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1

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

2

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

3

South Fork Clearwater River Habitat Enhancement, Nez Perce National Forest.  

SciTech Connect

In 1984, the Nez Perce National forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement which provided for improvement of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout habitat in south Fork Clearwater River tributaries. Project work was completed in seven main locations: Crooked River, Red River, Meadow Creek Haysfork Gloryhole, Cal-Idaho Gloryhole, Fisher Placer and Leggett Placer. This report describes restoration activities at each of these sites.

Siddall, Phoebe

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Flows in the Colorado River Delta. Figure 7Cost of Minimum Flows in the Colorado River Delta. Figure 8and Ecological Health on the Colorado River Delta region."

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

6

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Microsoft Word - CX_Clark_Fork_River_Delta.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$XJXVW   $XJXVW   REPLY TO ATTN OF: .(& SUBJECT: (QYLURQPHQWDO &OHDUDQFH 0HPRUDQGXP /HH :DWWV 3URMHFW 0DQDJHU ± .(:0 Proposed Action: 3URYLVLRQ RI IXQGV WR WKH ,GDKR 'HSDUWPHQW RI )LVK DQG *DPH IRU 3XUFKDVH RI &ODUN )RUN 5LYHU 'HOWD :KLWH ,VODQG 3URSHUW\ Fish and Wildlife Project No.:  &RQWUDFW %3$ Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 7UDQVIHU OHDVH GLVSRVLWLRQ RU DFTXLVLWLRQ RI LQWHUHVWV LQ XQFRQWDLPLQDWHG ODQG IRU KDELWDW SUHVHUYDWLRQ RU ZLOGOLIH PDQDJHPHQW DQG RQO\ DVVRFLDWHG EXLOGLQJV WKDW VXSSRUW WKHVH SXUSRVHV

8

Effects of rainbow trout fry of a metals-contaminated diet of benthic invertebrates from the Clark Fork River, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper Clark Fork River in northwestern Montana has received mining wastes from the Butte and Anaconda areas since 1880. These wastes have contaminated areas of the river bed and floodplain with tailings and heavy metal sludge, resulting in elevated concentration of metals in surface water, sediments, and biota. Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were exposed immediately after hatching for 91 d to cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in water at concentrations simulating those in Clark Fork River. From exogenous feeding (21 d posthatch) through 91 d, fry were also fed benthic invertebrates from the Clark Fork River that contained elevated concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, and lead. Evaluations of different combinations of diet and water exposure indicated diet-borne metals were more important than water-borne metals - at the concentrations we tested - in reducing survival and growth of rainbow trout. Whole-body metal concentrations ([mu]g/g, wet weight) at 91 d in fish fed Clark Fork invertebrates without exposure to Clark Fork water were arsenic, 1.4; cadmium, 0.16; and copper, 6.7. These were similar to concentrations found in Clark Fork River fishes. Livers from fish on the high-metals diets exhibited degenerative changes and generally lacked glycogen vacuolation. Indigenous Clark Fork River invertebrates provide a concentrated source of metals for accumulation into young fishes, and probably were the cause of decreased survival and growth of age-0 rainbow trout in our laboratory exposures. 30 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Woodward, D.F. (National Fisheries Contaminant Research Center, Jackson, WY (United States)); Brumbaugh, W.G.; DeLonay, A.J.; Little, E.E. (National Fisheries Contaminant Research Center, Columbia, MO (United States)); Smith, C.E. (Bozeman Fish Technology Center, MT (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

..A ..A -- South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment ig of No Significant Impact and Findi RECEIVED @ S T 1 JAN 3 1 DOEIEA-0956 September 1995 SOUTH FORK SNAKE RIVER / PALISADES WILDLIFE MITIGATION PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE EA # 0956 DECLAIMER This report was prepared as an a m u n t of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their ' employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- , bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer-

10

Forked River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River, New Jersey: Energy Resources River, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.8398413°, -74.1901399° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398413,"lon":-74.1901399,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

2020 Electric Car Exterior Design for Pearl River Delta Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pearl River Delta (PRD) is one of the fastest economic development regions in China. The big cities in PRD attract a great many young high-educated (more)

Zhu, H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1091-1109. Banco de Mxico. (2006). "Indices de Precios alColorado River Delta in Mexico." Cohen, M. J. (2006). "TheEstadsticas del Agua en Mxico 2004." Comisin Nacional del

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The project during 2003 was crippled due to the aftermath of the BPA budget crisis. Some objectives were not completed during the first half of this contract because of limited funds in the 2003 fiscal year. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were utilized only in the early, high water season and only from diversion points with functional fish screens. After July 1, all of the OCA water rights were put instream. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks continued to promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Hundreds of willow, dogwood, Douglas-fir, and cottonwood were planted along the Middle Fork John Day River. Livestock grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat, while promoting meadow vigor and producing revenue for property taxes. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2003 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

Cochran, Brian

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Organizational Legitimacy of Multinational Enterprises in the Pearl River Delta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, more and more Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) conduct foreign direct investments (FDI) in Pearl River Delta (PRD). This study is designed to research empirically organizational legitimacy typology of MNEs as compared with that of domestic ... Keywords: organizational legitimacy, Multinational Enterprises, telephone survey

Xu Fenglu

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Linking nitrogen biogeochemistry to different stages of wetland soil development in the Mississippi River delta, Louisiana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Extensive wetland loss and nutrient-enhanced eutrophication occur across the Mississippi River delta and include newly emergent landscapes, in the early stages of ecological succession, and (more)

Henry, Kelly Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Studies of urban aerosols in the Pearl River Delta Region using lidar.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Region of China, three Lidar systems have been employed for monitoring aerosol distribution: a mobile micro-pulse Lidar of City (more)

Chan, Lai Man Raymond (???)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Use of benthic invertebrate community structure and the sediment quality triad to evaluate metal-contaminated sediment in the upper Clark Fork River, Montana  

SciTech Connect

The upper Clark Fork River, above Flathead River, is contaminated with large amounts of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mn, and Zn ores from past mining activities. The contaminated area extends from the Butte and Anaconda area to at least 230 km downstream to Milltown Reservoir. Both the upper Clark Fork River and Milltown Reservoir have been designated as US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites because of metal-contaminated bottom sediments. The authors evaluated the impacts of past mining activities on the Clark Fork River ecosystem using benthic invertebrate community assessment, residue chemistry, and toxicity testing. Oligochaeta and Chironomidae generally accounted for over 90% of the benthic invertebrate community in the soft sediment depositional areas. Taxa of Oligochaeta and Chironomidae were predominantly pollution tolerant. Higher numbers of Chironomidae genera were present at stations with higher concentrations of metals in sediment identified as toxic by the amphipod Hyalella azteca in 28-d exposures. Frequency of mouthpart deformities in genera of Chironomidae was low and did not correspond to concentrations of metals in sediment. Total abundance of organisms/m[sup 2] did not correspond to concentrations of metals in the sediment samples. Chemical analyses, laboratory toxicity tests, and benthic community evaluations all provide evidence of metal-induced degradation to aquatic communities in both the reservoir and the river. Using a weight-of-evidence approach--the Sediment Quality Triad--provided good concurrence among measures of benthic community structure, sediment chemistry, and laboratory toxicity.

Canfield, T.J.; Kemble, N.E.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Fairchild, J.F. (National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Midwest Science Center)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Measurement and Analysis of a Multiday Photochemical Smog Episode in the Pearl River Delta of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent measurements of a photochemical episode in September of 2001 in the Pearl River delta (PRD) were analyzed to gain insight into the meteorological and chemical processes affecting ozone (O3) concentrations in the subtropical southern China ...

Tao Wang; Joey Y. H. Kwok

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from the upper Clark Fork River, Montana, to aquatic invertebrates and fish in laboratory exposures  

SciTech Connect

Sediments of the upper Clark Fork River, from the Butte and Anaconda area to Milltown Reservoir (230 km downstream), are contaminated with As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mn, and Zn primarily from mining activities. The toxicity of pore water from these sediments was determined using Daphnia magna, rainbow trout, and Microtox[reg sign]. However, pore-water data from these exposures were questionable because of changes in the toxicity of pore-water samples after 5 to 7 d of storage. Whole-sediment tests were conducted with Hyalella azteca, Chironomus riparius, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) 21- to 28-d exposure and Daphnia magna. Sediment samples from Milltown Reservoir and the Clark Fork River were not generally lethal to test organisms. However, both reduced growth and delayed sexual maturation of amphipods were associated with exposure to elevated concentrations of metals in sediments from the reservoir and river. Relative sensitivity (most sensitive to least sensitive) of organisms in whole-sediment toxicity tests was: Hyalella azteca > Chironomus riparius > rainbow trout > Daphnia magna. Relative sensitivity (most sensitive to least sensitive) of the three end points evaluated with Hyalella azteca was: length > sexual maturation > survival. The lack of lethal effects on organisms may be related to temporal differences in sediment, acid-volatile sulfide, or organic carbon.

Kemble, N.E.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G. (National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Midwest Science Center); Monda, D.P. (Pyramid Lake Fisheries, Sutcliffe, NV (United States)); Woodward, D.F. (National Biological Survey, Jackson, WY (United States). Midwest Science Center)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The 2002 contract period was well funded and the second year of the project. A new manager started in April, allowing the previous manager to focus his efforts on the Forrest Ranch acquisition. However, the Oxbow Habitat manager's position was vacant from October through mid February of 2003. During this time, much progress, mainly O&M, was at a minimum level. Many of the objectives were not completed during this contract due to both the size and duration needed to complete such activities (example: dredge mine tailings restoration project) or because budget crisis issues with BPA ending accrual carryover on the fiscal calendar. Although the property had been acquired a year earlier, there were numerous repairs and discoveries, which on a daily basis could pull personnel from making progress on objectives for the SOW, aside from O&M objectives. A lack of fencing on a portion of the property's boundary and deteriorating fences in other areas are some reasons much time was spent chasing trespassing cattle off of the property. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were used seldom in the summer of 2002, with minor irrigation water diverted from only Granite Boulder Creek. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks help promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Trees planted in this and past years are growing and will someday provide cover fish and wildlife. Even grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2002 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

Cochran, Brian; Smith, Brent

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper American River Hydroelectric Project, FERC Project No.California, Chili Bar Hydroelectric Project, FERC Projectthe night, as part of hydroelectric power generation by the

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Effects of the Cabinet Gorge Kokanee Hatchery on Wintering Bald Eagles in the Lower Clark Fork River and Lake Pend, Oreille, Idaho: 1986 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The abundance and distribution of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) on the lower Clark Fork River, Lake Pend Oreille, and the upper Pend Oreille River, Idaho, were documented during the winters of 1985--86 and 1986--87. Peak counts of bald eagles in weekly aerial censuses were higher in 1985--86 (274) and 1986--87 (429) than previously recorded in mid-winter surveys. Differences in eagle distribution within and between years were apparently responses to changes in prey availability. Eight bald eagles were captured and equipped with radio transmitters in the winter and spring of 1986. Residencies within the study area averaged 13.9 days in 1985--86 and 58.3 days for the four eagles that returned in 1986-87. The eagles exhibited considerable daily movement throughout the study area. After departing the area, one eagle was later sighted approximately 1185 km to the southwest in northern California. Eagle behavioral activity was recorded at time budget sessions at areas of heavy use. Perching in live trees was the most common behavior observed. 34 refs., 39 figs., 17 tabs.

Crenshaw, John G.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Levee Failures in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta: Characteristics and Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Between 1850 and 1922, agriculturalists built 1,700 kilometers of levees to convert 250,000 hectares of tidal marsh to farmland where the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers enter the San Francisco Bay (the Delta). Drained, farmed and isolated from the water channels, the organic soils behind the levees subsided to elevations as low as 8 meters below sea level, turning "levees" into "dams" that hold back water constantly. Engineers built water transfer projects in the mid-20th century, transferring water from the south Delta to 25 million Californians who now rely on the "dams" accidentally converted into supply channels. In 1972, however, a levee failure caused a salt-water intrusion into the Delta, raising the prominence of the polemic Peripheral Canal which, if built would replace the levees in the trans-Delta water transport role. Levee failures in 2004 (the Delta) and 2005 (New Orleans) have re-ignited the debate, fueled by comments made by public officials who warned that the Delta levees posed more risk of failure than did the pre-Katina Louisiana levees. This background motivates two research questions: What are the social perspectives regarding levee failures of the experts managing the Delta; and what is the history of levee failures that might support their perspectives? The research employed Q-Method to identify and describe four social perspectives: Delta Sustainers, Abandon the Levees, Levee Pragmatists, and Multi-Purpose Levee Advocates. A critical element underlying differences among the perspectives revolved around the perceived history of failures of Delta levees. This dissertation employed semi-structured interviews, archival record searches, and historic map and aerial photograph comparisons to compile a history of 265 levee failures since 1868, many of which are referenced to location, segment, and levee type. In addition, the dissertation compiled a list of emergency repairs and successful flood-fights. The history of failures indicates that important levees of the Delta have performed significantly better than previously identified. Sharing these social perspectives and research results among the key actors addressing Delta issues may lead to improved consensus decisions.

Hopf, Frank

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow. Trans Am Fish Soc FERC (Federal Energy RegulatoryUpper American River Hydroelectric Project, FERC Project No.Chili Bar Hydroelectric Project, FERC Project No. 2155-024,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

An aerial radiological survey of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Forked River, New Jersey. Date of survey: September 18--25, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant in Forked River, New Jersey, during the period September 18 through September 24, 1992. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) over a 26-square-mile (67-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power plant and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 4 and 10 microroentgens per hour and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system. A previous survey of the power plant was conducted in August 1969 during its initial startup phase. Exposure rates and radioactive isotopes revealed in both surveys were consistent and within normal terrestrial background levels.

Hopkins, H.A.; McCall, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Model Watershed Plan; Lemhi, Pahsimeroi, and East Fork of the Salmon River Management Plan, 1995 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho`s Model Watershed Project was established as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s plan for salmon recovery in the Columbia River Basin. The Council`s charge was simply stated and came without strings. The tasks were to identify actions within the watershed that are planned or needed for salmon habitat, and establish a procedure for implementing habitat-improvement measures. The Council gave the responsibility of developing this project to the Idaho Soil Conservation Commission. This Model Watershed Plan is intended to be a dynamic plan that helps address these two tasks. It is not intended to be the final say on either. It is also not meant to establish laws, policies, or regulations for the agencies, groups, or individuals who participated in the plan development.

