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Sample records for fork skokomish powerhouse

  1. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT NORTH FORK SKOKOMISH POWERHOUSE AT CUSHMAN NO. 2 DAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Steve; Wilson, Matthew

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project was to add generating capacity on an in-stream flow release at Tacoma Power's Cushman hydroelectric project, Cushman No. 2 Dam, FERC Project P-460. The flow that is being used to generate additional electricity was being discharged from a valve at the base of the dam without recovery of the energy. A second objective to the project was to incorporate upstream fish passage by use of a fish collection structure attached to the draft tubes of the hydroelectric units. This will enable reintroduction of native anadromous fish above the dams which have blocked fish passage since the late 1920's. The project was funded in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Department of Energy, Office of Energy, Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and Water Power Program.

  2. CX-003609: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cushman North Fork Skokomish PowerhouseCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): Tacoma, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  3. CX-001202: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cushman North Fork Skokomish PowerhouseCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 03/21/2010Location(s): Tacoma, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  4. Spawning sockeye salmon fossils in Pleistocene lake beds of Skokomish Valley, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Spawning sockeye salmon fossils in Pleistocene lake beds of Skokomish Valley, Washington Gerald R Research Center and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Box 351310, University of Washington, Seattle 98501, USA d Burke Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA Received 19 July 2006

  5. Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses The project will focus initially on three climate-change...

  6. BPA, public utilities fueling the energy efficiency powerhouse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    public-utilities-fueling-the-energy-efficiency-powerhouse Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  7. President's House Price's Fork Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    President's House Price's Fork Road Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center HOKIE BIKE HUB Media Hall Fralin Biotechnology Center Greenhouses Air Conditioning Plant Southgate Center Addition Sandy South Drillfield Drive WestCampusDrive Alumni Mall Washington Street SpringRoad Sterre Perry Street Kent

  8. The Powerhouse Control System Audit as a Means of Insuring a Successful System Design and Implementation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, M. E.; Robinson, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Improvements to the powerhouse control system can be a cost effective way to improve system efficiency and reliability. A critical step in making these improvements is to conduct a control system audit of the existing process units and their related...

  9. B Technical remarks on the ForkLight compiler package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Christoph

    B Technical remarks on the ForkLight compiler package The technical requirements to run ForkLight on your local system are an ANSI­C compiler like gcc and an installation of the P4 library. B.1 Installation The ForkLight compiler package can be obtained from the WWW page http

  10. Savannah River Site Retires Coal-Fired D-Area Powerhouse after Nearly 60 Years of Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The Savannah River Site (SRS) has shut down the massive, coal-powered D-Area powerhouse as the site turns to new, clean and highly efficient power generation technology.

  11. Spanish Fork Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit with form HistorySpain InstalledFork

  12. CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2ŁjLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

  13. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  14. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  15. Appendix 69 Bull Trout Draft Recovery Plan. Chapter 3: Clark Fork Recovery Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 69 Bull Trout Draft Recovery Plan. Chapter 3: Clark Fork Recovery Unit #12;Chapter 3 State(s): Montana, Idaho, and Washington Recovery Unit Name: Clark Fork River (Including Lake Pend Oreille, Priest and Wildlife Service. 2002. Chapter 3, Clark Fork River Recovery Unit, Montana, Idaho, and Washington. 285 p. U

  16. ForkLight special program variables name meaning sharity type remark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Christoph

    ID private int automatically renumbered in fork ForkLight function (pointer) type qualifiers name on global shared heap shalloc csync char * unsigned int allocate block on automatic shared heap shavail async. unsigned int void get size of free automatic shared heap space ForkLight group structure

  17. Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia: EnergyGorlitz AGGranby,Information ForksForks,

  18. EIS-0184: South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Seattle City Light, a Department of the City of Seattle proposal to construct a hydroelectric project with an installed capacity of 15 MW on the South Fork Tolt River near the town of Carnation located in King County in the State of Washington.

  19. A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited. We can move

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited the dirtiest tar sands and tar shales, hydrofracking for gas, continued mountain-top removal and mechanized change. Fossil fuel moguls get richer, we get poorer. Our children are screwed. Our well-oiled coal

  20. Five Forks, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoThermtheForks, South

  1. Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia: EnergyGorlitz AGGranby,Information Forks

  2. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01

    of constructional channel-fill sandstones of the Red Fork, East Clinton Field. Location of cross section shown in Fig. 17. Datum level is an overlying highly conductive shale marker 51 19 Core analysis plot showing porosity, permeability, and fluid saturation...- ducers of oil and gas. Huch of the Red Fork production 'n this area has occurred while drilling for the deeper Morrow sandstones. The excellent natural gas productior. from the shallower Red Fork reservoirs has recently generated much interest...

  3. Volume II, Chapter 12 Lewis River Subbasin--Upper North Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume II, Chapter 12 Lewis River Subbasin--Upper North Fork #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS.................................................................................................. 12-17 12.5.3 Water Quality

  4. Volume II, Chapter 11 Lewis River Subbasin--Lower North Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume II, Chapter 11 Lewis River Subbasin--Lower North Fork #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS..................................................................................................... 11-33 11.5.3 Water Quality

  5. Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork Electric Coop, Inc Jump to:

  6. American Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5AllEnergyAmeriPower LLC JumpTechnologies Inc JumpFork,

  7. Cherry Fork, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR JumpMaine: EnergyEnergyEnergyChengduSouth Carolina:County,Fork,

  8. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-18, 184-B Powerhouse Debris Pile, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-11-30

    The 100-B-18 Powerhouse Debris Pile contained miscellaneous demolition waste from the decommissioning activities of the 184-B Powerhouse. The debris covered an area roughly 15 m by 30 m and included materials such as concrete blocks, mixed aggregate/concrete slabs, stone rubble, asphalt rubble, traces of tar/coal, broken fluorescent lights, brick chimney remnants, and rubber hoses. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  9. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Cushman Hydroelectric project, located on the Skokomish River near Hood Canal on the Olympic Peninsula, fish passage, hatcheries, wildlife and recreation. #12;TACOMA POWER'S CUSHMAN HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT Powerhouse · Fish Passage · Hatcheries, Wildlife & Recreation · Summary #12;3 CUSHMAN HYDROELECTRIC PROJECT

  10. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  11. EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

  12. EIS-0353: South Fork Flathead Watershed/Westlope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In cooperation with Montana, Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage.

  13. DOE/BP-00005043-1 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOE/BP-00005043-1 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program June-01903, 143 electronic pages, (BPA Report DOE/BP-00005043-1) Field37: This report was funded by the Bonneville

  14. Characterization of Gatewell Orifice Lighting at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse and Compendium of Research on Light Guidance with Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Simmons, Mary Ann

    2007-12-29

    The goal of the study described in this report is to provide U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) biologists and engineers with general design guidelines for using artificial lighting to enhance the passage of juvenile salmonids into the collection channel at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2). During fall 2007, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers measured light levels in the field at one powerhouse orifice through which fish must pass to reach the collection channel. Two light types were evaluated—light-emitting diode (LED) lights and halogen spot lights. Additional measurements with mercury lamps were made at the PNNL Aquatic Research Laboratory to determine baseline intensity of the current lighting. A separate chapter synthesizes the relevant literature related to light and fish guidance for both field and laboratory studies. PNNL will also review the Corps plans for existing lighting protocol at all of the Portland District projects and help develop a uniform lighting scheme which could be implemented. The specific objectives for this study are to 1. Create a synthesis report of existing lighting data for juvenile salmonid attraction and deterrence and how the data are used at fish bypass facilities. 2. Evaluate current B2 orifice lighting conditions with both LED and halogen sources. 3. Make recommendations as to what lighting intensity, source, and configuration would improve passage at the B2 orifices. 4. Review USACE plans for retrofit of existing systems (to be assessed at a later date).

  15. The Weizmann A Powerhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................48 Milestones in Weizmann Alternative Energy Research...................................52 Thanks's energy outlook in this century. Alternative energy research received a major boost in 2006 with a pledge and a challenge from Mr. Yossie Hollander, an Israeli business leader and alternative energy advocate. The result

  16. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, ?eslovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteinsmore »retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.« less

  17. Atomic force microscopy of nickel dot arrays with tuning fork and nanotube probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasekhar, Venkat

    Atomic force microscopy of nickel dot arrays with tuning fork and nanotube probe S. Rozhok,a) S microscopy are combined with the unique properties of carbon nanotubes to improve the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy AFM images of nickel dot arrays. These arrays have high relief features

  18. Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    379 Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork length) were caught) Vertical movement patterns of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, California 92037-1508 Limited information on the vertical movements of skipjack tuna (Kat- suwonus pelamis

  19. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  20. C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01

    1987. Excerpts from: The Strawberry Creek Management Plan.and Vince Resh. 1992. Strawberry Creek on the University ofSite: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte

  1. Photo-thermal quartz tuning fork excitation for dynamic mode atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontempi, Alexia; Teyssieux, Damien; Thiery, Laurent; Hermelin, Damien; Vairac, Pascal; Friedt, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-13

    A photo-thermal excitation of a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) for topographic studies is introduced. The non-invasive photo-thermal excitation presents practical advantages compared to QTF mechanical and electrical excitations, including the absence of the anti-resonance and its associated phase rotation. Comparison between our theoretical model and experiments validate that the optical transduction mechanism is a photo-thermal rather than photo-thermoacoustic phenomenon. Topographic maps in the context of near-field microscopy distance control have been achieved to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  2. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spajer, M. Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D.; Jalocha, A.

    2013-11-11

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  3. Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonaradian Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F. Jerry; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2001-05-08

    The objective of this report is to characterize fracture porosity and distribution in the Wasson Clear Fork reservoir and to determine the effects of fractures on well performance. The approach is to measure fracture attributes in an analog outcrop, to develop models of fracture spacing and aperture, and to apply this information to the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir.

  4. Chapter 4, Section 4.2 South Fork Salmon River MPG Spg/Sum Chinook Status and Recovery (Draft describes habitat-related limiting factors, threats, strategies and actions)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a largely genetically cohesive grouping of summer run Chinook returning to the South Fork Salmon RiverChapter 4, Section 4.2 South Fork Salmon River MPG Spg/Sum Chinook Status and Recovery (Draft.2 Status and Recovery of South Fork Salmon River MPG in the Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon ESU

  5. Optimizing Data Locality for Fork/Join Programs Using Constrained Work Stealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2014-11-16

    We present an approach to improving data locality across different phases of fork/join programs scheduled using work stealing. The approach consists of: (1) user-specified and automated approaches to constructing a steal tree, the schedule of steal operations and (2) constrained work stealing algorithms that constrain the actions of the scheduler to mirror a given steal tree. These are combined to construct work stealing schedules that maximize data locality across computation phases while ensuring load balance within each phase. These algorithms are also used to demonstrate dynamic coarsening, an optimization to improve spatial locality and sequential overheads by combining many finer-grained tasks into coarser tasks while ensuring sufficient concurrency for locality-optimized load balance. Implementation and evaluation in Cilk demonstrate performance improvements of up to 2.5x on 80 cores. We also demonstrate that dynamic coarsening can combine the performance benefits of coarse task specification with the adaptability of finer tasks.

  6. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  7. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This document describes the organization, strategy, and procedures to be used to confirm that mercury concentrations in soils in the remediated areas are statistically less than, or equal to, the cleanup standard of 400 ppm. It focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of the Lower East Fork Popular Creed flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its associated flood plain.

  8. Fig. 1: (a) Tuning fork resonator with two electromechanical transistors on the outer tips of the nano-resonator, i.e. boxed region on the left.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Fig. 1: (a) Tuning fork resonator with two electromechanical transistors on the outer tips of the transistor: evaporated gold contacts on single crytalline silicon (purple) with spring constants k+/- . Nano-Electromechanical as a phase sensitive bi-polar current switch. Index Terms -- Nanotechnology, nano-electromechanical systems

  9. Sampling and analysis plan for treatment water and creek water for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the methodology, organizational structure, quality assurance and health and safety practices to be employed during the water sampling and analysis activities associated with the remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit during remediation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Bruner sites.

  10. Planning Grant Workshop Agenda for NSF I/UCRC on Smart Vehicle Concepts The Solitude, The Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center, 901 Prices Fork Road,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center, 901 Prices Fork Road, Blacksburg, VA. 24061 540-231-8000, 877.20 ­14.40: Dr. Don Leo: VT-8. Polymer Transducers, Energy Storage Devices, and Power Sources 14.40 ­ 15

  11. Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

  12. An Assessment of health risk associated with mercury in soil and sediment from East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revis, N.; Holdsworth, G.; Bingham, G.; King, A.; Elmore, J.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents results from a study conducted to determine the toxicity of Mercury in soils sediments samples. Mice were fed via diet, soils and sediment, from various locations along the East Fork Poplar creek. Tissue distribution of pollutants was determined at various intervals. The tissue level relative to toxicity was used to determine the effect of a complex matrix on the gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the pollutants (other pollutants included cadmium and selenium).

  13. INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Jerry Lucia

    2002-01-31

    This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

  14. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L.; Adams, S.M.; Black, M.C.

    1993-06-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

  15. First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

    1992-07-01

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

  16. Hills Creek Powerhouse Turbine and Unit Rehabilitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and oxygen content suitable for fish, require the project to discharge a minimum of 300 cfs throughout its entire operating head range. The Francis runners at Hills Creek have...

  17. Applications for Computers in Industrial Powerhouses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delk, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    generation tu reduce electrical demand. There are even certain instances where it might be practical to vent intermediate or low pressure steam to the atmosphere to increase electric generation on back pressure turbines. With extensive experience... maintenance, if necessary. ~,. 756 ESL-IE-81-04-130 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 EQUIPMENT CONTROL ~1r control of boiler functions such as drum level, drum pressure, furnace draf t, etc...

  18. Hills Creek Powerhouse Turbine and Unit Rehabilitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighland View school HighlandHydrogen andHighlyHills

  19. Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Loar, James M; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  20. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oiko, V. T. A. Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D.; Martins, B. V. C.; Silva, P. C.

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  1. Three Forks folio, Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, A. C. (Albert Charles), 1849-1914.

    1896-01-01

    A structural model of the central and southern Western Foothills Fold and Thrust Belt (WFFTB) was constructed from serial balanced cross sections. The cross sections are constrained by published surface and subsurface geologic data...

  2. Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

  3. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  4. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  5. Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 1993 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at several waste management facilities and petroleum fuel underground storage tank (UST) sites associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These sites are within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is one of three regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater and surface-water quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant. The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The annual groundwater report for the East Fork Regime is completed in two-parts; Part 1 (this report) containing the groundwater quality data and Part 2 containing a detailed evaluation of the data. The primary purpose of this report is to serve as a reference for the groundwater data obtained each year under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. However, because it contains information needed to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status assessment monitoring reporting requirements, this report is submitted to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDEC) by the RCRA reporting deadline.

  6. Calendar year 1994 groundwater quality report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: 1994 groundwater quality data and calculated rate of contaminant migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This annual groundwater quality report (GWQR) contains groundwater and surface water quality data obtained during the 1994 calendar year (CY) at several waste-management facilities and a petroleum fuel underground storage tank (UST) site associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The sites addressed by this document are located within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime). The East Fork Regime, which is one of three hydrogeologic regimes defined for the purposes of groundwater quality monitoring at the Y-12 Plant, encompasses the Y-12 Plant. The regime extends west from a surface water and shallow groundwater divide located near the west end of the plant to Scarboro Road (directions in this report are in reference to the Y-12 Plant grid system unless otherwise noted). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability (HSEA) Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime as part of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements and in accordance with DOE Orders and Energy Systems corporate policy.

  7. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  8. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  9. Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Stewart, Arthur J; Loar, James M

    2011-01-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  10. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    is safe for limited water-contact recreational uses, such as wading in footwear. Eating fish from the creek is not recommended based upon the level of mercury in the fish. Are...

  11. Secretary Moniz's Remarks on "The North American Energy Powerhouse...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Related Articles Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Bipartisan Policy Center on the IEA In-Depth Review of U.S. Energy Policy -- As Delivered Energy Secretary Moniz's Remarks...

  12. Industrial Powerhouse Optimization in the Deregulated Electricity Marketplace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, P. D.; Bailey, W. F.

    2003-01-01

    of electricity deregulation and implemented real-time optimization of the electricity make-buy decision....

  13. Interactive Off-Line Computer Modeling for Powerhouse Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delk, S. R.; Jones, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    EAM (HLII!KR),STACI 02, STACK, TEMP. -f 1 120 2 350 7. NO.7 JOIUI - STEAl( (HLI/HR) 0 8. CH[1.L UNIT LOADS A. LP FlOK #1 , #2 CHILL UNITS - (ITS) 3 - 9.699 "La/HI I. LP nOM IJ CHILL UNIT - (ns) ) ? 4.878 NUl" C. LP f'lOH '4 CHILL lItlT - (ns) 0 ? 0 HLa...

  14. Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t DClimate

  15. Kenya Becoming a Geothermal Powerhouse | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,NewKeithDelaware: EnergyInformationBecoming a

  16. Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMayARM-0501Classroom-presentationsFulbright Scholar

  17. PowerHouse Dynamics Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, BluePoulsen Hybrid, LLC JumpPowerAvenue

  18. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  19. Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    The demand for renewable energy sources has stimulated technological advances in solar cell development. Initially, development and fabrication were extremely costly and no encouragement for use in industrial applications was made. Today, evidence...

  20. East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation,Foothills, California: Energy Resources Jump

  1. Structural geology of the Irons Fork - North Fork Creek area, Lake Ouachita, Arkansas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Marjorie Ann

    1980-01-01

    flexural slip folding, whereas recrystall- ization is active during flexural flow folding. The S cleavage 3 which is best developed in the shaly units of all formations, is developed by the bending or "kinking" of mica grains into micro- folds. D... ) Kink folds with north trending axes formed during tne fourth deformation event. Macroscopic, northwest trending cross folds form at the same time, or slightly later than, the kink folds. Interlayer slip along SO/SI surfaces accomplished most...

  2. Mammoth dams, lean neighbours: assessing the bid to turn Ethiopia into East Africa's powerhouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuesta-Fernández, Iván

    2015-01-01

    This chapter sets out to discuss the main features of the undergoing Ethiopian electrification programme as well as the key steps towards its implementation. Doing so also allows its potentialities and pitfalls to be ...

  3. Advanced Powerhouse Controls Save Pulp Mill $500 in Purchased Energy in First Month 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, R.; Hilder, S.

    2004-01-01

    setpoints in order to prevent unnecessary bypassing during normal operation. Pressure controlling vents automatically limit the pressure build- up during upsets. The two power boilers are significantly different in design. The older power boiler #2 has...-pressure header was set at the operator?s discretion in order to minimize risk of boiler-drum relief-valve discharge. Lower header pressures were also set at the operator?s discretion. A significant comfort factor was included to ensure all mill consumers...

  4. Secretary Moniz's Remarks on "The North American Energy Powerhouse" at IHS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesAVideo » Search resultsEnergy CERAWeek 2015 -- As

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powerhouse Walk Down Powerhouse Walk Down Drilling Groundwater Well 200 West Area Drilling Groundwater Well 200 West Area...

  6. Three Forks, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe2009)Thonotosassa,Thornwood,

  7. Chemical Sensor Based on Microfabricated Wristwatch Tuning Forks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    made of different conducting polymers or composites in combination with multivariate statistical tech-7 single-walled carbon nanotubes,8,9 polyaniline micro/ nanostructures, 10-12 and carbon-polymer composites the mechanical response of a thin (10-µm) polymer wire stretched across the two prongs of a wristwatch quartz

  8. Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    until September. The lowest lake levels are reached during the winter. Additional information on Lake Pend Oreille operations is available in the Albeni Falls Dam Flexible...

  9. Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary From: v2.7|EnergyandEnergy| DepartmentRoadmapProgram |

  10. Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary From: v2.7|EnergyandEnergy| DepartmentRoadmapProgram ||

  11. Forked River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,Pevafersa JVOhio:River, New Jersey: Energy

  12. City of East Grand Forks, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd JumpGeorgiaBurley,ColumbusDurant, MississippiInformation

  13. Forked Deer Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex Fuels Energy JumpVynckeForests

  14. Spanish Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin JumpOpenColorado) JumpSoyminas

  15. Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit with form HistorySpain Installed

  16. Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A SOpen EnergyInformation AscensionAscot Renewco Jump

  17. Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa: Energy ResourcesCreek, Colorado: Energy

  18. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED1,400 Jobs |Inc. | DepartmentModeling

  19. Upper East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedofDepartment of EnergyEducation | Department

  20. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Underground Powerhouse - Pumped Storage Project Idaho Dworshak Damunderground crushing facil­ ity for preparation of concrete aggregate from dam-Underground Powerhouse Pumped Storage Project Idaho 58. Dworshak Dam

  1. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powerhouse 1 Main Unit Breakers and Station Service Replacement This proposed investment addresses issues with two groups of equipment in Powerhouse 1 at Bonneville: * Main unit...

  2. Evaluation of a Behavioral Guidance Structure at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse including Passage Survival of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead using Acoustic Telemetry, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; McComas, Roy L.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Fischer, Eric S.

    2010-02-12

    Summarizes research conducted at Bonneville Dam in 2008 to evaluate a prototype Behavioral Guidance Structure, that was deployed by the US Army Corps of Engineers in an effort to increase survival of outmigrating smolts at Bonneville Dam.

  3. FORK-DECOMPOSITIONS OF MATROIDS RHIANNON HALL, JAMES OXLEY, CHARLES SEMPLE, AND GEOFF WHITTLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semple, Charles

    , while true for q = 5, is false for all larger fields [21]. This failure has prompted the search for an appropriate strengthening of 3­connectivity that will not only regain control of the number of inequivalent definition to allow further progress in matroid representation theory. Let M be a matroid with ground set E.

  4. STRATAL PATTERNS OF THE WILLIAMS FORK (HUNTER CANYON) FORMATION, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ost, Rebekah Corrie

    2010-12-31

    highstand systems tracts. Units 2 and 3 both contain stacked, repetitive stratal packages interpreted as depositional sequences. Depositional sequences contain lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tracts. A complicated interplay between eustatic...

  5. RIPARIAN PLANT WATER RELATIONS ALONG THE NORTH FORK KINGS RIVER, CALIFORNIA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    averaged 1.41 m3/s (50 cfs), however they were notably lower in 1987 at 0.7 m3/s (25 cfs). Riparian systems

  6. Diagenesis of the Clear Fork Formation (Leonardian) in the Monahans field, west Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedrick, Carroll Lee

    1993-01-01

    2 15 15 15 18 Stratigraphic Distribution of Porosity and Permeability. . . . . 19 Pore Types. GEOCHEMICAL DATA. Trace Elements: General Stratigraphic Trends. . . . Trace Elements: Intracrystalline Variation. . . . . Carbon and Oxygen... Isotopes. . DISCUSSION Early Syndepositional Diagenesis. Fracturing, , . . . 23 25 25 27 . . . 30 . . . 34 . . . 36 Mechanical and Chemical Compaction Fabrics. . . . . Cathodoluminescence. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes. . Porosity...

