy Pavel, Colorado- ing current timeline-based video players. Video digests are a new format for informational videos authors create such digests using transcript-based interactions. With our tools, authors can manually

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS FROM HANFORD FORMATION SEDIMENTS REACTED WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS FROM HANFORD FORMATION SEDIMENTS REACTED WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE with the Hanford sediments. I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to Professor Jim Henson, Dan Hardesty for me to have all of my work done. iv #12;CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS FROM HANFORD FORMATION SEDIMENTS

  4. Geometric Analysis of the Formation Problem for Autonomous Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorfler, Florian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the formation control problem for autonomous robots a distributed control law steers the robots to the desired target formation. A local stability result of the target formation can be derived by methods of linearization and center manifold theory or via a Lyapunov-based approach. It is well known that there are various other undesired invariant sets of the robots' closed-loop dynamics. This paper addresses a global stability analysis by a differential geometric approach considering invariant manifolds and their local stability properties. The theoretical results are then applied to the well-known example of a cyclic triangular formation and result in instability of all invariant sets other than the target formation.

  5. Multiblock Grid Generation for Simulations in Geological Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjay Kumar Khattri

    2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulating fluid flow in geological formations requires mesh generation, lithology mapping to the cells, and computing geometric properties such as normal vectors and volume of cells. The purpose of this research work is to compute and process the geometrical information required for performing numerical simulations in geological formations. We present algebraic techniques, named Transfinite Interpolation, for mesh generation. Various transfinite interpolation techniques are derived from 1D projection operators. Many geological formations such as the Utsira formation (Torp and Gale, 2004; Khattri, Hellevang, Fladmark and Kvamme, 2006) and the Snohvit gas field (Maldal and Tappel, 2004) can be divided into layers or blocks based on the geometrical or lithological properties of the layers. We present the concept of block structured mesh generation for handling such formations.

  6. Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre (Rijswijk, NL); Schoeling, Lanny Gene (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  7. Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

  8. THE STAR FORMATION LAW AT LOW SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D. [California Institute of Technology, MC 278-17, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Heckman, Timothy M.; Szalay, Alex S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Young-Wook; Yi, Sukyoung K. [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing H I maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV - r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and far-infrared (FIR) data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than 1, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and H I maps to measure the star formation rate (SFR) and hydrogen gas surface density within the same region for all the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the SFR surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher surface brightness galaxies. Although there is more scatter, the LSB galaxies also lie below a second version of the star formation law in which the SFR surface density is correlated with the gas density divided by the orbital time in the disk. The downturn seen in both star formation laws is consistent with theoretical models that predict lower star formation efficiencies in LSB galaxies due to the declining molecular fraction with decreasing density.

  9. Cloud and Star Formation in Disk Galaxy Models with Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Shetty; Eve C. Ostriker

    2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We include feedback in global hydrodynamic simulations in order to study the star formation properties, and gas structure and dynamics, in models of galactic disks. We extend previous models by implementing feedback in gravitationally bound clouds: momentum is injected at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. This mechanical energy disperses cloud gas back into the surrounding ISM, truncating star formation in a given cloud, and raising the overall level of ambient turbulence. Propagating star formation can however occur as expanding shells collide, enhancing the density and triggering new cloud and star formation. By controlling the momentum injection per massive star and the specific star formation rate in dense gas, we find that the negative effects of high turbulence outweigh the positive ones, and in net feedback reduces the fraction of dense gas and thus the overall star formation rate. The properties of the large clouds that form are not, however, very sensitive to feedback, with cutoff masses of a few million solar masses, similar to observations. We find a relationship between the star formation rate surface density and the gas surface density with a power law index ~2 for our models with the largest dynamic range, consistent with theoretical expectations for our model of disk flaring. We point out that the value of the "Kennicutt-Schmidt" index depends on the thickness of the disk. With our simple feedback prescription (a single combined star formation event per cloud), we find that global spiral patterns are not sustained; less correlated feedback and smaller scale turbulence appear to be necessary for spiral patterns to persist.

  10. Negative feedback effects on star formation history and cosmic reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Wang; Jirong Mao; Shouping Xiang; Ye-Fei Yuan

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    After considering the effects of negative feedback on the process of star formation, we explore the relationship between star formation process and the associated feedback, by investigating how the mechanical feedback from supernovae(SNe) and radiative feedback from luminous objects regulate the star formation rate and therefore affect the cosmic reionization.Based on our present knowledge of the negative feedback theory and some numerical simulations, we construct an analytic model in the framework of the Lambda cold dark matter model. In certain parameter regions, our model can explain some observational results properly. In large halos(T_vir>10000 K), both mechanical and radiative feedback have a similar behavior: the relative strength of negative feedback reduces as the redshift decreases. In contrast, in small halos (T_virfeedback gets stronger when the redshift decreases. And the star formation rate in these small halos depends very weakly on the star-formation efficiency. Our results show that the radiative feedback is important for the early generation stars. It can suppress the star formation rate considerably. But the mechanical feedback from the SNe explosions is not able to affect the early star formation significantly. The early star formation in small-halo objects is likely to be self-regulated. The radiative and mechanical feedback dominates the star formation rate of the PopII/I stars all along. The feedback from first generation stars is very strong and should not be neglected. However, their effects on the cosmic reionization are not significant, which results in a small contribution to the optical depth of Thomson scattering.

  11. PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Chakhmakhchyan; D. Shepelyansky

    2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a PageRank model of opinion formation on Ulam networks, generated by the intermittency map and the typical Chirikov map. The Ulam networks generated by these maps have certain similarities with such scale-free networks as the World Wide Web (WWW), showing an algebraic decay of the PageRank probability. We find that the opinion formation process on Ulam networks have certain similarities but also distinct features comparing to the WWW. We attribute these distinctions to internal differences in network structure of the Ulam and WWW networks. We also analyze the process of opinion formation in the frame of generalized Sznajd model which protects opinion of small communities.

  12. Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

  13. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampikian, Janet M (Decatur, GA); Hunt, Eden M (Atlanta, GA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  14. Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling Li; Giulio Manico; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello; Gianfranco Vidali

    2007-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

  15. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces, and this reduction can be scaled by the gravitational dimensionless time. Mechanistic simulation of core-scale surfactant brine imbibition matches the experimentally observed imbibition data. In-situ distributions observed through simulation indicate that surfactant diffusion (which depends on temperature and molecular weight) is the rate limiting step. Most of the oil is recovered through gravitational forces. Oil left behind at the end of this process is at its residual oil saturation. The capillary and Bond numbers are not large enough to affect the residual oil saturation. At the field-scale, 50% of the recoverable oil is produced in about 3 years if the fracture spacing is 1 m and 25% if 10 m, in the example simulated. Decreasing fracture spacing and height, increasing permeability, and increasing the extent of wettability alteration increase the rate of oil recovery from surfactant-aided gravity drainage. This dilute surfactant aided gravity-drainage process is relatively cheap. The chemical cost for a barrel of oil produced is expected to be less than $1.

  16. The Recent Cluster Formation Histories of NGC 5253 and NGC 3077: Environmental Impact on Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Harris; D. Calzetti; J. S. Gallagher III; D. A. Smith; C. J. Conselice

    2003-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multicolor photometry of bright star cluster candidates in the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 3077 and NGC 5253, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in both broadband (F300W, F547M and F814W) and narrowband (F487N and F656N) filters. By comparing the photometry with theoretical population synthesis models, we estimate the age and mass of each star cluster, which provides constraints on the recent star formation histories of the host galaxies. We compare the star cluster populations in these dwarf starburst galaxies to those of the nuclear starburst in the barred spiral M 83, and discuss implications for our understanding of the nature and evolution of starburst events.

  17. The Recent Cluster Formation Histories of NGC 5253 and NGC 3077: Environmental Impact on Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J; Smith, D A; Conselice, C J

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multicolor photometry of bright star cluster candidates in the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 3077 and NGC 5253, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in both broadband (F300W, F547M and F814W) and narrowband (F487N and F656N) filters. By comparing the photometry with theoretical population synthesis models, we estimate the age and mass of each star cluster, which provides constraints on the recent star formation histories of the host galaxies. We compare the star cluster populations in these dwarf starburst galaxies to those of the nuclear starburst in the barred spiral M 83, and discuss implications for our understanding of the nature and evolution of starburst events.

  18. Estimating A Shear Modulus Of A Transversely Isotropic Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellefsen, K. J.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to estimate c[subscript 66], which is a shear modulus of a transversely isotropic formation (with its symmetry axis parallel to the borehole), is developed and tested. The inversion for c[subscript 66] is based ...

  19. Androgen Receptor Formation in Prenatally Endocrine Disrupted Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Conor David

    2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ) and we are hypothesizing that this androgen receptor malformation may decrease physical activity after birth. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between endocrine disruptors given prenatally, androgen receptor formation...

  20. EXFOR systems manual: Nuclear reaction data exchange format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLane, V. [ed.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes EXFOR, the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the members of the Nuclear Data Centers Network. In addition to storing the data and its bibliographic information, experimental information, including source of uncertainties, is also compiled. The status and history of the data set is also included, e.g., the source of the data, any updates which have been made, and correlations to other data sets. The exchange format, as outlined, is designed to allow a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in an easily machine-readable format (for checking and indicating possible errors) and a format that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting any errors indicated by the machine).

  1. Generating pictures from waves : aspects of image formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J. (Anthony Joseph), 1976-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research communities, technologies, and tools for image formation are diverse. On the one hand, computer vision and graphics researchers analyze incoherent light using coarse geometric approximations from optics. On ...

  2. Formatting Instructions for NIPS*2006 David S. Hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roweis, Sam

    Formatting Instructions for NIPS*2006 David S. Hippocampus Department of Computer Science Cranberry-Lemon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 hippo@cs.cranberry-lemon.edu Coauthor Affiliation Address email Coauthor

  3. Polymorphism control and the formation of organic molecular nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaochuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of organic molecular nanocrystals is a topic of great interest in the pharmaceutical industry because of the potential increase in dissolution rate and solubility of organic crystals below 1 ptm and their ...

  4. Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 range (1-2...

  5. Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi-Nan [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China) [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland); Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.; Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland)] [Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland); Shu, Xiaolin; Yu, Yi; Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China)] [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Li, Xiao-Chun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)] [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

  6. Eddy formation and propagation in the eastern tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of eddies in the eastern tropical Pacific from TOPEX altimetry data show that there are seasonal and interannual variations in eddy activity. Comparisons between time of eddy formation and corresponding wind data show that not all...

  7. IC 3418: STAR FORMATION IN A TURBULENT WAKE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hester, Janice A.; Neill, James D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Gil de Paz, Armando [Dpto. de Astrofisica, Universidad Computense de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: jhester@srl.caltech.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations of IC 3418, a low surface brightness galaxy in the Virgo Cluster, revealed a striking 17 kpc UV tail of bright knots and diffuse emission. H{alpha} imaging confirms that star formation is ongoing in the tail. IC 3418 was likely recently ram pressure stripped on its first pass through Virgo. We suggest that star formation is occurring in molecular clouds that formed in IC 3418's turbulent stripped wake. Tides and ram pressure stripping (RPS) of molecular clouds are both disfavored as tail formation mechanisms. The tail is similar to the few other observed star-forming tails, all of which likely formed during RPS. The tails' morphologies reflect the forces present during their formation and can be used to test for dynamical coupling between molecular and diffuse gas, thereby probing the origin of the star-forming molecular gas.

  8. CHEMOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC DUITSCHLAND FORMATION, SOUTH AFRICA: IMPLICATIONS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Alan Jay

    CHEMOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC DUITSCHLAND FORMATION, SOUTH AFRICA: IMPLICATIONS the only unequivocal glacial unit of this era in the Transvaal Basin, South Africa. Lithologic evidence Park 2006, Johannesburg, South Africa. [American Journal of Science, Vol. 301, March, 2001, P. 261

  9. Optimal Formation Flight Control Using Coupled Inter-Spacecraft Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Alvar Saenz-Otero October 2009 SSL # 10-09 #12;#12;Optimal Formation Flight Control Using Coupled Inter-Spacecraft Dynamics Martin Azkarate Vecilla, Alvar Saenz-Otero October 2009 SSL # 10-09 This work is based

  10. PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM) Lian Ding environments and the entire product lifecycle. There are new requirements for product representations, including: platform/application independence, support for the product lifecycle, rapidly sharing information

  11. Pb nanowire formation on Al/lead zirconate titanate surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattering of the Al film. Citation: Alvine KJ, V Shutthanandan, BW Arey, CM Wang, WD Bennett, and SG Pitman.2012."Pb nanowire formation on Allead zirconate titanate surfaces in...

  12. Star Formation in Mergers and Interacting Galaxies: Gathering the Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected results from recent studies of star formation in galaxies at different stages of interaction are reviewed. Recent results from the Spitzer Space Telescope are highlighted. Ideas on how large-scale driving of star formation in interacting galaxies might mesh with our understanding of star formation in isolated galaxies and small scale mechanisms within galaxies are considered. In particular, there is evidence that on small scales star formation is determined by the same thermal and turbulent processes in cool compressed clouds as in isolated galaxies. If so, this affirms the notion that the primary role of large-scale dynamics is to gather and compress the gas fuel. In gas-rich interactions this is generally done with increasing efficiency through the merger process.

  13. FORMATION OF A PHYSICALLY STABLE AMORPHOUS DRUG COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, Jenifer Anne

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    8 Conclusion 9 References 11 Chapter 2. Formation and Stabilization of Amorphous Solids Introduction 13 Stabilization of Amorphous Solids 14 Using... Experimental a. Materials 25 b. Methods 29 Conclusion 33 References 37...