Swift, Ralph

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Urban Modification in a Mesoscale Model and the Effects on the Local Circulation in the Pearl River Delta Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, located in the southern part of Guangdong Province in China, is one of the most rapidly developing regions in the world. The evolution of local and regional sea-breeze circulation (SBC) is believed to be ...

Jeff C. F. Lo; Alexis K. H. Lau; Fei Chen; Jimmy C. H. Fung; Kenneth K. M. Leung

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Distribution, source apportionment, and transport of PAHs in sediments from the Pearl River Delta and the northern South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in 59 surface sediments from rivers in the Pearl River Delta and the northern continental shelf of the South China Sea. Total PAH concentrations varied from 138 to 6,793 ng/g dry weight. The sources of PAH inputs to sediments in the Pearl River Delta were qualitatively and quantitatively determined by diagnostic ratios and principal components analysis with multiple linear regression. The results showed that on average coal and wood combustion, petroleum spills, vehicle emissions, and nature sources contributed 36%, 27%, 25%, and 12% of total PAHs, respectively. Coal and biomass combustion was the main source of PAHs in sediments of the South China Sea, whereas petroleum combustion was the main source of pyrolytic PAHs in riverine and estuarine sediments of the Pearl River Delta. Perylene was formed in situ in river sediments and then transported to coastal areas along with other PAHs. The relative abundance of perylene from five-ring PAHs can be used to estimate the contribution of riverine-discharged PAHs to coastal sediments.

Luo, X.J.; Chen, S.J.; Mai, B.X.; Sheng, G.Y.; Fu, J.M.; Zeng, E.Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ghangzhou (China)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration : Annual Report, January 2008 - March 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period 2008-2009, there were 2 contracts with BPA. One (38539) was dealing with the restoration work for 2007 and the other (26198) was an extension on the 2006 contract including the NEPA for Dam removal on the old channel of the Sandy River. For contract 38539, the Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration project continued its focus on riparian hardwood reforestation with less emphasis on wetlands restoration. Emphasis was placed on Sundial Island again due to the potential removal of the dike and the loss of access in the near future. AshCreek Forest Management was able to leverage additional funding from grants to help finance the restoration effort; this required a mid year revision of work funded by BPA. The revised work not only continued the maintenance of restored hardwood forests, but was aimed to commence the restoration of the Columbia River Banks, an area all along the Columbia River. This would be the final restoration for Sundial Island. The grant funding would help achieve this. Thus by 2011, all major work will have been completed on Sundial Island and the need for access with vehicles would no longer be required. The restored forests continued to show excellent growth and development towards true riparian gallery forests. Final inter-planting was commenced, and will continue through 2010 before the area is considered fully restored. No new wetland work was completed. The wetlands were filled by pumping in early summer to augment the water levels but due to better rainfall, no new fuel was required to augment existing. Monitoring results continued to show very good growth of the trees and the restoration at large was performing beyond expectations. Weed problems continue to be the most difficult issue. The $100,000 from BPA planned for forest restoration in 2008, was augmented by $25,000 from USFS, $120,000 from OR150 grant, $18,000 from LCREP, and the COE continued to add $250,000 for their portion. Summary of the use of these funds are displayed in Table 1 (page 5). Work on the restoration of the original Sandy River channel (dam removal, contract 26198) continued slowly. The draft EA was completed and sent out for review. The COE has decided to finish the NEPA with the intent to complete the project.

Dobson, Robin [USDA Forest Service, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Characterization of submicron aerosols at a rural site in Pearl River Delta of China using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in South China is one of the most economically developed regions in China, but it is also noted for its severe air pollution due to industrial/metropolitan emissions. In order to continuously ...

Kroll, Jesse

37

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

40

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Relationship between Air Pollution in Hong Kong and in the Pearl River Delta Region of South China in 2003 and 2004: An Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of south China, which is one of the four regions in China most heavily affected by haze, is found to correlate with that of Hong Kong, indicating the regional nature of the Hong Kong problem. Of ...

Y. C. Lee; A. Savtchenko

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.  

SciTech Connect

This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assessment of transboundary environmental effects in the Pearl River Delta Region: Is there a role for strategic environmental assessment?  

SciTech Connect

China's EIA Law does not require transboundary proposals to be assessed, despite recognition of this globally, for example in the Espoo Convention and Kiev Protocol, and in the European EIA and SEA Directives. In a transboundary context assessment within a state is unusual, as regulating these effects is primarily about the relationship between states. However where a state has more than one legal system such as in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Region of southern China, transboundary effects should also be addressed. Yet despite the geographical connections between Guangdong Province in mainland China (where the EIA Law applies) and the Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions (which have their own provisions, neither of which requires transboundary assessments), EIA and SEA are carried out separately. Coordinated or joint approaches to transboundary assessment are generally absent, with the legal autonomy of Hong Kong and Macau a major constraint. As a result institutional responses at the policy level have developed. The article considers global experiences with regulating transboundary EIA and SEA, and analyses potential application to land use, transport and air and water planning in the PRD Region. If applied, benefits may include prevention or mitigation of cumulative effects, broader public participation, and improvements to environmental governance. The PRD Region experience may encourage China to conduct and coordinate EIA and SEA processes with neighbouring states, which has been non-existent or extremely limited to date.

Marsden, Simon, E-mail: simon.marsden@flinders.edu.au

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (DOE/EIS-0353) (05/01/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program RECORD OF DECISION Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department's (MFWP) South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program. This program is the Proposed Action in the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program EIS (DOE/EIS- 0353, July 2005). BPA will fund the program pursuant to its authority under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in the Columbia River Basin. The project constitutes a portion of the Hungry

46

Paleoreconstruction of Particulate Organic Carbon Inputs to the High-Arctic Colville River Delta, Beaufort Sea, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Arctic permafrosted soils represent a massive sink in the global carbon cycle, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This dissertation summarizes the results of the first study to look at long term, fine scale organic carbon delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpsons Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern delivery of organic carbon to the Lagoon was determined to come from a variety of sources through the use of a three end-member mixing model and sediment biomarker concentrations. These sources include the Colville River in the western area of the Lagoon near the river mouth, marine sources in areas of the Lagoon without protective barrier islands, and coastal erosional sources and the Mackenzie River in the eastern area of the Lagoon. Downcore organic carbon delivery was measured on two cores in the Lagoon, one taken near the mouth of the Colville River (spans about 1800 years of history) and one taken on the eastern end of the Lagoon (spans about 600 years of history). Bulk organic parameters and biomarkers were measured in both cores and analyzed with Principle Component Analysis to determine long-term trends in organic carbon delivery. It was shown that at various times in the past, highly degraded organic carbon inputs of what is likely soil and peat carbon were delivered to the Lagoon. At other times, inputs of fresher, non-degraded, terrestrially-derived organic carbon inputs of what are likely higher amounts of plant and vegetative material was delivered to the Lagoon. Inputs of degraded soil carbon were also shown to correspond to higher temperatures on the North Slope of Alaska, likely indicating that warmer temperatures lead to a thawing of permafrost and in turn organic carbon mobilization to the coastal Beaufort Sea.

Schreiner, Kathryn 1983-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002 Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River, Selway River, and Middle Fork Clearwater River subbasins. Five-hundred forty-one ammocoetes were captured electroshocking 70 sites in the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River, Selway River, Middle Fork Clearwater River, Clearwater River, and their tributaries in 2002. Habitat utilization surveys in Red River support previous work indicating Pacific lamprey ammocoete densities are greater in lateral scour pool habitats compared to riffles and rapids. Presence-absence survey findings in 2002 augmented 2000 and 2001 indicating Pacific lamprey macrothalmia and ammocoetes are not numerous or widely distributed. Pacific lamprey distribution was confined to the lower reaches of Red River below rkm 8.0, the South Fork Clearwater River, Lochsa River (Ginger Creek to mouth), Selway River (Race Creek to mouth), Middle Fork Clearwater River, and the Clearwater River (downstream to Potlatch River).

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fork Biodiesel LLC Fork Biodiesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name East Fork Biodiesel, LLC Place Algona, Iowa Sector Renewable Energy Product Biodiesel producer and co-developer, with Renewable Energy Group (REG) of a 227m biodiesel plant in Algona, Iowa. Coordinates 47.278335°, -122.248554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.278335,"lon":-122.248554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Spanish Fork Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spanish Fork Wind Farm Facility Spanish Fork Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer Edison Mission Group Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Utah County near Spanish Fork UT Coordinates 40.072707°, -111.580027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.072707,"lon":-111.580027,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

51

Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers, 1999-2000 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Idaho Supplementation Studies, fisheries crews from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes have been snorkeling tributaries of the Salmon River to estimate chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) parr abundance; conducting surveys of spawning adult chinook salmon to determine the number of redds constructed and collect carcass information; operating a rotary screw trap on the East Fork Salmon River and West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River to enumerate and PIT-tag emigrating juvenile chinook salmon; and collecting and PIT-tagging juvenile chinook salmon on tributaries of the Salmon River. The Tribes work in the following six tributaries of the Salmon River: Bear Valley Creek, East Fork Salmon River, Herd Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Valley Creek, and West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River. Snorkeling was used to obtain parr population estimates for ISS streams from 1992 to 1997. However, using the relatively vigorous methods described in the ISS experimental design to estimate summer chinook parr populations, results on a project-wide basis showed extraordinarily large confidence intervals and coefficients of variation. ISS cooperators modified their sampling design over a few years to reduce the variation around parr population estimates without success. Consequently, in 1998 snorkeling to obtain parr population estimates was discontinued and only General Parr Monitoring (GPM) sites are snorkeled. The number of redds observed in SBT-ISS streams has continued to decline as determined by five year cycles. Relatively weak strongholds continue to occur in the South Fork Salmon River and Bear Valley Creek. A rotary screw trap was operated on the West Fork Yankee Fork during the spring and fall of 1999 and the spring of 2000 to monitor juvenile chinook migration. A screw trap was also operated on the East Fork of the Salmon River during the spring and fall from 1993 to 1997 and 1999 (fall only) to 2000. Significant supplementation treatments have occurred in the South Fork Salmon River (IDFG). The East Fork Salmon River received supplementation treatments yearly through 1995. There have been no treatments since 1995, and no significant future treatments from local broodstock are conceivable due to extremely poor escapement. The West Fork Yankee Fork received a single presmolt treatment in 1994. Similarly, no significant future treatments are planned for the WFYF due to extremely poor escapement. However, small scale experimental captive rearing and broodstock techniques are currently being tested with populations from the EFSR and WFYF. Captive rearing/broodstock techniques could potentially provide feedback for evaluation of supplementation. The other three SBT-ISS streams are control streams and do not receive hatchery treatments.

Kohler, Andy; Taki, Doug; Teton, Angelo

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

River Flow Response to Precipitation and Snow Budget in California during the 1994/95 Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of precipitation and river flow from November 1994 to May 1995 at two California basins is presented. The Hopland watershed of the Russian River in the northern California Coastal Range and the headwater of the North Fork ...

Jinwon Kim; Norman L. Miller; Alexander K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER ANDITSTRIBUTARIES-PartV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

« 37 L. Birch Creek 37 M* Couse Creek · 37 N. North Fork Walla Walla River · 37 0. South Fork Walla. c.f .s, on August 31» 1931« Minimum flows occur during the months of August, September, and October purposes has greatly reduced the sustained flows in the tributary streams* This factor together

54

The ecology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an ecosystem significantly different from other delta ecosystems in North America. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of the 60 largest river deltas in the world and is the largest river delta on the west coast. As the hub of California's water system, the delta is of immense municipal, agricultural, and industrial importance. The amount of freshwater that flows through the delta controls the delta's productivity and regulates the life cycles of many of its organisms. The vast estuary of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers is one of the most highly modified and intensively managed estuaries in the world. Biological processes in the delta are obscured by the temporal dynamics of the system. Many of the most significant alterations, such as leveeing, diking, and agricultural practices, are not now recognized as such by most citizens, making conservation and protection of the delta difficult. 308 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

Herbold, B.; Moyle, P.B. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology)

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a

56

Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 1998-1999 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1999, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued developing techniques for the captive rearing of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Techniques under development included protocols for rearing juveniles in freshwater and saltwater hatchery environments, and fieldwork to collect brood year 1998 and 1999 juveniles and eggs and to investigate the ability of these fish to spawn naturally. Fish collected as juveniles were held for a short time at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and later transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery for rearing. Eyed-eggs were transferred immediately to the Eagle Fish Hatchery where they were disinfected and reared by family groups. When fish from either collection method reached approximately 60 mm, they were PIT tagged and reared separately by brood year and source stream. Sixteen different groups were in culture at IDFG facilities in 1999. Hatchery spawning activities of captive-reared chinook salmon produced eyed-eggs for outplanting in streamside incubation chambers in the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=2,297) and the East Fork Salmon River (N=1,038). Additionally, a number of these eggs were maintained at the Eagle Fish Hatchery to ensure adequate brood year 1999 representation from these systems, and produced 279 and 87 juveniles from the West Fork Yankee Fork and East Fork Salmon River, respectively. Eyed-eggs were not collected from the West Fork Yankee Fork due to low adult escapement. Brood year 1998 juveniles were collected from the Lemhi River (N=191), West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=229), and East Fork Salmon River (N=185). Additionally, brood year 1999 eyed-eggs were collected from the Lemhi River (N=264) and East Fork Salmon River (N=143). Sixty-two and seven maturing adults were released into Bear Valley Creek (Lemhi River system) and the East Fork Salmon River, respectively, for spawning evaluation in 1999. Nine female carcasses from Bear Valley Creek were examined for egg retention, and of these five were spawned out, one was partially spawned, and three died before depositing eggs. However, much of the spawning related behavior observed involved female chinook salmon paired with male bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Two female carcasses from the East Fork Salmon River were recovered and examined for egg retention. One of these had spawned and one had not.