  7. MetaFork: A Compilation Framework for Concurrency Models Targeting Hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Maza, Marc

    to CUDA In automatic generation of GPU code from C code, it is desirable that the generated GPU code[i]; } Original C code. int ub_v = (N - 2) / B; meta_schedule { for (int t = 0; t int v = 0MemcpyHostToDevice)); } for (int c0 = 0; c0 c0 += 1) { { dim3 k0_dimBlock(B); dim3 k0_dimGrid(ub_v

  8. Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at Occidental Permian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

    2007-01-01

    the distribution of seismic energy within the reservoir.Field Monitoring of ASR Seismic Stimulation Source at LostField Results from Seismic Stimulation, 17th International

  9. Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project 1 Finding of No Significant Impact for Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy <ofEnergy Today, the| DepartmentClark

  10. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Chicken Creek Upstream N. Fork Strawberry Creek N.Fork Strawberry Creek Downstream N.Fork Strawberry Creek Upstream No Name Creek Ravine Creek

  11. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    and underground crushing facil­ ity for preparation of concrete aggregate from dam-Underground Powerhouse - Pumped Storage Project Idaho Dworshak DamUnderground Powerhouse Pumped Storage Project Idaho 58. Dworshak Dam

  12. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT ..........................................................................25 Division Barriers Upstream of the Powerhouse

  13. K-AR DATING OF AUTHIGENIC ILLITES: INTEGRATING THE DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF THE FLUVIAL WILLIAMS FORK FORMATION, MESAVERDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ability to date diagenetic reactions in tight gas reservoirs that significantly influence reservoir quality will enhance our ability to characterize and produce these fields. Although diagenetic clays form only a small percent of the sandstone, they have a disproportionately large impact on reservoir

  14. ALDER ESTABLISHMENT AND CHANNEL DYNAMICS IN A TRIBUTARY OF THE SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Professor, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis. 14 USDA Forest and Hedman (1977) call this inner region the "active channel." They de- scribe the active channel

  15. Population Recovery and Conservation Habitat Restoration Water Use and Hydropower Forests and Fish EAST FORK OWYHEE RIVER SALMON AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Recovery and Conservation · Habitat Restoration · Water Use and Hydropower · Forests........................................................................................................................................... 18 Water Quality Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 18 Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Water Quality Sampling

  16. Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennings, Peter Hill

    1986-01-01

    their equivalents in the western geosynclinal basins (e. g. , 2 to 5 km vs. 8 to 11 km). The structural style of Laramide deformation in the Wyoming Province is dominated by high angle faulting in the basement, whereas the style on the west side... on a scale of I: 12, 000 over the entire area and at a scale of I:6, 000 in structura11y complex portions. The map base consists of U. S. G. S. 7. 5 minute topographic quadrangles that were enlarged. Aerial photographs on a scale of appr oximate1y I...

  17. Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    On December 21, 1989, the EPA placed the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on the National Priorities List (NPL). On January 1, 1992, a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the DOE Field Office in Oak Ridge (DOE-OR), EPA Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) went into effect. This FFA establishes the procedural framework and schedule by which DOE-OR will develop, coordinate, implement and monitor environmental restoration activities on the ORR in accordance with applicable federal and state environmental regulations. The DOE-OR Environmental Restoration Program for the ORR addresses the remediation of areas both within and outside the ORR boundaries. This sampling and analysis plan focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the ORR and its associated floodplain. Both EFPC and its floodplain have been contaminated by releases from the Y-12 Plant since the mid-1950s. Because the EFPC site-designated as an ORR operable unit (OU) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is included on the NPL, its remediation must follow the specific procedures mandated by CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act in 1986.

  18. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Upper American River Hydroelectric Project, FERC Project No.California, Chili Bar Hydroelectric Project, FERC Projectthe night, as part of hydroelectric power generation by the

  19. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    the night, as part of hydroelectric power generation by theto manage water for hydroelectric power generation. There

  20. Use of BasinTemp to Model Summer Stream Temperatures in the South Fork of Ten Mile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in basins where the data inputs are scarce. It assumes that direct solar radiation is the chief mechanism solar radiation and stream temperatures and that discharge has a growing effect in water temperatures that in mid-latitude regions, direct solar radiation is the most important mechanism driving summer stream

  1. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Date East Canyon N. Fork Strawberry Creek pH 69-Storm DrainEast Canyon N. Fork Strawberry Creek Specific ConductanceCreek East Canyon N. Fork Strawberry Creek Total suspended

  2. Site Environmental Report for 2012, Volumes 1 & 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauer, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Sample Sample N. Fork Strawberry Creek Wildcat Creek WinterCreek pH N. Fork Strawberry Creek Winter Creek SpecificConductance N. Fork Strawberry Creek Result µmhos/cm No Name

  3. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Suying

    2010-01-01

    Chicken Creek N. Fork Strawberry Creek Wildcat Creek CesiumChicken Creek N. Fork Strawberry Creek Wildcat Creek GrossChicken Creek N. Fork Strawberry Creek Wildcat Creek Gross

  4. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina E

    2008-01-01

    East Canyon N. Fork Strawberry Creek Collection Date ResultChicken Creek N. Fork Strawberry Creek Cesium 137 ChickenCreek N. Fork Strawberry Creek Gross alpha Chicken Creek N.

  5. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Locks > Recreation * Over 500,000 Visitors Annually * Class "A" Visitor Center > Hydroelectric Power * Two Powerhouses * Five Generators * Remotely Operated By Nashville's...

  6. Energy Department Announces New Lab Program to Accelerate Commercializ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the private sector. "The Energy Department's National Laboratories are science and engineering powerhouses," said Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Ozark and WEbbers Hydropower conference1...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWT Project Manager Lee Beverly -SWL Project Manager 18 June 2015 Ozark and Webbers Falls Powerhouse Major Rehabilitation BUILDING STRONG * Project Scope: Replace three...

  8. Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles Tacoma Power's Cushman Hydroelectric Project installed a new two-generator powerhouse that increases electric generation capacity by 3.6 megawatts and captures...

  9. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina E

    2008-01-01

    Chicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek Upstream FIELD BLANKChicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek Upstream N. ForkChicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek Upstream N. Fork

  10. Design of non-serial, non-parallel flexural transmissions as applied to a micro-machined MEMS tuning fork gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Marcel A. C. (Marcel Adam Craig)

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement design rules for flexures that emphasize directionality. This work is important for flexure designs that cannot be broken down into equivalent series or parallel components. ...

  11. The garden of forking paths: Why multiple comparisons can be a problem, even when there is no "fishing expedition" or "p-hacking" and the research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    there is no "fishing expedition" or "p-hacking" and the research hypothesis was posited ahead of time Andrew Gelman of fishing or examining multiple p-values. We discuss in the context of several examples of published papers. Multiple comparisons doesn't have to feel like fishing 1.1. Background There is a growing realization

  12. Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    beneath the eye Reticulated Python 14 to 18 ft. Distinct reddish eyes; tan body with dark brown net dull with age. Males have larger spikes along back. Black and White Tegu 2 to 3 ft. Dark bands. Yellowish-tan to dark brown; red dewlap with yellow border Ianaré Sévi NATIVE Look-a-Likes David Barkasy

  13. Work plan for support to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek east end VOC plumes well installation project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 guidelines and requirements from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the Y-12 Plant initiated investigation and monitoring of various sites within its boundaries in the mid-1980s. The entire Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was placed on the National Priorities List of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites within the ORR require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) or an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) of potential remedial actions. Data from monitoring wells at the east end of the Y-12 Plant have identified an area of groundwater contamination dominated by the volatile organic compound (VOC) carbon tetrachloride; other VOCs include chloroform, tetrachloroethene, and trichloroethene.

  14. MEMS Resonant Strain Sensor Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, David Richard

    2010-01-01

    MEMS Capacitive BasedStrain Gauges MEMS Double-Ended Tuning Fork Strainand MEMS Potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. Landslides After Clearcut Logging in a Coast Redwood Forest1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Spittler (1998). The North Fork Caspar Creek watershed is underlain by marine sandstones and siltstones

  16. FIELD CAMP EQUIPMENT LIST SUMMER 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    ), knife, fork, spoon, bowl ____ Sunscreen (SPF 15 or greater) and protective lip balm ____ Toiletries

  17. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transfer packages in process for K-31K- 33 and Former PowerhouseDuct Island areas - Portal 4: CROET interest for potential railroad museum 12 www.energy.govEM 13 Historic...

  18. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Firehouse Burn Area * Duct Bank Remediation * K-720 Fly Ash Pile * K-901-A Holding Pond Fish KillCylinder Removal * Demolition of Powerhouse Cooling Towers and Buildings * Zone 1...

  19. An Innovative Approach to Plant Utility Audits Yields Significant Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J. E.; Moore, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents innovative methods to conduct powerhouse audits when applying advanced energy management to utility systems. Specifically, a new class of Energy Management and Reporting Systems (EMRS) applied to plant wide utility control...

  20. Capture Utility Savings Using Energy Management and Reporting Systems (EMRS) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Energy Management and Reporting Systems (EMRS) have proven effective in reducing powerhouse cost. These cost reductions are provided through effective management of equipment operation, fuel allocation, combustion optimization, and generation...

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is owned by Teck (formerly Teck Cominco), and the CBT/CPC own the rights to build a new power plant that powerhouse not only provides additional income to the CBT, its operation helps reduce dissolved gas

  2. Catalyst Paper No-Carb Strategy for GHG Reduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, C.; Robinson, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Catalyst Paper strategy to manage GHG exposure is a combination of energy reduction initiatives in manufacturing and the effective use of biomass and alternative fuels to produce mill steam and electricity from the powerhouse. The energy...

  3. Chu, Locke, Browner Call for Comprehensive Energy Plan at Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solar, a Division of Capial Communications, MT PowerHouse The Garage, MT Principle Power, WA Project Green America, MD PSEG, NJ PSi, NC Quinn Gillespie & Assoc, DC Recycled...

  4. CX-012003: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    John Day Powerhouse-John Day Number 1-4 Conductor Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/25/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. Supply chain practices in the context of an emerging economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhaumik, Vijan

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of the BRIC economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China as a formidable economic powerhouse is turning into a reality. The center of the world's economic gravity is slowly shifting towards these emerging ...

  6. The "+Add" Model : a proposed strategic framework to create agile high performance aerospace and defense product support supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riwes, Mina (Mina Diaa)

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Aerospace and Defense industry is a vital organ for national security and humanitarian disaster response as well as an economic powerhouse creating jobs and driving exports. News headlines often stop at the sale ...

  7. 4 ENGINEERING & SCIENCE SPRING 2013 Random Walk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --unites two powerhouse programs: the Resnick Sustainability Institute and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, or JCAP. Caltech has a central role in the search for dark matter and whatever else lies beyond

  8. Two-stroke engines; Cleaner and meaner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siuru, B.

    1990-06-01

    This article discusses how advanced technologies such as direct fuel injection and stratified charge combustion have turned the two-stroke engine into a clean, gasoline conserving powerhouse. The testing of prototype automotive designs is discussed.

  9. Rule-Based Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomasson, F. Y.; Childress, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    -based supervisory system which is interfaced to a DCS. The EMS includes boiler allocation, turbine load allocation, bark optimization, real-time pricing (RTP) tie-line control and coordinated header pressure control. It optimizes the powerhouse operations to meet...

  10. everythingHighlights from the University of Oslo's annual report 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerhardy, Philipp

    O should develop into one of Europe's best uni- versities and act as an academic powerhouse, a strategic to technology for global health 09 User-driven innovation 16 Interdisciplinary programmes 17 UiO:Energy 17

  11. Project Profile: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dow Chemical Company, under the BOS-X funding opportunity, has launched a transformational product in the building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) industry: the Dow POWERHOUSE Solar Shingle.

  12. Software industry in India : product and intellectual property focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vishal, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    India has established itself well as a powerhouse of talent in Information Technology (IT)/Software services, indicated by its exports of USD 54.33 Billion in 2010. Established in 1980s by the late Mr. Rajiv Gandhi, Prime ...

  13. Hotel Room Reservations for September 2015 The University of Winnipeg Alumni Affairs has arranged for a block of hotel rooms at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    . #12;Sparrow Hotels Inn at the Forks Standard Queen Guestroom $189 75 Forks Market Road Superior King applicable taxes Depending on availability Net non-commissionable rates Not a group block Individual

  14. The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Commercial Fisheries and the dom es-tic fishing industry, especially that part of the industry located in New England,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cover and simmer 5 to 10 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Remove fish from

  15. "Woody biomass" is all the buzz around the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    energy works; the recent ground breaking for the new woody biomass fired boiler at Forks High School

  16. the American lobster (JIomaros americanus). J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 30:1337-1344.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    jaw to the posterior end of the vertebral column (Hubbs and Lagler 1970:25); fork length was measured

  17. Site Environmental Report for 2010, Volumes 1 & 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, David

    2012-01-01

    Sample S.U. Dup N. Fork Strawberry Creek S.U. Sample S.U.Sample umhos/cm Dup N. Fork Strawberry Creek umhos/cm SampleL Sample mg/L Dup N. Fork Strawberry Creek mg/L Sample mg/L

  18. SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY AND FACIES ANALYSIS OF THE ROLLINS SANDSTONE MEMBER (MOUNT GARFIELD FORMATION) AND RE-EXAMINATION OF THE CONTACT BETWEEN THE MOUNT GARFIELD AND WILLIAMS FORK FORMATIONS (LATE CRETACEOUS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Jesse David

    2011-08-31

    The Cretaceous Rollins Sandstone Member (Mount Garfield Formation) is the youngest marine sandstone deposited within the Sevier foreland basin in Colorado. The Rollins Sandstone Member is a complicated stratigraphic unit ...

  19. Phase I - Smart Grid Data Access Pilot Program: Utilizing STEM Education as a Catalyst for Residential Consumer Decision Making and Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lishness, Alan

    2014-11-19

    Under Phase I of the Smart Grid Data Access Pilot Program, the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) partnered with Central Maine Power (CMP), and the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA) and engaged key vendors Tilson Government Services, LLC (Tilson), and Image Works to demonstrate the efficacy of PowerHouse, an interactive online learning environment linking middle school students with their home electricity consumption data provided through CMP’s Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). The goal of the program is to harness the power of youth to alter home energy consumption behaviors using AMI data. Successful programs aimed at smoking cessation, recycling, and seat belt use have demonstrated the power of young people to influence household behaviors. In an era of increasing concern about energy costs, availability, and human impacts on global climate, GMRI sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of a student-focused approach to understanding and managing household energy use. We also sought to contribute to a solid foundation of science-literate students who can analyze evidence to find solutions to increasingly complex energy challenges. While technical hurdles prevented us from achieving the scale of student engagement projected in the original proposal, results from Phase I nevertheless demonstrate the effectiveness of PowerHouse to bring science and math home to the kitchen table and to help students and families understand and manage electricity consumption: • 144 teachers learned about PowerHouse through workshops or other events and 33 teachers engaged students in the PowerHouse curriculum in their classrooms over the duration of this project. Fifty teachers have shared plans to use PowerHouse during this calendar year (2015). • Over the duration of this project, 1630 students created accounts on PowerHouse and 295 of these students connected their CMP Energy Manager electricity data to PowerHouse. • During our most recent complete school year (2013-2014): o 9 teachers engaged their students in a 4 (or more) week experience using PowerHouse curriculum o Those 9 teachers represented 357 students o 114 of the 357 students were connected to their CMP Energy Manager data through PowerHouse; the remaining students used the PowerHouse program and curriculum without connecting to Energy Manager The number of student accounts connected to their CMP AMI electricity data through PowerHouse is far below the goal of 1000 accounts. This is primarily attributable to successive technical challenges described in more detail below. However, program staff continue to address all aspects of this challenge: ongoing recruitment of teachers into PowerHouse, classroom processes to smooth out communications with families, and streamlining the technology. We anticipate reaching the goal of 1000 total CMP-connected accounts by the close of the 2015-2016 school year.

  20. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina E

    2008-01-01

    Sewer .Air Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer Fixed Treatment UnitsB13C Field Blank Hearst Sewer Lot Blank N. Fork Strawberry

  1. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Sewer .Rainwater Creeks Stormwater Sewer Fixed Treatment Units SoilB13C Field Blank Hearst Sewer Lot Blank N. Fork Strawberry

  2. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, in and underneath buildings, drains, and sumps. Mercury continues to be released into Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) from...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tankless Water Heater Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residents of...

  4. Farm to School Efforts: Innovations and Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galarneau, Tim; Millward, Suzanne; Laird, Megan

    2013-01-01

    taste tests, recycling and composting programs, and trips tothrough recycling and composting programs. 80 Developing ato the fork and through composting and waste diversion, a

  5. Lake County- Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  6. Eagle County- Energy Smart Colorado Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  7. Summit County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  8. Notices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    erosion, (2) realigning the existing tailrace channel and constructing a permanent fish passage barrier and concrete outfall at its confluence with the West Fork to prevent...

  9. The Columbia River System: Inside Story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Federal without Power North Fork (Benton) Lebanon Franzen Mercer Mompano Haskins (Walter Link) Silver Creek Binford Rogue Basin Federal with Power Green Springs Lost Creek...

  10. Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    of the utility companies. In Utah, the Commission is responsible for determining avoided cost rates for qualifying facilities. As will be noted later, the Spanish Fork Wind...

  11. Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Environmental Research Center Grand Forks ND Mr. Kleinberg Robert L. Schlumberger-Doll Research Cambridge MA Mr. Lewis Fletcher S. Rainmaker Oil & Gas Oklahoma City OK Dr....

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    General Electric Company Golden Field Office, Golden, CO (United States) Grand Forks Energy Technology Center (United States) Grand Junction Project Office, Grand Junction, CO...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Project, OH (United States) General Atomics Site, San Diego, CA (United States) General Electric Company Golden Field Office, Golden, CO (United States) Grand Forks Energy...

  14. Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hotspot track from 17 Ma to 2 Ma. The Ruby, Beaverhead, Big Hole, Deer Lodge, Medicine Lodge-Grasshopper, Three Forks, Canyon Ferry, Jefferson, Melrose, Wise River, and...

  15. ramseychair S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 0 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    a powerhouse program around the Ramsey Chair," says Associate Dean Robert Moore. Young helped establish Robert E. Moore Associate Dean Avani Raval Associate to the Dean Jennifer French Echols Editor Megramseychair S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 0 5 O F P O L I C Y S T U D I E S ANDREWYOUNG SCHOOL

  16. EIS-0121: Alternative Cooling Water Systems, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of cooling water systems for thermal discharges from K– and C-Reactors and from a coal-fired powerhouse in the D-Area at the Savannah River Plant (SRP)

  17. ExxonMobil is an Equal Opportunity Employer www.exxonmobil.com/ex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ExxonMobil is an Equal Opportunity Employer www.exxonmobil.com/ex EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICIST ExxonMobil will be a critical characteristic, as will the ability to work across disciplines and organizations. ExxonMobil.e.king@> at exxonmobil.com. ExxonMobil's Corporate Strategic Research (CSR) laboratory is a powerhouse in energy research

  18. Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallery, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    the high and low steam pressures. The discussion below shows how the savings in using low pressure steam can be above 25%! The key to the savings is not in the heat exchanger equipment or the steam trap, but is back at the powerhouse - the sensible heat...

  19. Bristol Heart Institute issue broken heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiesner, Karoline

    Bristol Heart Institute issue Mending a broken heart The energy powerhouse Plaques, cracks and heart attacks re:search University of Bristol · June 2006 #12;BRISTOL HEART INSTITUTE ISSUE · JUNE 2006 THE BRISTOL HEART INSTITUTE 1 C ardiovascular disease is the UK's single biggest killer of both men and women

  20. YOU MIGHT BE CELEBRATING THE BIG 3-0 IF....

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YOU MIGHT BE CELEBRATING THE BIG 3-0 IF.... You remember the power-house figures pictured or shine CVHS will be open for family fun, so do come to experience all the amazing Open House activities for a large variety of exotic animal clinical care. You might save a life with your purchase! To partner

  1. Fish Passage: A New Tool to Investigate Fish Movement: JSATS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-04-20

    A new system is being used to determine fish mortality issues related to hydroelectric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. Called the juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system (JSATS), this tool allows researchers to better understand fish movement, behavior, and survival around dams and powerhouses.

  2. A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM-8295 Final Draft April 19, 2004 #12;BioAnalysts, Inc Summer/Fall Chinook Research Plan Chief Joseph Dam Page........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

  3. Building bridges from B.C. to Brazil; Ties being developed through student exchanges will provide a foundation for future relationships that benefit all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Building bridges from B.C. to Brazil; Ties being developed through student exchanges will provide growth and a new-found confidence to compete in complex industries with established world leaders. Brazil is one of these new powerhouses. With a population of more than 190 million, Brazil is set to become one

  4. August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories of the last several decades ­ and today has become a vibrant democracy and an economic powerhouse. Brazil's international profile has never been and staff. Our study of Brazil is strong and our engagement with Brazil is growing. Today, work

  5. Davis Castro Californian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    69 77 79 77A 31 72 Strawberry Entrance Grizzly Peak Entrance National Center for Electron Microscopy Field House Strawberry Softball Field Haas Clubhouse Strawberry Canyon Recreational Area Strawberry Village Fenwick Weavers Village StrawberryCreekNort h Fork Straw b erry Creek South Fork Memorial Glade

  6. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. ISAB 2003-3 Supplementation Report Appendix: Extended Summaries of Columbia Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supplementation Projects Columbia Gorge Province A 1. Hood River Winter-run Steelhead Supplementation Background salmon and steelhead habitat in three major forks, the West, Middle, and East Fork Hood rivers. Spring-run programs to reintroduce spring-run chinook using Deschutes River stocks and to use supplementation

  8. Under Review for Publication in ASME J. Solar Energy Engineering SOL-12-1058 Life Estimation of Pressurized-Air Solar-Thermal Receiver Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Under Review for Publication in ASME J. Solar Energy Engineering SOL-12-1058 Life Estimation of Pressurized-Air Solar-Thermal Receiver Tubes David K. Fork 1 e-mail: fork@google.com John Fitch e-mail: fitch.ziaei@gmail.com Robert I. Jetter e-mail: bjetter@sbcglobal.net The operational conditions of the solar thermal receiver

  9. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  10. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Experimental Results of Structural Health Monitoring of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Virginia Tech (VT). The NASA and VT impedance-based SHM systems used separate but similar arrays of Smart Bridge Canyon, Spanish Fork, UT 84660, www.windwardengineering.com/ #12;American Institute of Aeronautics

  11. The impact of age, exposure and genetics on homologous recombination at the engineered repeat sequence in mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiktor-Brown, Dominika M

    2007-01-01

    Mitotic homologous recombination is a critical pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and broken replication forks. Although homologous recombination is generally error-free, recombination between misaligned ...

  12. CX-003393: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Updating the Improved Guidelines for Solving Ash Deposition Problems in Utility Boilers ReportCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 08/11/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. HABITS OF SOME OF THE COMMERCIAL CAT-FISHES. By 'NILLIAM CONVERSE KENDALL,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -half are very common or merit more than passing notice. The largest are the "great forked-tail cat in that 'direction. There are a few instances of pond culture, which will be referred to in another place. Food q

  14. Mission Support Contract Attachment J.10 Contract No. DE-AC06...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GROUP 5: Auto Crane, 2000 lbs capacity; Dumptor (6 yds and under); Flat Bed Truck (with hydraulic system); Fork Lift (3001-16,000 lbs); Fuel Truck Driver, steam cleaner and...