  14. Wakate-Initiative Seminar Memory formation in the fly brain!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejiri, Shinji

    Wakate-Initiative Seminar Memory formation in the fly brain! Dr. Hiromu Tanimoto Head is synthesized in ~280 neurons in the fly brain and involved also in other brain functions, it is important

  15. abscisic acid formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    me the idea for my project... Tjhen, Kien Hoa 2012-06-07 32 LACK OF CORRELATION BETWEEN GOUT AND THE INCORPORATION OF ISOTOPIC FORMATE INTO URIC ACID CiteSeer Summary: Certain...

  16. acetohydroxamic acid formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frdrique; Jaffrezo, J L; Legrand, M 2009-01-01 12 LACK OF CORRELATION BETWEEN GOUT AND THE INCORPORATION OF ISOTOPIC FORMATE INTO URIC ACID CiteSeer Summary: Certain...

  17. acid estolide formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frdrique; Jaffrezo, J L; Legrand, M 2009-01-01 13 LACK OF CORRELATION BETWEEN GOUT AND THE INCORPORATION OF ISOTOPIC FORMATE INTO URIC ACID CiteSeer Summary: Certain...

  18. Star formation histories in early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1998-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the formation of alpha-enhanced metal-rich stellar populations in the nuclei of luminous ellipticals. Based on hierarchical clustering, different galaxy formation scenarios, which imply different star formation histories, are considered. In contrast to the fast clumpy collapse mode, the late merger of two spiral galaxies fails to reproduce significantly $\\alpha$-enhanced abundance ratios, unless the IMF is flattened. Following the star formation history predicted by semi-analytic models of hierarchical clustering for the average elliptical, solar abundance ratios are obtained with Salpeter IMF. According to the models, bright ellipticals in the field are expected to have significantly lower Mg/Fe ratios than their counterparts in a cluster.

  19. Energetics of [alpha]-helix formation in peptides and proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Christian Reinhold

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the energetics of !-helix formation in peptides and proteins. The [alpha]-helix is the most prevalent type of secondary structure found in proteins, and has arguably dominated our thinking about ...

  20. Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce...

  1. Collisionless Weibel shocks: Full formation mechanism and timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Stockem, A. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitt Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Narayan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Silva, L. O. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  2. CONSENSUS SEEKING, FORMATION KEEPING, AND TRAJECTORY TRACKING IN MULTIPLE VEHICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Wei

    to mobile robots, unmanned air vehicles, autonomous underwater vehicles, satellites, aircraft, spacecraft controllers for fixed wing unmanned air vehicles and nonholonomic mobile robots with velocity and heading rateCONSENSUS SEEKING, FORMATION KEEPING, AND TRAJECTORY TRACKING IN MULTIPLE VEHICLE COOPERATIVE

  3. Radial and Spiral Stream Formation in Proteus mirabilis Colonies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Chuan

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis, which is a pathogen that forms biofilms in vivo, can swarm over hard surfaces and form a variety of spatial patterns in colonies. Colony formation involves two distinct cell types: ...

  4. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Review ES-127 Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Erin O'Driscoll (PI) Han Wu (Presenter) Dow Kokam May 13,...

  5. DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formations, including oil and gas reservoirs and deep salineGCS consist mainly of oil and gas reservoirs and deep salinebelow the caprock in oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline

  7. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae, E-mail: seowy@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  8. Quantum Black Hole Formation in the BFSS Matrix Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinya Aoki; Masanori Hanada; Norihiro Iizuka

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the various head-on collisions of two bunches of D0-branes and their real-time evolution in the BFSS matrix model in classical limit. For a various matrix size N respecting the 't Hooft scaling, we find quantitative evidence for the formation of a single bound state of D0-branes at late time, which is matrix model thermalization and dual to the formation of a larger black hole.

  9. Issues in the Formation of Globular Cluster Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. E. Harris

    1998-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments relevant to the formation of globular cluster systems in galaxies are discussed, including (1) The age distribution of the oldest Milky Way clusters, (2) Subgroups and possible accretion and merger remnants in the Galactic halo, (3) Key features of globular cluster systems in giant elliptical galaxies (metallicity distribution functions, luminosity distribution functions, specific frequencies). Processes contributing to the formation of giant ellipticals are summarized.

  10. Crystal Structure and Formation Energy of -carbide Using First

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Crystal Structure and Formation Energy of -carbide Using First Principles CalculationsIntroduction · Martensite (') -carbide -carbide -carbide Cementite () · Silicon promotes the formation of -carbide below-456(2008) 900, 100s 200, 20s 250, 30 s Ms = 302(1.0 wt%Si), 293 (1.7 wt%Si) 1.0wt% Si : No -carbide 1.7wt% Si

  11. Extended correlations of porosity, permeability, and formation resistivity factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Keith Wade

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the second is an empirically established correlation between the individual parameters. Although the two relationships are of the same form, the empirical form permits an independent detezmination of characterizing factors that appear in the rela..., and the characterizing factors for several formations have been calculated. These characterizing factors may have some merit for characterizing formations in general. Methods are also suggested for estimating these factors when limited data is available...

  12. Dynamics of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigel Goldenfeld; Pak Yuen Chan; John Veysey

    2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate and model the dynamics of spatial patterns arising during the precipitation of calcium carbonate from a supersaturated shallow water flow. The model describes the formation of travertine deposits at geothermal hot springs and rimstone dams of calcite in caves. We find explicit solutions for travertine domes at low flow rates, identify the linear instabilities which generate dam and pond formation on sloped substrates, and present simulations of statistical landscape evolution.

  13. Constraining Galaxy Formation Models with Dwarf Ellipticals in Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations demonstrate that dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in clusters, despite their faintness, are likely a critical galaxy type for understanding the processes behind galaxy formation. Dwarf ellipticals are the most common galaxy type, and are particularly abundant in rich galaxy clusters. The dwarf to giant ratio is in fact highest in rich clusters of galaxies, suggesting that cluster dEs do not form in groups that later merge to form clusters. Dwarf ellipticals are potentially the only galaxy type whose formation is sensitive to global, rather than local, environment. The dominant idea for explaining the formation of these systems, through Cold Dark Matter models, is that dEs form early and within their present environments. Recent results suggest that some dwarfs appear in clusters after the bulk of massive galaxies form, a scenario not predicted in standard hierarchical structure formation models. Many dEs have younger and more metal rich stellar populations than dwarfs in lower density environments, suggesting processes induced by rich clusters play an important role in dE formation. Several general galaxy cluster observations, including steep luminosity functions, and the origin of intracluster light, are natural outcomes of this delayed formation.

  14. The Suitable Geological Formations for Spent Fuel Disposal in Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marunteanu, C. [Bucharest Univ. (Romania); Ionita, G. [ANDRAD, Bucharest (Romania); Durdun, I. [S.C. GEOTEC S.A., Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the experience in the field of advanced countries and formerly Romanian program data, ANDRAD, the agency responsible for the disposal of radioactive wastes, started the program for spent fuel disposal in deep geological formations with a documentary analysis at the national scale. The potential geological formations properly characterized elsewhere in the world: salt, clay, volcanic tuff, granite and crystalline rocks,. are all present in Romania. Using general or specific selection criteria, we presently consider the following two areas for candidate geological formations: 1. Clay formations in two areas in the western part of Romania: (1) The Pannonian basin Socodor - Zarand, where the clay formation is 3000 m thick, with many bentonitic strata and undisturbed structure, and (2) The Eocene Red Clay on the Somes River, extending 1200 m below the surface. They both need a large investigation program in order to establish and select the required homogeneous, dry and undisturbed zones at a suitable depth. 2. Old platform green schist formations, low metamorphosed, quartz and feldspar rich rocks, in the Central Dobrogea structural unit, not far from Cernavoda NPP (30 km average distance), 3000 m thick and including many homogeneous, fine granular, undisturbed, up to 300 m thick layers. (authors)

  15. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

  16. Kinetics of Elementary Processes Relevant to Incipient Soot Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. C. Lin; M. C. Heaven

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Soot formation and abatement processes are some of the most important and challenging problems in hydrocarbon combustion. The key reactions involved in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHâ??s), the precursors to soot, remain elusive. Small aromatic species such as C5H5, C6H6 and their derivatives are believed to play a pivotal role in incipient soot formation. The goal of this project is to establish a kinetic database for elementary reactions relevant to soot formation in its incipient stages. In the past year, we have completed by CRDS the kinetics for the formation and decomposition of C6H5C2H2O2 in the C6H5C2H2 +O2 reaction and the formation of C10H7O2 in the C10H7 + O2 reaction by directly monitoring C6H5C2H2O2 and C10H7O2 radicals in the visible region; their mechanisms have been elucidated computationally by quantum-chemical calculations. The O + C2H5OH reaction has been studied experimentally and computationally and the OH + HNCN reaction has been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. In addition, a new pulsed slit molecular beam system has been constructed and tested for spectroscopic studies of aromatic radicals and their derivatives by the cavity ringdown technique (CRDS).

  17. Molecular Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2(110). Molecular Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2(110). Abstract: Understanding hydrogen formation on TiO2...

  18. Statistical Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation Parameters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statistical Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation Parameters using Gen3 Electrode Materials: Final Summary Statistical Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetone-butanol-isopropanol formation progress...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Biology, University of Ottawa Collection: Biology and Medicine 74 Automatic 3D Video Format Detection , Zhe Wanga Summary: the 3D format information into the video...

  20. Water-induced Formation of Cobalt Oxides Over SupportedCobalt...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Cobalt Oxides Over Supported CobaltCeria-Zirconia Catalysts under Ethanol-Steam Conditions. Water-induced Formation of Cobalt Oxides Over Supported Cobalt...

  1. The Era of Star Formation in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodwin, M; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Zeimann, G R; Snyder, G F; Mancone, C L; Pope, A; Eisenhardt, P R; Stern, D; Alberts, S; Ashby, M L N; Brown, M J I; Chary, R -R; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A; Gettings, D P; Jannuzi, B T; Miller, E D; Moustakas, J; Moustakas, L A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at $1 1.35$. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/MIPS observations at 24 $\\mu$m, along with robust optical+IRAC photometric redshifts and SED-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that $z\\sim 1.4$ represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at $z>1.4$ environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. Combining these obse...

  2. On the star formation history of IZw 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Legrand

    1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that a continuous low star formation rate has been the dominant regime in IZw 18 and in dwarf galaxies for the lifetime of these objects (Legrand et al. 1999). Here, we discuss and model various star-forming histories for IZw 18. Particularly, we show that if the metallicity observed in IZw 18 results from starburst events only, the observed colors constrain the fraction of the metals ejected from the galaxy to be less than 50-70 %. We demonstrate that the continuous star formation scenario reproduces the observed parameters of IZw 18. A continuous star formation rate (SFR) of about 10E-4 Msol/yr during 14 Gyr reproduces precisely the observed abundances. This SFR is comparable with the lowest SFR observed in low surface brightness galaxies (van Zee et al. 1997). Generalized to all galaxies, the low continuous SFR scenario accounts for various facts: the presence of star formation in quiescent dwarfs and LSBG, the metallicity increase with time in the most underabundant DLA systems, and the metal content extrapolations to the outskirts of spiral galaxies. Also the apparent absence of galaxies with a metallicity lower than IZw 18, the apparent absence of HI clouds without optical counterparts, and the homogeneity of abundances in dwarfs galaxies are natural outcomes of the scenario. This implies that, even if starbursts are strong and important events in the life of galaxies, their more subdued but continuous star formation regime cannot be ignored when accounting for their chemical evolution.

  3. Modelling New Particle Formation Events in the South African Savannah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, aka aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scale, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There are already some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first time detailed simulations, that include all the main processes relevant to particle formation, were done. The results show that both investigated particle formation mechanisms overestimated the formation rates dependency on sulphuric acid. The approach including low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events. To get reliable estimation of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa.

  4. THE PROGRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN THE ROSETTE MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Lada, Elizabeth A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32605 (United States); Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Unidad Academica de Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Balog, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany); Wang Junfeng [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Dr, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Feigelson, Eric D., E-mail: jybarra@astro.ufl.edu [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory data, we identify young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC). By being able to select cluster members and classify them into YSO types, we are able to track the progression of star formation locally within the cluster environments and globally within the cloud. We employ the nearest neighbor method analysis to explore the density structure of the clusters and YSO ratio mapping to study age progressions in the cloud. We find a relationship between the YSO ratios and extinction that suggests star formation occurs preferentially in the densest parts of the cloud and that the column density of gas rapidly decreases as the region evolves. This suggests rapid removal of gas may account for the low star formation efficiencies observed in molecular clouds. We find that the overall age spread across the RMC is small. Our analysis suggests that star formation started throughout the complex around the same time. Age gradients in the cloud appear to be localized and any effect the H II region has on the star formation history is secondary to that of the primordial collapse of the cloud.

  5. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

  6. Formation mechanisms of spatially-directed zincblende gallium nitride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A. W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Collino, R. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Cardozo, B. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Naab, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wang, Y. Q. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the spatially selective formation of GaN nanocrystals embedded in GaAs. Broad-area N{sup +} implantation followed by rapid thermal annealing leads to the formation of nanocrystals at the depth of maximum ion damage. With additional irradiation using a Ga{sup +} focused ion beam, selective lateral positioning of the nanocrystals within the GaAs matrix is observed in isolated regions of increased vacancy concentration. Following rapid thermal annealing, the formation of zincblende GaN is observed in the regions of highest vacancy concentration. The nucleation of zincblende nanocrystals over the wurtzite phase of bulk GaN is consistent with the predictions of a thermodynamic model for the nanoscale size-dependence of GaN nucleation.