Hassemer, Peter F.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 1999 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1999, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued developing techniques for the captive rearing of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Techniques under development included protocols for rearing juveniles in freshwater and saltwater hatchery environments, and fieldwork to collect brood year 1998 and 1999 juveniles and eggs and to investigate the ability of these fish to spawn naturally. Fish collected as juveniles were held for a short time at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and later transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery for rearing. Eyed-eggs were transferred immediately to the Eagle Fish Hatchery where they were disinfected and reared by family groups. When fish from either collection method reached approximately 60 mm, they were PIT tagged and reared separately by brood year and source stream. Sixteen different groups were in culture at IDFG facilities in 1999. Hatchery spawning activities of captive-reared chinook salmon produced eyed-eggs for outplanting in streamside incubation chambers in the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=2,297) and the East Fork Salmon River (N=1,038). Additionally, a number of these eggs were maintained at the Eagle Fish Hatchery to ensure adequate brood year 1999 representation from these systems, and produced 279 and 87 juveniles from the West Fork Yankee Fork and East Fork Salmon River, respectively. Eyed-eggs were not collected from the West Fork Yankee Fork due to low adult escapement. Brood year 1998 juveniles were collected from the Lemhi River (N=191), West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (N=229), and East Fork Salmon River (N=185). Additionally, brood year 1999 eyed-eggs were collected from the Lemhi River (N=264) and East Fork Salmon River (N=143). Sixty-two and seven maturing adults were released into Bear Valley Creek (Lemhi River system) and the East Fork Salmon River, respectively, for spawning evaluation in 1999. Nine female carcasses from Bear Valley Creek were examined for egg retention, and of these five were spawned out, one was partially spawned, and three died before depositing eggs. However, much of the spawning related behavior observed involved female chinook salmon paired with male bull trout Salvelinus confluentus. Two female carcasses from the East Fork Salmon River were recovered and examined for egg retention. One of these had spawned and one had not.

Hassemer, Peter F.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Clark Fork, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Clark Fork, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

59

Longwall mining thrives in Colorado's North Fork Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With mining units poised for record-setting capacity and rail service restored, these mines in Colorado's North Fork valley are ready to cut coal. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Fork+ burnup measurement system: Design and first measurement campaign  

SciTech Connect

Previous work with the original Fork detector showed that burnup as determined by reactor records could be accurately allocated to spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The original Fork detector, designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, used an ion chamber to measure gross gamma count and a fission chamber to measure neutrons from an activation source, {sup 244}Cm. In its review of the draft Topical Report on Burnup Credit, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission indicated it felt uncomfortable with a measurement system that depended on reactor records for calibration. The Fork+ system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute with the aim of providing this independent measurement capability. The initial Fork+ prototype was used in a measurement campaign at the Maine Yankee reactor. The campaign confirmed the applicability of the sensor approach in the Fork+ system and the efficiency of the hand-portable Fork+ prototype in making fuel assembly measurements. It also indicated potential design modifications that will be necessary before the Fork+ can be used effectively on high-burnup spent fuel.

Olson, C.E.; Bronowski, D.R.; McMurtry, W. [Sandia National Labs. (United States); Ewing, R. [Electric Power Research Inst. (United States); Jordan, R.; Rivard, D. [Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co., Westboro, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for renewable energy sources has stimulated technological advances in solar cell development. Initially, development and fabrication were extremely costly and no encouragement for use in industrial applications was made. Today, evidence exists that new technological advances and mass-production techniques have lowered the costs considerably. The U.S. Department of Energy has indicated that by the year 1990 the price per peak watt would be less than fifty U.S. cents. This paper keeps this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial material handling. Two evaluation methods were used; namely, the Payback Method, and the Modified Energy Inflation Rate Method. Neither of the methods proved to be economically favorable, but some interesting results were obtained.

Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act State Colorado Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 for small projects and up to $25,000 Provider Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program Residents of Eagle, Gunnison or Pitkin Counties may be eligible for financing through the Energy Smart Program. Loans as low as $1,000 with flexible terms are available for small projects, and larger projects may

65

Interfacial instability and DNA fork reversal by repair proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A repair protein like RecG moves the stalled replication fork in the direction from the zipped to the unzipped state of DNA. It is proposed here that a softening of the zipped-unzipped interface at the fork results in the front propagating towards the unzipped side. In this scenario, an ordinary helicase destabilizes the zipped state locally near the interface and the fork propagates towards the zipped side. The softening of the interface can be produced by the aromatic interaction, predicted from crystal structure, between RecG and the nascent broken base pairs at the Y-fork. A numerical analysis of the model also reveals the possibility of a stop and go type motion.

Somendra M. Bhattacharjee

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

Roaring Fork Valley - Renewable Energy Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Roaring Fork Valley for the installation of photovoltaic, solar hot water, and micro hydro systems. Solar energy systems must be installed or signed off by a COSEIA or NABCEP...

67

Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers, 1996-1998 Progress Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information contained in this report summarizes the work that has been done by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Fisheries Department under BPA Project No. 89-098-3, Contract Number 92-BI-49450. Relevant data generated by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe will be collated with other ISS cooperator data collected from the Salmon and Clearwater rivers and tributary streams. A summary of data presented in this report and an initial project-wide level supplementation evaluation will be available in the ISS 5 year report that is currently in progress. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department is responsible for monitoring a variety of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) production parameters as part of the Idaho Supplementation Studies (BPA Project No. 89-098-3, Contract Number 92-BI-49450). Parameters include parr abundance in tributaries to the upper Salmon River; adult chinook salmon spawner abundance, redd counts, and carcass collection. A rotary screw trap is operated on the East Fork Salmon River and West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River to enumerate and PIT-tag chinook smolts. These traps are also used to monitor parr movement, and collect individuals for the State and Tribal chinook salmon captive rearing program. The SBT monitors fisheries parameters in the following six tributaries of the Salmon River: Bear Valley Creek, East Fork Salmon River, Herd Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Valley Creek, and West Fork Yankee Fork. Chinook populations in all SBT-ISS monitored streams continue to decline. The South Fork Salmon River and Bear Valley Creek have the strongest remaining populations. Snorkel survey methodology was used to obtain parr population estimates for ISS streams from 1992 to 1997. Confidence intervals for the parr population estimates were large, especially when the populations were low. In 1998, based on ISS cooperator agreement, snorkeling to obtain parr population estimates was ceased due to the large confidence intervals. A rotary screw trap was operated on the West Fork Yankee Fork during the spring, summer, and fall of 1998 to monitor juvenile chinook migration. A screw trap was also operated on the East Fork of the Salmon River during the spring and fall from 1993 to 1997. Supplementation treatments have occurred on the South Fork Salmon River (IDFG), the East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), and the West Fork Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (WFYF). The EFSR received supplementation treatments yearly through 1995. There have been no treatments since 1995, and no significant future treatments from local broodstock are planned due to extremely poor escapement. The WFYF received a single presmolt treatment in 1994. There was an egg and adult release treatment in 1998 from the captive rearing program, not part of the original ISS study. Similarly, no significant future treatments are planned for the West Fork Yankee Fork due to extremely poor escapement. However, small scale experimental captive rearing and broodstock techniques are currently being tested with populations from the EFSR and WFYF. Captive rearing/broodstock techniques could potentially provide feedback for evaluation of supplementation. The other three SBT-ISS streams are control streams and do not receive supplementation treatments.

Reighn, Christopher A.; Lewis, Bert; Taki, Doug

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Fork+ Developmental Measurement Campaign at Maine Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of burnup credit in the design of spent-fuel storage and transportation systems significantly reduces risks and decreases costs. However, approval of storage and transportation designs using burnup credit will likely require independent measurement of the spent-fuel assembly burnup. EPRI's Fork(plus) system has been designed for measuring spent-fuel burnup without recourse to reactor records. This report presents results from testing of the Fork(plus) system prototype at the Maine Yankee reactor ...

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc Place Tennessee Utility Id 2960 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial GSA 1 (less than 50 kW) Commercial Commercial GSA 2 (51-1000 kW) Commercial Commercial GSA 3 (1001-5000 kW) Commercial Industrial GSA 1 (less than 50 kW) Industrial Industrial GSA 2 (51-1000 kW) Industrial Industrial GSA 3 (1001-5000 kW) Industrial Residential Residential outdoor light (175 MV) Lighting

71

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Smart Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Funding Source The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 State Colorado Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount 50% of the total costs of efficiency opportunities identified by the analyst, up to $500 $50 co-pay for energy assessments through the end of 2012, raising to $100 in 2013. Residents of Eagle, Pitkin and Gunnison Counties can participate in the Energy Smart Program. The Energy Smart Program helps residents identify,

72

Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Efficient Appliance Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Appliance Program Efficient Appliance Program Roaring Fork Valley - Energy Efficient Appliance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Smart Strip: $30 Programmable Thermostats: $50 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnaces (AFUE 92% or higher): $300 Boilers (AFUE 92% or higher): $500 Dishwashers: $100 Clothes Washers: $75 Refrigerators: $100 Smart Strip: $15 Programmable thermostats: $15 Provider Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who install energy

73

Shelf Currents Near the Mouth of the Mississippi River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A year-long current meter mooring near the Mississippi River Delta, with meters at four levels, suggests that minimal flow occurs around the front of the Delta during normal conditions. The observed currents exhibit variations on time scales of ...

Wm J. Wiseman Jr.; S. P. Dinnel

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deltas are the site of significant oil and gas accumulations and extraction as in the Niger, Magdalena rates of wetland loss resulting from ESLR are as high as 100 km2 /yr in the delta. Day et al., 2000 construction on the Volta River. Subsidence in the delta is attributed to the extraction of oil, which provides

New Hampshire, University of

75

Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described earlier in an e-mail, in an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal River Mountain Redux Below is an update to the Coal River Mountain story that I described billion gallons of toxic coal sludge located directly above Marsh Fork Elementary School. (No word yet on their campus a couple of years ago. Underground Appalachian coal mining is being replaced in recent years

Hansen, James E.

76

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Flathead River Creel Report, 1992-1993. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Hanzel, Delano

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho: Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult Pacific lamprey counted passing Ice Harbor Dam fishway averaged 18,158 during 1962-69 and 361 during 1993-2000. Human resource manipulations in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 120 years, likely impacting the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Timber harvest, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile and larval lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass/collection systems, and over spillway structures at the four lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities have impacted Pacific lamprey populations to an unknown degree. The Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, restricted chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha passage in the 1927-1940 period, altering the migration route of outmigrating Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae and upstream adult migrants (1927-1972). Dworshak Dam, completed in 1972, eliminated Pacific lamprey spawning and rearing in the North Fork Clearwater River drainage. Construction of the Harpster hydroelectric dam on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed fish passage 1949-1963. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2001. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine Pacific lamprey distribution, life history strategies, and habitat requirements in the South Fork Clearwater River drainage. Forty-three sites in Red River, South Fork Clearwater River, and their tributaries were electrofished in 2001. Sampling yielded a total of 442 juvenile/larval Pacific lamprey. Findings indicate Pacific lamprey juveniles/larvae are not numerous or widely distributed. Pacific lamprey distribution in the South Fork of the Clearwater River drainage was confined to lower reaches of Red River and the South Fork Clearwater River.

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 48.0037819°, -97.3594525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.0037819,"lon":-97.3594525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.3176°, -81.5209534° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.3176,"lon":-81.5209534,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.9252568°, -97.0328547° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.9252568,"lon":-97.0328547,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City Corporation (Utility Company) City Corporation (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Spanish Fork City Corporation Place Utah Utility Id 17732 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General service Industrial General service 2 Industrial Large Power Industrial Residential Residential yard light Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0892/kWh Commercial: $0.0798/kWh Industrial: $0.0602/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Spanish_Fork_City_Corporation_(Utility_Company)&oldid=411594"

84

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2250114°, -112.4840675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2250114,"lon":-112.4840675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

85

Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2005 Math-Science-Technology Institute Oak Ridge, Tennessee Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area ARC Participants Darin Baugess Ben Mordan Debi Owens Yvonne Shafer Mentors Larry Pounds Harry Quarles Final Presentations Pollard Auditorium July 22, 2005 Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area Introduction: The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of approximately 33,000 to 36,000 acres. This large forested area of land contains numerous unique habitats and communities that are disappearing from other areas in Tennessee and the Southeast US. In 2004 John Devereux Joslin, Jr. investigated one community in the north end of the Oak Ridge Reservation called the East

86

DOE/EIS-0353; South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Fork Flathead Watershed South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2005 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (FS) and State of Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Department Title of Proposed Project: South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program State Involved: Montana Abstract: In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic

87

EIS-0479: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage (NODOS) Investigation is a Feasibility Study being performed by the California Department of Water Resources and the Bureau of Reclamation, pursuant to the CALFED Bay-Delta Program Programmatic EIS/EIR Record of Decision. The NODOS Investigation is evaluating potential offstream surface water storage projects in the upper Sacramento River Basin that could improve water supply for agricultural, municipal, and industrial, and environmental uses. If the project is implemented, DOEs Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency, could provide power to project facilities and could market hydropower generated by the project.

88

Horizontal Symmetries $\\Delta(150)$ and $\\Delta(600)$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using group theory of mixing to examine all finite subgroups of SU(3) with an order less than 512, we found recently that only the group $\\Delta(150)$ can give rise to a correct reactor angle $\\th_{13}$ of neutrino mixing without any free parameter. It predicts $\\sin^22\\th_{13}=0.11$ and a sub-maximal atmospheric angle with $\\sin^22\\th_{23}=0.94$, in good agreement with experiment. The solar angle $\\th_{12}$, the CP phase $\\d$, and the neutrino masses $m_i$ are left as free parameters. In this article we provide more details of this case, discuss possible gain and loss by introducing right-handed symmetries, and/or valons to construct dynamical models. A simple model is discussed where the solar angle agrees with experiment, and all its mixing parameters can be obtained from the group $\\Delta(600)$ by symmetry alone. The promotion of $\\Delta(150)$ to $\\Delta(600)$ is on the one hand analogous to the promotion of $S_3$ to $S_4$ in the presence of tribimaximal mixing, and on the other hand similar to the extens...