  15. ONE LAPTOP PER CHILD TALK TITLE. C. Scott Ananian, TALK DATE. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ananian, C. Scott

    - Notifications (startup & alerts) Part II: GNOME - Panel Part III: Fedora - Fork merging & notification software" Backend-agnostic! - Fedora uses yum, XO builds use ...? #12;ONE LAPTOP PER CHILD TALK TITLE. C

  16. Hydroxyurea Induces Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Cell Death in Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Bryan W.

    Hydroxyurea (HU) specifically inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), depleting dNTP pools and leading to replication fork arrest. Although HU inhibition of RNR is well recognized, the mechanism by which it leads ...

  17. Department of,A,nima! Science, Universit'j of California J. P. Van Eenennaam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Abstract.-White sturgeon, Aci- penser transmontanus, adults (n=855) were collected on their feeding grounds 1:1. Average fork length was 139 cm ±1.1 em (mean ± standard er- ror of the mean); females were

  18. Daniel W. Beckman A. Louise Stanley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plans based on the cur- rent available information would be difficult. Otolith analyses have been proven predominantly captured around offshore oil and gas structures during fishing tournaments. Fork length (FL, mm

  19. Ordered association of helicase loader proteins with the Bacillus subtilis origin of replication in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smits, Wiep Klaas

    The essential proteins DnaB, DnaD and DnaI of Bacillus subtilis are required for initiation, but not elongation, of DNA replication, and for replication restart at stalled forks. The interactions and functions of these ...

  20. CX-004509: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demonstration of PWR?s Hydrogen Generator TechnologyCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/22/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-002358: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fischer-Tropsch Fuels DevelopmentCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/10/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. 12/13Aviation Services provided by: Air Methods Corporation and Aero Air. Willapa Harbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    12/13Aviation Services provided by: Air Methods Corporation and Aero Air. Forks Aberdeen Willapa patients of all types. For short distance flights, or to smaller airports the Aero Commander 690 is our

  3. Relationship of Oak Seedling HeightRelationship of Oak Seedling Height and Diameter with Bottomlandand Diameter with Bottomland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    %) · Protection & Restoration · Clean Water Act (1975) · Swampbuster Provision ·Food Security Act · WRP and CRP habitat · Timber production · Environmental · Nutrient cycling · Floodwater storage · Improve water-7) · 1 m high levees · Water control structures · Elevation gradient (NE to SW) · South Fork

  4. CX-001451: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fate and Control of Mercury and Trace ElementsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/31/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-002254: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance of Eskom Coal in Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustor (CFBC)CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/12/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-004482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gyroscope Guidance Sensor for Ultra-Deepwater ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/18/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-004481: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gyroscope Guidance Sensor for Ultra-Deepwater ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/18/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. SECTION 15 Table of Contents 15 Pend Oreille Subbasin Inventory of Existing Programs Aquatic............2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that provide habitat for fish and wildlife. A complete list of state, federal, and Tribal entities Fork system via passage at Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids dams is an important goal because

  9. CX-005042: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production and Purification from Coal and Other Heavy FeedstocksCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/19/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. Newsfront 25 June - 1 July 2007, Issue 22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Yubaraj

    for powerhouse and machinery costs. This fundamental consider- ation is at the root of the large cost reductions that occur at higher heads." Needless to mention that the lower investment cost means the generation cost of the electricity would also be less... . There may be limited opportunity for secondary energy generation during the periods of spillage.” Our grandiose national plans to develop our water resources to uplift the economic condition of our country would be nothing more than an empty rhetoric if we...

  11. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

    2009-12-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

  12. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  13. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  14. A review of the history of alkali-aggregate reaction at three of the Tennessee Valley Authority`s dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, C.D.; Newell, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three of The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) major hydroelectric projects are experiencing alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR), These projects include Fontana Dam and Powerhouse, Hiwassee Dam and Powerhouse, and Chickamauga Lock, Dam and Powerhouse, All of these dams are considered {open_quotes}high hazard,{close_quotes} causing significant economic losses from loss of power, replacement of the dam and generation facilities, and loss of life should they fail. This paper presents an overview of the descriptions of each of these projects, including construction and original instrumentation installed in the structure during construction, All of these projects are now 50 to 60 years old and are experiencing problems in one or more locations due to AAR with no indication of any slowing of the concrete growth process, Concrete problems at these projects came as no surprise. Cracks were noted within 5 years of construction, and by 1980 some of these cracks were 1/2 inch in width. continuous monitoring of these projects has always been a priority. This paper will discuss how the growth from AAR has affected each structure, which structures have been affected most, and why. It will discuss how TVA has managed AAR at these projects in the past and how TVA is changing from a reactive to a pro-active approach in its response to AAR.

  15. Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  16. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 126-B-3, 184-B Coal Pit Dumping Area, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-028

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-07

    The 126-B-3 waste site is the former coal storage pit for the 184-B Powerhouse. During demolition operations in the 1970s, the site was used for disposal of demolition debris from 100-B/C Area facilities. The site has been remediated by removing debris and contaminated soils. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  17. Energy & Environmental Benefits from Steam & Electricity Cogeneration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratheal, R.

    2004-01-01

    -site powerhouses (one coal-fired and one natural gas-fired) and from gas-fired and waste heat boilers in its four hydrocarbon cracking plants. The challenge was to find a way to reduce costs and improve reliability of procuring and/or producing electricity... and steam while maintaining or reducing TEX air emissions. TEX entered into an agreement with Eastex Cogeneration to build, own and operate a 440 MW gas-fired steam and electric cogeneration facility on site. Implementation of the project was complex...

  18. Audits and Implementation of Plant Wide Energy Management and Reporting Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.; Moore, D.

    2006-01-01

    ) metric as applied against the primary boilers PB#1, CB#2, and PB#3 in this powerhouse. In this instance, PB#4 and PB#5 are used for header stability and are to be re- moved from service after the EMRS installation. The Recovery Boiler generates... Philosophy To deal with the varying steam demands typical in industrial applications, boilers must be designed and controlled as a system to provide top efficiency at all steam demands. This requires the boilers to act transparently as one continuous...

  19. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUsefulJorgeAtl anta,GraduateTimePowerhouse 1

  20. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUsefulJorgeAtl anta,GraduateTimePowerhouse

  1. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUsefulJorgeAtl anta,GraduateTimePowerhouseG22 -

  2. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUsefulJorgeAtl anta,GraduateTimePowerhouseG22

  3. An ancient Chinese wisdom for metabolic engineering: Yin-Yang

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Stephen G.; He, Lian; Wang, Qingzhao; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2015-03-20

    In ancient Chinese philosophy, Yin-Yang describes two contrary forces that are interconnected and interdependent. This concept also holds true in microbial cell factories, where Yin represents energy metabolism in the form of ATP, and Yang represents carbon metabolism. Current biotechnology can effectively edit the microbial genome or introduce novel enzymes to redirect carbon fluxes. On the other hand, microbial metabolism loses significant free energy as heat when converting sugar into ATP; while maintenance energy expenditures further aggravate ATP shortage. The limitation of cell “powerhouse” prevents hosts from achieving high carbon yields and rates. Via an Escherichia coli flux balance analysismore »model, we further demonstrate the penalty of ATP cost on biofuel synthesis. To ensure cell powerhouse being sufficient in microbial cell factories, we propose five principles: 1. Take advantage of native pathways for product synthesis. 2. Pursue biosynthesis relying only on pathways or genetic parts without significant ATP burden. 3. Combine microbial production with chemical conversions (semi-biosynthesis) to reduce biosynthesis steps. 4. Create “minimal cells” or use non-model microbial hosts with higher energy fitness. 5. Develop a photosynthesis chassis that can utilize light energy and cheap carbon feedstocks. Meanwhile, metabolic flux analysis can be used to quantify both carbon and energy metabolisms. The fluxomics results are essential to evaluate the industrial potential of laboratory strains, avoiding false starts and dead ends during metabolic engineering« less

  4. Hydroelectric redevelopment maintains heritage values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulkovshteyn, L.; Chidiac, M.; Hall, W.

    1995-12-31

    The Seymour GS is an 80 year old generating station on the historic Trent-Severn Waterway in Ontario, Canada. The rehabilitation at Seymour was approved by Provincial and Federal authorities on condition that the original appearance of the building be maintained. The capacity of the Generating Station (GS) is being uprated from 3.15 MW to 5.7 MW, by replacing five vertical double runner Francis units with five horizontal Kaplan turbines. The replacement of vertical Francis units with horizontal Kaplan units, necessitated an extensive and innovative demolition approach for the substructure modification. The new turbines required a powerhouse base slab 3.5 m below the grade of the original slab. This required removal of the existing slabs and foundation rock along with most of the interior powerhouse walls. The type of modification and demolition were carefully chosen to accommodate a very tight schedule dictated by the requirement of the Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), where in-water work is restricted to certain months of the year.

  5. CX-001798: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subtask 4.12 - Algae Harvesting in an Integrated Power Plant-Algae SystemCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/20/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. Robert M. Reed Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    and characterizing fractures in dolostone reservoirs: using the link between diagenesis and fracturing studies of the interwell environment of carbonate reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-age) reservoirs, West­249. Articles Peer Reviewed Gale, J. F. W., Reed, R. M., and Holder, Jon, 2007, Natural fractures in the Barnett

  7. Correlation and Stratigraphic Analysis of the Bakken and Sappington Formations in Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adiguzel, Zeynep 1986-

    2012-09-24

    ). a . a SYSTEM SEQUENCE FM/GROUP MISSISSIPPIAN K A SK A SH IA M A D ISO N LODGEPOLE FORMATION BAKKEN FORMATION DEVONIAN THREE FORKS FORMATION a a a a a b. a. 11 2.2. Stratigraphy of the Bakken... ............................................................................................................... 3 1.3. Tectonic Setting ................................................................................................... 4 2. REGIONAL STRATIGRAPHY ................................................................................... 8 2...

  8. Mission Day The Call to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    knowledge and expertise on sustainability. #12;Our research Water research in Thailand Coffee waste water treatment in Nicaragua Garden- based education in the International District #12;The foods we enjoy... Bon Appétit buys local and organic whenever possible. The Farm to Fork program sources locally produced items

  9. CX-004679: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enhanced Oil Recovery from the Bakken Shale Using Surfactant Imbibition Couple with Gravity DrainageCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/08/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-002166: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North DakotaCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/03/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. A New Candidate Active Antenna Design for the Long Wavelength Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    blade design in the LWA project. The fork antenna is a simpler design than the big blade, and could cost blade, is a dipole-like structure, but it is a simpler design. The radiating elements on the big blade1 A New Candidate Active Antenna Design for the Long Wavelength Array Nagini Paravastu (ASEE

  12. Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described earlier in an e-mail, in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described billion gallons of toxic coal sludge located directly above Marsh Fork Elementary School. (No word yet on their campus a couple of years ago. Underground Appalachian coal mining is being replaced in recent years

  13. Page 1 of 2 Revised: 03/2015 This Safety Instruction supports Sections 103: OSU Safety Program and 203: Accident Investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : A situation that results in medical attention (treatment beyond first aid) and/or lost time (missed work. An example of a surface cause is a small spill of oil on the floor that someone slipped on. The root cause of preventive maintenance that resulted in the fork truck leaking oil on the floor. A thorough investigation

  14. Copyright 2010, USC/ISI. All rights reserved.2/7/2011 3:46 PM 1 Recursion and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touch, Joe

    Copyright 2010, USC/ISI. All rights reserved.2/7/2011 3:46 PM 1 Recursion and the Transport Tussle Joe Touch Postel Center Director USC/ISI Research Assoc. Prof. USC CS and EE/Systems Depts. #12;Copyright 2009, USC/ISI. All rights reserved. Overview Internet stack isn't forked (Ford) Flows separate

  15. MINUTES FOR SENATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING January 12, 2009, 2:30 p.m.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    cups, plates, forks and spoons. In addition, the UW is purchasing only green electricity. It costs slightly more, but it's entirely produced by hydropower. Finally, the figures from the UW Transportation, to avoid cutting programs in the next biennium. Schools, colleges and campuses are asked to develop plans

  16. Ericsson ResponseTM Cellular GSM System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ), Base Station Controller (BSC), Radio Base Station (RBS), network management, network database Station (RBS 2202) with six Transceiver Radio Units (TRU) inbuilt, but the central switching equipment container. The container has grips for fork and top lift, and adjustable stairs with rain shield. Weight

  17. EPA/ROD/R04-95/255 EPA Superfund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and carbon adsorption; · In-situ bioremediation; · Discharge of treated groundwater to Bat Fork Creek; and · Continued analytical monitoring for contaminants in groundwater and surface water. SOIL · Shepherd Farm. Demography 7 D. Surrounding Land/Water Use 7 E. Topography 8 F. Climate 9 G. Geology 9 H. Hydrogeology 9 I

  18. They're out there.The problem of invasive plants is as close as your own backyard.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    government agencies, as well as the media, the basic question for most homeowners is simply, "How do I get and digging Many herbaceous plants and some woody species (up to about one inch in diameter), if present as possible; even a small por- tion can restart the infestation. Pull plants by hand or use a digging fork

  19. Proc. 4th St.Petersburg Workshop on Simulation, St.Petersburg, Russia, 2001, 233-238 Modeling and Performance Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivulin, Nikolai K.

    and Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems Security Operation1 D. Guster2 St.Cloud State University3 N.K. Krivulin4 St.Petersburg State University5 Abstract A model of computer system security operation system security, security attack, security vul- nerability, performance evaluation, fork-join queueing

  20. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  1. Irrigation Canals as Sink Habitat for Trout and Other Fishes in a Wyoming Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of mortality for fish in the Rocky Mountain region. Our study looked at how fish were affected by the irrigation canal system in the Smiths Fork, a tributary to the Bear River in western Wyoming. There are two speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus (29% of all fish) and mountain sucker Catostomus platyrhynchus (37

  2. Coupling conditions for the shallow water equations on a network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caputo, Jean-Guy; Gleyse, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We study numerically and analytically how nonlinear shallow water waves propagate in a fork. Using a homothetic reduction procedure, conservation laws and numerical analysis in a 2D domain, we obtain angle dependent coupling conditions for the water height and the velocity. We compare these to the ones for a class of scalar nonlinear wave equations for which the angle plays no role.

  3. CX-004662: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Testing of Chinese Coal in a Transport Reactor Integrated Gasification (TRIG) SystemCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/09/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    and Production 6.9 billion barrels of oil consumption by U.S. annually (EIA) Production to date1 Williston of oil ~22% of Williston Basin production has been from the Bakken-Three Forks 1: Production numbers · Denbury Resources · Enerplus Corp. · Fidelity Exploration & Production · Hess Corp. · Kodiak Oil & Gas

  5. Magazine of Extension research & education Fall 2013 Safer food, from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    roadmap to economic success Mark Seeley ChartS MinneSota'S Changing CliMate Seeing Patterns 4-H alumni creates a stronger Minnesota 8 The roadmap to economic success 9 Hands-on nutrition education gets results Magazine of Extension research & education Fall 2013 Safer food, from farm to fork Community roadmap

  6. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral on Juan Pond (DJP), found at the lowest point in the South Fork of Upper Wright Valley, Antarctica (Figure

  7. UML and Concurrency Perdita Stevens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Perdita

    premature decisions about ordering of events. 6 #12;Basic "flow chart" activity diagram Calculate total cost Get authorisation Charge account [else] [cost>$50] 7 #12;Concurrency in activity diagrams A1 A2 A3 8-fork = enter state with n concurrent substates n-join = leave state with n concurrent substates This severely

  8. CX-001195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Electric Power Generation from Low to Intermediate Temperature Geothermal ResourcesCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1, B5.2Date: 03/23/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  9. CX-001459: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Air Quality VIII: An International Conference on Carbon Management, Mercury, Trace Elements, Sulfur Oxide (SOx), Nitrogen Oxide (NOx)CX(s) Applied: A9Date: 03/30/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. From Zygote to Morula: Fortifying Weakened ASLR on Android

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wenke

    From Zygote to Morula: Fortifying Weakened ASLR on Android Byoungyoung Lee, Long Lu, Tielei Wang division of the zygote cell; in Android, each application process is a fork of the Zygote process. Abstract--There have been many research efforts to secure Android applications and the high-level system mechanisms

  11. PNNL Hoisting and Rigging Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynie, Todd O.; Fullmer, Michael W.

    2008-12-29

    This manual describes the safe and cost effective operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair requirements for cranes, hoists, fork trucks, slings, rigging hardware, and hoisting equipment. It is intended to be a user's guide to requirements, codes, laws, regulations, standards, and practices that apply to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its subcontractors.

  12. Submitted to: A. Bestavros & A. Kfoury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by clients (e.g., stream players). In a road network, the flow constitutes vehicles which enter and exit at forks and intersections. In electric grids, a continuous flow of energy (electric current flow building blocks, which them- selves could be smaller, inductively assembled networks or alternately

  13. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    -based assessment of conventional and continuous oil and gas resources of the Devonian Three Forks Formation fracturing, which stimulates movement of hydrocarbons in tight-oil reservoirs. Approximately 450 million bar Basin Province boundary Bakken TPS Middle Bakken Conventional AU Nesson-Little Knife Continuous Oil AU

  14. Alternatives/action plan report for outfall 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    This Document contains information pertaining to alternatives/action associated with controlling ammonia entering through outfall 17. This document identifies the location of contaminate source, the ammonia concentration levels entering East Fork Poplar Creek, and the action taken to reduce/eliminate the toxicity problem.

  15. EMERGENCY NUMBERS THAT MAYADDRESS MENTAL HEALTH RELATED EMERGENCIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    communities Crookston Police Dept. 911 & 281-3111 (non- emergencies) CPD Crookston & UMC Polk County Sheriff 218-281-0431 Sheriff's Office Polk County Fosston Police Dept 218-435-6611 Fosston Erskine Police Dept-773-1104 East Grand Forks Polk County Social Services Adult and Child Protection 281-3127 M-F after hours call

  16. "These trees were presented to ONRC by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    are a lot like people. They can both stand tall, weather anything that comes their way, or can be uprooted and live only a short while, with nothing to offer as they slowly disappear. While I never got a chance Oak tree seedlings to the ONRC. He started these trees at his home here in Forks from acorns that he

  17. Water Quality Improvements: How do we know if we're doing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Water Quality Improvements: How do we know if we're doing Good? Steven J. Taff Department of Applied Economics University of Minnesota Water Seminar Series University of Nebraska - Lincoln February drive water policy (and, hence values: flooding, Grand Forks, ND 6 #12;Water pollution, Lake Superior 7

  18. .All ~ ...,. .J.'I..f.~ t"'.IIC-~ ,... ..,--':' If':--.....1c. ~ ...:. ~~-f.~'-r." ~...r ...t \\,,,:,'" ~ '" "'c...... ~.t~.-: ....... :......

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a fork. Heat asparagus; drain Combine soup and milk and heat until soup IS thawed, stirrir.g occasionally asparagus and sprinkle with paprika. Serves 6. Source; U S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries ------------------~-I and Beaton Hill / ' From the angle-beamed attic of an old-l~n..: ~family home come recipes like

  19. Eclipse Attacks on Bitcoin's Peer-to-Peer Network Ethan Heilman Alison Kendler Aviv Zohar Sharon Goldberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    , selfish mining, and adversarial forks in the blockchain. We take a detailed look at bitcoin's peer- to-of-work to reach consensus on a distributed public ledger of transactions, aka., the blockchain. Satoshi Nakamoto [52] argues that bitcoin is secure against attackers that seek to shift the blockchain

  20. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Table 4. Out-of-subbasin production for three Hood River steelhead populations. Table 5. Life cycle river mile 6 13 Dee ID seepage 13 cold springs 2 city of HR overflow? riverside drive reservoir? 2 stone springs 4 city of HR riverside drive reservoir? 4 middle fork coe branch 15 MFID 15 clear branch 19 MFID

  1. Revised Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313, Toxic Chemical Release reporting for calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This report contains forms which contain information on the physical location of the Y-12 Plant and the amount of lead that was released to the East Fork Poplar Creek and amounts transferred to landfills on-site as well as landfills in Texas and South Carolina. Amounts are given in pounds per year.

  2. Presented May 6, 2013 Blennerhasset Chapter By Gary Berti.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Connecticut Rogue River - Michigan On the Burner: Sea Run Brook Trout (Salters) East Fork of Greenbrier1 Presented May 6, 2013 Blennerhasset Chapter By Gary Berti. TU's Eastern Home River Initiatives Current Home River Initiatives: Potomac Headwaters Shenandoah Headwaters Musconetcong (the Musky) Upper

  3. CX-001298: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full-Scale Mercury Control Demonstrations: Information Collection Request Sampling with Mercury Control ElementsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 03/22/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. CX-007121: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full-Scale Mercury Control Demonstrations: Information Collection Request Sampling with Mercury Control ElementsCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 10/04/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. 1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury (Hg) complexation with natural East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) is controlled by the formation rate of strong Hg- DOM complexes Research #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury (Hg) forms strong complexes

  6. Licking River Basin, Cynthiana, Kentucky 24 March 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Licking River Basin, Cynthiana, Kentucky 24 March 2006 Abstract: The recommended project would reduce flood damages in the communities of Cynthiana, Millersburg, and Paris, in the Licking River B Kentucky, by the construction of two dry bed detention basins on tributaries of the South Fork

  7. FROM : El 11 Dean US FOODSERVERVICE PHONE NO, : 418 461 3791 Nay. 20 2088 07:13PM P2 CROWNE PLAZA SA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of the clegr Fork,the construction of several dams, flood wetland, prairie and bottomland systems and water such as programmanagement, and was all hydraulic (valley City Project,and all the buried archeological featuresother than to the previously approved plan: 1) move about 40percentof the estid,ated 5,000acre- feet of hydraulic mitigationto

  8. AGE AND GROWTH OF RED DRUM, SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS, FROM OFFSHORE WATERS OF THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXIC01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AGE AND GROWTH OF RED DRUM, SCIAENOPS OCELLATUS, FROM OFFSHORE WATERS OF THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXIC was Lt = 1.013(1 - 6 -O,Il88(/+11.291), where t is age (Years) and L t is fork length (nun). The red drum

  9. Karstic mountain almost conquered. [Guatemala

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-10

    International design and construction teams building a 300-Mw hydroelectric system high in central Guatemala's rugged mountains since 1977 have persevered through karstic-limestone nightmares, logistical bottlenecks and political upheaval to bring the $700-million Rio Chixoy project close to completion. The costly power push, requiring the largest construction effort in Guatemala's modern history, plays a critical role for the future. When all five Pelton-wheel turbines are spinning late next year, their output will more than double electricity production in Central America's poorest, most populous country. Despite numerous delays, design changes and cost increases above the original $240-million bid package, work has progressed to the final stages on a 360-ft-high rockfill dam, 16-mile power tunnel and aboveground powerhouse.