  7. Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a spiral startup staged sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include treating a first zone of the formation. Treatment of a plurality of zones of the formation may be begun at selected times after the treatment of the first zone begins. The treatment of at least two successively treated zones may begin at a selected time after treatment of the previous zone begins. At least two of the successively treated zones may be adjacent to the zone treated previously. The successive treatment of the zones proceeds in an outward, substantially spiral sequence from the first zone so that the treatment of the zones may move substantially spirally outwards towards a boundary of the treatment area.

  8. Microchannel formation in seaice as habitat for microalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Morawetz; S. Thoms; B. Kutschan

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of saline brine channels in seaice is described by two coupled order parameters, the tetrahedricity as structure of ice and the salinity. Their evolution equations follow from a Ginzburg-Landau-functional in the form of a phase-field theory conserving salinity. The stability analysis provides the phase diagram in terms of two parameters, one describing the velocity of the freezing process and the other one characterizing the velocity of structure formation. In thermodynamics these parameters determine the supercooling or superheating region and the specific heat respectively. In contrast to the Turing model the diffusivity does not enter this phase diagram but determines only the structure size. The numerical solution shows a microstructure formation of brine inclusions in agreement with the measured samples dependent on the salinity and temperature.

  9. X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oreshkin, V. I. [Institute of High Current Electronics, SB, RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Chaikovsky, S. A. [Institute of High Current Electronics, SB, RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Leninsky Ave., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Artyomov, A. P.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S. [Institute of High Current Electronics, SB, RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a hot spot. Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stages are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.

  10. The Formation of a Bubble from a Submerged Orifice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Jonathan A; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of a single bubble from an orifice in a solid surface, submerged in an in- compressible, viscous Newtonian liquid, is simulated. The finite element method is used to capture the multiscale physics associated with the problem and to track the evolution of the free surface explicitly. The results are compared to a recent experimental analysis and then used to obtain the global characteristics of the process, the formation time and volume of the bubble, for a range of orifice radii; Ohnesorge numbers, which combine the material parameters of the liquid; and volumetric gas flow rates. These benchmark calculations, for the parameter space of interest, are then utilised to validate a selection of scaling laws found in the literature for two regimes of bubble formation, the regimes of low and high gas flow rates.

  11. Study of spin-polaron formation in 1D systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arredondo, Y.; Navarro, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, Apartado Postal 70-360, 04510 Mxico D.F. (Mexico); Vallejo, E. [Facultad de Ingeniera Mecnica y Elctrica, Universidad Autnoma de Coahuila, Carretera Torren-Matamoros Km. 7.5 Ciudad Universitaria, 27276 Torren, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study numerically the formation of spin-polarons in low-dimensional systems. We consider a ferromagnetic Kondo lattice model with Hund coupling J{sub H} and localized spins interacting antiferromagnetically with coupling constant J. We investigate the ground state phase diagram as a function of the exchange couplings J{sub H} and J and as a function of the band filling, since it has been observed that doping either on the ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic regime lead to formation of magnetic domains [1]. We explore the quasi-particle formation and phase separation using the density-matrix renormalization group method, which is a highly efficient method to investigate quasi-one-dimensional strongly correlated systems.

  12. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  13. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, Mohan

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

  14. Commercial Buildings Partnership Projects - Metered Data Format and Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, Srinivas

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of the Commercial Building Partnership Projects (CBPs) will require metering, monitoring, data analysis and verification of savings after the retrofits are complete. Although monitoring and verification (M&V) agents are free to use any metering and monitoring devices that they chose, the data they collect should be reported to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in a standard format. PNNL will store the data collected in its CBP database for further use by PNNL and U.S. Department of Energy. This document describes the data storage process and the deliver format of the data from the M&V agents.

  15. Constraints on Cluster Formation from Old Globular CLuster Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of old globular cluster systems (GCSs) in galaxy halos offer unique insight into the physical processes that conspire to form any generic star cluster, at any epoch. Presented here is a summary of the information obtained from (1) the specific frequencies (total populations) and spatial structures (density vs. galactocentric radius) of GCSs in early-type galaxies, as they relate to the efficiency (or probability) of bound cluster formation, and (2) the fundamental role of a scaling between cluster mass and energy among Galactic globulars in setting their other structural correlations, and the possible implications for star formation efficiency as a function of mass in gaseous protoclusters.

  16. Star Formation and the Growth of Stellar Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric F. Bell; Xian Zhong Zheng; Casey Papovich; Andrea Borch; Christian Wolf; Klaus Meisenheimer

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have demonstrated a significant growth in the integrated stellar mass of the red sequence since z=1, dominated by a steadily increasing number of galaxies with stellar masses M* 3x10^10 M_sun blue galaxies would also be overproduced; i.e., most of the new stars formed in blue cloud galaxies are in the massive galaxies. We explore a simple truncation scenario in which these `extra' blue galaxies have their star formation suppressed by an unspecified mechanism or mechanisms; simple cessation of star formation in these extra blue galaxies is approximately sufficient to build up the red sequence at M*<10^11 M_sun.

  17. Effect of friction on disoriented chiral condensate formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the effect of friction on the DCC domain formation. We solve the Newton equation of motion for the O(4) fields, with quenched initial condition. The initial fields are randomly distributed in a Gaussian form. In one dimensional expansion, on the average, large DCC domains can not be formed. However, in some particular orbits, large instabilities may occur. This possibility also greatly diminishes with the introduction of friction. But, if the friction is large, the system may be overdamped and then, there is a possibility of large DCC domain formation in some events.

  18. Feedback Processes [in Massive Star Formation]: A Theoretical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordecai-Mark Mac Low

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the evidence for the importance of feedback from massive stars at small and large scales. The feedback mechanisms include accretion luminosity, ionizing radiation, collimated outflows, and stellar winds. The good news is that feedback doesn't entirely prevent the formation of massive stars, while the bad news is that we don't know what does limit their masses. Feedback from massive stars also influences their surroundings. I argue that this does not produce a triggering efficiency above unity, nor does it prevent lots of prompt star formation in GMCs, though it may preserve massive remnants of the clouds for many dynamical times.

  19. Evaluation of the Azinomycin B Biosynthetic Pathway: The Azabicycle Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Rachel Pokei

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    purified AziC3, AziC4, AziC5 and AziC6 ..... 30 Figure 19 The formation of hydroxamate-Fe3+ complex by AziC3 .......................... 31 Figure 20 Result of hydroxylamine assay by AziC3 ................................................. 31 Figure... 26 The proposed mechanistic scheme of the aziridine ring formation .......... 45 Figure 27 SDS-PAGE of insoluble proteins AziH1 and AziH2 and purified AziH3 47 Appendix Figure 1 Amino acid sequence alignment of AziC2 with LysX homologs 60...

  20. A Hybrid N-body--Coagulation Code for Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin C. Bromley; Scott J. Kenyon

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a hybrid algorithm to calculate the formation of planets from an initial ensemble of planetesimals. The algorithm uses a coagulation code to treat the growth of planetesimals into oligarchs and explicit N-body calculations to follow the evolution of oligarchs into planets. To validate the N-body portion of the algorithm, we use a battery of tests in planetary dynamics. Several complete calculations of terrestrial planet formation with the hybrid code yield good agreement with previously published calculations. These results demonstrate that the hybrid code provides an accurate treatment of the evolution of planetesimals into planets.

  1. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, J.W.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

  2. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

  3. Method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisemore, Clyde J. (Livermore, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for maximizing shale oil recovery from an underground oil shale formation which has previously been processed by in situ retorting such that there is provided in the formation a column of substantially intact oil shale intervening between adjacent spent retorts, which method includes the steps of back filling the spent retorts with an aqueous slurry of spent shale. The slurry is permitted to harden into a cement-like substance which stabilizes the spent retorts. Shale oil is then recovered from the intervening column of intact oil shale by retorting the column in situ, the stabilized spent retorts providing support for the newly developed retorts.

  4. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  5. Niederdruck-berschallexpansionen. Eine studie zur formation von kalten wasserstoff und deuteriumatomstrahlen fr polarisierte gastargets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nass, A

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niederdruck-berschallexpansionen. Eine studie zur formation von kalten wasserstoff und deuteriumatomstrahlen fr polarisierte gastargets

  6. Feedback from Protostellar Outflows in Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner

    2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic stresses collimate protostellar winds into a common distribution of force with angle. Sweeping into the ambient medium, such winds drive bipolar molecular outflows whose properties are insensitive to the distribution of ambient gas and to the details of how the wind is launched, and how its intensity varies over time. Moreover, these properties are in accord with the commonly observed features of outflows. This model is simple enough to permit a quantitative study of the feedback effects from low-mass star formation. It predicts the rate at which star-forming gas is ejected by winds, and hence the efficiency with which stars form. Applied to individual star formation, it relates the stellar initial mass function to the distribution of pre-stellar cores. Applied to cluster formation, it indicates whether the resulting stellar system will remain gravitationally bound. Using the energy injection and mass ejection implied by this model, we investigate the dynamical evolution of a molecular clump as a stellar cluster forms within it. This depends critically on the rate at which turbulence decays: it may involve equilibrium star formation (slow decay), overstable oscillations, or collapse (fast decay).

  7. The formate-pyruvate exchange reaction by Streptococcus faecalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeager, Robert Lee

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    !!e, ivlartin J, anci Guthrie, Robert 19;i9 incorporation oi formate- C14 into the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine. J, Bacteriol. 78, 545-549, Reed, L. J. , Gunsalus, I. C, , DuBusk, B. G. anc! Hornberger, C. S. 1951 Crystalline o(-Iipoic acid. A catalisti...

  8. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Greg L. Bryan; Michael L. Norman

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 0.5 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~100,000 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of 100,000/cm^3 are found. We find that less than 1% of the primordial gas in such small scale structures cools and collapses to sufficiently high densities to be available for primordial star formation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the formation of very massive objects, massive black holes, fragmentation of a large fraction of baryons into brown dwars or Jupiter size fragments seems, in contrast to various claims in the literature, very unlikely. The expected escape fraction of UV photons with (h nu) > 11eV is very small.

  9. Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sattler, Klaus

    Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames K. Siegmanna) Swiss 96822 Received 24 August 1999; accepted 13 October 1999 A laminar diffusion flame of methane exhausts,7­17 coal-fired, electricity generating power plants,18,19 tobacco smoke,20 residential wood

  10. GDCT Initialization File [gdct.ini] Format Specification Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosebrugh, Robert

    GDCT Initialization File [gdct.ini] Format Specification Guide Written By: Jeremy Bradbury June 22, 2000 Below is the layout of the gdct.ini file. It is important to note the following: · If the gdct.ini to represent that a file does not exist under the "Recent Files" section of the gdct.ini file. [Internal

  11. COMMUNICATION Formation of a Stable Oligomer of -2 Microglobulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranker, Andrew

    amyloidosis. 2007 Published by Elsevier Ltd. *Corresponding author Keywords: -2 microglobulin; amyloidCOMMUNICATION Formation of a Stable Oligomer of -2 Microglobulin Requires only Transient Encounter and Biochemistry, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520-8114, USA -2 Microglobulin (2m

  12. SUPPORTING INFORMATION Dissecting the Kinetic Process of Amyloid Fiber Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    eight Type-I amyloid proteins (the yeast prion Sup35 NW region, Csg Btrunc, Ure2 protein, 2SUPPORTING INFORMATION Dissecting the Kinetic Process of Amyloid Fiber Formation through Asymptotic 2 1 , where A represents proteins with specific conformations before fibrillation, B is proteins

  13. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowler, Brendan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Waller, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Megeath, S. Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Patten, Brian M. [National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Tamura, Motohide [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)], E-mail: bpbowler@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: william.waller@tufts.edu, E-mail: megeath@physics.utoledo.edu, E-mail: bpatten@nsf.gov, E-mail: motohide.tamura@nao.ac.jp

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At {approx} 400 pc, the Horsehead Nebula (B33) is the closest radiatively sculpted pillar to the Sun, but the state and extent of star formation in this structure is not well understood. We present deep near-infrared (IRSF/SIRIUS JHK {sub S}) and mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) observations of the Horsehead Nebula to characterize the star-forming properties of this region and to assess the likelihood of triggered star formation. Infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are used to identify young stars based on infrared excess emission and positions to the right of the zero-age main sequence, respectively. Of the 45 sources detected at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, three bona fide and five candidate young stars are identified in this 7' x 7' region. Two bona fide young stars have flat infrared spectral energy distributions and are located at the western irradiated tip of the pillar. The spatial coincidence of the protostars at the leading edge of this elephant trunk is consistent with the radiation-driven implosion model of triggered star formation. There is no evidence, however, for sequential star formation within the immediate {approx} 1.'5 (0.17 pc) region from the cloud/H II region interface.

  14. The Formation and Persistence of Automobile Brand Preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    The Formation and Persistence of Automobile Brand Preferences Soren T. Anderson Michigan State preferences in the automobile market demonstrate strong persistence, which im- plies that market conditions empirical evidence that (1) individuals tend to choose the same brand of automobile again and again

  15. A Study of Formation and Dissociation of Gas Hydrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badakhshan Raz, Sadegh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and initial pressure. The aim of the second part of the study was the evaluation of the formation of gas hydrate and ice phases in a super-cooled methane-water system under the cooling rates of 0.45 and 0.6 degrees C/min, and the initial pressures of 1500...