Lam, C S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Delta | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

91

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

Konopacky, Richard C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Oaks South Croydon East Croydon Streatham Common West Norwood Gipsy Hill Crystal Palace Birkbeck Penge

Delmotte, Nausicaa

93

City of East Grand Forks, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota (Utility Company) Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name East Grand Forks City of Place Minnesota Utility Id 5575 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Rate Commercial Off Peak Rates Commercial Residential Electric Heat Residential Residential General Electric Residential Small Commercial Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0943/kWh Commercial: $0.0740/kWh Industrial: $0.0789/kWh

94

EIS-0479: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project, Sacramento-San  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project, 9: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California EIS-0479: North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage Project, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California SUMMARY The North-of-the-Delta Offstream Storage (NODOS) Investigation is a Feasibility Study being performed by the California Department of Water Resources and the Bureau of Reclamation, pursuant to the CALFED Bay-Delta Program Programmatic EIS/EIR Record of Decision. The NODOS Investigation is evaluating potential offstream surface water storage projects in the upper Sacramento River Basin that could improve water supply for agricultural, municipal, and industrial, and environmental uses. If the project is implemented, DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating

95

DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

1960-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in July 2010, examines the effect of 13 dams on Willamette tributaries, plus 42 miles of bank upriver on the Middle Fork Willamette River, the land on the right bank is the Wildish property, where

97

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1 of 2, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, that will be used in conjunction with 1984 and 1985 fish and habitat pre-treatment (baseline) data to evaluate effects of habitat enhancement on the habitat and fish community in Bear Valley Creek overtime. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur in the upper-Salmon River basin. Subproject III involved fish inventories (pre-treatment) in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River, and habitat problem identification on Fivemile and Ramey Creek. Subproject IV involved baseline habitat and fish inventories on the East Fork of the Salmon River, Herd Creek and Big-Boulder Creek. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the four subproject reports. 20 refs., 37 figs., 22 tabs.

Richards, Carl

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Biogeochemistry of mercury in a river-reservoir system: impact of an inactive chloralkali plant on the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir, Virginia and Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Elevated mercury concentrations in fish species from the North Fork of the Holston River were observed in the early 1970's. The source of the mercury was a chloralkali plant which had ceased operation in 1972. Mercury continues to be released to the river from two large (approx. 40-ha) waste disposal ponds at the plant site. This report presents results of a study of the emission of mercury to the environment from the abandoned waste ponds and of the distribution of mercury in water, sediment, and biota of the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir System in Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

Hildebrand, S. G.; Lindberg, S. E.; Turner, R. R.; Huckabee, J. W.; Strand, R. H.; Lund, J. R.; Andren, A. W.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Delta Sud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product France-based company that provides services of design, project development and installation of PV systems. References Delta Sud1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

100

Delta Faucet: Data Request (2010-SW-1603) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delta Faucet: Data Request (2010-SW-1603) Delta Faucet: Data Request (2010-SW-1603) March 2, 2010 DOE requested test data from Delta Faucet Corporation for Delta Faucet's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Delta Electroproduction in 12-C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Delta-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the delta mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the delta. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the delta resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4(pie) acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the delta mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the delta-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the delta.

Steven McLauchlan

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Umatilla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement : FY 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summer of 1991, construction continued on the Bonneville Power Administration funded anadromous fish habitat enhancement project in the Umatilla River sub-basin, Umatilla County, State of Oregon. 1991 was the final year of this five year project. Work started in May 1 and ended on November 31. Preconstruction activity consisted of final layout and design of the project, movement of approximately 600 cubic yards of large boulders and 12 log trucks loads of woody material to the construction site. A total of five rock weirs, five rock deflectors, 20 woody debris placements and 79 individual boulder placements were constructed in the South Fork and the main stem of the Umatilla River. A total of twelve log weirs, four rock weirs, two rock deflectors, and ten woody debris placements were placed in Meacham Creek. In addition, 47 weirs in Thomas Creek and the upper portion of the South Fork of the Umatilla River were repaired. Project monitoring consisted of sediment sampling above and below the Umatilla River construction project area, and mapping and photographing all structures.

Northrop, Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

104

Scheuten Delta | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Netherlands-based JV focused on integrated solar project development across the supply chain. References Scheuten Delta1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

105

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

106

Water supply analysis for restoring the Colorado River Delta, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Pay for Additional Transboundary Water Flows from the US.2001). "Improving California Water Management: Optimizingloss functions to value urban water scarcity in California."

Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Lund, Jay R.; Howitt, Richard E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Umatilla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement : FY 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summer of 1990, construction continued on the Bonneville Power Administration funded anadromous fish habitat enhancement project in the Umatilla River sub-basin, Umatilla County, State of Oregon. Work started on 5/1/90 and ended 10/30/90. A total of five large log weirs, eight large rock weirs, 17 associated weir structures, 19 small to medium rock deflectors, four bank and island reinforcements, three rock flow controls, 19 woody debris placements, and 85 individual boulders were constructed in the South Fork of the Umatilla River. In addition, one large rock weir was constructed at the confluence of the North and South Forks of the Umatilla River, and repair work was completed on 33 structures in Thomas Creek. Also, 300 cubic yards of rock and some logs and woody material were moved on site for use in 1991. Preconstruction activity consisted of moving approximately 1,500 cubic yards of large boulders, and dive log truck loads of woody material to the construction site. Project monitoring consisted of sediment sampling above and below the project area and, mapping and photographing and structures. 7 figs.

Northrop, Michael

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho : Annual Report 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult returns in 1995-1999 were more than ten magnitudes less than returns in the early 1960's. Human activities in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 100 years and likely the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Logging, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass and collection systems, and spillway structures at lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities including the Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, impacted Pacific lamprey populations, however, the degree of impact is unknown (1920's-early 1970's). Hydroelectric dam construction (Harpster Dam) on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed salmonid passage in the mid-1900's. Habitat alterations in the Snake River basin and Clearwater River drainage have had numerous negative effects on salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead trout O. mykiss populations (wild fish), but the magnitude of impacts on lamprey productivity and survival is unknown. Thorough understanding of Pacific lamprey habitat use and life history processes is needed to facilitate management and restoration of the species. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game began investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2000. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine where Pacific lamprey persist in the South Fork of the Clearwater River drainage. Habitat surveys evaluating juvenile habitat use were primarily conducted in the Red River subbasin. Red River subbasin resource manipulations have resulted in elevated stream sediment, stream destabilization, riparian canopy reduction, and water temperature extremes. A total of 262 juvenile Pacific lamprey were captured during the 2000 field season. Sampling in the Red River drainage yielded the largest number of Pacific lamprey juveniles. Preliminary findings indicate Pacific lamprey juveniles, while present, are not numerous or widely distributed. Age of juveniles captured was determined using length frequency.

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Controlled Vortex Breakdown on Modified Delta Wings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the effect of perturbation to the breakdown of the leading-edge vortices over delta wings. The passive perturbation in the normal direction is achieved by installing the hemisphere-like bulges on the delta wing along the projection ... Keywords: Bulge perturbation, Delta wing, Vortex breakdown

S. Srigrarom; N. Lewpiriyawong

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In spite of an intensive management effort, chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Northwest have not recovered and are currently listed as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. In addition to the loss of diversity from stocks that have already gone extinct, decreased genetic diversity resulting from genetic drift and inbreeding is a major concern. Reduced population and genetic variability diminishes the environmental adaptability of individual species and entire ecological communities. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), in cooperation with Washington State University and the University of Idaho, established a germplasm repository in 1992 in order to preserve the remaining salmonid diversity in the region. The germplasm repository provides long-term storage for cryopreserved gametes. Although only male gametes can be cryopreserved, conserving the male component of genetic diversity will maintain future management options for species recovery. NPT efforts have focused on preserving salmon and steelhead gametes from the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin. However, the repository is available for all management agencies to contribute gamete samples from other regions and species. In 2002 a total of 570 viable semen samples were added to the germplasm repository. This included the gametes of 287 chinook salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River (Lookingglass Hatchery), Lake Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery), and upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Hatchery) and the gametes of 280 steelhead from the North Fork Clearwater River (Dworshak Hatchery), Fish Creek, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery) and Snake River (Oxbow Hatchery). In addition, gametes from 60 Yakima River spring chinook and 34 Wenatchee River coho salmon were added to the repository by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, respectively. To date, a total of 3,928 Columbia River salmon and steelhead gamete samples and three Kootenai River white sturgeon are preserved in the repository. Samples are stored in independent locations at the University of Idaho (UI) and Washington State University (WSU).

Young, William; Kucera, Paul

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pion optical potential with. delta. dynamics  

SciTech Connect

A pion optical potential is constructed which incorporates the ..delta.. dynamics found to be important in ..delta..-hole analyses of pion scattering from light nuclei. These dynamics include ..delta.. propagation, binding and Pauli blocking, and a ..delta.. spreading potential. We employ a local density approximation for the medium-modified ..delta.. propagator, resulting in a computationally flexible tool for the analysis of pion-nucleus data. We reproduce the ..delta..-hole results for ..pi..-/sup 16/O scattering satisfactorily. Elastic ..pi../sup + -/-/sup 208/Pb scattering is described very well with the same strongly damping spreading potential found for light nuclei. The pion wave functions in the medium are substantially modified by the ..delta.. dynamics.

Karaoglu, B.; Moniz, E.J.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Our River  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

113

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

114

Burnup verification measurements at U.S. Nuclear Facilities using the Fork system  

SciTech Connect

Burnup verification measurements have been performed using the Fork system at the Oconee Nuclear Station of Duke Power Company, and at Arkansas Nuclear One (Units 1 and 2), operated by Energy Operations, Inc. Passive neutron and gamma-ray measurements on individual spent fuel assemblies were correlated with the reactor records for burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment. The correlation generates an internal calibration for the system in the form of a power law determined by a least squares fit to the neutron data. The average deviation of the reactor burnup records from the calibration determined from the measurements is a measure of the random error in the burnup records. The observed average deviations ranged from 2.2% to 3.5% for assemblies at the three reactor sites, indicating a high degree of consistency in the reactor records. Anomalous measurements were also observed, but could be explained by the presence of neutron sources in the assemblies. The effectiveness of the Fork system for verification of reactor records is due to the sensitivity of the neutron yield to burnup, the self-calibration generated by a series of measurements, the redundancy provided by three independent detection systems, and the operational simplicity and flexibility of the design.

Ewing, R.I.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

River Steamboats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Steamboats River Steamboats Nature Bulletin No. 628-A February 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RIVER STEAMBOATS The westward migration of the pioneer settlers and the rapid growth of agriculture, commerce and industry in the Middle West is in large part the story of water transportation on our inland waterways. The two main water routes were the chain of Great Lakes on the north and the Ohio River on the south. Sailing vessels carrying hundreds of tons were able to navigate on the Great Lakes almost as freely as on the ocean. Also, on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers heavy loads could be floated downstream from Pittsburgh to New Orleans -- almost 2000 miles. But boats had to be hauled back upstream by manpower -- grueling labor, stretching over weeks or months to move a few tons a few hundred miles. The coming of the steamboat a century and a half ago changed all this.

117

Determination of the Delta++ magnetic dipole moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the elastic and radiative pi+ p scattering within a full dynamical model which incorporates the finite width effects of the Delta++. The scattering amplitudes are invariant under contact transformations of the spin 3/2 field and gauge-invariance is fulfilled for the radiative case. The pole parameters of the Delta++ obtained from the elastic cross section are m_Delta = 1211.2 \\pm 0.4 MeV and Gamma_Delta = 88.2 \\pm 0.4 MeV. From a fit to the most sensitive observables in radiative pi+ p scattering, we obtain mu_Delta = 6.14 \\pm 0.51 e/2m_p for the magnetic dipole moment of the Delta++.

G. Lopez Castro; A. Mariano

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Gas Phase Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the long-wave IR using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A paper to accompany a 20 minute talk about the progress of a DARPA funded project called LPAS. ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 micron between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz). This sensor was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultanious absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10^-8 W cm^-1 /Hz^1/2 and the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and survival ranged from 0% to 96%, although there was evidence that some eggs had died after reaching the eyed stage. Six redds were capped in an attempt to document fry emergence, but none were collected. A final hydraulic sampling of the capped redds yielded nothing from five of the six, but 75 dead eggs and one dead fry were found in the sixth. Smothering by fine sediment is the suspected cause of the observed mortality between the eyed stage and fry emergence.

Venditti, David A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microsoft Word - Wolf Fork CX-Environ Clearance Memo-CX 021511.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sarah Branum Sarah Branum Project Manager, KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provide funds for the Blue Mountain Land Trust (BMLT) to purchase a conservation easement on the Wolf Fork property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1996-046-01, Reference Number BPA-005911. Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment. Location: Township 9 North, Range 39 East, Section 11 T of the Dayton Quadrangle, in

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121

Waste management plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Plant Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain. The waste management plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the LEFPC remedial action. Most of the solid wastes will be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y- 12 facilities. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, along with possible low-level or mixed wastes (> 35 pCi/g). Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary and capable of being disposed of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant, except sanitary sewage.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Ultrasonic beamforming with Delta-Sigma modulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delta - Sigma (??) modulation allows delay resolution in ultrasound beamformers to be achieved by simple clock cycle delays applied to the undecimated bitstream, greatly reducing the complexity of the signal processing and the number of bits ... Keywords: beamformer, delay, delta-sigma, ultrasound

Ioan Lie; Mihail Eugen Tanase; Dan Lascu; Mihaela Lascu

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Bonneville Project Act, Federal Columbia River Transmission System Act and Other Related Legislation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Legislative texts are provided for: Bonneville Project Act which authorizes the completion, maintenance, and operation of Bonneville project for navigation, and for other purposes; Federal Columbia River Transmission system Act which enables the Secretary of the Interior to provide for operation, maintenance, and continued construction of the Federal transmission system in the Pacific Northwest by use of the revenues of the Federal Columbia River Power System and the proceeds of revenue bonds, and for other purposes; public law 88--552 which guarantees electric consumers of the Pacific Northwest first call on electric energy generated at Federal hydroelectric plants in that regions and reciprocal priority, and for other purposes; and public law 78--329 which provides for the partial construction of the Hungary Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River in the state of Montana, and for other purposes

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Delta connected resonant snubber circuit  

SciTech Connect

A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Peng, Fang Zheng (Oak Ridge, TN); Young, Sr., Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ott, Jr., George W. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Delta connected resonant snubber circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

1998-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Delta Junction Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Junction Wind Farm Delta Junction Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Delta Junction Wind Farm Facility Delta Junction Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Alaska Environmental Power Developer Alaska Environmental Power Location South of Delta Junction AK Coordinates 64.069461°, -145.717661° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.069461,"lon":-145.717661,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

127

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

Wilson, Wayne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the DeltaQ duct Leakage Test. ASHRAE Transactions (inof a new Duct Leakage Test: DeltaQ. LBNL 47308. Walker, I,Uncertainties in the DeltaQ test for Duct Leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 20072010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (Sandy River delta (rkm 192208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices, Volume 4, Appendix V-C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the the final verification run data package for pilot scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are data on volatiles, semivolatiles, and TCLP volatiles.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

delta. -nucleus interactions. CTP No. 887  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical description of pion-nucleus interactions, specifically in the intermediate-energy region dominated ..delta..-excitation, is discussed. Attention is focused on the interaction with and propagation through the nucleus of pions and ..delta..'s. The approach followed basically consists of viewing the ..delta..-nucleus system, formed by pion excitation of a nucleon, as a doorway for the pion-nucleus reaction. Analysis of the interacting ..delta..-nucleus system then leads to new dynamical information summarized in a complex ..delta..-nucleus interaction potential. The associated nuclear medium corrections to ..delta.. propagation, related in more conventional language to higher-order corrections in the pion optical potential, are so large as to demand consideration in quantitative studies of nuclear structure with pions. After a discussion of the basic scale parameters characterizing intermediate-energy pion-nucleus interactions, the author discusses the theoretical framework and the extraction of ..delta.. interaction parameters from inclusive pion-nucleus cross sections. More detailed tests of the picture, such as elastic scattering angular distributions, are then discussed. Finally, some implications for intermediate-energy photoreactions are outlined. 11 figures. (RWR)

Moniz, E.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

133

Confirmatory Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the organization, strategy, and procedures to be used to confirm that mercury concentrations in soils in the remediated areas are statistically less than, or equal to, the cleanup standard of 400 ppm. It focuses on confirming the cleanup of the stretch of the Lower East Fork Popular Creed flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the City of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation and its associated flood plain.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

135

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as outstanding...