  10. Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Q. Richardson

    2012-06-28

    Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

  11. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  12. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2012-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  13. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1 of 2, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Carl

    1987-03-01

    The tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, that will be used in conjunction with 1984 and 1985 fish and habitat pre-treatment (baseline) data to evaluate effects of habitat enhancement on the habitat and fish community in Bear Valley Creek overtime. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur in the upper-Salmon River basin. Subproject III involved fish inventories (pre-treatment) in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River, and habitat problem identification on Fivemile and Ramey Creek. Subproject IV involved baseline habitat and fish inventories on the East Fork of the Salmon River, Herd Creek and Big-Boulder Creek. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the four subproject reports. 20 refs., 37 figs., 22 tabs.

  14. Field verification program for small wind turbines. Quarterly report for the period October - December 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, A. Craig; Davis, Dean A.

    2000-01-26

    Windward Engineering has a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy to install two Whisper 900 wind turbines, one at the NREL National Wind Technology Center and one at a test site near Spanish Fork Utah. The authors monitor the turbine in Spanish Fork for approximately three years and report energy production availability, and general operating experience. In addition, they created a computer model to predict the furling behavior of the Whisper 900. They compare the predictions with measurements from the Utah test site. This is the first quarterly report on this project. The report is organized into 6 tasks and the progress is discussed for each task. The tasks are: (1) Install two turbines and repair as needed; (2) Phase 1 testing and analysis; (3) Phase 2 testing and analysis; (4) Phase 3 testing and analysis; (5) Turbine removal and inspection; and (6) Reporting and administration.

  15. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2005-02-01

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

  16. Systems and methods for retaining and removing irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runkle, Gary A.; Matsumoto, Jack T.; Dayal, Yogeshwar; Heinold, Mark R.

    2015-12-08

    A retainer is placed on a conduit to control movement of objects within the conduit in access-restricted areas. Retainers can prevent or allow movement in the conduit in a discriminatory fashion. A fork with variable-spacing between prongs can be a retainer and be extended or collapsed with respect to the conduit to change the size of the conduit. Different objects of different sizes may thus react to the fork differently, some passing and some being blocked. Retainers can be installed in inaccessible areas and allow selective movement in remote portions of conduit where users cannot directly interface, including below nuclear reactors. Position detectors can monitor the movement of objects through the conduit remotely as well, permitting engagement of a desired level of restriction and object movement. Retainers are useable in a variety of nuclear power plants and with irradiation target delivery, harvesting, driving, and other remote handling or robotic systems.

  17. An Analysis of Texas Waterways: A Report on the Physical Characteristics of Rivers, Streams, and Bayous in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belisle, Harold J.; Josselet, Ron

    1977-01-01

    Cree k San Jacinto River, East Fork Spring Creek Taylor Bayou Turkey Creek V. CENTRAL TEXAS WATE RWAYS A. Major Waterways Blanco River Bosque River Brazos River Colorado River Concho River . Frio River Guadalupe River Lampasas River... MAJOR CENTRAL TEXAS WATERWAYS 13. Blanco River 14. Bosque River 15. Brazos River 16. Colorado River 17. Concho River 18. Frio River 19. Guadal upe River 20. Lampasas River 21. Lavaca River 22. Leon River 23. Little River 24. Llano River 25...

  18. STRUCTURE OF THE INNER JET OF OJ287 FROM VLBA DATA AT 15 GHz IN SUPER-RESOLUTION MODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tateyama, Claudio E.

    2013-04-01

    In this work we show the results obtained from the Very Long Baseline Array data at 15 GHz of OJ287 in super-resolution mode. The data showed a jet configuration in the form of a 'fork' where superluminal components emerge via stationary components at the northwest and the southeast close to the core to form parallel trajectories along the southwest direction in the plane of sky. This agrees with a source structure of an extended, broad morphology of OJ287.

  19. Cottaneva Creek Ha rd yC re ek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blucher Cr Bear Cr Wolf Cr Ward Cr Fay Cr Billings Cr Mill Cr Annapolis Grape Cr Lorenzo R Scott Cr Big Cr of Big R Britain Cr Little Cr Bald Hill Cr Fly Cr Santa Rosa Cr Campbell Cr Rincon Cr Upper Indian Cr Big R Little N. Fork East of Eureka Hill Lower NF Big R Russell Bk Upper Navarro R Upper SF Ten Mile R

  20. Flabeg GmbH co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoThermtheForks,

  1. Flagler County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoThermtheForks,County,

  2. Carbon Bank Ireland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork

  3. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  4. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  5. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam, 2009-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2010-07-31

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2009 through early spring 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines for fisheries managers and engineers to use in decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study was from November 1, 2009 to April 10, 2010. The study was divided into three study periods: Period 1, November 1 - December 15, 2009 for a fall/winter sluiceway and turbine study; Period 2, December 16, 2009 - February 28, 2010 for a turbine only study; Period 3, March 1 - April 10, 2010 for a spring sluiceway and turbine study. Sluiceway operations were scheduled to begin on March 1 for this study; however, because of an oil spill cleanup near the sluice outfall, sluiceway operations were delayed until March 8, 2010, therefore the spring study period did not commence until March 8. The study objectives were to (1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA between November 1 and December 15, 2009 and March 1 and April 10, 2010, and (2) estimate the numbers and distribution of adult steelhead and kelt-sized targets passing into turbine units between December 16, 2009 and February 28, 2010. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics. For Period 1, overwintering summer steelhead fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. A total of 879 {+-} 165 (95% CI) steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse and sluiceway during November 1 to December 15, 2009. Ninety two percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Run timing peaked in early December, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that Sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for steelhead was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. For Period 2, adult steelhead passage occurred on January 14 and 31 and February 2, 22, and 24. A total of 62 {+-} 40 (95% CI) steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes during December 16, 2009 to March 7, 2010. Horizontal distribution data indicated turbine unit 18 passed the majority of fish. Fish passage occurred during morning periods. Passage did not occur during afternoon or nighttime. For Period 3, the early spring study period, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 34-day study period. A total of 1,985 {+-} 234 (95% CI) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse sluiceway. Ninety-nine percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Run timing peaked in late March and again in early April. Horizontal distribution indicated that Sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Diel distribution for steelhead was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. The results of this study strongly suggest that operating the TDA sluiceway for steelhead passage (fallbacks and kelts) during the late fall, winter, and early spring months will provide an optimal, non-turbine route for these fishes to pass the dam.

  6. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

    2003-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

  7. SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

    2011-10-31

    Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

  8. Interim survey report, Wailua River hydropower, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Installation of hydroelectric facilities on the South Fork Wailua River three and five miles upstream of Wailua Falls on the Island of Kauai, Hawaii is proposed. The hydroelectric facilities would provide an additional source of energy for the island, effectively utilizing available waters. Addition of hydropower to the island's power system, which is primarily reliant on fuel and diesel oils, would diversify the system's base. Hydropower diversion would reduce flows downstream of the structures, affecting fishery, recreational, and aesthetic resources. Construction activities would disturb approximately 2.7 acres of cropland and create temporary turbidity downstream of the sites.

  9. Groundwater Conservation Districts: Success Stories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Dana; Persyn, Russell A.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-09-06

    Plains UWCD No. 1 7 Sandy Land UWCD 8 South Plains UWCD 9 Garza County U and Fresh WCD 10 Salt Fork UWCD 11 Mesa UWCD 12 Permian Basin UWCD 13 Hudspeth County UWCD No. 1 14 Glasscock County UWCD 15 Sterling UWCD 16 Coke County UWCD 17 Santa... Activities Groundwater Conservation Districts vary in size, from partial county or single county districts to multiple county districts. Staffing levels vary from one part-time position to several full-time positions, depending upon the goals of the Boards...

  10. Chicken Barbecue. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Marshall M.; Mellor, David B.

    1979-01-01

    for finishing. (Recipes are given). ? Use charcoal or any hardwood such as oak, hickory, pecan or mesquite for fuel. ? Use kerosene or charcoal lighter fluid to start the fire. ? Metal tongs are best for turning chicken halves, but a fine-tined fork... is also suitable. ? Have plentiful serving and eating space. Having made the above preparations, you are now ready to barbecue. Place the charcoal or wood in the pit on a nest of newspaper and saturate it with starting fuel. Gasoline or cigarette...

  11. Flood analyses for Department of Energy Y-12, ORNL and K-25 Plants. Flood analyses in support of flood emergency planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The study involved defining the flood potential and local rainfall depth and duration data for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and K-25 plants. All three plants are subject to flooding from the Clinch River. In addition, the Y-12 plant is subject to flooding from East Fork Poplar and Bear Creeks, the ORNL plant from Whiteoak Creek and Melton Branch, and the K-25 plant from Poplar Creek. Determination of flood levels included consideration of both rainfall events and postulated failures of Norris and Melton Hill Dams in seismic events.

  12. Samnites, Ligurians and Romans revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, John Robert

    2013-10-29

    , 2004). 16 E. Dench, ‘Samnites in English: the legacy of E. Togo Salmon in the English-speaking world’, in Jones 2004 (n. 15), p. 7-22. 17 E. Dench, From barbarians to new men: Greek Roman and modern perceptions of peoples from the central Apennines... describes how the Roman army was surrounded by Ligurian forces in a narrow defile, and recounts how the soldiers were reminded of the disastrous defeat at the hands of the Samnites at the Caudine Forks.52 Later we are told of the Ligurians assembling...

  13. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David A.

    2001-10-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1996 through 1999. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this project. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin. Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of Pacific lampreys from tribal members within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation was useful in gaining baseline life history information. Tribal members described harvesting two types of lampreys from spring through fall, the short brown type and the long dark type. Lamprey spawning distribution was from the mouth to the headwaters in the Umatilla River. Larval lampreys were observed in the mud and sand areas of the river. Tribal members observed major declines in lampreys within the Columbia River basin. Larval Pacific lampreys were distributed throughout the John Day River basin. Larval distribution in the other subbasins was patchy and limited to the lower reaches of the streams. Larval densities were highly variable in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, as opposed to the Main stem John Day River. Larval lengths varied little in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, but were highly variable in the Main stem John Day River. Larval abundance decreased as we moved upstream in the Columbia and Snake rivers. In addition, we found strong evidence for lack of larval recruitment as distance increased from the mouth of the Columbia River. We identified clinical indicators of stress in adult Pacific lampreys. Plasma glucose became elevated soon after acute stress and remained elevated for one week. Plasma lactate also became elevated by 30 minutes; however, it decreased to resting levels by one hour after application of the stressor. Muscle lactate was shown to have an inverse relationship with glucose. Muscle lactate levels decreased by 4 hours and remained depressed for two days. Plasma chloride ions decreased by one hour, then returned to resting levels by 8 hours, decreased again at 24 hours, and then recovered by 48 hours. The steroid cortisol was not found in the plasma of Pacific lampreys. Our study suggests plasma glucose, lactate, chloride ions, and muscle lactate can be used as clinical indicators of stress in Pacific lampreys.

  14. Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

    2003-09-01

    This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

  15. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venditti, David A.

    2002-04-01

    During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and survival ranged from 0% to 96%, although there was evidence that some eggs had died after reaching the eyed stage. Six redds were capped in an attempt to document fry emergence, but none were collected. A final hydraulic sampling of the capped redds yielded nothing from five of the six, but 75 dead eggs and one dead fry were found in the sixth. Smothering by fine sediment is the suspected cause of the observed mortality between the eyed stage and fry emergence.

  16. Rio Grande River 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  17. 2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01

    The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

  18. Five Star Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Flagsol GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  3. Caney Valley El Coop Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Cangxi Jianghe Hydroelectric Power Development Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Cannelton Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Cantium Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork Electric Coop,

  7. CantorCO2e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Canyon Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Capacity Building on Promoting Sustainable Development in the GMS | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. Capacity Needs Diagnostics for Renewable Energies (CaDRE) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork Electric

  11. Capara Energia S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Cape Verde Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Cape Verde: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Capital Connections | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork ElectricCapara Energia

  15. Capital Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork ElectricCapara EnergiaCapital

  16. Capstone Turbine Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork ElectricCapara

  17. CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarFork ElectricCaparaOpen Energy

  18. Caracas, Venezuela: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. CarboTech Engineering GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Community Engagement | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. Carbon Capture and Storage in Southern Africa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Carbon Clear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Carbon Compliance Acquisition 16 Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Project Phase 2 (CCP2) - Storage Program:

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarForkInformation

  6. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,CalendarForkInformationSources | Open

  7. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Carbon Market Opportunities for the Forestry Sector of Africa | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. Carbon Market Special Initiative of the ADB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Tensile Forces and Shape Entropy Explain Observed Crista Structure in Mitochondria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ghochani; J. D. Nulton; P. Salamon; T. G. Frey; A. Rabinovitch; A. R. C. Baljon

    2010-04-03

    A model is presented from which the observed morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane can be inferred as minimizing the system's free energy. Besides the usual energetic terms for bending, surface area, and pressure difference, our free energy includes terms for tension that we believe to be exerted by proteins and for an entropic contribution due to many dimensions worth of shapes available at a given energy. In order to test the model, we measured the structural features of mitochondria in HeLa cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts using 3D electron tomography. Such tomograms reveal that the inner membrane self-assembles into a complex structure that contains both tubular and flat lamellar crista components. This structure, which contains one matrix compartment, is believed to be essential to the proper functioning of mitochondria as the powerhouse of the cell. We find that tensile forces of the order of 10 pN are required to stabilize a stress-induced coexistence of tubular and flat lamellar cristae phases. The model also predicts \\Deltap = -0.036 \\pm 0.004 atm and \\sigma=0.09 \\pm 0.04 pN/nm.

  12. Old Harbor Scammon Bay Hydro Feasibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Petrie

    2007-06-27

    The grantee, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC), is a non-profit member owned rural electric generation and distribution cooperative. The proposed Project is located near the community of Old Harbor, Alaska. Old Harbor is on the southeastern coast of Kodiak Island, approximately 70 miles southwest of the City of Kodiak and 320 miles southwest of Anchorage. In 1998 sufficient information had been developed to apply for a license to construct the project and the cost was estimated to be $2,445,000 for a 500 KW project on Lagoon Creek. Major features of the project included an eight-foot high diversion dam on Mountain Creek, a desander box, a 9,800-foot long penstock to the powerhouse on Lagoon Creek, and a 5,500-foot long access road. It was also anticipated that the project could provide an additional source of water to Old Harbor. The report details the history and lessons learned in designing and permiting the proposed hydroelectric facility.

  13. Recycled waste oil: A fuel for medium speed diesel engines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, A.B.L.; Poynton, W.A.; Howard, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the exploratory engine trials that Mirrlees Blackstone has undertaken to investigate the effect of fueling an engine using waste oil derived from used lubricants. The effect on the engine`s mechanical components, and thermal performance are examined, and the steps taken to overcome problems are discussed. The proposed engine is sited within the Research and Development facilities, housed separately from the manufacturing plant. The unit is already capable of operating on two different types of fuel with single engine set up. It is a 3 cylinder, 4-stroke turbocharged direct injection engine mounted on an underbase and it operates at 600 rpm, 15.0 bar B.M.E.P. (Brake Mean Effective Pressure). It is a mature engine, built {approximately} 20 years previously, and used for emergency stand-by duties in the company`s powerhouse. The test engine is coupled to an alternator and the electricity generated is fed to the national grid. Initial samples of treated fuel oil, analyzed by an independent oil analysis consultant, indicated that the fuel oil does not correspond to a normal fuel oil. They contained high concentrations of trace elements (i.e. calcium, phosphorus, lead, aluminum and silicon) which was consistent with sourcing from waste lubricating oils. The fuel oil was considered to be too severe for use in an engine.

  14. Wetland survey of selected areas in the K-24 Site Area of responsibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A.; Awl, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    In accordance with DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, wetland surveys were conducted in selected areas within the K-25 Area of Responsibility during the summer of 1994. These areas are Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, the K-770 OU, Duct Island Peninsula, the Powerhouse area, and the K-25 South Corner. Previously surveyed areas included in this report are the main plant area of the K-25 Site, the K-901 OU, the AVLIS site, and the K-25 South Site. Wetland determinations were based on the USACE methodology. Forty-four separate wetland areas, ranging in size from 0.13 to 4.23 ha, were identified. Wetlands were identified in all of the areas surveyed with the exception of the interior of the Duct Island Peninsula and the main plant area of the K-25 Site. Wetlands perform functions such as floodflow alteration, sediment stabilization, sediment and toxicant retention, nutrient transformation, production export, and support of aquatic species and wildlife diversity and abundance. The forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent wetlands identified in the K-25 area perform some or all of these functions to varying degrees.

  15. Lung Function Measurement with Multiple-Breath-Helium Washout System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Owers-Bradley, John; Mellor, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Multiple-breath-washout (MBW) measurements are regarded as a sensitive technique which can reflect the ventilation inhomogeneity of respiratory airways. Typically nitrogen is used as the tracer gas and is washed out by pure oxygen in multi-breath-nitrogen (MBNW) washout tests. In this work, instead of using nitrogen, helium is used as the tracer gas and a multiple-helium-breath-washout (MBHW) system has been developed for the lung function study. A commercial quartz tuning fork with a resonance frequency of 32768 Hz has been used for detecting the change of the respiratory gas density. The resonance frequency of the tuning fork decreases linearly with increasing density of the surrounding gas. Knowing the CO2 concentration from the infrared carbon dioxide detector, the helium concentration can be determined. Results from 12 volunteers (3 mild asthmatics, 2 smokers, 1 with asthma history, 1 with COPD history, 5 normal) have shown that mild asthmatics have higher ventilation inhomogeneity in either conducting o...

  16. Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    Fine sediment in spawning substrate has a major effect on salmon survival from egg to smolt. Basin-wide restoration plans have established targets for fine sediment levels in spawning habitat. The project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Fork John Day (NFJDR) and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years. The project is also investigating the potential relationship between surface fine levels and overwinter sedimentation. It will provide data to assess trends in substrate conditions in monitored reaches and whether trends are consistent with efforts to improve salmon habitat conditions. The data on the magnitude of overwinter sedimentation will also be used to estimate salmon survival from egg to emergence. In Sept. 1998, 1999, and Aug. 2000, sites for monitoring overwinter sedimentation were established in salmon spawning habitat in the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek (a Grande Ronde tributary), the North Fork John Day River (NFJDR), and Granite Creek (a NFJDR tributary). Surface fine sediment levels were measured in these reaches via the grid method and visually estimated to test the relative accuracy of these two methods. In 1999 and 2000, surface fine sediment was also estimated via pebble counts at selected reaches to allow comparison of results among the methods. Overwintering substrate samples were collected in April 1999 and April-May 2000 to estimate the amount of overwinter sedimentation in clean gravels in spawning habitat. Monitoring methods and locations are described.

  17. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1989 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoelscher, Brian

    1990-04-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1989. Estimated kokanee abundance in late August was 7.71 million fish. Decreased population size is the result of lower hatchery and wild fry recruitment and low age 1+ survival. Lower recruitment of wild fry in 1989 resulted from a smaller parental escapement in 1988 and lower wild fry survival. Six fry release strategies were evaluated in 1989. Two groups were released in Clark Fork River to help improve a spawning run to Cabinet Gorge Hatchery. Survival from the mid-summer release, which was barged down Clark Fork River to avoid low flow problems, was not significantly different from the early release. The final assessment of these release strategies will be evaluated when adults return to Cabinet gorge Hatchery in 1992 and 1993. Fry released to support the Sullivan Springs Creek spawning run also survived will in 1989. Two open-water releases were made during early and mid-summer. 30 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  19. Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2008-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

  20. Characterize and Quantify Residual Steelhead in the Clearwater River, Idaho, 1999-2000 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brostrom, Jody K. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

    2006-08-01

    During 1999-2002 we determined whether size at release and release site influenced emigration success and survival of hatchery steelhead smolts raised at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery and released into the Clearwater River drainage. We marked 4,500 smolts each year with Passive Integrated Transponder Tags (PIT-tags) which enabled us to track emigration and estimate survival through mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams. Hatchery steelhead raised in System I freshwater were significantly smaller than those raised in warmer System II re-use water (196 mm, 206 mm, 198 mm and 201 mm System I; 215 mm, 213 mm, 206 mm and 209 mm System II). However, there was no significant difference in detection rates to mainstem observation sites between the two groups (65%, 58%, 78% and 55% System I; 69%, 59%, 74% and 53% System II). Survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam were also not significant between the two groups (72%, 81%, 80% and 77% System I; 77%, 79%, 77%, and 72% System II). Smolts less than 180 mm FL were less likely to be detected than larger smolts. Hatchery steelhead smolts released into Clear Creek, the South Fork Clearwater River and the Clearwater River at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery had significantly different lengths each year, but there was no discernible pattern due to random egg takes and rearing systems. Detection rates to mainstem observation sites for smolts released into Clear Creek were significantly less than the other two groups in all years except 2002 (62%, 57%, 71%, and 57% Clear Creek; 68%, 63%, 73% and 61% South Fork Clearwater River; 70%, 59%, 78% and 55% Clearwater River). However, survival rates to Lower Granite Dam were not significantly different (73%, 65%, 78%, and 77% Clear Creek; 79%, 72%, 79% and 76% South Fork Clearwater River; 81%, 76%, 80% and 83% Clearwater River). Similar to the size at release group, smolts less than 180 mm FL were less likely to get detected than larger smolts. Smolts from both size at release and release site groups that were mature at tagging rarely migrated downstream. If smolts migrated they did it in the same year they were released, as less than 0.02% were observed migrating the second year. We sampled the Clearwater River, North Fork Clearwater River, Bedrock Creek, Big Canyon Creek, Cottonwood Creek, Jacks Creek and the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery adult ladder to collect residual hatchery steelhead. We PIT-tagged and released 3,651 hatchery steelhead and collected 645 hatchery steelhead for coded wire tags. Most residual hatchery steelhead were caught within 4 rkm of Dworshak National Fish Hatchery. Hatchery steelhead sampled in the North Fork Clearwater River and the Dworshak Hatchery adult ladder were significantly larger than those sampled in the Clearwater River and lower tributaries in all years except 2001 (205 mm, 205 mm, 223 mm and 238 mm North Fork Clearwater River; 190 mm, 182 mm, 226 mm and 189 mm Clearwater River). Of the hatchery steelhead we PIT-tagged, only 12% were observed at downstream observation sites. Most migrants were tagged in the Clearwater River (91%) and were smaller than hatchery steelhead that were tagged but were not detected. Most migrants were detected in the same year they were tagged, but 14% held over and migrated in the second year after tagging. We documented migration outside of the normal window, as one detection occurred on October 31 at Lower Granite Dam. We recaptured 130 individual hatchery steelhead that we had tagged during sampling. Over 77% of the recaptures were within one km of where they were tagged, and 67% of the recaptures were tagged in the North Fork Clearwater River and the Dworshak Hatchery adult ladder. We calculated a mean growth rate of 0.27 mm/day for fish we recaptured. For those hatchery steelhead we PIT-tagged, the proportion of males was 13%, the rest we could not ascertain gender. All the males were precocious. Over 97% of the coded-wire tag recoveries came from hatchery steelhead released at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery. The Contribution group (random egg take and rearing system) comp

  1. Forrest Ranch Acquisition, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2003-08-01

    Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

  2. Forrest Ranch Management and Implementation, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2004-01-01

    Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

  3. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-12-01

    This document is the third revision of the 'Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan' for groundwater wells associated with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for: (1) inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12; (2) identifying maintenance needs that extend the life of the well and assure well-head protection is in place, and (3) identifying wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring-well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment. The inspection and maintenance of groundwater monitoring wells is one of the primary management strategies of the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Management Plan, 'proactive stewardship of the extensive monitoring well network at Y-12' (BWXT 2004a). Effective stewardship, and a program of routine inspections of the physical condition of each monitoring well, ensures that representative water-quality monitoring and hydrologic data are able to be obtained from the well network. In accordance with the Y-12 GWPP Monitoring Optimization Plan (MOP) for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (BWXT 2006b), the status designation (active or inactive) for each well determines the scope and extent of well inspections and maintenance activities. This plan, in conjunction with the above document, formalizes the GWPP approach to focus available resources on monitoring wells which provide the most useful data. This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management facilities located within the three hydrogeologic regimes: (1) the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime); (2) the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime); and (3) the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV east of scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime is directly south of Y-12 and encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge that is bound to the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and by Scarboro Road to the east. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime in the 'Updated Subsurface Database for Bear Creek Valley, Chestnut Ridge, and parts of Bethel Valley on the US DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (BWXT 2003a). A detailed description of the hydrogeologic framework at Y-12 can be found in the GWPP Management Plan (BWXT 2004a).