  16. Red fluorescent proteins: chromophore formation and cellular applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    Red fluorescent proteins: chromophore formation and cellular applications Atsushi Miyawaki1,2 , Daria M Shcherbakova3,4 and Vladislav V Verkhusha3,4 In the last decade, a number of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) that emit orange, red, and far-red fluorescence have been isolated from anthozoans (corals

  17. Organic Aerosol Formation Downwind from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Organic Aerosol Formation Downwind from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Nicole ONeill - ATOC 3500 and aerosol composition of air over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. · The lightest chemicals in the oil evaporated within hours, as scientists expected them to do. What they didn't expect

  18. A Suggested Format for Preparing a Thesis/Project Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    completion of the thesis/project and graduation of the student. The proposal should address the items's graduation plans? For any further guidance in this regard, the student must contact his/her Thesis/ProjectA Suggested Format for Preparing a Thesis/Project Proposal A thesis/project proposal must

  19. Genetic and Economic Interaction in the Formation of Human Capital.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    Genetic and Economic Interaction in the Formation of Human Capital. The Case of Obesity Pietro by changes in the incentives to invest. I take the model to the data using the Avon Longitudinal Study regulation of food intake, and shed light on the interdependence between genes and economic choices regarding

  20. Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings Kent D. Carlson cycle of inclusions during the filling of steel castings. There are two ways that inclusions can the final location and characteristics of reoxidation inclusions in steel castings. Carlson, K

  1. The role of calcium hydroxide in the formation of thaumasite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellmann, F. [Institute for Building Materials Science, Department of Civil Engineering, Bauhaus-University Weimar (Germany)], E-mail: frank.bellmann@bauing.uni-weimar.de; Stark, J. [Institute for Building Materials Science, Department of Civil Engineering, Bauhaus-University Weimar (Germany)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been derived by thermodynamic calculation that the presence or absence of calcium hydroxide plays a vital role in the resistance of cement paste or concrete against the formation of thaumasite. To obtain experimental data on this matter, special binders have been mixed and used for the preparation of mortar bars. These specimens were exposed to moderate sulphate attack for a period of 18 months at a temperature of 8 deg. C. Mortar bars containing calcium hydroxide showed visual signs of attack a few months after exposure, leading to expansion, mass loss and complete failure. In contrast to this, no signs of attack were observed when no calcium hydroxide was present in the microstructure. These results confirm the conclusions of earlier thermodynamic calculations that the presence of calcium hydroxide has an important impact on the formation of thaumasite. Calcium-rich C-S-H formed in the presence of calcium hydroxide is vulnerable against sulphate attack and the formation of thaumasite. In the absence of calcium hydroxide, C-S-H has a much lower calcium/silicon ratio and a higher resistance against the formation of thaumasite.

  2. Acquisition and Control of a Precision Formation Flying Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 SSL # 10-10 #12;#12;Acquisition and Control of a Precision Formation Flying Mission John M. Field, David W. Miller June 2010 SSL # 10-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by John M

  3. Coke formation during pyrolysis of 1,2-dichloroethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmen, A. [Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Lindvag, O.A. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most processes involving hydrocarbons or carbon oxides at high temperatures suffer from the disadvantage of coke formation. The formation of coke deposits during pyrolysis of hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is of significant practical importance. Examples of such processes are the steam cracking of alkanes to produce olefins and the thermal decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC) for the production of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). Even id the rate of coke production is low, the cumulative nature of the solid product will result in reactor fouling. The present work deals with the thermal decomposition of EDC. Coke formation has been studied on metal surfaces in a quartz tubular reactor. The rate of coke deposition was measures on metal foils hanging from one arm of a microbalance. A complete analysis of the product gas was accomplished using on-line gas chromatography. The results show that coke deposition during thermal decomposition of EDC depends on the composition of the feed as well as on the nature of the surface of the metal foil. Small amounts of other components (contamination with other chlorinated hydrocarbons as an example) may have a large influence on the rate of coke formation. The results are discussed in terms of surface composition/morphology of the metal foil and the free radical mechanism for thermal decomposition of FDC.

  4. An Interchange File Format for Graphs Michael Himsolt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pentus, Mati

    graphical information. It is designed as an extendible format and provides facilities such that other be as flexible and extensible as possible. Other programs should be able to write graph files with low overhead Ascii). Since end of line is encoded differ­ ently on different platform, we choose not to use end­of­line

  5. Representational Format, Student Choice, and Problem Solving in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    , pictorial, graphical, verbal).1 In a study of a 367-student algebra-based physics class, we examine student formats, and look for factors that may influence their ability or choices. As a control, part of the class or informal, abstract or concrete, or text-based versus graphics-based, to name just a few. Studies involving

  6. Modeling of NOx formation in circular laminar jet flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siwatch, Vivek

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    -premixed isolated circular laminar jet flame. The jet consists of the fuel rich inner region and the O2 rich outer region. The model estimates both thermal NOx and prompt NOx assuming single step kinetics for NOx formation and a thin flame model. Further the amount...

  7. Wave optics and image formation in gravitational lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasusada Nambu

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss image formation in gravitational lensing systems using wave optics. Applying the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction formula to waves scattered by a gravitational potential of a lens object, we demonstrate how images of source objects are obtained directly from wave functions without using a lens equation for gravitational lensing.

  8. On formation of equation of state of evolving quantum field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Leonidov; A. A. Radovskaya

    2014-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Stylized model of evolution of matter created in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions is considered. Systematic procedure of computing quantum corrections in the framework of Keldysh formalism is formulated. Analytical expressions for formation of equations of state taking into account leading quantum corrections is worked out, complete description of subleasing corrections and analytical expressions for some of them is presented.

  9. Diurnal and Seasonal Variations of Ultrafine Particle Formation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Fangqun

    of ultrafine particles observed in the plumes from the Horne smelter: one in the summer and the other cases, showing that particle formation in the Horne smelter plumes is dominated by binary homogeneous in this parameterization. Sulfur emission from power plants and smelters is a dominant anthropogenic sulfur source

  10. Spatial Pattern Formation in Fused Silica Under UV Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, David A.

    Spatial Pattern Formation in Fused Silica Under UV Irradiation Problem Presenter Leslie Button lenses gradually degrades and ultimately damages these optical components. Corning is a global supplier of optical and ceramic materials across various industries and is particularly interested in this damage

  11. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    to test the effects of these parameters. The experiments were used to test the effect of 2 on vent simulations were used to test the effect of 3 on vent morphology and dynamics. In the numerical models we see to underground explosions that blast the overlaying rock formations [e.g., Gisler, 2009]. This phenomenon occurs

  12. FormationTEX:plainTEX DenisROEGEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roegel, Denis

    'est ce que l'on obtient avec la commande tex. Il y environ 600 commandes dans plain TEX, qui se rajoutentFormationTEX:plainTEX DenisROEGEL roegel@loria.fr 1999 1 #12;1 Exemple simple en plain TEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4 TEX et plain TEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5 Commandes

  13. A simple model of the hierarchical formation of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hoeneisen

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a simple, fast and predictive model of the hierarchical formation of galaxies which is in quantitative agreement with observations. Comparing simulations with observations we place constraints on the density of the universe and on the power spectrum of density fluctuations.

  14. GUV formation protocol: -Ethanol, DI water and Kimwipes for cleaning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movileanu, Liviu

    GUV formation protocol: Materials: - Ethanol, DI water and Kimwipes for cleaning - 5-10 µl glass with ethanol and DI water using Kimwipes alternating the solvents at least twice to make sure any grease-ring using a Kimwipe and ethanol. Use Que-tip or grease slide to apply a thin layer of vacuum grease to one

  15. Effectsof ice-crystal structure on halo formation: cirrus cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano, Yoshihide

    Effectsof ice-crystal structure on halo formation: cirrus cloud experimental and ray campaign, four 220halo-producing cirrus clouds were studied jointly from a ground- based polarization lidar of the aircraft, which collecteda total of 84slides byimpaction, preserving the ice crystals for later microscopic

  16. Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Kegang; Zeng, Zhengwen; He, Jun; Pei, Peng; Zhou, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Huang, Luke; Ostadhassan, Mehdi; Jabbari, Hadi; Blanksma, Derrick; Feilen, Harry; Ahmed, Salowah; Benson, Steve; Mann, Michael; LeFever, Richard; Gosnold, Will

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 1, 2008 US DOE-sponsored research project entitled Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005643 officially started at The University of North Dakota (UND). This is the final report of the project; it covers the work performed during the project period of October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. The objectives of this project are to outline the methodology proposed to determine the in-situ stress field and geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 3% to a higher level. The success of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing depends on knowing local in-situ stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks. We propose a proactive approach to determine the in-situ stress and related geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in representative areas through integrated analysis of field and well data, core sample and lab experiments. Geomechanical properties are measured by AutoLab 1500 geomechanics testing system. By integrating lab testing, core observation, numerical simulation, well log and seismic image, drilling, completion, stimulation, and production data, in-situ stresses of Bakken formation are generated. These in-situ stress maps can be used as a guideline for future horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing design to improve the recovery of Bakken unconventional oil.

  17. Nonlinear formation of holographic images of obscurations in laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear formation of holographic images of obscurations in laser beams C. Clay Widmayer, David of obscurations in laser beams. The predictions of the model are found to be in good agreement with measurements the intensity and fluence of the beam at each component in the laser chain. Dam- age threats to the system can

  18. Pocket formation and the flame surface density equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollman, W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence and properties of singularities in the equation for the surface density function {sigma} {triple_bond}{vert_bar}{del}{Phi}{vert_bar} are analyzed analytically and numerically using data from two dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) of pocket formation in a premixed methane-air flame. The various stages and the relevant time scales associated with pocket formation were determined in a previous study. It was found that isolated pockets form if and only if a nondegenerate critical point of a saddle point type appears. The appearance of a singularity in the isoline representing the flame front may have implications to modeling of the terms in the surface density function (sdf) approach during such transient events as pocket formation. The sink and source terms in sdf are evaluated in the neighborhood of a critical point using DNS data during pocket formation, and an analytic representation of a scalar in the vicinity of the critical point which allows for the computation of all kinematic properties. The analytic and computational results show that the normal restoration and dissipation terms in the sdf become singular at the critical point when the pocket emerges. Furthermore, the analytic results show that the singularities exactly cancel, and therefore, the main conclusion is that it is unnecessary to model the singular behavior of these terms at critical points. However, closure of their sum is recommended.

  19. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi [Physics Department and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Djerdj, Igor [Department of Materials, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Tonejc, Andelka [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Gamulin, Ozren [School of Medicine, Zagreb University, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  20. Typologie des dispositifs de formation hybrides : configurations et mtaphores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    , TECFA, Universit de Genve (Suisse); Peltier, Claire, TECFA, Universit de Genve (Suisse); Villiot sur les dispositifs de formation hybrides et, plus particulirement, de celles qui s'attachent volution de celle dj prsente en 2011 dans la premire phase du projet europen Hy-Sup, ddi l

  1. Treating-pressure analysis in the Bakken formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, D.D. (BJ Services (US))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bakken formation is an oil-producing interval in the Williston basin. Usually, commercial Bakken wells are linked to an anisotropic natural fracture network. Hydraulic fracturing treatments have been used extensively in vertical wells and to a limited extent in horizontal wells. In this paper, bottom hole treating pressure (BHTP's) are analyzed to improve understanding of hydraulic fracture propagation in the Bakken.

  2. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  3. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, A., E-mail: a.gao@utwente.nl; Lee, C. J.; Bijkerk, F. [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein, The Netherlands and XUV Optics Group, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy lower than 80?eV. After e-beam irradiation, it is found that the D peak, I(D), appears in the Raman spectrum, indicating defect formation in graphene. The evolution of I(D)/I(G) follows the amorphization trajectory with increasing irradiation dose, indicating that graphene goes through a transformation from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline and then further to amorphous carbon. Further, irradiation of graphene with increased water partial pressure does not significantly change the Raman spectra, which suggests that, in the extremely low energy range, e-beam induced chemical reactions between residual water and graphene are not the dominant mechanism driving defect formation in graphene. Single layer graphene, partially suspended over holes was irradiated with EUV radiation. By comparing with the Raman results from e-beam irradiation, it is concluded that the photoelectrons, especially those from the valence band, contribute to defect formation in graphene during irradiation.

  4. Stable plateau formation and Brillouin suppression in laser plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulser, P. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Weng, S. M. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80333 Munich (Germany)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the variety of ponderomotively induced density structures in laser produced plasmas in one dimension, it is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that the stable plateau formation at critical, subcritical, and above critical density is possible. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering is suppressed with increasing laser intensity.

  5. Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckler, Andrew F.

    Concrete vs. Abstract Problem Formats: A Disadvantage of Prior Knowledge Andrew F. Heckler experiments examine the effects of varying the relative concreteness of physics word problems on student performance.Previous studies have found that concrete representations benefit performance for relatively

  6. Duplicated genes evolve independently after polyploid formation in cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendel, Jonathan F.

    Duplicated genes evolve independently after polyploid formation in cotton Richard C. Cronn to characterize the evolution of homoeologous loci in allopolyploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and in species from organismal history was recovered. In contrast to observations involving repetitive DNAs in cotton

  7. Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a handling by M. Gascoyne Abstract Highly-alkaline waste solutions have leaked from underground tanks mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions

  8. Collaborative Estimation of Gradient Direction by a Formation of AUVs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    underwater vehicles). The present paper proposes a distributed solution in which a group of vehicles and unmanned air vehicles (AUVs and UAVs) [6, 7]. Cooperative formation control and motion co- ordination have-agent systems [1, 2], flocking [3], distributed sensor networks [4, 5], and autonomous sys- tems as underwater

  9. The Star-formation History of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rowan-Robinson

    1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The star formation history derived from ultraviolet and H$\\alpha$ data, without correction for dust extinction, on the one hand, and from far infrared and submillimetre data, on the other, is investigated. The latter estimates are found to be a factor 2-3 higher than the former, consistent with 2/3-3/4 of the uv light in star forming regions being absorbed by dust and reemitted in the far infrared. A reanalysis of the Hubble Deep Field galaxies using photometric reshifts shows no evidence for a decline in star formation rate at z = 2-4. A simple and versatile parameterized approach to the star formation history allows a quantitative investigation of the constraints from far infrared and submillimetre counts and background intensity measurements. A good fit to the counts, the 850 $\\mu$m background and the star formation history can be found in an $\\Omega_o$ = 1 universe, but this model fails to account for even the lowest estimates of the 140-350 $\\mu$m background by a factor of 2. Either the observed values are overestimated or we need a new population of found in a $\\Lambda$ = 0, $\\Omega_o$ = 0.3 universe.