136

Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium  

SciTech Connect

The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Delta Hedging Energy Portfolios: an Exploratory Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delta hedging, although widely used in commodity markets, needs to be further adapted to electricity markets. Given the extreme volatility of electricity prices, even a portfolio whose market value is perfectly hedged may still yield large and potentially ...

Richard Goldberg; James Read; Art Altman; Remi Audouin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

Waste Management Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Remedial Action Project Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Remedial Action project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the floodplain of LEFPC, dispose of these soils at the Y-12 Landfill V, and restore the affected floodplain upon completion of remediation activities. This effort will be conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD) for LEFPC as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) action. The Waste Management Plan addresses management and disposition of all wastes generated during the remedial action for the LEFPC Project Most of the solid wastes will be considered to be sanitary or construction/demolition wastes and will be disposed of at existing Y-12 facilities for those types of waste. Some small amounts of hazardous waste are anticipated, and the possibility of low- level or mixed waste exists (greater than 35 pCi/g), although these are not expected. Liquid wastes will be generated which will be sanitary in nature and which will be capable of being disposed 0214 of at the Oak Ridge Sewage Treatment Plant.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Delta Coherence Protocols: The Home Update Protocol  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new class of directory coherence protocols called delta coherence protocols that use network guarantees to support a new and highly concurrent approach to maintain a consistent shared memory. Delta coherence protocols are more concurrent than other coherence protocols in that they allow processes to pipeline memory accesses without violating sequential consistency; support multiple concurrent readers and writers to the same cache block; and allow processes to access multiple shared variables atomically without invalidating the copies held by other processes or otherwise obtaining exclusive access to the referenced variables. Delta protocols include both update and invalidate protocols. In this paper we describe the simplest, most basic delta protocol, an update protocol called the home update protocol. Delta protocols are based on isotach network guarantees. An isotach network maintains a logical time system that allows each process to predict and control the logical time at which its messages are received. Processes use isotach guarantees to control the logical time at which their requests on shared memory appear to be executed. We prove the home update protocol is correct using logical time to reason about the order in which requests are executed.

Williams, C.; Reynolds, P.F.; de Supinoki, B.

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Delta Power Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Power Company LLC Delta Power Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Delta Power Company LLC Place Morristown, New Jersey Zip NJ 07960 Product Develops, acquires, finances, and manages independent power projects throughout the US. Coordinates 44.555834°, -72.621905° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.555834,"lon":-72.621905,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

145

Delta Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Energy Group Delta Energy Group Address 21 Omega Drive, Delta Campus Place Brattleboro, Vermont Zip 05301 Sector Efficiency Year founded 2008 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 802-251-7337 Website http://www.deltaenergygroup.co Coordinates 42.8509152°, -72.5578678° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8509152,"lon":-72.5578678,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Protect and Restore Red River Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Red River Watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2001. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. From completing a watershed assessment to two NEPA efforts and a final stream restoration design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Red River to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed. Another major, and extremely, important component of this project is the Red River Meadow Conservation Easement. We have begun the process of pursuing a conservation easement on approximately 270 acres of prime meadow habitat (Red River runs through this meadow and is prime spawning and rearing habitat).

Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Definition of the {delta} mass and width  

SciTech Connect

In the framework of effective field theory we show that, at two-loop order, the mass and width of the {delta} resonance defined via the (relativistic) Breit-Wigner parametrization both depend on the choice of field variables. In contrast, the complex-valued position of the pole of the propagator is independent of this choice.

Djukanovic, D.; Scherer, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Gegelia, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Isospin dependence of the. delta. -spreading potential  

SciTech Connect

The ratio of near-resonance inclusive ..pi../sup + -/ scattering cross sections from the isotopic pair /sup 16,18/O is shown to be consistent with an isospin dependence of the ..delta..-spreading potential determined by intermediate coupling to the pion absorption channel.

Karaoglu, B.; Karapiperis, T.; Moniz, E.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A delta configured auxiliary resonant snubber inverter  

SciTech Connect

A delta ({Delta}) configured auxiliary resonant snubber inverter is developed to overcome the voltage floating problem in a wye (Y) configured resonant snubber inverter. The proposed inverter is to connect auxiliary resonant branches between phase outputs to avoid a floating point voltage which may cause over-voltage failure of the auxiliary switches. Each auxiliary branch consists of a resonant inductor and a reverse blocking auxiliary switch. Instead of using an anti-paralleled diode to allow resonant current to flow in the reverse direction, as in the Y-configured version, the resonant branch in the {Delta}-configured version must block the negative voltage, typically done by a series diode. This paper shows single-phase and three-phase versions of {Delta}-configured resonant snubber inverters and describes in detail the operating principle of a single-phase version. The extended three-phase version is proposed with non-adjacent state space vector modulation. For hardware implementation, a single-phase 1-kW unit and a three-phase 100-kW unit were built to prove the concept. Experimental results show the superiority of the proposed topology.

Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; McKeever, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.; Peng, F.Z. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

151

Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Savannah River National Laboratory  

At a glance Remote Electrical Throw Device Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory ... sufficient manufacturing capacity, established dist ...

153

Nitrogen cycling in oxygen deficient zones : insights from [delta]?N and [delta]?O of nitrite and nitrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stable isotopes, [delta]?N and [delta]?O, of nitrite and nitrate can be powerful tools used to interpret nitrogen cycling in the ocean. They are particularly useful in regions of the ocean where there are multiple ...

Buchwald, Carolyn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Delta, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta, Utah: Energy Resources Delta, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.3521777°, -112.57717° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3521777,"lon":-112.57717,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

Delta Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Electric Power Assn Delta Electric Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 22815 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 01 Farm and Residential Electric Service Residential 09 Residential Electric Service Water Heater Residential 10 All Electric Residential Service Residential 12 Small Commercial Service Commercial 13 Street Lighting High Pressure Sodium 100 Watt Lighting 13 Street Lighting High Pressure Sodium 400 Watt Lighting 13 Street Lighting Mercury Vapor 175 Watt enclosed Lighting

156

Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC Appendices, Volume 2, Appendix V-A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains information concerning validation of analytical data for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain soils located at the Y-12 Plant site. This volume is an appendix of compiled data from this validation process.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Delta Hedging Energy Portfolios: An Exploratory Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delta hedging is widely used by risk managers in commodity markets because of its effectiveness and ease of use. The technique also is used in electricity markets but needs to be further adapted to account for their specificity. Given the extreme volatility of electricity prices, even a portfolio whose lifetime value is perfectly hedged may still yield large and potentially fatal cash-flow swings in the short term. Thus, risk managers must implement hedging strategies with multiple, if not contradictory,...

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

Operation Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin : Annual Report 1995, Volume I - Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clearwater Hatchery is located on the north bank of the North Fork of the Clearwater River, downstream from Dworshak Dam. It is approximately 72 miles from Lower Granite Dam, and 504 miles from the mouth of the Columbia River. Site elevation is approximately 994 feet above sea level. The hatchery is staffed with 8 FTE`s. Clearwater Hatchery has two pipelines from Dworshak Reservoir. One is attached to a floating platform and is capable of providing various temperatures at varying depths. The other is a stationary intake about 245 feet below the top of the dam. All water is gravity fed to the hatchery. An 18-inch intake pipe provides an estimated 10 cfs with temperature remaining constant at approximately 40T. The primary 42-inch intake pipe can draw water from 5 to 45 feet in depth with temperatures ranging from 55{degrees} to 60{degrees}F and 70 cfs of flow. This report describes the operations of the hatchery.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game; US Fish and Wildlife Service; Nez Perce Tribe

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon : Project Progress Report, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

During 2001, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were hydraulically collected from redds in the East Fork Salmon River (EFSR; N = 311) and the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF; N = 272) to establish brood year 2001 culture cohorts. The eyed-eggs were incubated and reared by family group at the Eagle Fish Hatchery (Eagle). Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease prior to the majority of them being transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through maturity. Smolt transfers included 210 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 242 from the WFYF, and 178 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from Manchester to Eagle included 62 individuals from the LEM, 72 from the WFYF, and 27 from the EFSR. Additional water chilling capacity was added at Eagle in 2001 to test if spawn timing could be advanced by temperature manipulations, and adults from the LEM and WFYF were divided into chilled ({approx} 9 C) and ambient ({approx} 13.5 C) water temperature groups while at Eagle. Twenty-five mature females from the LEM (11 chilled, 14 ambient) were spawned in captivity with 23 males with the same temperature history in 2001. Water temperature group was not shown to affect the spawn timing of these females, but males did mature earlier. Egg survival to the eyed stage of development averaged 37.9% and did not differ significantly between the two temperature groups. A total of 8,154 eyed-eggs from these crosses were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 89) were released into the WFYF to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Five of the 18 redds spawned by captive-reared parents were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from four of these, and survival to this stage ranged from 0%-89%. Expanding these results to the remaining redds produced an estimate of 15,000 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish.

Venditti, David A.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

162

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

163

Savannah River National Laboratory  

located in every town and city have the potential to be used as environmental ... Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC. SRNS is responsible for

164

Savannah River Remediation Procurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and procedures, rules and regulations, terms and conditions and the orders and directives under which Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) develops, issues, administers and...

165

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Field Sites SREL is supported largely by external funding. Major sources include DOE Environmental Management, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, USGS, US Department of the...

166

Savannah River National Laboratory  

The coupling also provided excellent response to impact. ... used as a means of remote camera and equipment, ... Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, ...

167

Savannah River National Laboratory  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC. SRNS is responsible for transferring its technologies to the private sector so that these technologies may have ...

168

Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

Hillson, Todd D. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper...

170

delta S = 2 nonleptonic hyperon decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A sensitive search for the rare decays \\Omega^- \\to \\Lambda \\pi^- and \\Xi^0 \\to p \\pi^- has been performed using data from the 1997 run of the HyperCP (Fermilab E871) experiment. Limits on other such processes do not exclude the possibility of observable rates for |\\Delta S| = 2 nonleptonic hyperon decays, provided the decays occur through parity-odd operators. We obtain the branching-fraction limits B(\\Omega^- \\to \\Lambda \\pi^-)< 2.9 x 10^{-6} and B(\\Xi^0 \\to p \\pi^-)< 8.2 x 10^{-6}, both at 90% confidence level.

C. G. White; R. A. Burnstein; A. Chakravorty; A. Chan; Y. C. Chen; W. S. Choong; K. Clark; E. C. Dukes; C. Durandet; J. Felix; G. Gidal; P. Gu; H. R. Gustafson; C. Ho; T. Holmstrom; M. Huang; C. James; C. M. Jenkins; D. M. Kaplan; L. M. Lederman; N. Leros; M. J. Longo; F. Lopez; L. C. Lu; W. Luebke; K. B. Luk; K. S. Nelson; H. K. Park; J. -P. Perroud; D. Rajaram; H. A. Rubin; P. K. Teng; J. Volk; S. L. White; P. Zyla

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

delta S = 2 nonleptonic hyperon decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A sensitive search for the rare decays \\Omega^- \\to \\Lambda \\pi^- and \\Xi^0 \\to p \\pi^- has been performed using data from the 1997 run of the HyperCP (Fermilab E871) experiment. Limits on other such processes do not exclude the possibility of observable rates for |\\Delta S| = 2 nonleptonic hyperon decays, provided the decays occur through parity-odd operators. We obtain the branching-fraction limits B(\\Omega^- \\to \\Lambda \\pi^-)< 2.9 x 10^{-6} and B(\\Xi^0 \\to p \\pi^-)< 8.2 x 10^{-6}, both at 90% confidence level.

White, C G; Chakravorty, A; Chan, A; Chen, Y C; Choong, W S; Clark, K; Dukes, E C; Durandet, C; Flix, J; Gidal, G; Gu, P; Gustafson, H R; Ho, C; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; James, C; Jenkins, C M; Kaplan, D M; Lederman, Leon Max; Leros, Nicolas; Longo, M J; Lpez, F; Lu, L C; Luebke, W; Luk, K B; Nelson, K S; Park, H K; Perroud, Jean-Pierre; Rajaram, D; Rubin, H A; Teng, P K; Volk, J; White, S L; Zyla, P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

173

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Savannah River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

174

about Savannah River National Laboratory  

S R N The Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and are managed and operated by Savannah River ...