  4. Brigham City Hydro Generation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammons, Tom B.

    2015-10-31

    Brigham City owns and operates its own municipal power system which currently includes several hydroelectric facilities. This project was to update the efficiency and capacity of current hydro production due to increased water flow demands that could pass through existing generation facilities. During 2006-2012, this project completed efficiency evaluation as it related to its main objective by completing a feasibility study, undergoing necessary City Council approvals and required federal environmental reviews. As a result of Phase 1 of the project, a feasibility study was conducted to determine feasibility of hydro and solar portions of the original proposal. The results indicated that the existing Hydro plant which was constructed in the 1960’s was running at approximately 77% efficiency or less. Brigham City proposes that the efficiency calculations be refined to determine the economic feasibility of improving or replacing the existing equipment with new high efficiency equipment design specifically for the site. Brigham City completed the Feasibility Assessment of this project, and determined that the Upper Hydro that supplies the main culinary water to the city was feasible to continue with. Brigham City Council provided their approval of feasibility assessment’s results. The Upper Hydro Project include removal of the existing powerhouse equipment and controls and demolition of a section of concrete encased penstock, replacement of penstock just upstream of the turbine inlet, turbine bypass, turbine shut-off and bypass valves, turbine and generator package, control equipment, assembly, start-up, commissioning, Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), and the replacement of a section of conductors to the step-up transformer. Brigham City increased the existing 575 KW turbine and generator with an 825 KW turbine and generator. Following the results of the feasibility assessment Brigham City pursued required environmental reviews with the DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) concurring with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) It was determined that Brigham City’s Upper Hydroelectric Power Plant upgrade would have no effect to federally listed or candidate species. However Brigham City has contributed a onetime lump sum towards Bonneville cutthroat trout conservation in the Northern Bonneville Geographic Management Unit with the intention to offset any impacts from the Upper Hydro Project needed to move forward with design and construction and is sufficient for NEPA compliance. No work was done in the river or river bank. During construction, the penstock was disconnected and water was diverted through and existing system around the powerhouse and back into the water system. The penstock, which is currently a 30-inch steel pipe, would be removed and replaced with a new section of 30-inch pipe. Brigham City worked with the DOE and was awarded a new modification and the permission to proceed with Phase III of our Hydro Project in Dec. 2013; with the exception to the modification of the award for the construction phase. Brigham City developed and issued a Request for Proposal for Engineer and Design vendor. Sunrise Engineering was selected for the Design and throughout the Construction Phase of the Upper Hydroelectric Power Plant. Brigham City conducted a Kickoff Meeting with Sunrise June 28, 2013 and received a Scope of Work Brigham City along with engineering firm sent out a RFP for Turbine, Generator and Equipment for Upper Hydro. We select Turbine/Generator Equipment from Canyon Industries located in Deming, WA. DOE awarded Brigham City a new modification and the permission to proceed with Phase III Construction of our Hydro Project. Brigham City Crews removed existing turbine/generator and old equipment alone with feeder wires coming into the building basically giving Caribou Construction an empty shell to begin demolition. Brigham City contracted with Caribou Construction from Jerome, Idaho for the Upper Power Plant construction. A kickoff meeting was June 24, 2014 and

  5. PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Pasha, MD Fayzul K; Stewart, Kevin M; Bender, Merlynn; Schneider, Michael L.

    2012-07-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

  6. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam 2008-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2009-09-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam (TDA) sluiceway and turbines during fall/winter 2008 and early spring 2009, respectively. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). Operating the sluiceway reduces the potential for hydropower production. However, this surface flow outlet may be the optimal non-turbine route for fallbacks in late fall after the sluiceway is typically closed for juvenile fish passage and for overwintering summer steelhead and kelt passage in the early spring before the start of the voluntary spill season. The goal of this study was to characterize adult steelhead spatial and temporal distributions and passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines, and their movements in front of the sluiceway at TDA to inform fisheries managers’ and engineers’ decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. The study periods were from November 1 to December 15, 2008 (45 days) and from March 1 to April 9, 2009 (40 days). The study objectives were to 1) estimate the number and distribution of overwintering summer steelhead fallbacks and kelt-sized acoustic targets passing into the sluiceway and turbines at TDA during the two study periods, respectively, and 2) assess the behavior of these fish in front of sluice entrances. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics and fish behavior data using acoustic imaging. For the overwintering summer steelhead, fallback occurred throughout the 45-day study period. We estimated that a total of 1790 ± 250 (95% confidence interval) summer steelhead targets passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices during November 1 to December 15, 2008. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, without the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of steelhead may have fallen back through turbines. Run timing peaked in late November, but fish continued to pass the dam until the end of the study. Horizontal distribution data indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these fish during fallback through the dam. Diel distribution for overwintering steelhead fallbacks was variable with no apparent distinct patterns. Therefore, sluiceway operations should not be based on diel distribution. For the early spring study, overwintering summer steelhead and early out-migrating steelhead kelt downstream passage occurred throughout the 40-day study period. A total of 1766 ± 277 (95% confidence interval) kelt-size targets were estimated to have passed through the powerhouse intakes and operating sluices. Ninety five percent of these fish passed through the sluiceway. Therefore, as with steelhead fallback, not having the sluiceway as a route through the dam, a number of overwintering steelhead and kelts may use the turbines for downstream passage before the start of the spill season. Run timing peaked in late March; however, relatively large numbers of kelt-sized targets passed the dam on March 2 and March 6 (162 and 188 fish, respectively). Horizontal distribution indicated that sluice 1 is the preferred route for these adult salmonids as they migrate downstream through the dam. Again, no clear pattern was seen for diel distribution of overwintering steelhead and early out-migrating kelt passage.

  7. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapoor, Amit; Senthilkumaran, P; Joseph, Joby

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  8. A compact method for matrix decomposition matrix inversion, and solution of simultaneous linear equations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banker, Donald Henry

    1966-01-01

    & j & n+1. (k) (k) The elements of A are defined in terms of the ik row by (2 18) (k) (k-1) (k-1) (k-1) ikk ikk ~1 ik4 i k for 1 & k & n, ik p ik 1, ik-2''''' 1' (2 ] 9) a(k) (a(k 1) 1 (k-1) (k-1) ) ) ] ya(k) kj ikj ~ 1 k ~j k fork& j &n+1; (2.... 85) follows from (2. 84) will be accom- plished by a case by case description of the elements pro- duced by the product R S (k-1} Case 1 i & k & m-1; 1 & j & n. (k) (k-1) ~ ~ (k-1) (k-1) 1"i~ 4] . 1 ii Cj ig (k) ij 36 Case II k&i&n; j &i. (k...

  9. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2005-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2004 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2004. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2004 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2004 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2004 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G contai

  10. Isospin coupling-channel decomposition of nuclear symmetry energy in covariant density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian Zhao; Bao Yuan Sun; Wen Hui Long

    2014-11-23

    The isospin coupling-channel decomposition of the potential energy density functional is carried out within the covariant density functional theory, and their isospin and density dependence in particular the influence on the symmetry energy is studied. It is found that both isospin-singlet and isospin-triplet components of the potential energy play the dominant role in deciding the symmetry energy, especially when the Fock diagram is introduced. The results illustrate a quite different mechanism to the origin of the symmetry energy from the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory, and demonstrate the importance of the Fork diagram in the CDF theory, especially from the isoscalar mesons, in the isospin properties of the in-medium nuclear force at high density.

  11. Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

  12. Determining plutonium mass in spent fuel using Cf-252 interrogation with prompt neutron detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jianwei; Tobin, Stephen J; Menlove, Howard O; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron (CIPN) detection is proposed as one of 14 NDA techniques to determine Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies (FAs). CIPN is a low-cost and portable instrument, and it looks like a modified fork detector combined with an active interrogation source. Fission chamber (FC) is chosen as neutron detector because of its insensitivity to {gamma} radiation. The CIPN assay is comprised of two measurements, a background count and an active count, without and with the {sup 252}Cf source next to the fuel respectively. The net signal above background is primarily due to the multiplication of Cf source neutrons caused by the fissile content. The capability of CIPN to detect diversion and to determine fissile content was quantified using MCNPX simulations. New schemes were proposed (such as burnup and cooling time correction, etc.) and the results show that the fissile content of a target spent fuel assembly can be determined using CIPN signal.

  13. Design criteria Drain Rerouting Project 93-OR-EW-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A--E) in the performance of Title I and II design for the Drain Rerouting Project. The Drain Rerouting project at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will provide the Y-12 Plant with the capability to reroute particular drains within buildings 9202, 9203 and 9995. Process drains that are presently connected to the storm sewer shall be routed to the sanitary sewer to ensure that any objectionable material inadvertently discharged into process drains will not discharge to East Fork Popular Creek (EFPC) without treatment. The project will also facilitate compliance with the Y-12 Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge permit and allow for future pretreatment of once-through coolant.

  14. A Causal Net Approach to Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Bateson

    2012-05-13

    In this paper we discuss a causal network approach to describing relativistic quantum mechanics. Each vertex on the causal net represents a possible point event or particle observation. By constructing the simplest causal net based on Reichenbach-like conjunctive forks in proper time we can exactly derive the 1+1 dimension Dirac equation for a relativistic fermion and correctly model quantum mechanical statistics. Symmetries of the net provide various quantum mechanical effects such as quantum uncertainty and wavefunction, phase, spin, negative energy states and the effect of a potential. The causal net can be embedded in 3+1 dimensions and is consistent with the conventional Dirac equation. In the low velocity limit the causal net approximates to the Schrodinger equation and Pauli equation for an electromagnetic field. Extending to different momentum states the net is compatible with the Feynman path integral approach to quantum mechanics that allows calculation of well known quantum phenomena such as diffraction.

  15. Systems and methods for managing shared-path instrumentation and irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heinold, Mark R.; Berger, John F.; Loper, Milton H.; Runkle, Gary A.

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods permit discriminate access to nuclear reactors. Systems provide penetration pathways to irradiation target loading and offloading systems, instrumentation systems, and other external systems at desired times, while limiting such access during undesired times. Systems use selection mechanisms that can be strategically positioned for space sharing to connect only desired systems to a reactor. Selection mechanisms include distinct paths, forks, diverters, turntables, and other types of selectors. Management methods with such systems permits use of the nuclear reactor and penetration pathways between different systems and functions, simultaneously and at only distinct desired times. Existing TIP drives and other known instrumentation and plant systems are useable with access management systems and methods, which can be used in any nuclear plant with access restrictions.

  16. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  17. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  18. Final technical report; Mercury Release from Organic matter (OM) and OM-Coated Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiken, George

    2014-10-02

    This document is the final technical report for a project designed to address fundamental processes controlling the release of mercury from flood plain soils associated with East Fork Poplar Creek, Tennessee near the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge facility. The report summarizes the activities, findings, presentations, and publications resulting from an award to the U.S. Geological that were part of a larger overall effort including Kathy Nagy (University of Illinois, Chicago, Ill) and Joseph Ryan (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO). The specific charge for the U.S.G.S. portion of the study was to provide analytical support for the larger group effort (Nagy and Ryan), especially with regard to analyses of Hg and dissolved organic matter, and to provide information about the release of mercury from the floodplain soils.

  19. Enhanced sensitivity of a microfabricated resonator using a graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Eunho; Cho, Kilwon; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-08-18

    A graphene layer was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition methods and a polystyrene solution was spin-cast onto the graphene film. The graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane was attached between the two tines of a microfabricated quartz tuning fork (QTF). The modulus of the graphene-polystyrene bilayer was measured to be twice that of a pristine polystyrene membrane. Exposure of the membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor decreased the resonance frequency of the microresonator. The bilayer membrane-coated QTF produced a frequency change that was three times the change obtained using a polystyrene membrane-coated QTF, with a lower degree of degradation in the Q factor. The limit of detection of the bilayer membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor was determined to be 20?ppm.

  20. Multivariate Approaches to Classification in Extragalactic Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Clustering objects into synthetic groups is a natural activity of any science. Astrophysics is not an exception and is now facing a deluge of data. For galaxies, the one-century old Hubble classification and the Hubble tuning fork are still largely in use, together with numerous mono-or bivariate classifications most often made by eye. However, a classification must be driven by the data, and sophisticated multivariate statistical tools are used more and more often. In this paper we review these different approaches in order to situate them in the general context of unsupervised and supervised learning. We insist on the astrophysical outcomes of these studies to show that multivariate analyses provide an obvious path toward a renewal of our classification of galaxies and are invaluable tools to investigate the physics and evolution of galaxies.

  1. Calendar Year 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2005 monitoring data is deferred to the ''Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium'' (BWXT 2006). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and distinguishing sampling characteristics; (3) an evaluation of hydrologic characteristics, based on pre-sampling groundwater elevations, along with a compilation of available test results (e.g., hydraulic conductivity test data); (4) a discussion of geochemical characteristics based on evaluation of the analytical results for the primary anions and cations; and (5) a detailed analysis and interpretation of the available data for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2005 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regime. Section 2 briefly describes the hydrogeologic system and generalized extent of groundwater contamination in each regime. Section 3 describes the monitoring programs implemented and associated sampling activities performed in each regime during CY 2005. Section 4 presents an a summary of the CY 2005 monitoring data with regard to the provisions of DOE Order 450.1 (surveillance and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring), including highlights of notable findings and time-series plots of data for CY 2005 sampling locations that provide representative examples of long-term contaminant concentration trends. Brief conclusions and proposed recommendations are provided in Section 5. Section 6 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Monitoring well construction details are in Appendix C. Results of field measurements and laboratory analyses of the groundwater and surface water samples collected during CY 2005 are in Appendix D (Bear Creek Regime), Appendix E (East Fork Regime and surrounding areas), and Appendix F (Chestnut Ridge Regime). Appendix G co

  2. A diamond-based scanning probe spin sensor operating at low temperature in ultra-high vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer-Nolte, E.; Wrachtrup, J. [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany) [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); 3rd Institute of Physics and Research Center SCoPE, University Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Reinhard, F. [3rd Institute of Physics and Research Center SCoPE, University Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [3rd Institute of Physics and Research Center SCoPE, University Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Ternes, M., E-mail: m.ternes@fkf.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, K. [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany) [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique de la Matičre Condenseé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    We present the design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) low temperature scanning probe microscope employing the nitrogen-vacancy color center in diamond as an ultrasensitive magnetic field sensor. Using this center as an atomic-size scanning probe has enabled imaging of nanoscale magnetic fields and single spins under ambient conditions. In this article we describe an experimental setup to operate this sensor in a cryogenic UHV environment. This will extend the applicability to a variety of molecular systems due to the enhanced target spin lifetimes at low temperature and the controlled sample preparation under UHV conditions. The instrument combines a tuning-fork based atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high numeric aperture confocal microscope and the facilities for application of radio-frequency (RF) fields for spin manipulation. We verify a sample temperature of <50 K even for strong laser and RF excitation and demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging with a magnetic AFM tip.

  3. Legrand BBBP Implementation Model Designed for Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horton, P.

    2013-01-01

    of Operation ? Turn OFF lights ? Plug in fork lifts 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1 :1 5: 01 A M E D T 2 :0 0: 01 A M E D T 2 :4 5: 01 A M E D T 3 :3 0: 01 A M E D T 4 :1 5: 01 A M E D... M E D T 1 0: 15 :0 1 P M E D T 1 1: 00 :0 1 P M E D T 1 1: 45 :0 1 P M E D T 1 2: 30 :0 1 A M E D T Distribution Center Lighting and Battery Submeters April 16, 2013 Battery Lighting 1 :1 5...

  4. Water balance report for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    The Y-12 Plant, which occupies approximately 800 acres, was built by the Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Recently, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, who manages the Y-12 Plant, has been concerned with the effects of water consumption and losses at the plant facility, and the ability of ground water beneath the site to act as a source of water seepage into East Fork Poplar Creek or as a source of water infiltration into subsurface strata. This has prompted the need to perform a water balance study on the facility. Data regarding all uses of municipal water and sources of discharge from the plant were recorded and then water balance calculations were performed using a computer model developed in a multi-dimensional electronic spreadsheet. This report describes the results of this research and includes the flow data collected during the study.

  5. Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpine, J.L. ); Joshi, S.D. )

    1991-08-05

    This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

  6. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

  7. Field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The former YS-860 Firing Ranges are located at the eastern end of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant outside the primary facility fence line and west of Scarboro Road within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. A decision has been made by the US Department of Energy to conduct a removal action of lead-contaminated soils at this site as part of early source actions within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. This non-time critical removal action of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the YS-860 Firing Ranges is being conducted as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 action. These actions are consistent with the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. The removal action will focus on the excavation of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the shooting range berms, transportation of the material to a permitted treatment facility for disposal, demolition and land filling of a concrete trench and asphalt pathways at the site, and grading and revegetating of the entire site. This report is the field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges. The field sampling and analysis plan addresses environmental sampling for lead after the removal of lead-contaminated soil from the target berm area. The objective of this sampling plan is to obtain sufficient analytical data to confirm that the removal action excavation has successfully reduced lead levels in soil to below the action level of 1,400 micrograms/g.

  8. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1986-02-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration in spring, 1984. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week in April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) +- 1 mm.

  9. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2011-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

  10. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1983-1984 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1985-12-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration In spring, 1984. We operated smolt monitoring traps at Whitebird from March 14 to May 12, Snake River from March 22 to May 15 and Clearwater from March 29 to May 13. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week In April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Median migration rates for branded chinook salmon between release sites and Whitebird were 3, 17 and 15 miles/day for Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat smolts, respectively, an average of 11.6 miles/day. Average migration rate for these three groups between Whitebird and Snake River trap was 28 miles/day. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Descaling rate often Increased about 1% at release sites. Classical descaling at Whitebird, Clearwater and Snake River traps averaged 4.5, 2.5 and 1.5% for chinook salmon, 2.1, 0.4 and 1.4% for wild steelhead and 8.7, 4.1 and 5.5% for hatchery steelhead, respectively. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) + 1 mm. The largest chinook salmon smolts came from Dworshak National Fish Hatchery on the Clearwater River. Hatchery steelhead were smallest (2 = 203 mm) at the Clearwater trap and largest (2 = 239 mm) at the Whitebird trap. Wild steelhead were also smallest at Clearwater trap ({bar x} = 178 mm) and largest at Whitebird trap ({bar x} = 193 mm). Purse seining to evaluate rates of descaling before and after smolts passed Lower Granite Dam was largely ineffective since we were unable to catch sufficient numbers of smolts in the tailrace, and winds in the forebay area altered descaling rates in sampled smolts.

  11. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-12-01

    This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated every three years, as specified in the ''Y-12 GWPP Management Plan'' (BWXT 2004). Between scheduled updates of this plan, addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee) will document any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan. The addenda, numbered in consecutive ascending order, will be forwarded to all personnel included on the distribution list for this plan. The addenda are inserted in Appendix C pending the next scheduled update of the plan, which will incorporate the information included in the addenda.

  12. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  13. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison H.A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao

    2014-12-15

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  14. Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

  15. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  16. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle R.H.

    2008-09-25

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

  17. Structural Insights into the Cooperative Binding of SeqA to a Tandem GATC Repeat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Y.; Brendler, T; Austin, S; Guarne, A

    2009-01-01

    SeqA is a negative regulator of DNA replication in Escherichia coli and related bacteria that functions by sequestering the origin of replication and facilitating its resetting after every initiation event. Inactivation of the seqA gene leads to unsynchronized rounds of replication, abnormal localization of nucleoids and increased negative superhelicity. Excess SeqA also disrupts replication synchrony and affects cell division. SeqA exerts its functions by binding clusters of transiently hemimethylated GATC sequences generated during replication. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger formation and disassembly of such complex are unclear. We present here the crystal structure of a dimeric mutant of SeqA [SeqA{Delta}(41-59)-A25R] bound to tandem hemimethylated GATC sites. The structure delineates how SeqA forms a high-affinity complex with DNA and it suggests why SeqA only recognizes GATC sites at certain spacings. The SeqA-DNA complex also unveils additional protein-protein interaction surfaces that mediate the formation of higher ordered complexes upon binding to newly replicated DNA. Based on this data, we propose a model describing how SeqA interacts with newly replicated DNA within the origin of replication and at the replication forks.

  18. Development of a video-based slurry sensor for on-line ash analysis. Final technical report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1996-12-02

    Automatic control of fine coal cleaning circuits has traditionally been limited by the lack of sensors for on-line ash analysis. Although several nuclear-based slurry analyzers are available, none have seen widespread acceptance. This is largely due to the fact that nuclear sensors are expensive and tend to be influenced by changes in seam type and pyrite content. In this investigation, an image analysis technique is used for on-line determination of ash content in fine coal slurries. The ash content of a flotation tailings stream is correlated to the mean gray level of the slurry. Based on a 90% prediction interval, an analysis of sensor performance indicates an accuracy of 73 {+-} 4% ash over a range from 65 - 90% ash. While this result is comparable to existing nuclear-based analyzers, the video-based system is only a fraction of the cost. The sensor is currently being used to monitor the column flotation tailings stream at the Middle Fork preparation plant owned and operated by Pittston Coal Company.