  10. SPE-139032-PP Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE-139032-PP Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation S.Zargari, SPE, S s a ckno wle dgm ent of S PE co p yrig ht. Abstract Bakken shale has been subjected to more attention coupled with advancements in horizontal drilling, increased the interest of oil companies for investment

  11. A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE COALMONT FORMATION (TERTIARY),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter SN A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE COALMONT FORMATION (TERTIARY), NORTH PARK BASIN, COLORADO By S assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  12. Method of condensing vaporized water in situ to treat tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Fu (Rijswijk, NL)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a first portion of the formation. Conditions may be controlled in the formation so that water vaporized by the heaters in the first portion is selectively condensed in a second portion of the formation. At least some of the fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. The formation of PdCx over Pd-based catalysts in vapor-phase vinyl acetate synthesis: does a PdAu alloy catalyst resist carbide formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    ­Au alloy catalyst resist carbide formation? Y.-F. Han, D. Kumar, C. Sivadinarayana, A. Clearfield, and D October 2003; accepted 24 February 2004 The formation of Pd carbide (PdCx) during the synthesis of vinyl­Au/SiO2; XRD. 1. Introduction The formation of carbides over supported Pd catalysts was first reported

  14. Biofuel cells: Electro-enzymatic oxidation of formate using formate dehydrogenase, NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, benzyl viologen, and graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmmore, G.T.R.; Bertschy, H.; Bergens, S.H.; Whitesides, G.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed an effective electrochemical method to regenerate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) from NADH. Diaphorase (D) was used to oxidize NADH to NAD{sup +} with the concomitant reduction of two equivalents of benzylviologen (BV{sup 2+}) to the mono cation, BV{sup +} to the mono cation, BV{sup +}. The BV{sup +} was then electrochemically oxidized to BV{sup 2+} at a carbon-felt anode: NADH + 2BV{sup 2+} --(D)--> NAD{sup +} + 2BV{sup +} 2BV{sup +}-->(anode)-->2BV{sup 2+}. This system was incorporated into an enzymatic fuel cell that used formate as fuel. Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was used to oxidize formate to CO{sub 2} with the concomitant 2 e{sup {minus}}, 2H{sup +} reduction of NAD{sup +} to NADH. The NADH was then regenerated using the system described above. The anode of the fuel cell was used to oxidize BV{sup +} to BV{sup 2+}. Blackened Pt gauze as used as the cathode of the fuel cell. The working parameters of the formate/O{sub 2} biofuel cell will be presented including methods to develop this system into the more complex methanol/O{sub 2} biofuel cell.

  15. Star Formation and Merging in Massive Galaxies at z < 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2008-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing massive galaxies at various redshifts is one of the most straightforward and direct approaches towards understanding galaxy formation. There is now largely a consensus that the massive galaxy (M_* > 10^11 M_0) population is fully formed by z~1, based on mass and luminosity functions. However, we argue that the latest data can only rule out number and mass density evolution of a factor of > 2-3 at z 10^11 M_0 galaxies reveals that 40+/-5% of galaxies with M_* > 10^11 M_0 at z~1 are undergoing star formation that effectively doubles their stellar mass between z = 0.4 - 1.4. These massive galaxies also undergo 0.9^+0.7_-0.5 major mergers during this same time period.

  16. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, T; Norman, M L; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 0.5 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~100,000 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of 11eV is very small.

  17. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, T; Norman, M L; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of theintergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to beintimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. Inparticular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMFare of special interest. We present results from high resolutionthree--dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow thecollapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentationwithin a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpcdown to 1 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics andall relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followedself-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model.Primordial molecular clouds with ~10^5 solar masses are assembled by mergers ofmultiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with afractional abundance of ~10^-4. As the subclumps merge cooling ...

  18. Instability of black hole formation in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider here the classic scenario given by Oppenheimer, Snyder, and Datt, for the gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud, and examine its stability under the introduction of small tangential stresses. We show, by offering an explicit class of physically valid tangential stress perturbations, that an introduction of tangential pressure, however small, can qualitatively change the final fate of collapse from a black hole final state to a naked singularity. This shows instability of black hole formation in collapse and sheds important light on the nature of cosmic censorship hypothesis and its possible formulations. The key effect of these perturbations is to alter the trapped surface formation pattern within the collapsing cloud and the apparent horizon structure. This allows the singularity to be visible, and implications are discussed.

  19. Haze Formation and Behavior in Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arm, Stuart T.; Jenkins, J. A.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous haze formation and behavior was studied in the liquid-liquid system tri-n-butyl phosphate in odorless kerosene and 3M nitric acid with uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate representing the major solute and an impurity, respectively. A pulsed column, mixer-settler and centrifugal contactor were chosen to investigate the effect of different turbulence characteristics on the manifestation of haze since these contactors exhibit distinct mixing phenomena. The dispersive processes of drop coalescence and breakage, and water precipitation in the organic phase were observed to lead to the formation of haze drops of {approx}1 um in diameter. The interaction between the haze and primary drops of the dispersion was critical to the separation efficiency of the liquid-liquid extraction equipment. Conditions of high power input and spatially homogeneous mixing enabled the haze drops to become rapidly assimilated within the dispersion to maximize the scrub performance and separation efficiency of the equipment.

  20. What do Multiple Planet Systems Teach us about Planet Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric B. Ford

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    For centuries, our knowledge of planetary systems and ideas about planet formation were based on a single example, our solar system. During the last thirteen years, the discovery of ~170 planetary systems has ushered in a new era for astronomy. I review the surprising properties of extrasolar planetary systems and discuss how they are reshaping theories of planet formation. I focus on how multiple planet systems constrain the mechanisms proposed to explain the large eccentricities typical of extrasolar planets. I suggest that strong planet-planet scattering is common and most planetary systems underwent a phase of large eccentricities. I propose that a planetary system's final eccentricities may be strongly influenced by how much mass remains in a planetesimal disk after the last strong planet-planet scattering event.

  1. Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

  2. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  3. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

    2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  4. Consensus formation: The case of using cell phones while driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhner, B M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several models (including the widely used Sznajd model) have been proposed in order to describe the social phenomenon of consensus formation. The objective of the present paper is to supplement the simulations based on these models with a ``real world simulation''; it considers a situation which can be considered as an ideal laboratory for analyzing consensus formation, namely the authorization or prohibition of using cell phones while driving. This is a convenient laboratory for several reasons (i) The issue was raised in similar terms in all industrialized countries, a circumstance that facilitates comparative analysis by providing a {\\it set of observations} (as opposed to single observations generated, for instance, in election contests). (ii) This is a situation where we happen to know the rule a ``rational'' agent should follow. (iii) Because the issue is a matter of life and death, the phenomenon can be considered as fairly robust with respect to various, endogenous or exogenous, sources of noise. (iv)...

  5. Bent-housing turbodrills improve hard-formation directional drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koot, L.; Koole, K. (Shell U.K. Exploration and Production, Lowestoft (United Kingdom)); Gaynor, T. (Neyrfor-Weir Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in the design of turbine-powered downhole motors allowed steerable drilling in a hard formation at a high rate of penetration (ROP). Drilling in this dolomite formation with the rotary or with positive-displacement motors (PDMs) was slow during steering operations. Shell's solution to the steering penetration rate problems was to change the well plans if suitable directional drilling tools weren't available. Where possible, the wells were designed with the Zechstein interval drilled as a tangent section with non-steerable turbodrills. However, a better solution was the use of a steerable turbodrill-a tool unavailable on the market at that time. The paper describes motor development, a field test, and the design and operation of the motor.

  6. Quasar feedback: accelerated star formation and chaotic accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing Supermassive Black Holes (SMBH) are believed to influence their parent galaxies in a negative way, terminating their growth by ejecting gas out before it could turn into stars. Here we present some of the most sophisticated SMBH feedback simulations to date showing that quasar's effects on galaxies are not always negative. We find that when the ambient shocked gas cools rapidly, the shocked gas is compressed into thin cold dense shells, filaments and clumps. Driving these high density features out is much more difficult than analytical models predict since dense filaments are resilient to the feedback. However, in this regime quasars have another way of affecting the host -- by triggering a massive star formation burst in the cold gas by over-pressurising it. Under these conditions SMBHs actually accelerate star formation in the host, having a positive rather than negative effect on their host galaxies. The relationship between SMBH and galaxies is thus even more complex and symbiotic than currently b...

  7. Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

  8. VARIABLE WINDS AND DUST FORMATION IN R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Zhang Wanshu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Geballe, T. R., E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: wzhan21@lsu.edu, E-mail: tgeballe@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed P-Cygni and asymmetric, blue-shifted absorption profiles in the He I {lambda}10830 lines of 12 R Coronae Borealis stars over short (1 month) and long (3 yr) timescales to look for variations linked to their dust-formation episodes. In almost all cases, the strengths and terminal velocities of the line vary significantly and are correlated with dust formation events. Strong absorption features with blue-shifted velocities {approx}400 km s{sup -1} appear during declines in visible brightness and persist for about 100 days after recovery to maximum brightness. Small residual winds of somewhat lower velocity are present outside of the decline and recovery periods. The correlations support models in which recently formed dust near the star is propelled outward at high speed by radiation pressure and drags the gas along with it.

  9. Influence of formation clays on the flow of aqueous fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, W.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most sandstone formations contain clays that can have a significant effect on the flow of aqueous fluids. The clays most frequently detected are smectite, mixed layer, illite, kaolinite, and chlorite. All of these clays are capable of migrating and causing permeability damage when they are contacted by waters foreign to the formation. Normally, these waters alter ionic environments around the clays, which causes the clays to be dislodged from their original positions. Thus, any time clay is present in the rock, it can be assumed that permeability damage can occur. The degree of damage depends upon the concentration and types of clays present, their relative position in the rock, the severity of the ionic environmental change; and fluid velocity. Permeability damage has been minimized in oil and gas wells through the use of potassium and ammonium ions. 15 references.

  10. Role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge was investigated. Three Ge films with different spherical or columnar pore morphologies to act as inherent nucleation sites were sputtered on (001) Ge. Samples were implanted 90 Degree-Sign from incidence at 300 keV with fluences ranging from 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} to 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Ge{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Electron microscopy investigations revealed varying thresholds for nanoporous Ge formation and exhibited a stark difference in the evolution of the Ge layers based on the microstructure of the initial film. The results suggest that the presence of inherent nucleation sites significantly alters the onset and evolution of nanoporous Ge.

  11. Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faber, Felix; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an Ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix by using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a data set of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consi...

  12. The Star Formation Rate Function of the Local Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Christopher Martin; Mark Seibert; Veronique Buat; Jorge Inglesias-Paramo; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Jose Donas; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; Bruno Milliard; Patrick F. Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; R. Michael Rich; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Ted K. Wyder

    2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived the bivariate luminosity function for the far ultraviolet (1530Angstroms) and far infrared (60 microns). We used matched GALEX and IRAS data, and redshifts from NED and PSC-z. We have derived a total star formation luminosity function phi(L_{tot}), with L_{tot} = L_{FUV}+L_{FIR}. Using these, we determined the cosmic ``star formation rate'' function and density for the local universe. The total SFR function is fit very well by a log-normal distribution over five decades of luminosity. We find that the bivariate luminosity function phi(L_{FUV},L_{FIR}) shows a bimodal behavior, with L_{FIR} tracking L_{FUV} for L_{TOT}< 10^10 L_sun, and L_{FUV} saturating at 10^10 L_sun, while L_{TOT} L_{FIR} for higher luminosities. We also calculate the SFR density and compare it to other measurements.

  13. Modelling Pattern Formation in Dip-Coating Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Wilczek; Walter B. H. Tewes; Svetlana V. Gurevich; Michael H. Kpf; Lifeng Chi; Uwe Thiele

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review selected mathematical models that describe the dynamics of pattern formation phenomena in dip-coating and Langmuir-Blodgett transfer experiments, where solutions or suspensions are transferred onto a substrate producing patterned deposit layers with structure length from hundreds of nanometres to tens of micrometres. The models are presented with a focus on their gradient dynamics formulations that clearly shows how the dynamics is governed by particular free energy functionals and facilitates the comparison of the models. In particular, we include a discussion of models based on long-wave hydrodynamics as well as of more phenomenological models that focus on the pattern formation processes in such systems. The models and their relations are elucidated and examples of resulting patterns are discussed before we conclude with a discussion of implications of the gradient dynamics formulation and of some related open issues.

  14. Formation of hydroxylamine on dust grains via ammonia oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Jiao; Lemaire, Jean-Louis; Garrod, Robin T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quest to detect prebiotic molecules in space, notably amino acids, requires an understanding of the chemistry involving nitrogen atoms. Hydroxylamine (NH$_2$OH) is considered a precursor to the amino acid glycine. Although not yet detected, NH$_2$OH is considered a likely target of detection with ALMA. We report on an experimental investigation of the formation of hydroxylamine on an amorphous silicate surface via the oxidation of ammonia. The experimental data are then fed into a simulation of the formation of NH$_2$OH in dense cloud conditions. On ices at 14 K and with a modest activation energy barrier, NH$_2$OH is found to be formed with an abundance that never falls below a factor 10 with respect to NH$_3$. Suggestions of conditions for future observations are provided.