175

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations in the Northwest are decreasing. Genetic diversity is being lost at an alarming rate. Along with reduced population and genetic variability, the loss of biodiversity means a diminished environmental adaptability. The Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe) strives to ensure availability of genetic samples of the existing male salmonid population by establishing and maintaining a germplasm repository. The sampling strategy, initiated in 1992, has been to collect and preserve male salmon and steelhead genetic diversity across the geographic landscape by sampling within the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin, assuming a metapopulation structure existed historically. Gamete cryopreservation conserves genetic diversity in a germplasm repository, but is not a recovery action for listed fish species. The Tribe was funded in 2001 by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to coordinate gene banking of male gametes from Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River basin. In 2001, a total of 398 viable chinook salmon semen samples from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Lookingglass Hatchery (Imnaha River stock), Lake Creek, the South Fork Salmon River weir, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery, and Sawtooth Hatchery (upper Salmon River stock) were cryopreserved. Also, 295 samples of male steelhead gametes from Dworshak Hatchery, Fish Creek, Grande Ronde River, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery and Oxbow Hatchery were also cryopreserved. The Grande Ronde chinook salmon captive broodstock program stores 680 cryopreserved samples at the University of Idaho as a long-term archive, half of the total samples. A total of 3,206 cryopreserved samples from Snake River basin steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon, from 1992 through 2001, are stored in two independent locations at the University of Idaho (UI) and Washington State University (WSU). Two large freezer tanks are located at each university. Recommendations for future gene banking efforts include the need for establishment of a regional genome resource bank, an emphasis on cryopreserving wild unmarked fish, continued fertility trials, and genetic analysis on all fish represented in the germplasm repository.

Armstrong, Robyn; Kucera, Paul

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

177

from Savannah River National Laboratory  

operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. SRNL offers innovative solutions ... The decommissioning of F Area at the Savannah River Site involves long-term management

178

Pion-nucleon bremsstrahlung and. delta. electromagnetic moments  

SciTech Connect

A dynamically consistent, gauge invariant model for ..pi..N bremsstrahlung is developed. The ..pi..N dynamics are described through an isobar model fit to the experimental phase shifts. The charge and current operators are constructed in a gauge invariant fashion and include contributions from interaction currents at the ..pi..N..delta.. vertices and from the bare ..delta.. electromagnetic moments. The meaning of such moments for an unstable particle is discussed in detail. From a fit to the ..pi../sup +/p bremsstrahlung data, we extract a dipole moment for the bare ..delta../sup ++/ in the range ..mu../sub ..delta..//sub =//..mu../sub p/approx. =2.5 to 3.5; if the contributions from internal pion and nucleon currents are included, this ratio is somewhat smaller. The ..pi../sup -/p bremsstrahlung data are consistent with a broad range of values for ..mu../sub ..delta..//sub =/, including ..mu../sub ..delta..//sub =/ = 0. The ..delta.. quadrupole moment cannot be extracted meaningfully from the data. We discuss the sensitivity of the extracted values of ..mu../sub ..delta../ to the off-shell extension of the ..pi..N scattering amplitude. The polarization asymmetry is found to be sensitive to ..mu../sub ..delta../ while being less sensitive to off-shell scattering.

Heller, L.; Kumano, S.; Martinez, J.C.; Moniz, E.J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Big Delta, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Relationship Tables Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigDelta,Alaska&oldid227751" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

180

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid ...  

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Substituted 3-hydroxy-delta-lactones from epoxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalysts and methods for the carbonylation of epoxides to substituted 3-hydroxy-.delta.-lactones and .beta.-lactones are disclosed.

Coates, Geoffrey W.; Kramer, John W.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Intercomparison of Meteorological Forcing Data from Empirical and Mesoscale Model Sources in the North Fork American River Basin in Northern Sierra Nevada, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The data required to drive distributed hydrological models are significantly limited within mountainous terrain because of a scarcity of observations. This study evaluated three common configurations of forcing data: 1) one low-elevation station, ...

Nicholas E. Wayand; Alan F. Hamlet; Mimi Hughes; Shara I. Feld; Jessica D. Lundquist

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The [delta]f algorithm for beam dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is developed to study particle dynamics of beams including collective interaction with high accuracy and low noise. Particle dynamics with collective interactions is treated through particle simulation, where the main or average distribution f[sub 0] and the deviation away from it [delta]f are separately followed. The main distribution f[sub 0] is handled by an analytic equilibrium solution and the perturbation away from it [delta]f is followed by the method of characteristics. We call this the [delta]f algorithm. We specifically model a synchrotron collider which includes the collision section where collective effects of collisions are simulated by this [delta]f algorithm and the rest of the collider where single particle dynamics are treated by simple harmonic transport. The most important target of this simulation is to understand and predict the long-time behavior of the beam luminosity and lifetime. The [delta]f method allows the study the effect of small perturbations over long timescales on beam lifetime by eliminating the numerical noise problem inherent in Particle-in-Cell techniques. In the [delta]f code using the reference parameters of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider), beam blow-up near resonances and oscillations in the tune shift, [Delta][nu], far from resonances are observed. In studying long timescale particle diffusion in the phase space of the beams away from resonances, the [delta]f code performance is compared with a tracking code which does not incorporate collective interaction.

Koga, J.; Tajima, T.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The {delta}f algorithm for beam dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is developed to study particle dynamics of beams including collective interaction with high accuracy and low noise. Particle dynamics with collective interactions is treated through particle simulation, where the main or average distribution f{sub 0} and the deviation away from it {delta}f are separately followed. The main distribution f{sub 0} is handled by an analytic equilibrium solution and the perturbation away from it {delta}f is followed by the method of characteristics. We call this the {delta}f algorithm. We specifically model a synchrotron collider which includes the collision section where collective effects of collisions are simulated by this {delta}f algorithm and the rest of the collider where single particle dynamics are treated by simple harmonic transport. The most important target of this simulation is to understand and predict the long-time behavior of the beam luminosity and lifetime. The {delta}f method allows the study the effect of small perturbations over long timescales on beam lifetime by eliminating the numerical noise problem inherent in Particle-in-Cell techniques. In the {delta}f code using the reference parameters of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider), beam blow-up near resonances and oscillations in the tune shift, {Delta}{nu}, far from resonances are observed. In studying long timescale particle diffusion in the phase space of the beams away from resonances, the {delta}f code performance is compared with a tracking code which does not incorporate collective interaction.

Koga, J.; Tajima, T.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Delta-sigma (??) frequency synthesizers for wireless applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the state-of-the-art design approaches to delta-sigma (@D@S) frequency synthesizers for wireless transceiver applications. Various synthesizer architectures, including the integer and fractional-N synthesizers, and frequency-to-digital ... Keywords: Frequency synthesizers, Frequency-to-digital converters, RF transmitters, Sigma-delta modulation

Bertan Bakkaloglu; Sayfe Kiaei; Bikram Chaudhuri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Delta Montrose Electric Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Assn Electric Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Delta Montrose Electric Assn Place Colorado Utility Id 5086 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png AGRICULTURE GENERAL FARM: Single-Phase Commercial AGRICULTURE GENERAL FARM: Three-Phase Commercial GENERAL MUNICIPAL SERVICE: Single-Phase Commercial GENERAL MUNICIPAL SERVICE: Three-Phase Commercial INDUSTRIAL-DISTRIBUTION VOLTAGE 12kV Industrial INDUSTRIAL-TRANSMISSION (46kV and 115kV) Industrial

187

Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate and potassium fluoride (HAN) to a temperature between 40 and 70 C, then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not ore than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride 1M. Additionally, a small amount of sulfamic acid, such as 0.1M can be added to assure stability of the HAN in the presence of nitric acid. The oxide layer that forms on plutonium metal may be removed with a non-oxidizing acid as a pre-treatment step.

Karraker, D.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Overview of Mississippi River - Louisiana State Study  

SciTech Connect

There are significant benefits to be obtained from providing deepdraft vessel access to the lower Mississippi River including savings in vessel transportation costs, increased export tonnage and consequent improvements of the U.S. balance of payments, increases in employment, and the opportunity for creation of marshlands and land reclamation in the river's eroding delta. The most effective course of action for the State of Louisiana to take is to plan and seek authorization to further deepen the channel in stages to 55 feet should actual increases in commerce equal the high level of commerce, but to dredge the present 40-foot channel to 45 feet initially from the Gulf via Southwest Pass to Mile 172 AHP to provide for two-way navigation of vessels. In addition, the State should encourage private interests to put into operation as soon as possible, facilities for loading and topping-off grain ships midstream and topping-off coal carriers in the Gulf in order to attract and establish patterns of trade in large ships.

Rosselli, A.T.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Delta Solar Group Pte Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Group Pte Ltd Solar Group Pte Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Delta Solar Group Pte Ltd Place Singapore Zip 169876 Sector Services, Solar Product Turnkey solar services provider. References Delta Solar Group Pte Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Delta Solar Group Pte Ltd is a company located in Singapore . References ↑ "Delta Solar Group Pte Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Delta_Solar_Group_Pte_Ltd&oldid=344149" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

190

Unstable particles, gauge invariance and the Delta^{++} resonance parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The elastic and radiative pion(+)-proton scattering are studied in the framework of an effective Lagrangian model for the Delta^{++} resonance and its interactions. The finite width effects of this spin-3/2 resonance are introduced in the scattering amplitudes through a complex mass scheme to respect electromagnetic gauge invariance. The resonant pole (Delta^{++}) and background contributions (rho^0, sigma, Delta and neutron states) are separated according to the principles of the analytic S-matrix theory. The mass and width parameters of the \\Delta^{++} obtained from a fit to experimental data on the total cross section are in agreement with the results of a model-independent analysis based on the analytic S-matrix approach. The magnetic dipole moment determined from the radiative pion-proton scattering is mu_Delta^{++}=(6.14 +/- 0.51) nuclear magnetons.

G. Lopez Castro; A. Mariano

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gaining Ground Wetlands, Hurricanes and the Economy: The Value of Restoring the Mississippi River Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a project of Earth Economics. The authors are responsible for the content of this report. Funding

David Batker; Isabel De La Torre; Robert Costanza; Paula Swedeen; John Day; Roelof Boumans; Kenneth Bagstad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Multi-level hardware prefetching using low complexity delta correlating prediction tables with partial matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a low complexity table-based approach to delta correlation prefetching. Our approach uses a table indexed by the load address which stores the latest deltas observed. By storing deltas rather than full miss addresses, considerable ...

Marius Grannaes; Magnus Jahre; Lasse Natvig

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Investigation of increased mercury levels in the fisheries of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (Lefpc), Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) is supporting remediation efforts on the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee by performing this study. MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) has performed a series of literature reviews and bench-scale testing to further evaluate the mercury problem in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) at Oak Ridge. The primary problem is that total mercury (HgT) levels in LEFPC water decrease, while HgT levels in sunfish muscle tissue increase, with distance away from the National Security Complex (NSC), despite extensive source control efforts at the facility and within downstream riparian zones. Furthermore, dissolved methylmercury (d-MeHg) levels increase downstream from the NSC, especially during warm weather and/or high flow events. MSE performed four test series that focused on conversion of aqueous phase elemental mercury (Hg deg. A) to methyl mercury (MeHg) by algal-bacterial bio-films (periphyton) present in the stream-bed of LEFPC. Small (mg/L) quantities of un-sulphured molasses and peptone were added to some of the Hinds Creek samples to stimulate initial bacterial growth. Other Hinds Creek samples either were dosed with glutaraldehyde to preclude microbial growth, or were wrapped in aluminum foil to preclude Hg photochemical redox effects. The bench-scale testing for Phase II was completed August 2006. The final reporting and the planning for Phase III testing are in progress. (authors)

Byrne-Kelly, D.; Cornish, J.; Hart, A. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., 200 Technology Way, Butte, MT (United States); Southworth, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sims, L. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Final report for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils  

SciTech Connect

IT Corporation (IT) was contracted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the effectiveness of thermal desorption as a remedial technology for removing mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain soil. Previous laboratory studies by Energy Systems suggested that this technology could reduce mercury to very low levels. This pilot-scale demonstration study was initiated to verify on an engineering scale the performance of thermal desorption. This report includes the details of the demonstration study, including descriptions of experimental equipment and procedures, test conditions, sampling and analysis, quality assurance (QA), detailed test results, and an engineering assessment of a conceptual full-scale treatment facility. The specific project tasks addressed in this report were performed between October 1993 and June 1994. These tasks include soil receipt, preparation, and characterization; prepilot (bench-scale) desorption tests; front-end materials handling tests; pilot tests; back-end materials handling tests; residuals treatment; and engineering scale-up assessment.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Postremediation monitoring program baseline assessment report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) and its floodplain are contaminated with mercury (Hg) from ongoing and historical releases from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. A remedial investigation and feasibility study of LEFPC resulted in the signing of a Record of Decision (ROD) in August 1995. In response to the ROD, soil contaminated with mercury above 400 mg/kg was removed from two sites in LEFPC and the floodplain during a recently completed remedial action (RA). The Postremediation Monitoring Program (PMP) outlined in the LEFPC Monitoring Plan was envisioned to occur in two phases: (1) a baseline assessment prior to remediation and (2) postremediation monitoring. The current report summarizes the results of the baseline assessment of soil, water, biota, and groundwater usage in LEFPC and its floodplain conducted in 1995 and 1996 by personnel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). This report also includes some 1997 data from contaminated sites that did not undergo remediation during the RA (i.e., sites where mercury is greater than 200 mg/kg but less than 400 mg/kg). The baseline assessment described in this document is distinct and separate from both the remedial investigation/feasibility study the confirmatory sampling conducted by SAIC during the RA. The purpose of the current assessment was to provide preremediation baseline data for the LEFPC PMP outlined in the LEFPC Monitoring Plan, using common approaches and techniques, as specified in that plan.

Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Ashwood, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Rash, C.D.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phipps, T.L. [CKY, Inc. (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

F. Jerry Lucia

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

198

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

Shaw, R.Todd

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place Hudson, South Dakota Zip 57034 Product Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

200

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effects of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1979-1985 Final Research Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. Studies concerning operation of the dam on the Flathead River aquatic biota began in 1979 and continued to 1982 under Bureau of Reclamation funding. These studies resulted in flow recommendations for the aquatic biota in the main stem Flathead River, below the influence of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork. Studies concerned specifically with kokanee salmon have continued under Bonneville Power Administration funding since 1982. This completion report covers the entire study period (September 1979 to June 1985). Major results of this study were: (1) development and refinement of methods to assess hydropower impacts on spawning and incubation success of kokanee; (2) development of a model to predict kokanee year class strength from Flathead River flows; and (3) implementation of flows favorable for successful kokanee reproduction. A monitoring program has been developed which will assess the recovery of the kokanee population as it proceeds, and to recommend management strategies to maintain management goals for the kokanee fishery in the river system.

Clancy, Patrick

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NNSA Small Business Week 2011: Delta Research Associates supports NNSA  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1: Delta Research Associates supports NNSA 1: Delta Research Associates supports NNSA Human Resource offices | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Small Business Week 2011: Delta Research ... NNSA Small Business Week 2011: Delta Research Associates supports NNSA Human Resource offices Posted By Office of Public Affairs

203

ARM - Campaign Instrument - pyran-delta-spn1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

delta-spn1 delta-spn1 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Delta-T Sunshine Pyranometer- SPN1 (PYRAN-DELTA-SPN1) Instrument Categories Radiometric Campaigns Diffuse Shortwave IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2001.09.24 - 2001.10.22 Surface Observation in Support of in-situ Observations within the Arctic Boundary Layer [ Download Data ] North Slope Alaska, 2008.04.01 - 2008.05.31 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance

204

A Statistical Approach for DeltaQ Modeling Concerning Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Statistical Approach for DeltaQ Modeling Concerning Building Envelope and HVAC Duct Leakage Behavior Prediction Speaker(s): Alexander Dimitrov Date: March 22, 2006 - 12:00pm...

205

Using Science to Restore California's Bay-Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Technology. 62 p. Weinberg A. 1972. Science andtrans- science. Minerva 10:209222. Weiser M. 2013. Federal2013/05/12/5411951/if-bdcp-were-science- based-delta.html

Layzer, Judith A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

River Protection.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cc: cc: DOE/IG-0506 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS I N S P E C T I O N O F SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM JUNE 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 June 14, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Selected Aspects of the Office of River Protection Performance-Based Incentive Program" BACKGROUND The Office of River Protection (ORP), which reports to the Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for remediation of the radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in the State of Washington. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2000, ORP established 26 performance-based contract

207

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

208

from Savannah River National Laboratory  

Operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy near Aiken, S.C. E from Savannah River National Laboratory PAGE 2 OF 2 ...

209

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC Permission to Publish KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned (hereinafter referred to

210

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Project in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts Sandra Reategui Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 January 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2760 Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 Report Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2

211

Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonaradian Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The major goal of this project was to evaluate the impact of fracture porosity on performance of the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir. The approach was to use subcritical crack (SCC) index measurements and a crack-growth simulator to model potential fracture geometries in this reservoir. The SCC index on representative rock samples and proceedings with other pertinent rock measurements were measured. An approach for modeling coupled matrix and fracture flow using nonneighbor connections in a traditional finite-difference simulator was tested and found to be feasible.

Philip, Zeno; Jennings, Jr., James W.

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

212

Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal springs 4 Crystal Sp WD bypass reach to overflow? ? 4 dog river 3 City of TD none 3 no infoAppendix B Aquatic Supplement Contents Hood River Subbasin Tables and Figures: Table 1. Current estimated peak summer withdrawals from the Hood River Table 2. Historic lake stocking and fish introductions

213

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration conducted a study relating to the epidemiology and control of three fish diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These three diseases were ceratomyxosis caused by the myxosporidan parasite Ceratomyxa Shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the causative agent Renibacterium salmoninarum, and infectious hematopoietic necrosis, caused by a rhabdovirus. Each of these diseases is highly destructive and difficult or impossible to treat with antimicrobial agents. The geographic range of the infectious stage of C. Shasta has been extended to include the Snake River to the Oxbow and Hells Canyon Dams. These are the farthest upriver sites tested. Infections of ceratomyxosis were also initiated in the east fork of the Lewis River and in the Washougal River in Washington. Laboratory studies with this parasite failed to indicate that tubeficids are required in its life cycle. Bacterial kidney disease has been demonstrated in all life stages of salmonids: in the eggs, fry, smolts, juveniles and adults in the ocean, and in fish returning to fresh water. Monoclonal antibodies produced against R. salmoninarum demonstrated antigenic differences among isolates of the bacterium. Monoclonal antibodies also showed antigens of R. salmoninarum which are similar to those of a wide variety of gram positive and gram negative bacteria. A demonstration project at Round Butte Hatchery showed U V treatment to be an effective method for reducing the microbial population of the water supply and could reduce risks of IHNV. Tangential flow filtration was used successfully to concentrate IHNV from environmental water. At Round Butte Hatchery the carrier rate of IHNV in adults was very low and there was no subsequent mortality resulting from IHN in juveniles.

Fryer, John L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A retrospective study of the chemical analysis cost for the remediation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A retrospective study of the remediation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee was completed. The study was conducted by reviewing the public Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act record documents associated with the remediation of LEFPC and through discussions with the project staff involved or familiar with the project. The remediation took place in two phases. The first phase involved the excavation of about 5,560 yd{sup 3} of soil at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) locations in 1996. The second phase involved the excavation of 39,200 yd{sup 3} at another NOAA location and at the Bruner location in 1997. For the entire project (remedial investigation through cleanup), a total of 7,708 samples (1 sample for each 5.8 yd{sup 3} of soil remediated) were analyzed for mercury. The project obtained special regulatory approval to use two methods for the determination of mercury in soils that are not part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act SW-846 methods manual. The mercury analysis cost was $678,000, which represents 9.6% of the cleanup cost. During the cleanup phase of the project, an on-site laboratory was used. The estimated cost savings that the on-site laboratory provided fall into two categories: direct reduction of costs associated with chemical analysis and sample shipment totaling approximately $38,000, which represents a 5.3% savings relative to the estimated cost of using an off-site laboratory, and savings in the amount of $890,000 (12.5% of the $7.1 M cleanup cost), associated with expediting execution of the cleanup work by providing rapid (< 3 hours) sample result turnaround time. The manner in which the analytical services were procured for the LEFPC project suggest that the development of new chemical analysis technology must address deployment, performance, regulatory, robustness, reliability, and business appropriateness factors if the technology is to be used in environmental remediation.

Klatt, L.N.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 20072010  

SciTech Connect

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hood River Passive House  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

Hales, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Delta-Montrose Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Delta-Montrose Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Dishwasher: $30 Clothes Washer: $40 Refrigerator/Freezer: $40 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $60 Water Heaters: $150; additional $25 for the installation of a timer Heat Pumps: $150/ton; plus additional $100 - $150 for Energy Star qualified systems Split System Air Conditioner: $150; plus additional $100 - $150 for Energy Star qualified systems Provider Delta-Montrose Electric Association Delta-Montrose Electric Association (DMEA) offers a variety of rebates for

222

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ Speaker(s): Iain Walker Date: February 21, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Cynthia Tast Duct leakage has been identified as a major contributor to HVAC energy use and building infiltration, particularly in residences. In order to make good estimates of HVAC system energy performance, we need to know how much air leaks between the ducts and outside the building during system operation. Existing methods for determining duct leakage do not perform well due to experimental procedures that produce imprecise results or they require many assumptions to convert measurements into the desired leakage flows. The DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL to determine duct leakage flows by

223

Alger-Delta Coop Electric Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alger-Delta Coop Electric Assn Alger-Delta Coop Electric Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Alger-Delta Coop Electric Assn Place Michigan Utility Id 305 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png SChedule SL- 150 Watt HPS Lighting Schedule A- Farm & Home Residential Schedule AS- Seasonal Residential Residential Schedule B- Commercial & Small Power Commercial Schedule DD- 100 Watt HPS Lighting Schedule DD- 150 Watt HPS Lighting Schedule DD- 250 Watt MV Lighting Schedule DD-175 Watt MV Lighting

224

Lepton Mixing Predictions from Delta(6n^2) Family Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain predictions of lepton mixing parameters for direct models based on Delta(6n^2) family symmetry groups for arbitrarily large n in which the full Klein symmetry is identified as a subgroup of the family symmetry. After reviewing and developing the group theory associated with Delta(6n^2), we find many new candidates for large n able to yield reactor angle predictions within 3 sigma of recent global fits. We show that such Delta(6n^2) models with Majorana neutrinos predict trimaximal mixing with reactor angle theta_{13} fixed up to a discrete choice, an oscillation phase of either zero or pi and the atmospheric angle sum rules theta_{23}=45 degrees -/+ theta_{13}/sqrt{2}, respectively, which are consistent with recent global fits and will be tested in the near future.

King, Stephen F; Stuart, Alexander J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lepton Mixing Predictions from Delta(6n^2) Family Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain predictions of lepton mixing parameters for direct models based on Delta(6n^2) family symmetry groups for arbitrarily large n in which the full Klein symmetry is identified as a subgroup of the family symmetry. After reviewing and developing the group theory associated with Delta(6n^2), we find many new candidates for large n able to yield reactor angle predictions within 3 sigma of recent global fits. We show that such Delta(6n^2) models with Majorana neutrinos predict trimaximal mixing with reactor angle theta_{13} fixed up to a discrete choice, an oscillation phase of either zero or pi and the atmospheric angle sum rules theta_{23}=45 degrees -/+ theta_{13}/sqrt{2}, respectively, which are consistent with recent global fits and will be tested in the near future.

Stephen F. King; Thomas Neder; Alexander J. Stuart

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dynamical instabilities of warm npe matter: {delta} meson effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of {delta} mesons on the dynamical instabilities of cold and warm nuclear and stellar matter at subsaturation densities are studied in the framework of relativistic mean-field hadron models (NL3, NL{rho}, and NL{rho}{delta}) with the inclusion of the electromagnetic field. The distillation effect and the spinodals for all the models considered are discussed. The crust-core transition density and pressure are obtained as a function of temperature for {beta}-equilibrium matter with and without neutrino trapping. An estimation of the size of the clusters formed in the nonhomogeneous phase and the corresponding growth rates are made. It is shown that cluster sizes increase with temperature. The effects of the {delta} meson on the instability region are larger for low temperatures, very asymmetric matter, and densities close to the spinodal surface. It increases the distillation effect above {approx}0.4{rho}{sub 0} and has the opposite effect below that density.

Pais, Helena; Santos, Alexandre; Providencia, Constanca [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

North Woods River: The St. Croix River in Upper Midwest History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: North Woods River: The St. Croix River in Upperand Karamanski, Theodore J. North Woods River: The St. Croixbeauty and splendor. In North Woods River, Eileen M. McMahon

Karalus, Daniel E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Gauge symmetric delta(1232) couplings and the radiative muon capture in hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the difference between the gauge symmetric and standard pi-N-delta couplings, a contact pi-pi-N-N term, quadratic in the pi-N-delta coupling, is explicitly constructed. Besides, a contribution from the delta excitation mechanism to the photon spectrum for the radiative muon capture in hydrogen is derived from the gauge symmetric pi-N-delta and gamma-N-delta couplings. It is shown for the photon spectrum, studied recently experimentally, that the new spectrum is for the photon momentums k > 60 MeV by 4-10 % smaller than the one obtained from standardly used couplings with the on-shell deltas.

J. Smejkal; E. Truhlik

2004-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Savannah River Site - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Savannah River Site Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Puncture Wound Injury resulting in a Radiological Uptake at the Savannah River Site, July 22, 2011 (NEA-2011-02) Consent Order issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Facility Construction Deficiencies and Subcontractor Oversight at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Amer Industrial Technologies, Inc. related to Weld Deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010

230

Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates  

SciTech Connect

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates  

SciTech Connect

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

235

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

236

about Savannah River National Laboratory  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions ... Office of Environmental Management Applied research ... in the areas of national security, clean energy and environmental stewardship

237

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

238

from Savannah River National Laoratory  

of Energys Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina ... guidance for understanding natural complexity and heterogeneity in the environment. Impact

239

about Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Effects on Materials In an effort to ensure the safety of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) maintains an active role in...

240

PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA  

SciTech Connect

Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in the future.

Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

$\\Delta$-scaling and heat capacity in relativistic ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $\\Delta$-scaling method and the multiplicity information entropy has been applied to the relativistic collisions of p+p, C+C and Pb+Pb which were simulated by a Monte Carlo package, LUCIAE 3.0. In addition, the heat capacities of different mesons and baryons have been extracted from event-by-event temperature fluctuation.

Ma, Y G; Cai, X Z; Chen, J G; Chen, J H; Fang, D Q; Guo, W; He, Z J; Huang, H Z; Long, J L; Ma, C W; S Ben-Hao; Shen, W Q; Su, Q M; Wang, K; Wei, Y B; Yan, T Z; Zhong, C; Zuo, J X

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

MHK Technologies/DeltaStream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage DeltaStream.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/DeltaStream *MHK Projects/DeltaStream Pembrokeshire Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The DeltaStream device is a nominal 1 2MW unit which sits on the seabed without the need for a positive anchoring system generating electricity from three separate horizontal axis turbines mounted on a common frame The use of three turbines on a single circa 30m wide triangular frame produces a low center of gravity enabling the device to satisfy its structural stability requirements including the avoidance of overturning and sliding The device utilizes fixed pitch blades designed to maximize the energy extracted from the tidal flow distribution at the deployment site A mechanical yaw system allows the nacelles to oscillate by a control system which is programmed to seek the optimum flow The rotors extract the energy from the water flow at an elevation of between approximately 5 20m above the seabed assuming a 15m rotor diameter

244

Minimising the delta test for variable selection in regression problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of selecting an adequate set of variables from a given data set of a sampled function becomes crucial by the time of designing the model that will approximate it. Several approaches have been presented in the literature although recent studies ... Keywords: FBS, GAs, delta test, forward-backward search, genetic algorithms, hybrid algorithms, parallel architectures, regression problems, tabu search, variable selection

Alberto Guillen; Dusan Sovilj; Amaury Lendasse; Fernando Mateo; Ignacio Rojas

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Recursive modelling in dynamics of delta parallel robot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recursive matrix relations in kinematics and dynamics of a Delta parallel robot having three revolute actuators are established in this paper. The prototype of the manipulator is a three degrees-of-freedom space mechanism, which consists of a system ... Keywords: Dynamics modelling, Kinematics, Parallel mechanism, Virtual work

Stefan Staicu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Delta Energy & Environment Ltd Registered in Scotland: No SC259964  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy & Environment Scene setting: Challenges for heat pumps penetrating the gas grid Europe: 770k HPs Stuart Street, Edinburgh, EH3 7TS Heat Pumps in the Building Sector: Hybrid Heat Pumps opening UK DECC IEA Heat Pump Workshop 13th November 2012 Contact: lindsay.sugden@delta-ee.com, +44(0)131 625 1006

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

247

A Grand Delta(96) x SU(5) Flavour Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results from the Daya Bay and RENO reactor experiments have measured the smallest lepton mixing angle and found it to have a value of theta_13 approximately 9 degrees. This result presents a new challenge for the existing paradigms of discrete flavour symmetries which attempt to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. Here we propose a Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory of Flavour based on Delta(96) x SU(5), together with a U(1) x Z3 symmetry, including a full discussion of Delta(96) in a convenient basis. The Grand Delta(96) x SU(5) Flavour Model relates the quark mixing angles and masses in the form of the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin relation and realises the Georgi-Jarlskog mass relations between the charged leptons and down-type quarks. We predict a Bi-trimaximal (not Tri-bimaximal) form of neutrino mixing matrix, which, after including charged lepton corrections with zero phase, leads to the following GUT scale predictions for the atmospheric, solar, and reactor mixing angles: theta_23=36.9 degrees, theta_12=32.7 degrees and theta_13=9.6 degrees, in good agreement with recent global fits, and a zero Dirac CP phase delta~0.