  19. Steelhead Supplementation in Idaho Rivers, 1993-1999 Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Alan

    2001-02-01

    The Steelhead Supplementation Study has conducted field experiments since 1993 that assess the ability of hatchery stocks to reestablish natural populations. We have stocked hatchery adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss trapped at Sawtooth Fish Hatchery in Beaver Creek yearly and Frenchman creeks when enough fish were available. We stocked Dworshak Hatchery stock fingerlings in the South Fork Red River from 1993 to 1996 and smolts in Red River from 1996 to 1999. Although results from all experiments are not complete, preliminary findings indicate that these hatchery stocks will not reestablish natural steelhead populations. We focused most of our effort on monitoring and evaluating wild steelhead stocks. We operated a temporary weir to estimate the wild steelhead escapement in Fish Creek, a tributary of the Lochsa River. We snorkeled streams to monitor juvenile steelhead abundance, captured and tagged steelhead with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags, and recorded stream temperatures in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages. We operated screw traps in five to ten streams each year. We have documented growth rates in Fish and Gedney creeks, age of parr in Fish Creek, Gedney Creek, Lick Creek, and Rapid River, and documented parr and smolt migration characteristics. This report summarizes our effort during the years 1993 to 1999.

  20. Analysis of a Lifting Fixture to Hold a Steel Mandrel Horizontally from one End Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cease, H.; /Fermilab

    1999-04-07

    A lifting fixture (drawing number 3823.113-MD-372382) that lifts large steel mandrels from one end through the mandrel's end support web is described. The mandrels are used as a mold to form carbon fiber cylinders. The mandrels are held from one end to allow the carbon cylinder to be pulled horizontally off the mandrel. Only mandrels as described in drawing numbers 3823.113-MD-358992 and 3823.1 13-MD-358994 are lifted by the fixture. The largest mandrel is 41 inches in diameter, 120 inches long, and weighs approximately 3,000 lbs. A detailed procedure for removing the carbon cylinder from the steel mandrel is given in the Appendix. The fixture is to be supported only using Fermilab Forklift 10207 or equivalent. The forklift has a nameplate capacity of 12,000 lbs 24 inches from the mast at an elevation of 130 inches from the floor. The forklift forks must be removed from the truck prior to using the fixture. The forklift is to be used to support the mandrels only during the lifting operation and is not to be used to transport the mandrels. Stresses at the lifting fixture are shear stresses on the support brackets due to the overall weight of the mandrel and moment loads due to the cantilever style suppOrt. The moment on the forklift due to the overhanging weight of the mandrel is calculated. Stresses in the mandrel due to the method of support are also described.

  1. Remedial investigation report on the abandoned nitric acid pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek OU-2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline. This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately} 4,800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. A total of nineteen locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The nineteen samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Y-12 Plant laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health via incidental ingestion of soil, inhalation of dust, dermal contact with the soil, or external exposure to radionuclides in the ANAP soils, under the construction worker and/or the residential land-use scenarios.

  2. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  3. Easy system call tracing for Plan 9.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnich, Ronald G.

    2010-09-01

    Tracing system calls makes debugging easy and fast. On Plan 9, traditionally, system call tracing has been implemented with acid. New systems do not always implement all the capabilities needed for Acid, particularly the ability to rewrite the process code space to insert breakpoints. Architecture support libraries are not always available for Acid, or may not work even on a supported architecture. The requirement that Acid's libraries be available can be a problem on systems with a very small memory footprint, such as High Performance Computing systems where every Kbyte counts. Finally, Acid tracing is inconvenient in the presence of forks, which means tracing shell pipelines is particularly troublesome. The strace program available on most Unix systems is far more convenient to use and more capable than Acid for system call tracing. A similar system on Plan 9 can simplify troubleshooting. We have built a system calling tracing capability into the Plan 9 kernel. It has proven to be more convenient than strace in programming effort. One can write a shell script to implement tracing, and the C code to implement an strace equivalent is several orders of magnitude smaller.

  4. Preliminary gravity inversion model of basins east of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Phelps; Carter W. Roberts, and Barry C. Moring

    2006-03-17

    The Yucca Flat eastern extension study area, a 14 kilometer by 45 kilometer region contiguous to Yucca Flat on the west and Frenchman Flat on the south, is being studied to expand the boundary of the Yucca Flat hydrogeologic model. The isostatic residual gravity anomaly was inverted to create a model of the depth of the geologic basins within the study area. Such basins typically are floored by dense pre-Tertiary basement rocks and filled with less-dense Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks and Quaternary alluvium, a necessary condition for the use of gravity modeling to predict the depth to the pre-Tertiary basement rocks within the basins. Three models were created: a preferred model to represent the best estimate of depth to pre-Tertiary basement rocks in the study area, and two end-member models to demonstrate the possible range of solutions. The preferred model predicts shallow basins, generally less than 1,000m depth, throughout the study area, with only Emigrant Valley reaching a depth of 1,100m. Plutonium valley and West Fork Scarp Canyon have maximum depths of 800m and 1,000m, respectively. The end-member models indicate that the uncertainty in the preferred model is less than 200m for most of the study area.

  5. Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

    2009-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

  6. Oscillatory elastic instabilities in an extensional viscoelastic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atul Varshney; Eldad Afik; Yoav Kaplan; Victor Steinberg

    2015-10-01

    Dilute polymer solutions are known to exhibit purely elastic instabilities even when the fluid inertia is negligible. Here we report the quantitative evidence of two consecutive oscillatory elastic instabilities in an elongation flow of a dilute polymer solution as realized in a T-junction geometry with a long recirculating cavity. The main result reported here is the observation and characterization of the first transition as a forward Hopf bifurcation resulted in a uniformly oscillating state due to breaking of time translational invariance. This unexpected finding is in contrast with previous experiments and numerical simulations performed in similar ranges of the $Wi$ and $Re$ numbers, where the forward fork-bifurcation into a steady asymmetric flow due to the broken spatial inversion symmetry was reported. We discuss the plausible discrepancy between our findings and previous studies that could be attributed to the long recirculating cavity, where the length of the recirculating cavity plays a crucial role in the breaking of time translational invariance instead of the spatial inversion. The second transition is manifested via time aperiodic transverse fluctuations of the interface between the dyed and undyed fluid streams at the channel junction and advected downstream by the mean flow. Both instabilities are characterized by fluid discharge-rate and simultaneous imaging of the interface between the dyed and undyed fluid streams in the outflow channel.

  7. 1996 Buyer`s Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Buyer`s Guide consists of two sections: a list of vendors by category and an alphabetical list of vendors. The type of equipment and services include: air compressors, air conditioning, gas analysis, pipe anchors, anodes, gas appliances, augers, backhoes, pipe bending machines, billing systems, bits, blasting equipment, gas boilers, boring equipment, gas burners, calorimeters, well casings, cathodic protection equipment and surveys, coating machines, coatings, cogeneration equipment, gas heaters, communications equipment, compactors, compressor stations, computer software, flow computers, portable computers, connectors, consulting services, control equipment, cooling systems, corrosion control systems, couplings, cranes, cutting tools, data acquisition systems, dehydration equipment, gas detectors, drilling machines, engine controls and monitors, engineering services, diesel engines, gas engines, excavators, filters, financial services, fireplace equipment, pipe fittings, flanges, flowmeters, food services, fork lifts, gas furnaces, gas exploration, gas marketing services, gas processing, gas production, gas storage, gas transmission, electric generators, heat exchangers, heating systems, hydrostatic testing services, information systems, instruments, insulation, insurance, expansion joints, leak detectors, legal services, lightning protection, lubricants, meter reading services, meter sets, gas meters, NGV equipment, nondestructive test equipment, odorants, offshore drilling, pigs, pipes, pipe maintenance services, pressure relief valves, pressure vessels, pumps, recording equipment, regulators, risers, safety equipment, gas scrubbers, sealants, security systems, separators, SCADA equipment, survey instruments, tanks, telemetering equipment, tractors, training, trenching equipment, gas turbines, underwater tools, valve actuators, valves, vibration analyzers, gas water heaters, weld inspection, welding equipment, and wires and cables.

  8. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1986 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, William H.; DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James M.

    1986-08-01

    We believe our results have clearly shown Kerr hydroelectric operations and operational constraints have negatively affected Flathead River trout and northern pike populations and the aquatic habitat which support them. Even so, it is possible to mitigate many of these impacts and develop a very important fishery. Trout abundance in the lower Flathead averaged only 19 fish per kilometer, the lowest abundance of trout for a river of this size in Montana. Little main channel spawning by trout was observed and most spawning probably occurs in tributaries. Lower river tributaries support resident populations of brook, rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout; and a small resident population of bull trout is present in the South Fork of the Jocko River. Using weirs, spawning runs of rainbow and brown trout from the main river were monitored entering the Jocko River and the Post/Mission Creek system. Utilization of Crow Creek by main river trout stocks of trout was limited to the 6 km segment below Crow Dam. Evaluations of tributary spawning gravels showed high levels of silt which would suggest poor survival of trout eggs. Excessive harvest in the tributaries was indicated by analysis of age class structure and abundance of trout greater than 200 mm.

  9. U.S.-Russia MPC and A upgrades at the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraev, O. [Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant, Zarechny (Russian Federation); Haase, M.; Smarto, C. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Mikkelsen, K.; Heinberg, C. [Pacific Northwest National Labs., Richland, WA (United States); Showalter, R.; Soo Hoo, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hatcher, C.; Forehand, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-08-01

    During the January 1996 meeting of the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission, the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) was identified as one of the additional sites for cooperative projects on upgrading Materials Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A). Since June 1996, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have worked with BNPP to upgrade MPC and A at the facility. Some unique challenges were encountered because BNPP has an operating BN-600 600-Megawatt breeder reactor. SNL has been responsible for working with BNPP to implement physical protection upgrades to the Central Alarm Station, Fresh Fuel Storage building, Spent Fuel Storage Area, and Vehicle/Personnel Portal. In addition, improved communication equipment for the Ministry of the Interior (MVD) guards and training of personnel were provided. PNNL has been responsible for coordinating Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) upgrades at BNPP. PNNL, in conjunction with LANL, has implemented such MC and A upgrades as a computerized nuclear materials accounting system, training in MC and A elements, nondestructive assay instrumentation for fresh fuel, installation of a fork detector for measuring spent fuel, and installation of an underwater video camera for verification of spent fuel serial numbers.

  10. Geothermal COMPAX drill bit development. Final technical report, July 1, 1976-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.; Flom, D.G.

    1984-04-01

    The objective was to develop and demonstrate the performance of new drill bit designs utilizing sintered polycrystalline diamond compacts for the cutting edges. The scope included instrumented rock cutting experiments under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and pressure, diamond compact wear and failure mode analysis, rock removal modeling, bit design and fabrication, full-scale laboratory bit testing, field tests, and performance evaluation. A model was developed relating rock cutting forces to independent variables, using a statistical test design and regression analysis. Experiments on six rock types, covering a range of compressive strengths from 8 x 10/sup 3/ psi to 51 x 10/sup 3/ psi, provided a satisfactory test of the model. Results of the single cutter experiments showed that the cutting and thrust (penetration) forces, and the angle of the resultant force, are markedly affected by rake angle, depth of cut, and speed. No unusual force excursions were detected in interrupted cutting. Wear tests on two types of diamond compacts cutting Jack Fork Sandstone yielded wear rates equivalent at high cutting speeds, where thermal effects are probably operative. At speeds below approx. 400 surface feet per minute (sfm), the coarser sintered diamond product was superior. 28 refs., 235 figs., 55 tabs.

  11. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    This is the second annual storm water report prepared in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) on December 1, 2011, and the corresponding Y-12 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) which became effective on September 7, 2012. However, Appendix A does contain some analytical data gathered under the previous NPDES permit and SWP3 for comparison purposes. The quality of storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek remained relatively stable from 2012 to 2013. However, there was one largely unexpected high concentration of mercury noted in an area that is not known to have previously been a mercury use area. This was noted in Sector AA, Outfall 014. This outfall is normally sampled on a rotating basis but, due this elevated concentration, will be sampled again in 2014. The Y-12 Complex will continue to implement appropriate BMPs and reduce outside material storage ares where possible. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and timely implementation of proper storm water control measures.

  12. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1985-02-01

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Progress and Future Plans for Mercury Remediation at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 13059

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkerson, Laura O. [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); DePaoli, Susan M. [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Turner, Ralph [P.O. Box 421, Squamish, BC V8B 0A4 (United States)] [P.O. Box 421, Squamish, BC V8B 0A4 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), along with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has identified mercury contamination at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) as the highest priority cleanup risk on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The historic loss of mercury to the environment dwarfs any other contaminant release on the ORR. Efforts over the last 20 years to reduce mercury levels leaving the site in the surface waters of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) have not resulted in a corresponding decrease in mercury concentrations in fish. Further reductions in mercury surface water concentrations are needed. Recent stimulus funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) has supported several major efforts involving mercury cleanup at Y-12. Near-term implementation activities are being pursued with remaining funds and include design of a centrally located mercury treatment facility for waterborne mercury, treatability studies on mercury-contaminated soils, and free mercury removal from storm drains. Out-year source removal will entail demolition/disposal of several massive uranium processing facilities along with removal and disposal of underlying contaminated soil. As a National Priorities List (NPL) site, cleanup is implemented under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and directed by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between DOE, EPA, and TDEC. The CERCLA process is followed to plan, reach approval, implement, and monitor the cleanup. (authors)

  14. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in themore »hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.« less

  15. Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Galbreath

    2009-06-30

    Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

  16. Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather-Blair, Signe

    1985-02-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

  18. Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Fleet Deployment Projects Final Technical Report May 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingler, James J

    2014-05-06

    The overall objectives of this project were to evaluate the performance, operability and safety of fork lift trucks powered by fuel cells in large distribution centers. This was accomplished by replacing the batteries in over 350 lift trucks with fuel cells at five distribution centers operated by GENCO. The annual cost savings of lift trucks powered by fuel cell power units was between $2,400 and $5,300 per truck compared to battery powered lift trucks, excluding DOE contributions. The greatest savings were in fueling labor costs where a fuel cell powered lift truck could be fueled in a few minutes per day compared to over an hour for battery powered lift trucks which required removal and replacement of batteries. Lift truck operators where generally very satisfied with the performance of the fuel cell power units, primarily because there was no reduction in power over the duration of a shift as experienced with battery powered lift trucks. The operators also appreciated the fast and easy fueling compared to the effort and potential risk of injury associated with switching heavy batteries in and out of lift trucks. There were no safety issues with the fueling or operation of the fuel cells. Although maintenance costs for the fuel cells were higher than for batteries, these costs are expected to decrease significantly in the next generation of fuel cells, making them even more cost effective.

  19. Subtask 1.8 - Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethany Kurz; Darren Schmidt; Steven Smith Christopher Beddoe; Corey Lindeman; Blaise Mibeck

    2012-07-31

    Given the importance of hydraulic fracturing and proppant performance for development of the Bakken and Three Forks Formations within the Williston Basin, a study was conducted to evaluate the key factors that may result in conductivity loss within the reservoirs. Various proppants and reservoir rock cores were exposed to several different fracturing and formation fluids at reservoir conditions. The hardness of the rock cores and the strength of the proppants were evaluated prior to and following fluid exposure. In addition, the conductivity of various proppants, as well as formation embedment and spalling, was evaluated at reservoir temperatures and pressures using actual reservoir rock cores. The results of this work suggest that certain fluids may affect both rock and proppant strength, and therefore, fluid exposure needs to be considered in the field. In addition, conductivity decreases within the Bakken Formation appear to be a function of a variety of factors, including proppant and rock strength, as well as formation embedment and spalling. The results of this study highlight the need for advanced conductivity testing, coupled with quantification of formation embedment and spalling. Given the importance of proppant performance on conductivity loss and, ultimately, oil recovery, better understanding the effects of these various factors on proppant and rock strength in the field is vital for more efficient production within unconventional oil and gas reservoirs.

  20. Update on the Stockpile Monitor Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, T.; Harry, H.H.

    1999-04-01

    In 1991 the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) launched a program to develop a comprehensive database of warhead storage conditions. Because of the extended lifetimes expected of the Stockpile, it became desirable to obtain as much detailed information on the storage environments as possible. Temperature and relative humidity at various facilities capable of storing and/or handling nuclear weapons were used as monitoring locations. The Stockpile Monitor Program (SMP) was implemented in a variety of locations as illustrated in a figure. Probably the most useful data come from the most extreme conditions monitored. The hottest outside temperatures and relative humidities come from Barksdale, while some of the lowest relative humidity values come from Nellis, which continue to be monitored. The coldest conditions come from Grand Forks, Griffiss, and KI Sawyer, none of which are presently being monitored. For this reason, the authors would like to begin monitoring Minot, ND. The outside extreme temperatures are ameliorated by the structures to a significant degree. For example, the hottest outside temperature (120 F) is contrasted by the corresponding cooler inside temperature (85 F), and the coldest outside temperature ({minus}35 F) is contrasted by the corresponding warmer inside temperature (+25 F). These data have become useful for calculations related to stockpile-to-target sequence (STS) and other analyses. SMP information has been provided to a number of outside agencies.

  1. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1992-04-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

  2. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1986 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1987-02-01

    Estimated kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) abundance in Lake Pend Oreille was 4.3 million during September 1986. This estimate was similar to 1985 and indicates continued suppression of the kokanee population since initial decline in the late 1960s. Atypically high survival of wild fry resulted in similar fry recruitment in 1986 as 1985, whereas hatchery-reared fry contributed only 8% to total fry recruitment as a result of low post-release survival (3%). Fry released into the Clark Fork River from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery had very low survival during emigration to Lake Pend Oreille, resulting from poor flow conditions and potentially high predation. Fry survival during emigration was twice as high during nighttime flows of 16,000 cfs than 7,800 cfs. Emigration also was faster during higher flows. Several marks were tested to differentially mark fry release groups to help determine impacts of flow and other factors on fry survival. Survival of fry marked with tetracycline and fluorescent dye was high (>99%) during the 10-week study. In contrast, survival of fry marked with fluorescent grit marks ranged from 5 to 93%, depending on application pressure and distance from the fry. Retention was high (>96%) for tetracycline and grit marks during the study, whereas dye marks were discernible (100%) for only one week. 23 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  4. High quality factor nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators limited by thermoelastic damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najar, Hadi; Chan, Mei-Lin; Yang, Hsueh-An; Lin, Liwei; Cahill, David G.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-04-14

    We demonstrate high quality factor thin-film nanocrystalline diamond micromechanical resonators with quality factors limited by thermoelastic damping. Cantilevers, single-anchored and double-anchored double-ended tuning forks, were fabricated from 2.5??m thick in-situ boron doped nanocrystalline diamond films deposited using hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Thermal conductivity measured by time-domain thermoreflectance resulted in 24?±?3?W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} for heat transport through the thickness of the diamond film. The resonant frequencies of the fabricated resonators were 46?kHz–8?MHz and showed a maximum measured Q???86?000 at f{sub n}?=?46.849?kHz. The measured Q-factors are shown to be in good agreement with the limit imposed by thermoelastic dissipation calculated using the measured thermal conductivity. The mechanical properties extracted from resonant frequency measurements indicate a Young's elastic modulus of ?788?GPa, close to that of microcrystalline diamond.

  5. Superpenumbral fibrils powered by sunspot oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Park, Hyungmin; Maurya, Ram Ajor; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Yurchysyn, Vasyl

    2014-07-10

    It is still a mystery how the solar chromosphere can stand high above the photosphere. The dominant portion of this layer must be dynamically supported, as is evident by the common occurrence of jets such as spicules and mottles in quiet regions, and fibrils and surges in active regions. Hence, revealing the driving mechanism of these chromospheric jets is crucial for our understanding of how the chromosphere itself exists. Here, we report our observational finding that fibrils in the superpenumbra of a sunspot are powered by sunspot oscillations. We find patterns of outward propagation that apparently originate from inside the sunspot, propagate like running penumbral waves, and develop into the fibrils. Redshift ridges seen in the time-distance plots of velocity often merge, forming a fork-like pattern. The predominant period of these shock waves increases, often jumping with distance, from 3 minutes to 10 minutes. This short-to-long period transition seems to result from the selective suppression of shocks by the falling material of their preceding shocks. Based on our results, we propose that the fibrils are driven by slow shock waves with long periods that are produced by the merging of shock waves with shorter periods propagating along the magnetic canopy.

  6. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  7. Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project - Replacement of Current Mechanical Seal System with Rope Packing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Jessica D.

    2013-05-29

    On January 27, 2010 the City of North Little Rock, Arkansas received notification of the awarding of a Department of Energy (DOE) grant totaling $450,000 in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Project Title: Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project – Automated Intake Clearing Equipment and Materials Management. The purpose of the grant was for improvements to be made at the City’s hydroelectric generating facility located on the Arkansas River. Improvements were to be made through the installation of an intake maintenance device (IMD) and the purchase of a large capacity wood grinder. The wood grinder was purchased in order to receive the tree limbs, tree trunks, and other organic debris that collects at the intake of the plant during high flow. The wood grinder eliminates the periodic burning of the waste material that is cleared from the intake and reduces any additional air pollution to the area. The resulting organic mulch has been made available to the public at no charge. Design discussion and planning began immediately and the wood grinder was purchased in July of 2010 and immediately put to work mulching debris that was gathered regularly from the intake of the facility. The mulch is currently available to the public for free. A large majority of the design process was spent in discussion with the Corps of Engineers to obtain approval for drawings, documents, and permits that were required in order to make changes to the structure of the powerhouse. In April of 2011, the City’s Project Engineer, who had overseen the application, resigned and left the City’s employ. A new Systems Mechanical Engineer was hired and tasked with overseeing the project. The transfer of responsibility led to a re-examination of the original assumptions and research upon which the grant proposal was based. At that point, the project went under review and a trip was booked for July 2011 to visit facilities that currently had an IMD installed. This further study of facilities revealed that the implementation of the project as originally described, while proving the benefits described in the original grant application, would likely intensify sand intake. Increased sand intake would lead to an increase in required shutdowns for maintenance and more rapid depreciation of key equipment which would result in a loss of generation capacity. A better solution to the problem, one that continued to meet the criteria for the original grant and ARRA standards, was developed. A supporting day trip was planned to visit other facilities located on the Arkansas River to determine how they were coping with the same strong amounts of sand, silt, and debris. Upon returning from the trip to other Arkansas River facilities it was extremely clear what direction to go in order to most efficiently address the issue of generator capacity and efficiency. Of the plants visited on the Arkansas River, every one of them was running what is called a rope packing shaft sealing system as opposed to mechanical shaft seals, which the facility was running. Rope packing is a time proven sealing method that has been around for centuries. It has proved to perform very well in dirty water situations just like that of the Arkansas River. In April of 2012 a scope change proposal was submitted to the DOE for approval. In August of 2012 the City received word that the change of scope had been approved. Plans were immediately set in motion to begin the conversion from mechanical seals to a packing box at the facility. Contractors arrived on October 1st, 2012 and the project team began unwatering the unit for disassembly. The seal conversion was completed on February 29th, 2013 with start-up of the unit. Further testing and adjusting was done throughout the first two weeks of March.