  15. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  16. Multi-Phase Galaxy Formation and Quasar Absorption Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariyeh H. Maller

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The central problem of galaxy formation is understanding the cooling and condensation of gas in dark matter halos. It is now clear that to match observations this requires further physics than the simple assumptions of single phase gas cooling. A model of multi-phase cooling (Maller & Bullock 2004) can successfully account for the upper cutoff in the masses of galaxies and provides a natural explanation of many types of absorption systems (Mo & Miralda-Escude 1996). Absorption systems are our best probes of the gaseous content of galaxy halos and therefore provide important constraints on models for gas cooling into galaxies. All physical processes that effect gas cooling redistribute gas and therefore are detectable in absorption systems. Detailed studies of the nature of gas in galaxy halos using absorption systems are crucial for building a correct theory of galaxy formation.

  17. Primordial magnetic fields and formation of molecular hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiv K Sethi; Biman B. Nath; Kandaswamy Subramanian

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the implications of primordial magnetic fields for the thermal and ionization history of the post-recombination era. In particular we compute the effects of dissipation of primordial magnetic fields owing to ambipolar diffusion and decaying turbulence in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the collapsing halos and compute the effects of the altered thermal and ionization history on the formation of molecular hydrogen. We show that, for magnetic field strengths in the range $2 \\times 10^{-10} {\\rm G} \\la B_0 \\la 2 \\times 10^{-9} {\\rm G}$, the molecular hydrogen fraction in IGM and collapsing halo can increase by a factor 5 to 1000 over the case with no magnetic fields. We discuss the implication of the increased molecular hydrogen fraction on the radiative transfer of UV photons and the formation of first structures in the universe.

  18. ARTIFACT FORMATION DURING NEUTRALIZATION OF TANK 50 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crump, S.; Young, J.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation products have been identified in the extracts of Tank 50 samples analyzed by semivolatile organic compound analysis (SVOA) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These materials, identified as short chain alkyl alcohols, were formed by acidification during sample preparation. A number of questions were raised about the formation of these and other materials reported in Tank 50 surface samples, and this report serves to address these questions.

  19. The evolution of hydraulic fracturing in the Almond formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, D.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study draws from a database of over 600 wells to evaluate reservoir, production and treatment characteristics in the low-permeability, naturally-fractured Almond formation. Treatment-induced damage can be significant; damage mechanisms are discussed and ways are shown to mitigate these problems. An effective fracture stimulation design combines proppant scheduling of the late 1970`s with fluid and gel-breaker systems of today.

  20. PROCEDURE VAE / VAP Universit Blaise Pascal Service Formation Permanente

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    d'obtenir LE diplôme qui correspond à SON expérience (Code de l'éducation ­ Article D613-38 et formation en l'absence du diplôme préalablement requis pour y accéder (Code de l'éducation ­ Article D613 SAINT ELOY LES MINES - Antenne CIBC - 41, rue Gomot - 63200 RIOM - Pôle emploi - 2 Allée du Parc - 63600

  1. A Standard format for Les Houches event files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwall, J.; Ballestrero, A.; Bartalini, P.; Belov, S.; Boos, E.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.M.; Dudko, L.; Frixione, S.; Garren, L.; Gieseke, S.; Gusev, A.; Hinchliffe,I.; Huston, J.; Kersevan, B.; Krauss, F.; Lavesson, N.; Lonnblad, L.; Maina, E.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; /Louvain U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Karlsruhe U., TP /Democritos Nucl. Res.Ctr. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Cracow, INP /Dubna, JINR /SINP, Moscow /Serpukhov, IHEP /Ljubljana U. /Lund U. /CERN /Zurich, ETH /Cambridge U. /Durham U., IPPP/University Coll. London /Manchester U. /Fermilab /LBL, Berkeley; ,

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard file format is proposed to store process and event information, primarily output from parton-level event generators for further use by general-purpose ones. The information content is identical with what was already defined by the Les Houches Accord five years ago, but then in terms of Fortran commonblocks. This information is embedded in a minimal XML-style structure, for clarity and to simplify parsing.

  2. Solar System Processes Underlying Planetary Formation, Geodynamics, and the Georeactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Only three processes, operant during the formation of the Solar System, are responsible for the diversity of matter in the Solar System and are directly responsible for planetary internal-structures, including planetocentric nuclear fission reactors, and for dynamical processes, including and especially, geodynamics. These processes are: (i) Low-pressure, low-temperature condensation from solar matter in the remote reaches of the Solar System or in the interstellar medium; (ii) High-pressure, high-temperature condensation from solar matter associated with planetary-formation by raining out from the interiors of giant-gaseous protoplanets, and; (iii) Stripping of the primordial volatile components from the inner portion of the Solar System by super-intense solar wind associated with T-Tauri phase mass-ejections, presumably during the thermonuclear ignition of the Sun. As described herein, these processes lead logically, in a causally related manner, to a coherent vision of planetary formation with profound implications including, but not limited to, (a) Earth formation as a giant gaseous Jupiter-like planet with vast amounts of stored energy of protoplanetary compression in its rock-plus-alloy kernel; (b) Removal of approximately 300 Earth-masses of primordial gases from the Earth, which began Earth's decompression process, making available the stored energy of protoplanetary compression for driving geodynamic processes, which I have described by the new whole-Earth decompression dynamics and which is responsible for emplacing heat at the mantle-crust-interface at the base of the crust through the process I have described, called mantle decompression thermal-tsunami; and, (c)Uranium accumulations at the planetary centers capable of self-sustained nuclear fission chain reactions.

  3. Signalling pathway in appressorium formation in Magnaporthe grisea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippi, Marta Cristina

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (Pyricularia grisea anamorph Cav.). The fungus is distributed world-wide and causes losses of up to 100% of the yield depending on cultivar susceptibility, environmental conditions and management system. During 2003, in India, rice blast was responsible... to pathogenesis if the signals at the plant surface are sensed as favorable by the fungus (Kolattukudy and Roger 1995). Formation of appressoria involves complex morphogenetic processes, which are influenced by multiple environmental signals. These signals may...

  4. Water confined in nanopores: spontaneous formation of microcavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Russo; Simone Melchionna; Francesco De Luca; Cinzia Casieri

    2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular Dynamics simulations of water confined in nanometer sized, hydrophobic channels show that water forms localized cavities for pore diameter ~ 2.0 nm. The cavities present non-spherical shape and lay preferentially adjacent to the confining wall inducing a peculiar form to the liquid exposed surface. The regime of localized cavitation appears to be correlated with the formation of a vapor layer, as predicted by the Lum-Chandler-Weeks theory, implying partial filling of the pore.

  5. The chemistry of high-mass star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floris F. S. van der Tak

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the chemistry of star-forming regions, with an emphasis on the formation of high-mass stars. We first outline the basic molecular processes in dense clouds, their implementation in chemical models, and techniques to measure molecular abundances. Then, recent observational, theoretical and laboratory developments are reviewed on the subjects of hot molecular cores, cosmic-ray ionization, depletion and deuteration, and oxygen chemistry. The paper concludes with a summary of outstanding problems and future opportunities.

  6. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry; Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM), Martin; Grant D. (Marlborough, MA), Holzrichter; Michael W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  7. Data from selected Almond Formation outcrops -- Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.R.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline barrier reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana, that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. A report similar to this one presents the Muddy Formation outcrop data and analyses performed in the course of this study (Rawn-Schatzinger, 1993). Two outcrop localities, RG and RH, previously described by Roehler (1988) provided good exposures of the Upper Almond shoreline barrier facies and were studied during 1990--1991. Core from core well No. 2 drilled approximately 0.3 miles downdip of outcrop RG was obtained for study. The results of the core study will be reported in a separate volume. Outcrops RH and RG, located about 2 miles apart were selected for detailed description and drilling of core plugs. One 257-ft-thick section was measured at outcrop RG, and three sections {approximately}145 ft thick located 490 and 655 feet apart were measured at the outcrop RH. Cross-sections of these described profiles were constructed to determine lateral facies continuity and changes. This report contains the data and analyses from the studied outcrops.

  8. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and expert riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  9. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and export riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

  10. Formation of thin-film resistors on silicon substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schnable, George L. (Montgomery County, PA); Wu, Chung P. (Hamilton Township, Mercer County, NJ)

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of thin-film resistors by the ion implantation of a metallic conductive layer in the surface of a layer of phosphosilicate glass or borophosphosilicate glass which is deposited on a silicon substrate. The metallic conductive layer materials comprise one of the group consisting of tantalum, ruthenium, rhodium, platinum and chromium silicide. The resistor is formed and annealed prior to deposition of metal, e.g. aluminum, on the substrate.

  11. Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

  12. Kinetically driven helix formation during the homopolymer collapse process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sid Ahmed Sabeur; Fatima Hamdache; Friederike Schmid

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Langevin simulations, we find that simple 'generic' bead-and-spring homopolymer chains in a sufficiently bad solvent spontaneously develop helical order during the process of collapsing from an initially stretched conformation. The helix formation is initiated by the unstable modes of the straight chain, which drive the system towards a long-lived metastable transient state. The effect is most pronounced if hydrodynamic interactions are screened.

  13. The History of Galaxy Formation in Groups: An Observational Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a pedagogical review on the formation and evolution of galaxies in groups, utilizing observational information from the Local Group to galaxies at z~6. The majority of galaxies in the nearby universe are found in groups, and galaxies at all redshifts up to z~6 tend to cluster on the scale of nearby groups (~1 Mpc). This suggests that the group environment may play a role in the formation of most galaxies. The Local Group, and other nearby groups, display a diversity in star formation and morphological properties that puts limits on how, and when, galaxies in groups formed. Effects that depend on an intragroup medium, such as ram-pressure and strangulation, are likely not major mechanisms driving group galaxy evolution. Simple dynamical friction arguments however show that galaxy mergers should be common, and a dominant process for driving evolution. While mergers between L_* galaxies are observed to be rare at z < 1, they are much more common at earlier times. This is due to the increased density of the universe, and to the fact that high mass galaxies are highly clustered on the scale of groups. We furthermore discus why the local number density environment of galaxies strongly correlates with galaxy properties, and why the group environment may be the preferred method for establishing the relationship between properties of galaxies and their local density.

  14. Efficiencies of Low-Mass Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner; Christopher F. McKee

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quantitative model for bipolar outflows driven by hydromagnetic protostellar winds, we calculate the efficiency of star formation assuming that available gas is either converted into stars or ejected in outflows. We estimate the efficiency of a single star formation event in a protostellar core, finding 25%-70% for cores with various possible degrees of flattening. The core mass function and the stellar initial mass function have similar slopes, because the efficiency is not sensitive to its parameters. We then consider the disruption of gas from a dense molecular clump in which a cluster of young stars is being born. In both cases, we present analytical formulae for the efficiencies that compare favorably against observations and, for clusters, against numerical simulations. We predict efficiencies in the range 30%-50% for the regions that form clusters of low-mass stars. In our model, star formation and gas dispersal happen concurrently. We neglect the destructive effects of massive stars: our results are therefore upper limits to the efficiency in regions more massive than about 3000 Msun.

  15. Turing pattern formation in the Brusselator system with nonlinear diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Gambino; M. C. Lombardo; M. Sammartino; V. Sciacca

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we investigate the effect of density dependent nonlinear diffusion on pattern formation in the Brusselator system. Through linear stability analysis of the basic solution we determine the Turing and the oscillatory instability boundaries. A comparison with the classical linear diffusion shows how nonlinear diffusion favors the occurrence of Turing pattern formation. We study the process of pattern formation both in 1D and 2D spatial domains. Through a weakly nonlinear multiple scales analysis we derive the equations for the amplitude of the stationary patterns. The analysis of the amplitude equations shows the occurrence of a number of different phenomena, including stable supercritical and subcritical Turing patterns with multiple branches of stable solutions leading to hysteresis. Moreover we consider traveling patterning waves: when the domain size is large, the pattern forms sequentially and traveling wavefronts are the precursors to patterning. We derive the Ginzburg-Landau equation and describe the traveling front enveloping a pattern which invades the domain. We show the emergence of radially symmetric target patterns, and through a matching procedure we construct the outer amplitude equation and the inner core solution.

  16. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Greg L. Bryan; Michael L. Norman

    2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three--dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 1 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~10^5 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of ~10^-4. As the subclumps merge cooling lowers the temperature to ~200 Kelvin in a `cold pocket' at the center of the halo. Within this cold pocket, a quasi-hydrostatically contracting core with ~200 solar mass and number densities > 10^5 cm^-3 is found. We find that less than 1% of the primordial gas in such small scale structures cools and collapses to sufficiently high densities to be available for primordial star formation. Furthermore, it is worthwhile to note that this study achieved the highest dynamic range covered by structured adaptive mesh techniques in cosmological hydrodynamics to date.

  17. Ion-beam-induced damage formation in CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rischau, C. W.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage formation in <111>- and <112>-oriented CdTe single crystals irradiated at room temperature and 15 K with 270 keV Ar or 730 keV Sb ions was investigated in situ using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) in channeling configuration. Defect profiles were calculated from the RBS spectra using the computer code DICADA and additional energy-dependent RBS measurements were performed to identify the type of defects. At both temperatures no formation of a buried amorphous layer was detected even after prolonged irradiation with several 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The fact that CdTe is not rendered amorphous even at 15 K suggests that the high resistance to amorphization is caused by the high ionicity of CdTe rather than thermal effects. The calculated defect profiles show the formation of a broad defect distribution that extends much deeper into the crystal than the projected range of the implanted ions at both temperatures. The post-range defects in CdTe thus do not seem to be of thermal origin either, but are instead believed to result from migration driven by the electronic energy loss.