  8. Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone 1, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2011-02-01

    Zone 1 is a 1400-acre area outside the fence of the main plant at The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Record of Decision for Interim Actions in Zone, ETTP (Zone 1 Interim ROD) (DOE 2002) identifies the remedial actions for contaminated soil, buried waste, and subsurface infrastructure necessary to protect human health and to limit further contamination of groundwater. Since the Zone 1 Interim Record of Decision (ROD) was signed, new information has been obtained that requires the remedy to be modified as follows: (1) Change the end use in Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA) from unrestricted industrial to recreational; (2) Remove Exposure Units (EU5) ZI-50, 51, and 52 from the scope of the Zone I Interim ROD; (3) Change the end use of the duct bank corridor from unrestricted industrial to restricted industrial; and (4) Remove restriction for the disturbance of soils below 10 feet in Exposure Unit (EU) Z1-04. In accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300.435, these scope modifications are a 'significant' change to the Zone 1 Interim ROD. In accordance with CERCLA Sect. 117 (c) and 40 CFR 300.435 (c)(2)(i), such a significant change is documented with an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD). The purpose of this ESD is to make the changes listed above. This ESD is part of the Administrative Record file, and it, and other information supporting the selected remedy, can be found at the DOE Information Center, 475 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The ORR is located in Roane and Anderson counties, within and adjacent to the corporate city limits of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ETTP is located in Roane County near the northwest corner of the ORR. ETTP began operation during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. The original mission of ETTP was to produce enriched uranium for use in atomic weapons. The plant produced enriched uranium from 1945 until 1985. Uranium production was terminated in 1987. ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, so remediation activities are conducted under CERCLA. The primary contaminants of concern at ETTP follow: (1) In groundwater - volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at multiple locations (trichloroethene is generally the most prevalent compound); (2) In sediment - inorganic elements, radionuclides, and polychlorinated biphenyls; (3) In soil - inorganic elements, radionuclides, semivolatile organic compounds (particularly the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and VOCs; and (4) In facilities - radionuclides and polychlorinated biphenyls (abandoned facilities also pose a safety and health hazard to workers.) The purposes of the remedial actions selected in the Zone 1 Interim ROD are to allow unrestricted industrial use down to 10 feet and to remediate potential sources of groundwater contamination. Following is a summary of the major components of the Zone 1 Interim ROD remedy: (1) Excavation of the Blair Quarry burial area and associated contaminated soil; (2) Excavation of miscellaneous contaminated soil in the K-895 Cylinder Destruct Facility area and in the Powerhouse Area; (3) Removal of sludge and demolition of the K-710 sludge beds and Imhoff tanks; (4) Implementation of land use controls (LUCs); and (5) Characterization of soil and remediation of areas that exceed remediation levels.

  9. Calendar Year 2011 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental LLC,

    2012-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2011 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. This report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and known extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) contractor responsible for environmental cleanup on the ORR. In August 2011, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) replaced Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) as the DOE EM contractor. For this report, BJC/UCOR will be referenced as the managing contractor for CY 2011. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2011 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. This report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC/UCOR. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC. Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2011 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR address DOE Order 436.1 and DOE Order 458.1 requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring) and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). This report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. This report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

  10. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  11. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-07-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of the study was to provide fish passage and distribution data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. During the year-long study period - February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011the objectives of the hydroacoustic evaluation of fish passage and distribution at LOP were to: 1. Estimate passage rates, run timing, horizontal distribution, and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for smolt-size fish. 2. Estimate passage rates, run timing and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for small-size fish. 3. Estimate passage rates and run timing at the regulating outlets for smolt-size fish. 4. Estimate vertical distribution of smolt-size fish in the forebay near the upstream face of the dam. The fixed-location hydroacoustic technique was used to accomplish the objectives of this study. Transducers (420 kHz) were deployed in each penstock intake, above each RO entrance, and on the dam face; a total of nine transducers (2 single-beam and 7 split-beam) were used. We summarize the findings from the hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011 as follows. • Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> ~90 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. • During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish ± 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. • Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. • Run timing for small-size fish (~65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Downstream passage of small-size juvenile fish was variable, occurring on two days in the spring, eight days in the summer, and at times throughout late fall and winter. A total of 7,017 ± 690 small-size fish passed through the turbine penstock intakes during the study period. • Relatively few fish passed into the ROs when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). • Fish were surface-oriented with 62-80% above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30-60%) was in the 5-10 m depth bin. We draw the following conclusions from the study. • The non-obtrusive hydroacoustic data from this study are reliable because passage estimates and patterns were similar with those observed in the direct capture data from the tailrace screw trap and were consistent with distribution patterns observed in other studies of juvenile salmonid passage at dams. • Fish passage at LOP was apparently affected but not dominated by dam operations and reservoir elevation. • The surface-oriented vertical distribution of fish we observed supports development of surface passage or collector devices. In summary, the high-resolution spatially and temporally data reported herein provide detailed estimates of vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal passage and distributions at LOP during March 2010 through January 2011. This information is applicable to management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collections devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above Lookout Point Dam.

  12. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-05-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and < 300 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. Passage peaks were also evident in early spring, early summer, and late fall. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (P<0.001). This relationship was positive, but there was no relationship between total project passage and forebay elevation (P=0.48) or forebay elevation delta, i.e., day-to-day change in forebay elevation (P=0.16). In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed data well. The multiple regression model indicates a positive trend between expected daily fish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

  13. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K.; Doublet, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  14. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  15. Hydrophobic Dewatering of Fine Coal. Topical report, March 1, 1995-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R.; Sohn, S.; Luttrell, J.; Phillips, D.

    1997-12-31

    Many advanced fine coal cleaning technologies have been developed in recent years under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy. However, they are not as widely deployed in industry as originally anticipated. An important reason for this problem is that the cleaned coal product is difficult to dewater because of the large surface area associated with fine particles. Typically, mechanical dewatering, such as vacuum filtration and centrifugation, can reduce the moisture to 20-35% level, while thermal drying is costly. To address this important industrial problem, Virginia Tech has developed a novel dewatering process, in which water is displaced from the surface of fine particulate materials by liquid butane. Since the process is driven by the hydrophobic interaction between coal and liquid butane, it was referred to as hydrophobic dewatering (HD). A fine coal sample with 21.4 pm median size was subjected to a series of bench-scale HD tests. It was a mid-vol bituminous coal obtained from the Microcel flotation columns operating at the Middle Fork coal preparation plant, Virginia. All of the test results showed that the HD process can reduce the moisture to substantially less than 10%. The process is sensitive to the amount of liquid butane used in the process relative to the solids concentration in the feed stream. Neither the intensity nor the time of agitation is critical for the process. Also, the process does not require long time for phase separation. Under optimal operating conditions, the moisture of the fine coal can be reduced to 1% by weight of coal.

  16. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993--May 12, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division`s efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division`s efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE`s compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division`s findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division`s request to be an active participant in DOE`s prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year`s annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division`s office.

  17. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, R.Todd

    1996-05-01

    During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

  18. Storm water runoff for the Y-12 Plant and selected parking lots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of storm water runoff from the Y-12 Plant and selected employee vehicle parking lots to various industry data is provided in this document. This work is an outgrowth of and part of the continuing Non-Point Source Pollution Elimination Project that was initiated in the late 1980s. This project seeks to identify area pollution sources and remediate these areas through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process as managed by the Environmental Restoration Organization staff. This work is also driven by the Clean Water Act Section 402(p) which, in part, deals with establishing a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges. Storm water data from events occurring in 1988 through 1991 were analyzed in two reports: Feasibility Study for the Best Management Practices to Control Area Source Pollution Derived from Parking Lots at the DOE Y-12 Plant, September 1992, and Feasibility Study of Best Management Practices for Non-Point Source Pollution Control at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, February 1993. These data consisted of analysis of outfalls discharging to upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) within the confines of the Y-12 Plant (see Appendixes D and E). These reports identified the major characteristics of concern as copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nitrate (as nitrogen), zinc, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliform, and aluminum. Specific sources of these contaminants were not identifiable because flows upstream of outfalls were not sampled. In general, many of these contaminants were a concern in many outfalls. Therefore, separate sampling exercises were executed to assist in identifying (or eliminating) specific suspected sources as areas of concern.

  19. Expansion of decline curve parameters for tight gas sands with massive hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, T.

    1995-12-31

    With the advances in modern hydrocarbon technology and expansion of geologic settings for development, it is necessary to make changes to the conventional wisdoms that accompany production technology. This paper discusses some possible changes that necessitate implementation as observed both empirically and analytically. Specifically it discusses the time at which a decline curve can be implemented for production forecasting, the need for a dual decline model, and the severity of the decline variable that may be used for this model. It is the point of this paper to prove that for fight gas sands with massive hydraulic fractures that it is not only feasible to use decline variables that are greater than the traditional limit of harmonic or 1.0, but that the decline curve may also be implemented in the transient flow period of the well and decline both hyperbolically and exponentially. These ideas were not only proven through field study, but were additionally modeled with a fracture flow simulator. In order to prove these points this paper first introduces the Red Fork Formation and the development of an initial field model curve for this formation. After the initial model was developed, questions arose as to its feasibility. These questions were first addressed with a literature survey and further comparisons were made to test the models accuracy using pressure decline analysis and a fracture flow simulator. All of these methods were used to justify the implementation of a decline exponent as high as 2.1 for a hyperbolic curve during the early transient flow period, and regressing this hyperbolic into an exponential decline in the pseudo-steady state period.

  20. Long-Term Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community Monitoring to Assess Pollution Abatement Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Brandt, Craig C; Christensen, Sigurd W

    2011-01-01

    The benthic macroinvertebrate community of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in East Tennessee was monitored for 18 years to evaluate the effectiveness of a water pollution control program implemented at a major United States (U.S.) Department of Energy facility. Several actions were implemented to reduce and control releases of pollutants into the headwaters of the stream. Four of the most significant actions were implemented during different time periods, which allowed assessment of each action. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected annually in April from three locations in EFPC (EFK24, EFK23, and EFK14) and two nearby reference streams from 1986 through 2003. Significant improvements occurred in the macroinvertebrate community at the headwater sites (EFK24 and EFK23) after implementation of each action, while changes detected 9 km further downstream (EFK14) could not be clearly attributed to any of the actions. Because the stream was impacted at its origin, invertebrate recolonization was primarily limited to aerial immigration, thus, recovery has been slow. As recovery progressed, abundances of small pollution-tolerant taxa (e.g., Orthocladiinae chironomids) decreased and longer lived taxa colonized (e.g., hydropsychid caddisflies, riffle beetles, Baetis). While assessments lasting three to four years may be long enough to detect a response to new pollution controls at highly impacted locations, more time may be needed to understand the full effects. Studies on the effectiveness of pollution controls can be improved if impacted and reference sites are selected to maximize spatial and temporal trending, and if a multidisciplinary approach is used to broadly assess environmental responses (e.g., water quality trends, invertebrate and fish community assessments, toxicity testing, etc.).

  1. Simulating and evaluating best management practices for integrated landscape management scenarios in biofuel feedstock production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ha, Miae; Wu, May

    2015-09-08

    Sound crop and land management strategies can maintain land productivity and improve the environmental sustainability of agricultural crop and feedstock production. With this study, it evaluates a strategy of incorporating landscape design and management concepts into bioenergy feedstock production. It examines the effect of land conversion and agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on water quality (nutrients and suspended sediments) and hydrology. The strategy was applied to the watershed of the South Fork Iowa River in Iowa, where the focus was on converting low-productivity land to provide cellulosic biomass and implementing riparian buffers. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) wasmore »employed to simulate the impact at watershed and sub-basin scales. The study compared the representation of buffers by using trapping efficiency and area ratio methods in SWAT. Landscape design and management scenarios were developed to quantify water quality under (i) current land use, (ii) partial land conversion to switchgrass, and (iii) riparian buffer implementation. Results show that implementation of vegetative barriers and riparian buffer can trap the loss of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment significantly. The effect increases with the increase of buffer area coverage. Implementing riparian buffer at 30 m width is able to produce 4 million liters of biofuels. When low-productivity land (15.2% of total watershed land area) is converted to grow switchgrass, suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and nitrate loadings are reduced by 69.3%, 55.5%, 46.1%, and 13.4%, respectively. The results highlight the significant role of lower-productivity land and buffers in cellulosic biomass and provide insights into the design of an integrated landscape with a conservation buffer for future bioenergy feedstock production.« less

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY: A SUMMARY REPORT OF ACTIVITIES COMPLETED AT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY FROM 2005 TO 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Holmes

    2011-05-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energyâ??s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHTâ??s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT projectâ??s 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  3. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1987 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1988-05-01

    Estimated kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka abundance in Lake Pend Oreille was 6.01 million during late summer 1987. This estimate is 40% higher than the 1986 estimate and is the second largest population estimate since 1977. Higher abundance is predominantly a result of enhanced fry survival and recruitment. Hatchery-reared fry contribution was 22% of total fry recruitment in 1987, compared to 8% in 1986, and resulted from a fivefold increase in survival. Much of this improvement can be attributed to the large (52 mm) fry produced at Cabinet Gorge Hatchery in 1987 and represents the first measurable contribution of the new hatchery to the kokanee rehabilitation program. Survival of hatchery-reared fry released into Clark Fork River was nearly one-half that of fry released into Sullivan Springs due to poor flow conditions and potentially high predation during migration from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery to Lake Pend Oreille. Wild fry survival was enhanced by early availability of forage (cladocern zooplankton) during fry emergence in late spring. Cladoceran production began three weeks earlier in 1987 than 1986, which resulted from reduced Mysis abundance and earlier thermal stratification of Lake Pend Oreille, which helped segregate cladocerans from mysid predation. Kokanee dry otolith coding was evaluated to provide a reliable long-term mark. Analysis of daily growth increments on otoliths was used successfully in 1987 to differentiate fry from various release sites. The technique will be refined during 1988 to include coding fry otoliths with water temperature fluctuations during hatchery residence. 23 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Michael

    2012-05-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  5. Development of a container for the transportation and storage of plutonium bearing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.; Geinitz, R.; Thorp, D.; Rivera, M.

    1998-03-01

    There is a large backlog of plutonium contaminated materials at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Denver, Colorado, USA. The clean-up of this site requires this material to be packaged in such a way as to allow for efficient transportation to other sites or to a permanent geologic repository. Prior to off-site shipment of the material, it may be stored on-site for a period of time. For this reason, it is desirable to have a container capable of meeting the requirements for storage as well as the requirements for transportation. Most of the off-site transportation is envisioned to take place using the TRUPACT-II Type B package, with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as the destination. Prior to the development of this new container, the TRUPACT-II had a limit of 325 FGE (fissile gram equivalents) of plutonium due to criticality control concerns. Because of the relatively high plutonium content in the material to be transported, transporting 325 FGE per TRUPACT-II is uneconomical. Thus, the purpose of the new containers is to provide criticality control to increase the allowed TRUPACT-II payload and to provide a safe method for on-site storage prior to transport. This paper will describe the analysis and testing used to demonstrate that the Pipe Overpack Container provides safe on-site storage of plutonium bearing materials in unhardened buildings and provides criticality control during transportation within the TRUPACT-II. Analyses included worst-case criticality analyses, analyses of fork-lift time impacts, and analyses of roof structure collapse onto the container. Testing included dynamic crush tests, bare pipe impact tests, a 30-minute totally engulfing pool-fire test, and multiple package impact tests in end-on and side-on orientations.

  6. Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

    1996-12-01

    Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

  7. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore »represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  8. Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Coutant, Charles C

    2006-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

  9. Remediation of Mercury-Contaminated Storm Sewer Sediments from the West End Mercury Area at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 12061

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tremaine, Diana [Science and Ecology Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37931 (United States); Douglas, Steven G. [B and W Y-12, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN has faced an ongoing challenge from mercury entrapped in soils beneath and adjacent to buildings, storm sewers, and process pipelines. Previous actions to reduce the quantity and/or mobilization of mercury-contaminated media have included plugging of building floor drains, cleaning of sediment and sludge from sumps, manholes, drain lines, and storm sewers, lining/relining of storm sewers and replacement of a portion of the storm sewer trunk line, re-routing and removal of process piping, and installation of the Central Mercury Treatment System to capture and treat contaminated sump water. Despite the success of these actions, mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls that discharge to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) continues to pose a threat to long-term water quality. A video camera survey of the storm sewer network revealed several sections of storm sewer that had large cracks, separations, swells, and accumulations of sediment/sludge and debris. The selected remedy was to clean and line the sections of storm sewer pipe that were determined to be primary contributors to the mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls. The project, referred to as the West End Mercury Area (WEMA) Storm Sewer Remediation Project, included cleaning sediment and debris from over 2,460 meters of storm sewer pipe followed by the installation of nearly 366 meters of cure-in-place pipe (CIPP) liner. One of the greatest challenges to the success of this project was the high cost of disposal associated with the mercury-contaminated sludge and wastewater generated from the storm sewer cleaning process. A contractor designed and operated an on-site wastewater pre-treatment system that successfully reduced mercury levels in 191 cubic meters of sludge to levels that allowed it to be disposed at Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS) disposal cell as a non-hazardous, low-level waste. The system was also effective at pre-treating over 1,514,000 liters of wastewater to levels that met the waste acceptance criteria for the on-site West End [wastewater] Treatment Facility (WETF). This paper describes the storm sewer cleaning and lining process and the methods used to process the mercury-contaminated sludge and wastewater, as well as several 'lessons learned' that would be relevant to any future projects involving storm sewer cleaning and debris remediation. (authors)

  10. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn

    2006-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  11. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn

    2006-06-26

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  12. Texas Hydrogen Education Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitchcock, David; Bullock, Dan

    2011-06-30

    The Texas Hydrogen Education project builds on past interest in hydrogen and fuel cells to help create better informed leaders and stakeholders and thereby improve decision making and planning for inclusion of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as energy alternatives in Texas. In past years in Texas, there was considerable interest and activities about hydrogen and fuel cells (2000-­?2004). During that time, the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) created a fuel cell consortium and a fuel cell testing lab. Prior to 2008, interest and activities had declined substantially. In 2008, in cooperation with the Texas H2 Coalition and the State Energy Conservation Office, HARC conducted a planning process to create the Texas Hydrogen Roadmap. It was apparent from analysis conducted during the course of this process that while Texas has hydrogen and fuel cell advantages, there was little program and project activity as compared with other key states. Outreach and education through the provision of informational materials and organizing meetings was seen as an effective way of reaching decision makers in Texas. Previous hydrogen projects in Texas had identified the five major urban regions for program and project development. This geographic targeting approach was adopted for this project. The project successfully conducted the five proposed workshops in four of the target metropolitan areas: San Antonio, Houston, Austin, and the Dallas-­?Ft. Worth area. In addition, eight outreach events were included to further inform state and local government leaders on the basics of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The project achieved its primary objectives of developing communication with target audiences and assembling credible and consistent outreach and education materials. The major lessons learned include: (1) DOE’s Clean Cities programs are a key conduit to target transportation audiences, (2) real-­?world fuel cell applications (fuel cell buses, fuel cell fork lifts, and hydrogen fueling) are effective for engaging target audiences, and (3) a clear path forward is needed for state and local agencies interested in project implementation (funding, financing, preliminary design, technical assistance, etc.).

  13. Final Project Report: "Â?Â?Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury"Â?Âť

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    This is the final project report for award DE-SC0005351, which supported the research project "Â?Â?Exploratory Research: Mercury Stable Isotopes as Indicators of the Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury."Â?Âť This exploratory project investigated the use of mercury (Hg) stable isotope measurements as a new approach to study how Hg moves and changes its chemical form in environmental systems, with particular focus on the East Fork of Poplar Creek (EFPC) near the DOE Y-12 plant (a Hg contamination source). This study developed analytical methods and collected pilot data that have set the stage for more detailed studies and have begun to provide insights into Hg movement and chemical changes. The overall Hg stable isotope approach was effective. The Hg isotope analysis methods yielded high-precision measurements of the sediment, water, and fish samples analyzed; quality control measures demonstrated the precision. The pilot data show that the 202Hg/198Hg, 199Hg/198Hg, and 201Hg/198Hg isotope ratios vary in this system. 202Hg/198Hg ratios of the Hg released from the Y-12 plant are relatively high, and those of the regional Hg background in soils and river sediments are significantly lower. Unfortunately, 202Hg/198Hg differences that might have been useful to distinguish early Hg releases from later releases were not observed. However, 202Hg/198Hg ratios in sediments do provide insights into chemical transformations that may occur as Hg moves through the system. Furthermore, 199Hg/198Hg and 201Hg/198Hg ratio analyses of fish tissues indicate that the effects of sunlight-driven chemical reactions on the Hg that eventually ends up in EFPC fish are measureable, but small. These results provide a starting point for a more detailed study (already begun at Univ. of Michigan) that will continue Hg isotope ratio work aimed at improving understanding of how Hg moves, changes chemically, and does or does not take on more highly toxic forms in the Oak Ridge area. This work also benefits efforts to trace Hg contamination in the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers, into which EFPC flows, and to distinguish Hg from the Y-12 plant from that released from a nearby coal ash accident.

  14. Middleware Case Study: MeDICi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynne, Adam S.

    2011-05-05

    In many application domains in science and engineering, data produced by sensors, instruments and networks is naturally processed by software applications structured as a pipeline . Pipelines comprise a sequence of software components that progressively process discrete units of data to produce a desired outcome. For example, in a Web crawler that is extracting semantics from text on Web sites, the first stage in the pipeline might be to remove all HTML tags to leave only the raw text of the document. The second step may parse the raw text to break it down into its constituent grammatical parts, such as nouns, verbs and so on. Subsequent steps may look for names of people or places, interesting events or times so documents can be sequenced on a time line. Each of these steps can be written as a specialized program that works in isolation with other steps in the pipeline. In many applications, simple linear software pipelines are sufficient. However, more complex applications require topologies that contain forks and joins, creating pipelines comprising branches where parallel execution is desirable. It is also increasingly common for pipelines to process very large files or high volume data streams which impose end-to-end performance constraints. Additionally, processes in a pipeline may have specific execution requirements and hence need to be distributed as services across a heterogeneous computing and data management infrastructure. From a software engineering perspective, these more complex pipelines become problematic to implement. While simple linear pipelines can be built using minimal infrastructure such as scripting languages, complex topologies and large, high volume data processing requires suitable abstractions, run-time infrastructures and development tools to construct pipelines with the desired qualities-of-service and flexibility to evolve to handle new requirements. The above summarizes the reasons we created the MeDICi Integration Framework (MIF) that is designed for creating high-performance, scalable and modifiable software pipelines. MIF exploits a low friction, robust, open source middleware platform and extends it with component and service-based programmatic interfaces that make implementing complex pipelines simple. The MIF run-time automatically handles queues between pipeline elements in order to handle request bursts, and automatically executes multiple instances of pipeline elements to increase pipeline throughput. Distributed pipeline elements are supported using a range of configurable communications protocols, and the MIF interfaces provide efficient mechanisms for moving data directly between two distributed pipeline elements.

  15. Reduction of Non-CO2 Gas Emissions Through The In Situ Bioconversion of Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, B; Balin, D F

    2012-09-06

    The primary objectives of this research were to seek previously unidentified anaerobic methanotrophs and other microorganisms to be collected from methane seeps associated with coal outcrops. Subsurface application of these microbes into anaerobic environments has the potential to reduce methane seepage along coal outcrop belts and in coal mines, thereby preventing hazardous explosions. Depending upon the types and characteristics of the methanotrophs identified, it may be possible to apply the microbes to other sources of methane emissions, which include landfills, rice cultivation, and industrial sources where methane can accumulate under buildings. Finally, the microbes collected and identified during this research also had the potential for useful applications in the chemical industry, as well as in a variety of microbial processes. Sample collection focused on the South Fork of Texas Creek located approximately 15 miles east of Durango, Colorado. The creek is located near the subsurface contact between the coal-bearing Fruitland Formation and the underlying Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The methane seeps occur within the creek and in areas adjacent to the creek where faulting may allow fluids and gases to migrate to the surface. These seeps appear to have been there prior to coalbed methane development as extensive microbial soils have developed. Our investigations screened more than 500 enrichments but were unable to convince us that anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was occurring and that anaerobic methanotrophs may not have been present in the samples collected. In all cases, visual and microscopic observations noted that the early stage enrichments contained viable microbial cells. However, as the levels of the readily substrates that were present in the environmental samples were progressively lowered through serial transfers, the numbers of cells in the enrichments sharply dropped and were eliminated. While the results were disappointing we acknowledge that anaerobic methane oxidizing (AOM) microorganisms are predominantly found in marine habitats and grow poorly under most laboratory conditions. One path for future research would be to use a small rotary rig to collect samples from deeper soil horizons, possibly adjacent to the coal-bearing horizons that may be more anaerobic.

  16. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  17. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly; Olson, Jason

    2009-07-13

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

  18. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) EM Program adopted a watershed approach for performing Remedial Investigations (RIs) and characterizations for ORR because it is an effective system for determining the best methods for protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting human health. The basic concept is that water quality and ecosystem problems are best solved at the watershed level rather than at the individual water-body or discharger level. The watershed approach requires consideration of all environmental concerns, including needs to protect public health, critical habitats such as wetlands, biological integrity, and surface and ground waters. The watershed approach provides an improved basis for management decisions concerning contaminant sources and containment. It allows more direct focus by stakeholders on achieving ecological goals and water quality standards rather than a measurement of program activities based on numbers of permits or samples. The watershed approach allows better management strategies for investigations, therefore maximizing the utilization of scarce resources. Feasibility studies (FSs) evaluate various alternatives in terms of environmental standards, the protection of human health and the environment, and the costs of implementation to find the optimum solution among them. Society has to decide how much it is willing to spend to meet the standards and to be protective. Conducting FSs is the process of trading off those criteria to pick that optimum point that society wants to achieve. Performing this analysis at the watershed scale allows those trade-offs to be made meaningfully. In addition, a Land Use Control Assurance Plan for the ORR was prepared to identify the strategy for assuring the long-term effectiveness of land use controls. These land use controls will be relied upon to protect human health and the environment at areas of the ORR undergoing remediation pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This plan will be implemented by means of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) incorporating its terms with the United States EPA and TDEC. The majority of projects described in this report are grouped into five watersheds. They are the East Tennessee Technical Park (ETTP) Watershed (formerly the K-25 Site), the Melton Valley (MV) and Bethel Valley (BV) Watersheds at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watersheds at the Y-12 Plant.

  19. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

    2008-12-31

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

  20. Calendar Year 2007 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Annual Monitoring Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - RCRA Post-Closure Permit Nos. TNHW-113, TNHW-116, and TNHW-128

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental

    2008-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the following hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; this S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm, Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits (BCBG/WIP), Eastern S-3 Site Plume, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Baste (CRSDB), few Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and East Chestnut Ridge Waste Pile (ECRWP). Hit monitoring data were obtained in accordance with the applicable Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) hazardous waste post-closure permit (PCP). The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) - Division of Solid Waste Management issued the PCPs to define the requirements for RCRA post-closure inspection, maintenance, and groundwater monitoring at the specified TSD units located within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-116), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-113), and Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-128). Each PCP requires the Submittal of an annual RCRA groundwater monitoring report containing the groundwater sampling information and analytical results obtained at each applicable TSD unit during the preceding CY, along with an evaluation of groundwater low rates and directions and the analytical results for specified RCRA groundwater target compounds; this report is the RCRA annual groundwater monitoring report for CY 2007. The RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements specified in the above-referenced PCP for the Chestnut Ridge Regime replace those defined in the previous PCP (permit no. TNHW-088), which expired on September 18, 2005, but remained effective until the TDEC issued the new PCP in September 2006. The new PCP defines site-specific groundwater sampling and analysis requirements for the CRSDB, CRSP, and KHQ that differ from those established under the expired PCP, including modified suites of laboratory analytes (RCRA groundwater target compounds) for each site and annual rather than semiannual sampling frequencies for the CRSDB and KHQ. The new PCP also specifies the RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements for the ECRWP, a closed TSD unit that was not addressed in the expired PCP.

  1. Remedial Investigation Report on the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Program; Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid pipeline (ANAP). This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately}4800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. During the mid-1980s, sections of the pipeline were removed during various construction projects. A total of 19 locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The 19 samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant`s laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. Uranium activities in the soil samples ranged from 0.53 to 13.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U, from 0.075 to 0.75 pCi/g for {sup 235}U, and from 0.71 to 5.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U. Maximum total values for lead, chromium, and nickel were 75.1 mg/kg, 56.3 mg/kg, and 53.0 mg/kg, respectively. The maximum nitrate/nitrite value detected was 32.0 mg-N/kg. One sample obtained adjacent to a sewer line contained various organic compounds, at least some of which were tentatively identified as fragrance chemicals commonly associated with soaps and cleaning solutions. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the ANAP contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health.

  2. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn

    2004-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  3. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefs, Nancy

    2004-02-01

    During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

  4. Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.

    2005-08-01

    In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout in streams using electrofishing. Although the success of electrofishing removal projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. We evaluated the effectiveness of a three-year removal project in reducing brook trout and enhancing native salmonids in 7.8 km of an Idaho stream and looked for brook trout compensatory responses such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, or earlier maturation. Due to underestimates of the distribution of brook trout in the first year and personnel shortages in the third year, the multiagency watershed advisory group that performed the project fully treated the stream (i.e. multipass removals over the entire stream) in only one year. In 1998, 1999, and 2000, a total of 1,401, 1,241, and 890 brook trout were removed, respectively. For 1999 and 2000, an estimated 88 and 79% of the total number of brook trout in the stream were removed. For the section of stream that was treated in all years, the abundance of age-1 and older brook trout decreased by 85% from 1998 to 2003. In the same area, the abundance of age-0 brook trout decreased 86% from 1998 to 1999 but by 2003 had rebounded to near the original abundance. Abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss decreased for age-1 and older fish but did not change significantly for age-0 fish. Despite high rates of removal, total annual survival rate for brook trout increased from 0.08 {+-} 0.02 in 1998 to 0.20 {+-} 0.04 in 1999 and 0.21 {+-} 0.04 in 2000. Growth of age-0 brook trout was significantly higher in 2000 (the year after their abundance was lowest) compared to other years, and growth of age-1 and age-2 brook trout was significantly lower following the initial removal years but recovered by 2003. Few other brook trout demographic parameters changed appreciably over the course of the project. Electrofishing removals required 210 person-days of effort. Despite experiencing slight changes in abundance, growth, and survival, brook trout in Pikes Fork appeared little affected by three years of intensive removal efforts, most likely because mortality within the population was high prior to initiation of the project such that the removal efforts merely replaced natural mortality with exploitation.

  5. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile for the K-770 Scrap Yard Soils and Miscellaneous Debris, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - EMWMF Waste Lot 4.12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport M.

    2009-04-15

    Waste Lot 4.12 consists of approximately 17,500 yd{sup 3} of low-level, radioactively contaminated soil, concrete, and incidental metal and debris generated from remedial actions at the K-770 Scrap Metal Yard and Contaminated Debris Site (the K-770 Scrap Yard) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The excavated soil will be transported by dump truck to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). This profile provides project-specific information to demonstrate compliance with Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2001). The K-770 Scrap Yard is an approximately 36-acre storage area located southwest of the main portion of ETTP, outside the security perimeter fence in the Powerhouse Area adjacent to the Clinch River. The K-770 area was used to store radioactively contaminated or suspected contaminated materials during and previous to the K-25 Site cascade upgrading program. The waste storage facility began operation in the 1960s and is estimated to at one time contain in excess of 40,000 tons of low-level, radioactively contaminated scrap metal. Scrap metal was taken to the site when it was found to contain alpha or beta/gamma activity on the surface or if the scrap metal originated from a process building. The segregated metal debris was removed from the site as part of the K-770 Scrap Removal Action (RA) Project that was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2007 by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). An area of approximately 10 acres is located in EUs 29 and 31 where the scrap was originally located in the 100-year floodplain. In the process of moving the materials around and establishing segregated waste piles above the 100-year floodplain, the footprint of the site was expanded by 10-15 acres in EUs 30 and 32. The area in EUs 29 and 31 that was cleared of metallic debris in the floodplain was sown with grass. The areas in EUs 30 and 32 have some scattered vegetation but are generally open and accessible. With limited exception, all materials contained in the scrap yard have been removed and disposed at the EMWMF. Soils that underlay the original waste storage area in EUs 29 and 31 as well as soils that underlay the scrap piles in EUs 30 and 32 show substantially elevated radioactivity. In addition to soils present at the site, remaining portions of foundations/floor slabs for Bldgs. K-725, K-726, and K-736 as well as the unnamed pad at the northeast corner of the site constructed to support the sort and segregation operations at the K-770 Scrap Removal Project in 2006 and several other small, unnamed concrete pads are included in this waste lot. While many of these foundations/floor slabs will be removed because they are contaminated, some of the smaller unamed concrete pads will be removed in order to access contaminated soils that are around and under the pads and regrade the site. Appendix E contains a map showing the areas of soil and concrete pads that are expected to be excavated. Soils in the areas indicated on this map will be removed to approximately one foot below the surface. (This corresponds to the soil interval sampled and analyzed to characterize this waste lot.) Contaminants present in the soils are directly derived from metallic debris and rubbish handled by the waste storage operations, are concentrated in the top few inches, and include the predominant constituents of concern associated with the metallic waste already disposed at EMWMF. Additionally, some residual metallic debris remains embedded in the shallow soils that underlay the former debris piles. This residual metallic debris is eligible for disposal in the EMWMF WAC criteria as defined in Waste Profile for: Disposal of the Scrap Removal Project Waste Lot 65.1 East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (BJC 2004a). This waste, however, has been included in Waste Lot 4.12 to conform to the more rigorous profiling requirements currently contained in Waste Acceptance Criteria Attainment Team Project Execution Plan Environmental Manag

  6. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2009-12-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-792 Switchyard Complex, which includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-79 1-B building, the K-796-A building, and the K-792 Northern Expansion Area located in the northwestern portion of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The total area of the property is approximately 19.91 acres. DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land area and buildings to the Heritage Center, LLC (Heritage Center), a subsidiary corporation of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned facility at ETTP to a non-federal entity. The area proposed for title transfer includes the former K-792 Switchyard, the K-792 Northern Expansion Area, Bldg. K-791-B, Bldg. K-796-A, and the underlying property known as the underlying fee. Located within the K-792 Switchyard footprint but not included in the transfer are Bldg. K-131 0-MP and Bldg. K- 131 0-MQ, two buildings owned by a private company that leases space in the northern portion of the Switchyard. The transfer footprint is bounded by Perimeter Road to the north and west, the parking area for Portal 8 to the south, and primarily the former K-792 Powerhouse Complex and Avenue 'U' North to the east; however, the eastern boundary along the Northern Expansion area has no physical features associated with it. Zone 2 remedial action objectives were developed by the DVS to support the future use of ETTP as a mixed-use commercial and industrial park. Therefore, remediation criteria were designed for the protection of the future industrial worker under the assumption the worker normally would not have the potential for exposure to soils at depths below 10 ft below ground surface (bgs). Accordingly, land use controls (LUCs) have been established to restrict disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to limit future land use to industriallcornmercial activities. Where the need for LUCs below 10 ft bgs is not warranted, this is so stated and explained. Once all actions associated with the DVS for Zone 1 and Zone 2 are completed and the data support it, there will be a re-evaluation with EPA and TDEC for the restriction on excavation below 10 ft. The DVS process and the preparation of this report included visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, a detailed records search, sampling and analysis of soils, radiological walkover surveys, and a risk evaluation. Resources evaluated as part of the records search included Federal Government records, title documents, aerial photographs that may reflect prior uses, and interviews with current and former employees 1 involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed of. In addition, radiological surveys of Bldgs. K-791-B and K-796-A were conducted to assess the buildings radiological condition. Soil vapor sampling and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) swipe sampling also were conducted within the buildings. Based on the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) review of the existing information, including discussions and interviews referenced herein, and evaluation of the data gathered in preparation of the environmental baseline survey (EBS) for the K-792 Switchyard Complex, DOE recommends the following: Due to the uncertainty associated with the nature of the on-site groundwater and the need to evaluate and possibly address groundwater in the future, DOE recommends that the transfer of the K-792 Switchyard Complex be achieved by a covenant deferral per the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Sect. 120(h)(3)(c). Land use restrictions associated with the covenant deferral are described.

  7. Electric Power Generation from Low to Intermediate Temperature Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosnold, William D.

    2015-06-18

    This project was designed to test the concept on the Eland-Lodgepole Field near Dickinson, North Dakota in the Williston Basin. The field is in secondary-recovery water-flood and consists of 12 producing oil wells, 5 water injection wells and one disposal well. Water production at the site averages approximately 320 gallons per minute (20.2 l s-1) and the temperature is 100 ?C. Engineers at Ormat estimated power production potential with the existing resource to be approximately 350 kWh. Unfortunately, ownership of the field was transferred from Encore, Inc., to Denbury, Inc., within the first week of the project. After two years of discussion and planning, Denbury decided not to pursue this project due to complications with the site location and its proximity to Patterson Lake. Attempts to find other partners operating in the Williston Basin were unsuccessful. Consequently, we were unable to pursue the primary objective of the project. However, during negations with Denbury and subsequent time spent contacting other potential partners, we focused on objectives 2 and 3 and developed a clear understanding of the potential for co-produced production in the Williston Basin and the best practices for developing similar projects. At least nine water bearing formations with temperatures greater than 90 ?C extend over areas of several 10s of km2. The total energy contained in the rock volume of those geothermal aquifers is 283.6 EJ (1 EJ = 1018 J). The total energy contained in the water volume, determined from porosities which range from 2 percent to 8 percent, is 6.8 EJ. The aquifers grouped by 10 ?C temperature bins (Table 1) include one or more formations due to the bowl-shape structure of the basin. Table 1. Summary of energy available in geothermal aquifers in the Williston Basin Analysis of overall fluid production from active wells, units, fields and formations in North Dakota showed that few sites co-produce sufficient fluid for significant power production with ORC technology. Average co-produced water for 10,480 wells is 3.2 gallons per minute (gpm). Even excluding the tight formations, Bakken and Three Forks, average co-produced water for the remaining 3,337 is only 5 gpm. The output of the highest producing well is 184 gpm and the average of the top 100 wells is 52 gpm. Due to the depth of the oil producing formations in the Williston Basin, typically 3 km or greater, pumps are operated slowly to prevent watering out thus total fluid production is purposefully maintained at low volumes. There remain potential possibilities for development of geothermal fluids in the Williston Basin. Unitized fields in which water production from several tens of wells is collected at a single site are good possibilities for development. Water production in the unitized fields is greater than 1000 gpm is several areas. A similar possibility occurs where infill-drilling between Bakken and Three Forks horizontal wells has created areas where large volumes of geothermal fluids are available on multi-well pads and in unitized fields. Although the Bakken produces small amounts of water, the water/oil ration is typically less than 1, the oil and water mix produced at the well head can be sent through the heat exchanger on an ORC. It is estimated that several tens of MWh of power could be generated by a distributed system of ORC engines in the areas of high-density drilling in the Bakken Formation. Finally, horizontal drilling in water bearing formations is the other possibility. Several secondary recovery water-flood projects in the basin are producing water above 100 ?C at rates of 300 gpm to 850 gpm. Those systems also could produce several tens of MWh of power with ORC technology. Objective 3 of the project was highly successful. The program has produced 5 PhDs, 7 MS, and 3 BS students with theses in geothermal energy. The team has involved 7 faculty in 4 different engineering and science disciplines, ChE, EE, GE, and Geol. The team has produced 26 peer-reviewed papers and 62 presentations at professional meetings. Faculty invol

  8. Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

  9. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn; Tohtz, Joel

    2008-11-12

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  10. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  11. Umatilla Basin Fish Facilities Operation & Maintenance : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wick, Mike

    2008-12-30

    Westland Irrigation District, as contractor to Bonneville Power Administration, and West Extension Irrigation District, as subcontractor to Westland, provide labor, equipment, and material necessary for the operation, care, and maintenance of fish facilities on the Umatilla River. Westland Irrigation District is the contractor of record. Job sites that are covered: Three Mile Right, Three Mile Left, Three Mile Adult Spawning, WEID Sampling Facility, Maxwell Screen Site, Westland Screen Site/Ladder/Juvenile Sampling Facility, Feed Canal Ladder/Screen Site, Stanfield Ladder/Screen Site, Minthorn Holding Facility, Thornhollow Acclimation Site, Imeques Acclimation Site, Pendleton Acclimation Site, and South Fork Walla Walla Spawning Facility. O & M personnel coordinate with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel in performing tasks under this contract including scheduling of trap and haul, sampling, acclimation site maintenance, and other related activities as needed. The input from ODFW biologists Bill Duke and Ken Loffink, and CTUIR biologist Preston Bronson is indispensable to the success of the project, and is gratefully acknowledged. All tasks associated with the project were successfully completed during the fiscal year 2008 work period of October, 2007 through September, 2008. The project provides operations and maintenance throughout the year on five fish screen sites with a total of thirty-four rotating drum-screens, and four fish ladders in the Umatilla River Basin; additionally, periodic operations and maintenance is performed at holding, acclimation, and spawning sites in the Basin. Three people are employed full-time to perform these tasks. The FY08 budget for this project was $492,405 and actual expenditures were $490,267.01. Selected work activities and concerns: (1) Feed Dam Passage Improvement Project - A project to improve fish passage over the short term at the Feed Canal Diversion Dam site (Umatilla River mile 28.7) was implemented with local U.S. Bureau of Reclamation field office personnel coordinating project activities. Operation and Maintenance Project personnel assisted with labor, materials, and equipment to ensure the project was completed as planned. Discussions are under way to determine feasible alternatives for longer term solutions to passage issues at the site. (2) Three Mile Right (east bank) Facilities - The pump for supplying water to the fish handling facility holding pond was reconstructed successfully to achieve the desired increase in flow output necessary when increased quantities of fish are present. (3) Fish Screen Rehab at Stanfield Canal Diversion - Working with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife screen shop personnel, three rotating drum screens at the Stanfield Canal diversion site (Umatilla River mile 33.3) were serviced and overhauled with new bearings, seals, paint, and reinforcing bars. Work was completed, and screens reinstalled prior to water diversions beginning in the spring. (4) O & M personnel performed daily, weekly, and monthly operations and maintenance duties at the screen and ladder sites including, but not limited to, desilting of mud and debris, lubrication of mechanical parts, replacement of screen seals and screen motor components, adjustment of ladder gates, removal of large trees and woody debris deposited during high river flow conditions, servicing of pumps and screens for fish handling operations and sampling studies, in addition to general site clean-up, vegetative control, and security. Crew members responded as needed during evenings and after-hours according to weather conditions, river flows, and fish passage facility needs.

  12. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

  13. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  14. Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranski, Dr. Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

  15. Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S.

    2009-05-28

    We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

  16. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-04-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

  17. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

  18. SEISMIC SOURCE SCALING AND DISCRIMINATION IN DIVERSE TECTONIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, R E; Mayeda, K; Walter, W R; Viegas, G M; Murphy, K

    2008-07-08

    The objectives of this study are to improve low-magnitude (concentrating on M2.5-5) regional seismic discrimination by performing a thorough investigation of earthquake source scaling using diverse, high-quality datasets from varied tectonic regions. Local-to-regional high-frequency discrimination requires an estimate of how earthquakes scale with size. Walter and Taylor (2002) developed the MDAC (Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Corrections) method to empirically account for these effects through regional calibration. The accuracy of these corrections has a direct impact on our ability to identify clandestine explosions in the broad regional areas characterized by low seismicity. Unfortunately our knowledge at small magnitudes (i.e., m{sub b} < {approx} 4.0) is poorly resolved, and source scaling remains a subject of on-going debate in the earthquake seismology community. Recently there have been a number of empirical studies suggesting scaling of micro-earthquakes is non-self-similar, yet there are an equal number of compelling studies that would suggest otherwise. It is not clear whether different studies obtain different results because they analyze different earthquakes, or because they use different methods. Even in regions that are well studied, such as test sites or areas of high seismicity, we still rely on empirical scaling relations derived from studies taken from half-way around the world at inter-plate regions. We investigate earthquake sources and scaling from different tectonic settings, comparing direct and coda wave analysis methods that both make use of empirical Green's function (EGF) earthquakes to remove path effects. Analysis of locally recorded, direct waves from events is intuitively the simplest way of obtaining accurate source parameters, as these waves have been least affected by travel through the earth. But finding well recorded earthquakes with 'perfect' EGF events for direct wave analysis is difficult, limits the number of earthquakes that can be studied. We begin with closely-located, well-correlated earthquakes. We use a multi-taper method to obtain time-domain source-time-functions by frequency division. We only accept an earthquake and EGF pair if they are able to produce a clear, time-domain source pulse. We fit the spectral ratios and perform a grid-search about the preferred parameters to ensure the fits are well constrained. We then model the spectral (amplitude) ratio to determine source parameters from both direct P and S waves. We analyze three clusters of aftershocks from the well-recorded sequence following the M5 Au Sable Forks, NY, earthquake to obtain some of the first accurate source parameters for small earthquakes in eastern North America. Each cluster contains a M{approx}2, and two contain M{approx}3, as well as smaller aftershocks. We find that the corner frequencies and stress drops are high (averaging 100 MPa) confirming previous work suggesting that intraplate continental earthquakes have higher stress drops than events at plate boundaries. We also demonstrate that a scaling breakdown suggested by earlier work is simply an artifact of their more band-limited data. We calculate radiated energy, and find that the ratio of Energy to seismic Moment is also high, around 10{sup -4}. We estimate source parameters for the M5 mainshock using similar methods, but our results are more doubtful because we do not have a EGF event that meets our preferred criteria. The stress drop and energy/moment ratio for the mainshock are slightly higher than for the aftershocks. Our improved, and simplified coda wave analysis method uses spectral ratios (as for the direct waves) but relies on the averaging nature of the coda waves to use EGF events that do not meet the strict criteria of similarity required for the direct wave analysis. We have applied the coda wave spectral ratio method to the 1999 Hector Mine mainshock (M{sub w} 7.0, Mojave Desert) and its larger aftershocks, and also to several sequences in Italy with M{approx}6 mainshocks. The Italian earthquakes have higher stress dro