  18. Hafnium silicide formation on Si(100) upon annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siervo, A. de [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Caixa Postal 6192, 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Fluechter, C. R.; Weier, D.; Schuermann, M.; Dreiner, S.; Westphal, C. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Carazzolle, M. F.; Pancotti, A.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G. G. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Caixa Postal 6165, 13083-970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High dielectric constant materials, such as HfO{sub 2}, have been extensively studied as alternatives to SiO{sub 2} in new generations of Si based devices. Hf silicate/silicide formation has been reported in almost all literature studies of Hf based oxides on Si, using different methods of preparation. A silicate interface resembles close to the traditional Si/SiO{sub 2}. The silicate very likely forms a very sharp interface between the Si substrate and the metal oxide, and would be suitable for device applications. However, the thermal instability of the interfacial silicate/oxide film leads to silicidation, causing a dramatic loss of the gate oxide integrity. Despite the importance of the Hf silicide surface and interface with Si, only a few studies of this surface are present in the literature, and a structural determination of the surface has not been reported. This paper reports a study of the Hf silicide formation upon annealing by using a combination of XPS, LEED, and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) analyses. Our results clearly indicate the formation of a unique ordered Hf silicide phase (HfSi{sub 2}), which starts to crystallize when the annealing temperature is higher than 550 deg. C.

  19. The Formation of the Oort Cloud in Open Cluster Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan A. Kaib; Thomas Quinn

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the influence of an open cluster environment on the formation and current structure of the Oort cloud. To do this, we have run 19 different simulations of the formation of the Oort Cloud for 4.5 Gyrs. In each simulation, the solar system spends its first 100 Myrs in a different open cluster environment before transitioning to its current field environment. We find that, compared to forming in the field environment, the inner Oort Cloud is preferentially loaded with comets while the Sun resides in the open cluster and that most of this material remains locked in the interior of the cloud for the next 4.4 Gyrs. In addition, the outer Oort Cloud trapping efficiencies we observe in our simulations are lower than previous formation models by about a factor of 2, possibly implying an even more massive early planetesimal disk. Furthermore, some of our simulations reproduce the orbits of observed extended scattered disk objects, which may serve as an observational constraint on the Sun's early environment. Depending on the particular open cluster environment, the properties of the inner Oort Cloud and extended scattered disk can vary widely. On the other hand, the outer portions of the Oort Cloud in each of our simulations are all similar.

  20. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

  1. Cosmological Simulations of Galaxy Formation Including Hydrodynamics (hyper-abridged)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F J Summers

    1994-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of galaxies in hierarchical cosmogonies is studied using high resolution N-body plus SPH hydrodynamics simulations. The collapse of structure is followed self-consistently from Mpc scale filamentary structures to kpc scale galactic objects. The characteristics and formation processes of the galaxy like objects are studied in detail, along with the aggregation into a poor cluster. Related studies consider the effects of modelling star formation, the reliability of tracing galaxies in simulations, and tests of SPH methods. This submission serves first to notify that the full text and figures of my thesis are available in compressed PostScript form via anonymous ftp from astro.princeton.edu in the directory /summers/thesis (122 files, 19 MB compressed, 65 MB uncompressed). See the README file first. Second, this submission contains the title page, abstract, table of contents, introductory chapter, summary chapter, and references for my thesis. Those who are curious about the work may scan these pages to identify which chapters may be interesting to get via ftp.

  2. SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  3. Sigma phase formation kinetics in stainless steel laminate composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenmen, D.W.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steel laminate composites were made to simulate weld microstructures. The use of laminates with variations in chemical composition allows for one dimensional analysis of phase transformation associated with the more complex three-dimensional solidification experience of weld metal. Alternate layers of austenitic (304L and 316L) and ferritic (Ebrite) stainless steels allowed for the study of sigma phase formation at the austenite-ferrite interface in duplex stainless steel. Two austenitic stainless steels, 304L (18.5Cr-9.2Ni-0.3Mo) and 316L (16.2Cr-10.1Ni-2.6Mo), and one ferritic stainless steel, Ebrite (26.3Cr-0Ni-1.0Mo) were received in the form of sheet which was laboratory cold rolled to a final thickness of 0.25 mm (0.030 in.). Laminate composites were prepared by laboratory hot rolling a vacuum encapsulated compact of alternating layers of the ferrite steel with either 304L or 316L stainless steel sheets. Laminate composite specimens, which simulate duplex austenite-ferrite weld metal structure, were used to establish the kinetics of nucleation and growth of sigma phase. The factors affecting sigma phase formation were identified. The effects of time, temperature, and transport of chromium and nickel were evaluated and used to establish a model for sigma phase formation in the austenite-ferrite interfacial region. Information useful for designing stainless steel welding consumables to be used for high temperature service was determined.

  4. Star-formation histories of local luminous infrared galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Prez-Gonzlez, Pablo G; Arribas, Santiago; Bellocchi, Enrica; Cazzoli, Sara; Daz-Santos, Tanio; Lpez, Javier Piqueras

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and H$\\alpha$ of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 10^11 Lsun and 10^11.8 Lsun. We have combined new narrow-band H$\\alpha$+[NII] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. The SEDs (photometry and integrated H$\\alpha$ flux) have been fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking into account the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation. From the SED fits we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyrs. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enha...

  5. Hydrocarbon potential of Spearfish Formation in eastern Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge C.J.N.; Reid, F.S.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 36 million bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic traps in sandstones of the Triassic-Jurassic Spearfish Formation in the eastern part of the Williston basin. Newburg field has produced 32 million bbl of oil and Waskada field, discovered in 1980, is estimated to have over 10 million bbl of oil in reserves. A binocular microscopic and petrographic examination of cores from each of the fields has revealed considerable differences in the characteristics of producing sandstones. Cores and sample cuttings from 30 wells in the US and Canada form the basis for this comparison of the two fields. The Spearfish Formation consists of porous, permeable, well-sorted, very fine-grained sandstones with a sucrosic dolomite matrix that are interbedded with impermeable sandstones, siltstones, and shale. The environment of deposition is believed to be the intertidal zone (tidal flat). Sediments of the Spearfish Formation were deposited by a transgressive sea on an eroded Mississippian carbonate section. Oil found in the Spearfish sandstones is derived from the Mississippian.

  6. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    West Carney Field produces from Hunton Formation. All the wells produce oil, water and gas. The main objective of this study is to understand the unique behavior observed in the field. This behavior includes: (1) Decrease in WOR over time; (2) Decrease in GOR at initial stages; (3) High decline rates of oil and gas; and (4) strong hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. This report specifically addresses two issues relevant to our understanding of the West Carney reservoir. By using core and log data as well as fluorescence information, we demonstrate that our hypothesis of how the reservoir is formed is consistent with these observations. Namely, oil migrated in water wet reservoir, over time, oil changed the wettability of some part of the reservoir, oil eventually leaked to upper formations prompting re-introduction of water into reservoir. Because of change in wettability, different pore size distributions responded differently to water influx. This hypothesis is consistent with fluorescence and porosity data, as we explain it in this quarterly report. The second issue deals with how to best calculate connected oil volume in the reservoir. The log data does not necessarily provide us with relevant information regarding oil in place. However, we have developed a new material balance technique to calculate the connected oil volume based on observed pressure and production data. By using the technique to four different fields producing from Hunton formation, we demonstrate that the technique can be successfully applied to calculate the connected oil in place.

  7. Measurement of the Formation Rate of Muonic Hydrogen Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreev, V A; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The rate \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ characterizes the formation of pp\\mu\\ molecules in collisions of muonic p\\mu\\ atoms with hydrogen. In measurements of the basic weak muon capture reaction on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling g_P, capture occurs from both atomic and molecular states. Thus knowledge of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ is required for a correct interpretation of these experiments. Purpose: Recently the MuCap experiment has measured the capture rate \\Lambda_S from the singlet p\\mu\\ atom, employing a low density active target to suppress pp\\mu\\ formation (PRL 110, 12504 (2013)). Nevertheless, given the unprecedented precision of this experiment, the existing experimental knowledge in \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ had to be improved. Method: The MuCap experiment derived the weak capture rate from the muon disappearance rate in ultra-pure hydrogen. By doping the hydrogen with 20 ppm of argon, a competing process to pp\\mu\\ formation was introduced, which allowed the extraction of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ from the observed t...

  8. On Damage Propagation in a Soft Low-Permeability Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Barenblatt, G.I.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this presentation, we develop a mathematical model of fluid flow with changing formation properties. The modification of formation permeability is caused by development of a connected system of fractures. As the fluids are injected or withdrawn from the reservoir, the balance between the pore pressure and the geostatic formation stresses is destroyed. If the strength of the rock is not sufficient to accommodate such an imbalance, the cementing bonds between the rock grains become broken. Such a process is called damage propagation. The micromechanics and the basic mathematical model of damage propagation have been studied in [7]. The theory was further developed in [3], where new nonlocal damage propagation model has been studied. In [2] this theory has been enhanced by incorporation of the coupling between damage propagation and fluid flow. As it has been described above, the forced fluid flow causes changes in the rock properties including formation permeability. At the same time, changing permeability facilitates fluid flow and, therefore, enhances damage propagation. One of the principle concepts introduced in [3] and [2] is the characterization of damage by a dimensionless ratio of the number of broken bonds to the number of bonds in pristine rock per unit volume. It turns out, that the resulting mathematical model consist of a system of two nonlinear parabolic equations. As it has been shown in [6] using modeling of micromechanical properties of sedimentary rocks, at increasing stress the broken bonds coalesce into a system of cracks surrounding practically intact matrix blocks. These blocks have some characteristic size and a regular geometry. The initial microcracks expand, interact with each other, coalesce and form bigger fractures, etc. Therefore, as the damage is accumulated, the growing system of connected fractures determines the permeability of the reservoir rock. Significant oil deposits are stored in low-permeability soft rock reservoirs such as shales, chalks and diatomites [9, 10]. The permeability of the pristine formation matrix in such reservoirs is so low that oil production was impossible until hydraulic fracturing was applied. For development of correct production policy, it is very significant to adequately understand and predict how fast and to what extend the initial damage induced by drilling and hydrofracturing will propagate into the reservoir. The importance of fractures for rock flow properties is a well-established and recognized fact [4, 9, 5]. Different conceptual models have been developed [8]. In this study, we propose a damage propagation model based on a combination of the model of double-porosity and double-permeability medium [4] and a modification of the model of damage propagation developed in [2].

  9. DUST EMISSION AND STAR FORMATION IN STEPHAN'S QUINTET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natale, G.; Tuffs, R. J. [Max Planck Institute fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Xu, C. K.; Lu, N. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Popescu, C. C. [University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Fischera, J. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Lisenfeld, U. [Department de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dopita, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Duc, P.-A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Dapnia/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gao, Y. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Reach, W. [Spitzer Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sulentic, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, 18080, Granada (Spain); Yun, M., E-mail: giovanni.natale@mpi-hd.mpg.d, E-mail: richard.buffs@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a comprehensive set of MIR/FIR observations of Stephan's Quintet (SQ), taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our study reveals the presence of a luminous (L{sub IR} {approx} 4.6 x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) and extended component of infrared dust emission, not connected with the main bodies of the galaxies, but roughly coincident with the X-ray halo of the group. We fitted the inferred dust emission spectral energy distribution of this extended source and the other main infrared emission components of SQ, including the intergalactic shock, to elucidate the mechanisms powering the dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, taking into account collisional heating by the plasma and heating through UV and optical photons. Combining the inferred direct and dust-processed UV emission to estimate the star formation rate (SFR) for each source we obtain a total SFR for SQ of 7.5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, similar to that expected for non-interacting galaxies with stellar mass comparable to the SQ galaxies. Although star formation in SQ is mainly occurring at, or external to the periphery of the galaxies, the relation of SFR per unit physical area to gas column density for the brightest sources is similar to that seen for star formation regions in galactic disks. We also show that available sources of dust in the group halo can provide enough dust to produce up to L{sub IR} {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} powered by collisional heating. Though a minority of the total infrared emission (which we infer to trace distributed star-formation), this is several times higher than the X-ray luminosity of the halo, so could indicate an important cooling mechanism for the hot intergalactic medium (IGM) and account for the overall correspondence between FIR and X-ray emission. We investigate two potential modes of star formation in SQ consistent with the data, fueled either by gas from a virialized hot IGM continuously accreting onto the group, whose cooling is enhanced by grains injected from an in situ population of intermediate mass stars, or by interstellar gas stripped from the galaxies. The former mode offers a natural explanation for the observed baryon deficiency in the IGM of SQ as well as for the steep L{sub X}-T{sub X} relation of groups such as SQ with lower velocity dispersions.

  10. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. 2006. A threshold in soil formation at Earth's arid-R. , 2006, A threshold in soil formation at Earth's arid-in situ aqueous alteration of soils on Mars. Geochimica et

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy formation process Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that formation of eutectic alloys, along with the gold... investigation of stage of the formation of eutectic alloys in Si-Au and Si-Al systems *B. Bokhonov , M... microscopic...

  12. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Abstract: In this study, porous silicon...

  13. Method of producing drive fluid in situ in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. The heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation such that a drive fluid is produced in situ in the formation. The drive fluid may move at least some mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons from a first portion of the formation to a second portion of the formation. At least some of the mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons may be produced from the formation.

  14. Reservoir Characterization and Modeling of the Glorieta and the Clearfork Formations, Monahans Field, Permian Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeatman, Ryan Yeatman

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Monahans Field of the Permian Basin in West Texas is a complex carbonate reservoir due to the lateral heterogeneity caused by facies changes throughout the Lower Guadalupian Glorieta Formation and the Upper Leonardian Upper Clearfork Formation. A...

  15. V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users...

  16. Ocular and Systemic Safety Evaluation of Calcium Formate as a Dietary Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altaweel, Michael M.; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Eells, Janis T.; Zhang, Baoyan

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of the ocular and systemic safety of calcium formate, a dietary calcium supplement for prevention and management of osteoporosis. Although formate is an endogenous product...

  17. Cryogenic heat pipe for cooling high temperature superconductors with application to Electromagnetic Formation Flight Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An emerging method of propellant-less formation flight propulsion is the use of electromagnets coupled with reaction wheels. This technique is called Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF). In order to create a large ...

  18. Facies analysis of the Caballero Formation and the Andrecito Member of the Lake Valley Formation (Mississippian): implications for Waulsortian bioherm inception, Alamo Canyon area, Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Thomas Martin

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation disconformably overlies the Onate Formation and is composed of shale and yellow, nodular, silty limestone and dolomite. The percha Formation is composed of black shale. In most of the immediate study area, the Mississippian disconformably... of nodular limestone and shale. A layer of 1-inch thick, black, phosphatic nodules and fish teeth marks the 21 Laudon and Bowsher, 1949; formal (ibis study) Pray, 1961 (modified) lithology Lane end Ormislon 1982 and DsKeyser, 1983 focnal (proposed...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - array format 20khz Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Computation Visualization Summary: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Version 5 MATLAB Array Data Element Formats . . . .10 Numeric Array and Character Array Data... Element...

  20. Birth of Supermassive Black holes and Star Formation after the Big Bang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Paramashivam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern observations of star formation in different galaxies contradicts with the current star formation theories. There are few questions and observations where current star formation theories were not able to explain well. This paper proposes an alternative theory of Star formation and birth of Supermassive Black holes after the Big Bang, which can answer the contradictions without violating the physics laws and fit perfectly well with the modern observations.

  1. Control of water injection into a layered formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In previously published work, we have analyzed transient injection of water from a growing vertical hydrofracture into a low-permeability compressible rock of uniform properties, filled with a fluid of identical mobility. Here we extend the prior analysis1 to water injection into a layered rock initially filled with a fluid of different mobility. We then develop a new control model of water injection from a growing hydrofracture into a layered formation. Based on the new model, we design an optimal injection controller that manages the rate of water injection in accordance with the hydrofracture growth and the formation properties. As we have already demonstrated, maintaining the rate of water injection into low-permeability rock above a reasonable minimum inevitably leads to hydrofracture growth if flow in a uniform formation is transient. The same conclusion holds true for transient flow in layered formation. Analysis of field water injection rates and wellhead injection pressures leads us to conclude that direct links between injectors and producers can be established at early stages of waterflood, especially if injection policy is aggressive. On one hand, injection into a low-permeability rock is slow and there is a temptation to increase injection pressure. On the other hand, such an increase may lead to irrecoverable reservoir damage: fracturing of the formation and water channeling from the injectors to the producers. Such channeling may be caused by thin highly permeable reservoir layers, which may conduct a substantial part of injected water. Considering these field observations, we expand our earlier model. Specifically, we consider a vertical hydrofracture in contact with a multilayered reservoir where some layers have high permeability and they, therefore, quickly establish steady state flow from an injector to a neighboring producer. The main part of this paper is devoted to the development of an optimal injection controller for purely transient flow and for mixed transient/steady-state flow into a layered formation. The objective of the controller is to maintain the prescribed injection rate in the presence of hydrofracture growth. Such a controller will be essential in our proposed automated system of field-wide waterflood surveillance and control. We design optimal injection controllers using methods of optimal control theory. The history of injection pressure and cumulative injection, along with estimates of the hydrofracture size are the controller input data. By analyzing these inputs, the controller outputs an optimal injection pressure for each injector. When designing the controller, we keep in mind that it can be used either off-line as a smart advisor, or on-line in a fully automated regime. We demonstrate that the optimal injection pressure depends not only on the instantaneous measurements, but it is determined by the whole history of injection and growth of the hydrofracture. Because our controller is process-based, the dynamics of the actual injection rate and the pressure can be used to estimate an effective area of the hydrofracture. The latter can be passed to the controller as one of the input parameters. Finally, a comparison of the estimated fracture area with independent measurements leads to an estimate of the fraction of injected water that flows directly to the neighboring producers due to channeling or thief-layers.

  2. Spatially Resolved Galaxy Star Formation and its Environmental Dependence I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niraj Welikala; Andrew J. Connolly; Andrew M. Hopkins; Ryan Scranton; Alberto Conti

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the photometric information contained in individual pixels of 44,964 (0.019effects of environment on galaxy star formation (SF). We use the pixel-z technique, which combines stellar population synthesis models with photometric redshift template fitting on the scale of individual pixels in galaxy images. Spectral energy distributions are constructed, sampling a wide range of properties such as age, star formation rate (SFR), dust obscuration and metallicity. By summing the SFRs in the pixels, we demonstrate that the distribution of total galaxy SFR shifts to lower values as the local density of surrounding galaxies increases, as found in other studies. The effect is most prominent in the galaxies with the highest star formation, and we see the break in the SFR-density relation at a local galaxy density of $\\approx 0.05 $(Mpc/h)$^{-3}$. Since our method allows us to spatially resolve the SF distribution within galaxies, we can calculate the mean SFR of each galaxy as a function of radius. We find that on average the mean SFR is dominated by SF in the central regions of galaxies, and that the trend for suppression of SFR in high density environments is driven by a reduction in this nuclear SF. We also find that the mean SFR in the outskirts is largely independent of environmental effects. This trend in the mean SFR is shared by galaxies which are highly star forming, while those which are weakly star forming show no statistically significant correlation between their environment and the mean SFR at any radius.

  3. Fusion, deep-inelastic collisions, and neck formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguiar, C.E.; Barbosa, V.C.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the liquid drop model to calculate the cross section for neck formation in a heavy-ion collision and show that for the recently measured /sup 58/Ni+/sup 124/Sn case this cross section is strongly related to the sum of the fusion and deep-inelastic cross sections. We note that the observation of deep-inelastic collisions at sub-Coulomb barrier energies may be classically understood by the effective barrier lowering obtained when the neck degree of freedom is considered.

  4. FORMATIONS OUVERTES ET AUTODIRECTION DE L'APPRENANT Annie Jzgou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FORMATIONS OUVERTES ET AUTODIRECTION DE L'APPRENANT Annie Jézégou L'Harmattan | Savoirs 2008/1 - n.0097 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Distribution électronique Cairn.info pour L'Harmattan. © L'Harmattan. Tous droits réservés pour tous pays. La.54.76.162-25/04/201215h18.©L'Harmattan Documenttéléchargédepuiswww.cairn.info---193.54.76.162-25/04/201215h18.©L'Harmattan

  5. Heats of formation and steric hindrance in three hydrocarbon polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Claude William

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (ethylene), poly(propylene), and poly(1- butene) have been measured and heats of formation comparedtovalues predicted by bond energy schemes. Heats of polymerization have 27 been derived using previous heat of combustion data (by flame calorimetry) on monomers... molecule cause a steric hindrance of only about 0. 4 kcal/mole. Poly(1-butene) The heat of combustion of poly(1-butene) has not been previously measured and is of interest as the next higher member in the ho- mologous series of isotactic poly...

  6. The case against scaling defect models of cosmic structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Albrecht; Richard A. Battye; James Robinson

    1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate predictions from defect models of structure formation for both the matter and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) over all observable scales. Our results point to a serious problem reconciling the observed large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization, a result which is robust for a wide range of defect parameters. We conclude that standard scaling defect models are in conflict with the data, and show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects would require radical departures from the standard scaling picture.

  7. Increased Upstream Ionization due to Formation of a Double Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, S. Chakraborty; Harvey, Z.; Biloiu, I. A.; Hansen, A.; Hardin, R. A.; Przybysz, W. S.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observations that confirm a theoretical prediction that formation of a current-free double layer in a plasma expanding into a chamber of larger diameter is accompanied by an increase in ionization upstream of the double layer. The theoretical model argues that the increased ionization is needed to balance the difference in diffusive losses upstream and downstream of the expansion region. In our expanding helicon source experiments, we find that the upstream plasma density increases sharply at the same antenna frequency at which the double layer appears.

  8. Formation, regeneration and fusion of protoplasts from Gliocladium spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seh, Monica Leigh

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of digestion (Fig. 2a, b). Protoplast Regeneration Several regeneration media (Garcia-Ache, Lopez- Bellmonte, Villanueva, 1966; Anne, Essyen, De Somer, 1974; Hashibi & Yamada, 1982; Yabuki et al. , 1984; Kiguchi & Yanagi, 1985) were tested prior to the use.... , Essyen, H. & De Somer, P. (1974). Formation and g tt f P \\ tilt ~h, p t pl t A ht f ~Mt bt I 98, 159-166. 8 11, 0. (1984). 911 t f gt I . G ti d ~gdt of Industrial Microor anisms. (ed. C. Ball), pp. 520- 327. Boca Raton, Florida, U. S. A. : CRC Press...

  9. Formation of Complex Structures in Dusty Plasmas under Temperature Gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyak, L.M.; Vetchinin, S.P.; Polyakov, D.N.; Fortov, V.E. [Institute for High Energy Densities, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophoretic effects on dust structures under temperature gradients in glow and radio-frequency discharge plasmas are studied experimentally. The geometry of dust structures consisting of micrometer-sized polydisperse grains depends on heat release in the plasma. Thermophoretic forces associated with heat release can control the formation of dust structures of different geometries. A theoretical model is proposed to describe dust separation with respect to grain size caused by the effects of radial electrostatic and thermophoretic forces. The glow discharge currents under critical conditions for grain separation predicted by the model agree with those observed experimentally.

  10. Energy conditions in the epoch of galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy conditions of Einstein gravity (classical general relativity) do not require one to fix a specific equation of state. In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe where the equation of state for the cosmological fluid is uncertain, the energy conditions provide simple, model-independent, and robust bounds on the behaviour of the density and look-back time as a function of red-shift. Current observations suggest that the "strong energy condition" is violated sometime between the epoch of galaxy formation and the present. This implies that no possible combination of "normal" matter is capable of fitting the observational data.

  11. A+M Collisional Databases in ALADDIN Format

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ALADDIN (A Labelled Atomic Data Interface) is a database system developed in order to provide a standard and flexible format and interface for the exchange and management of atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction data of interest to fusion research. As part of the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS), introduced by the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit, the ALADDIN interface is available on-line. Twelve databases from DOE and IAEA sources are available from the CFADC website under the heading A+M Collisional Databases.

  12. Process for recovering hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-bearing formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alston, R.B.; Braden, W.B.; Flournoy, K.H.

    1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for transporting heavy crude oil through a pipeline which involves introducing into a pipeline or well-bore with the viscous hydrocarbons an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) coupling agent whereby there is spontaneously formed a low viscosity, salt tolerant, oil-in-water emulsion. Also disclosed is a method of recovery of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon bearing formation employing an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) a coupling agent.

  13. Oxygen line formation in 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asplund

    2000-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of [O I], O I and OH lines in metal-poor stars has been studied by means of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. For O I detailed 3D non-LTE calculations have been performed. While the influence of 3D model atmospheres is minor for [O I] and O I lines, the very low temperatures encountered at low metallicities have a drastic impact on the OH lines. As a result, the derived O abundances are found to be systematically overestimated in 1D analyses, casting doubts on the recent claims for a monotonic increase in [O/Fe] towards lower metallicities.

  14. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous

  15. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers ApplyResistant:NOAA-EPA UVBrown carbon formation from

  16. Study of formation ying for the XEUS mission and the ISAS Design of the Detector Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    Study of formation ying for the XEUS mission and the ISAS Design of the Detector Spacecraft ABSTRACT Strategy of formation ying for the X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy mission (XUES by formation ying the X-ray mirror and the focal plane X-ray detectors on two separate spacecrafts. We #12;rst

  17. Nonequilibrium Alfvenic Plasma Jets Associated with Spheromak Formation Deepak Kumar and Paul M. Bellan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Paul M.

    Nonequilibrium Alfve´nic Plasma Jets Associated with Spheromak Formation Deepak Kumar and Paul M the helicity injection stage of the Caltech spheromak experiment. Density and time of flight measurements-current arcs [4], Z-pinch formation [5], spheromak formation [6,7], and sustainment [8]) to extraterrestrial

  18. Formation Damage due to Iron Precipitation in Acidizing Operations and Evaluating GLDA as a Chelating Agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rohit

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron control during acidizing plays a key role in the success of matrix treatment. Ferric ion precipitates in the formation once the acid is spent and the pH exceeds 1-2. Precipitation of iron (III) within the formation can cause formation damage...

  19. The competition for graphene formation on Re(0001): A complex interplay between carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfè, Dario

    The competition for graphene formation on Re(0001): A complex interplay between carbon segregation) structure. In the range 500­700 K, the formation of a high-quality single-layer of graphene is strongly conditions, the formation of a long-range ordered graphene layer on Re(0001) without carbon bulk saturation

  20. Effect of overbalance pressure on formation damage S.Z. Jilani a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Majed, Abdulaziz Abdullah

    to the invasion of drilling fluids during drilling operations. The formation impairment or skin due to drilling formation comes first time in contact with a foreign fluid, i.e. drilling mud, which invades the formation and plugs the pores around the well bore. Although drilling fluids are presently being designed