Stephen F. King; Christoph Luhn; Alexander J. Stuart

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Weighted median filters with sigma-delta modulation encoding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital decimation filters play a fundamental role in oversampled sigma-delta A/D decoders. In this paper, we first show that weighted median (WM) filtering of a demodulated sequence (at the Nyquist rate) can be implemented concurrently in the A/D decoder. ...

G.R. Arce; N.A. Grabowski; N.C. Gallagher

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

N and N to Delta transition form factors from Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent lattice QCD results on nucleon form factors and N to Delta transition form factors. We predict the parity violating asymmetry in N to Delta and check the off-diagonal Goldberger-Treiman relation.

C. Alexandrou

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Enthalpy of gamma-delta Transition in Ternary U-Pu-Zr Fuel Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enthalpy of gamma-delta Transition in Ternary U-Pu-Zr Fuel ... that the activities of Pu and Zr in the delta phase may be self-compensating.

251

High active carrier concentration in n-type, thin film Ge using delta-doping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate CVD in situ doping of Ge by utilizing phosphorus delta-doping for the creation of a high dopant diffusion source. Multiple monolayer delta doping creates source phosphorous concentrations above 1 10[superscript ...

Cai, Yan

252

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Title Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47308 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, J. Wempen, Duo Wang, Jennifer A. McWilliams, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Abstract Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard

253

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

SciTech Connect

The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARADIAN AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Petrophysical heterogeneity in the South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCF) reservoir and other shallow-water platform carbonates in the Permian Basin and elsewhere is composed of a large-scale stratigraphically controlled component and a small-scale poorly correlated component. The large-scale variability exists as a flow-unit scale petrophysical layering that is laterally persistent at interwell scales and produces highly stratified reservoir behavior. Capturing the rate-enhancing effect of the small-scale variability requires carefully controlled averaging procedures at four levels of scaleup. Porosity can be easily scaled using arithmetic averaging procedures. Permeability, however, requires carefully controlled power-averaging procedures. Effective permeability is increased at every scaleup level.

James W. Jennings, Jr.; F. Jerry Lucia

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Population Viability of the Snake River Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha) : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 11 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A stochastic simulation model of spring chinook population dynamics was parameterized using 36 years of redd count data from five index streams on the middle fork of the Salmon River in Idaho. Two versions of the model, one in which spawning age structure was presumed to follow an evolutionarily stable strategy and another in which spawning age structure was constrained to observed values were examined. The models were then used to generate 1000 statistically representative population projections over the next 100 years to assess risk of extinction and prospects for stock rebuilding. Current levels of production and mortality appear to suffice for maintaining the status quo, virtually assuring persistence over the next 100 years, barring catastophes, but providing no hope for rebuilding. A doubling of the current population level over the next 100 years can be expected to follow an increase in {alpha} (density independent mortality or fry production) of 5 to 25%, but rebuilding to the population levels prevailing in the 1950`s will require an increase in {alpha} of at least 37%.

Emlen, John Merritt

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Remedial investigation work plan for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, located within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. The entire ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of CERCLA sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites under investigation require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) of potential remedial actions. The need to complete RIs in a timely manner resulted in the establishment of the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Characterization Area (CA) and the Bear Creek CA. The CA approach considers the entire watershed and examines all appropriate media within it. The UEFPC CA, which includes the main Y-12 Plant area, is an operationally and hydrogeologically complex area that contains numerous contaminants and containment sources, as well as ongoing industrial and defense-related activities. The UEFPC CA also is the suspected point of origin for off-site groundwater and surface-water contamination. The UEFPC CA RI also will address a carbon-tetrachloride/chloroform-dominated groundwater plume that extends east of the DOE property line into Union Valley, which appears to be connected with springs in the valley. In addition, surface water in UEFPC to the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek CA boundary will be addressed. Through investigation of the entire watershed as one ``site,`` data gaps and contaminated areas will be identified and prioritized more efficiently than through separate investigations of many discrete units.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not

258

Wisconsin River Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Wisconsin River Power Company Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20863 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC MRO Yes...

259

Canadian River Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial...

260

Hydrologic Variability of the Cosumnes River Floodplain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preserve (CRP) floodplain, Michigan Bar streamflow gage,and mean monthly streamflow streamflow at River at Michiganat Michigan Bar. at Cosumnes Cosumnes River Bar. SAN

Booth, Eric; Mount, Jeff; Viers, Joshua H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Big River Resources LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Big River Resources LLC Place West Burlington, Iowa Zip 52655 Product Dry-mill bioethanol producer with a cooperative structure. References Big River Resources LLC1...

262

Ohio River Ecological Research Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2009 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) fish community sampling near 14 Ohio River power plants. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Spring Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon; 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the fourth consecutive year, the Nez Perce Tribe, in conjunction with the Fish Passage Center, participated in the smolt monitoring program in the Imnaha River. A screw trap was used to collect emigrating natural and hatchery chinook salmon (Uncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolts from February 25 to June 27, 1997. A total of 270 natural chinook salmon, 10,616 hatchery chinook salmon, 864 natural steelhead trout (and 13 natural steelhead parr), and 7,345 hatchery steelhead trout smolts were captured during emigration studies on the Imnaha River. Mortality associated with trapping, handling and tagging was low: 0.37% for natural chinook, 0.11% for hatchery chinook, 0.11% for natural steelhead, and 0.39% for hatchery steelhead trout smolts. Natural chinook salmon smolts emigrated from the Imnaha River from February 25 to June 10 and had a mean length of 108 mm, average weight of 13 g, and mean condition factor of 1.02. The peak period of natural chinook smolt emigration, based on number of fish collected, occurred between March 25 and April 30. Hatchery reared chinook salmon smolts were collected from April 9 to May 9, with 99% of the smolts being caught within 10 days after release. Hatchery chinook smolts mean length, weight, and condition factor were 131 mm, 25.4 g, and 1.12, respectively. Emigration of natural steelhead smolts in the Imnaha River occurred between March 14 and June 25. Peak emigration occurred from May 1 to May 15. Natural steelhead smolts averaged 175 mm in fork length, 55.8 g in weight and had a mean condition factor of 1 .OO. Hatchery steelhead smolts emigrated from the Imnaha River between April 15 and June 27. Hatchery steelhead smolts averaged 210 mm in fork length, 88 g in weight and had a mean condition factor of 0.93. Spring runoff water conditions in 1997 provided above average flows for emigrating anadromous salmonid smolts. Imnaha River mean daily discharge during spring emigration ranged from 7.4 cms (260 cfs) on March 9 to 96.6 cms (3,410 cfs) on April 20 at USGS gauge 13292000, Imnaha, OR. Snake River discharge measured at the Anatone gauge station, ranged from 61.1 to 152 kcfs from April 15 to May 18. River discharge at LGR ranged from 79.6 kcfs on March 6 to 225.3 kcfs on May 18. Flows at LGR were generally greater than 100 kcfs during most of the spring runoff period, and discharge exceeded 120 kcfs from March 20-31 and April 19 to June 24. The water spill period at LGR occurred continuously from April 10 to June 29 with peak spill of 101.9 kcfs occurring on May 17.

Blenden, Michael L.; Veach, Eric R.; Kucera, Paul A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 1988 through March 1989 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. Highlights of results of our work in the Dalles and Bonneville reservoirs are: using setlines, we caught 1,586 sturgeon in The Dalles Reservoir and 484 sturgeon in Bonneville Reservoir in 1988. Fork length of fish caught ranged from 34 cm to 274 cm. Of the fish caught we marked 1,248 in The Dalles Reservoir and 341 in Bonneville Reservoir. Of the fish marked in 1988, we recaptured 82 in The Dalles Reservoir and none in Bonneville Reservoir. We recaptured 89 fish marked in 1987 in The Dalles Reservoir. Anglers recaptured 35 fish marked in 1988 and 16 fish marked in 1987 in The Dalles Reservoir. Anglers recaptured 2 sturgeon marked in 1988 in Bonneville Reservoir. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Delta M(s) in the MSSM with large tan beta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bs-Bsbar mixing parameter Delta Ms is studied in the MSSM with large tan beta. The recent Tevatron measurement of Delta Ms is used to constrain the MSSM parameter space. From this analysis the often neglected contribution to Delta Ms from the operator Q^SLL is found to be significant.

Parry, J K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current Delta water Plant and Intake Location System Size (future water quality conditions at different Delta intakesusing the intake with the better water quality between Old

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Feasibility of Documenting and Estimating Adult Fish Passage at Large Hydroelectric Facilities in the Snake River Using Video Technology; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field study was conducted at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River in 1992 to evaluate the feasibility of using time-lapse video technology to document and estimate fish ladder passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, sockeye salmon 0. nerka, and steelhead 0. mykiss using time-lapse video technology. High quality video images were produced with a time-lapse video system operating in 72 h mode from 1 May through 31 December, 1992 and fish were counted from 1 June through 15 December. From the video record we counted 15 sockeye salmon, 3,283 summer chinook salmon, 1,022 fall chinook salmon, and 125,599 steelhead. The composite count of target species generated from the video record was similar (p = 0.617) to the estimate made by on-site counters during identical time periods indicating that the two methods were precise. Comparisons of 24 h video counts and on-site (10 and 16 h) counts showed that a significant (p < 0.001) proportion of target salmonids migrated during the nighttime when on-site counts are not typically made at Lower Granite Dam. The mean sockeye salmon fork length measured from video images was 453 mm. Mean fork-lengths reported for Snake River sockeye salmon between 1953 and 1965 were much greater ({female} = 546 mm {male} = 577 mm). Cost comparisons showed that video costs were less than half those of on-site counting methods. The video method also included the collection of additional data. A computer software demonstration program was developed that graphically illustrated the possibilities of a completely automated, computerized fish counting and identification system.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Pederson, David R.; Schartzberg, Mathew

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2002, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game continued to develop techniques to rear Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were hydraulically collected from redds in the East Fork Salmon River (EFSR; N = 328) and the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF; N = 308) to establish brood year 2002 culture cohorts. The eyed-eggs were incubated and reared at the Eagle Fish Hatchery, Eagle, Idaho (Eagle). Juveniles collected in 2000 were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease prior to being transferred to the NOAA Fisheries, Manchester Marine Experimental Station, Manchester, Washington (Manchester) for saltwater rearing through maturity. Smolt transfers included 203 individuals from the WFYF and 379 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from Manchester to Eagle included 107 individuals from the LEM, 167 from the WFYF, and 82 from the EFSR. This was the second year maturing adults were held on chilled water at Eagle to test if water temperature manipulations could advance spawn timing. Adults from the LEM and WFYF were divided into chilled ({approx} 9 C) and ambient ({approx} 13.5 C) temperature groups while at Eagle. Forty-seven mature females from the LEM (19 chilled, 16 ambient, and 12 ambient not included in the temperature study) were spawned at Eagle with 42 males in 2002. Water temperature group was not shown to affect the spawn timing of these females, but males did mature earlier. Egg survival to the eyed stage averaged 66.5% and did not differ significantly between the temperature groups. Personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe placed a total of 47,977 eyed-eggs from these crosses in in-stream incubators. Mature adults (N = 215 including 56 precocial males) were released into the WFYF to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Twenty-six captive-reared females constructed 33 redds in the WFYF in 2002. Eighteen of these were hydraulically sampled, and eggs were collected from 17. The percentage of live eggs ranged from 0-100% and averaged 34.6%. No live eggs were found in redds spawned by brood year 1997 females. Expanding these results to the remaining redds gives an estimate of 22,900 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish in the WFYF. Additionally, 130 mature adults (including 41 precocial males) were released into the EFSR. Almost all of these fish moved out of the areas shoreline observers had access to, so no spawning behavior was observed. Radio-telemetry indicated that most of these fish initially moved downstream (although three females moved upstream as far as 7 km) and then held position.

Venditti, David; Willard, Catherine; James, Chris

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

MHK Projects/DeltaStream Pembrokeshire | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DeltaStream Pembrokeshire DeltaStream Pembrokeshire < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.8757,"lon":-4.93919,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

270

City of Delta, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Place Colorado Utility Id 5036 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Greater than 50 KVA of Installed Transformer Capacity Industrial Residential Residential Security and Yard Lights Lighting Single Phase Less Than 50 KVA of Installed Transformer Capacity Commercial Street Lighting, Traffic Lighting, City Power Lighting Three Phase Less Than 50 KVA of Installed Transformer Capacity Commercial

271

Usina Geradora Delta Eolica Ltda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usina Geradora Delta Eolica Ltda Usina Geradora Delta Eolica Ltda Place Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil Sector Wind energy Product Brazil-based wind project developer. Coordinates -3.718404°, -38.542924° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-3.718404,"lon":-38.542924,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

272

MHK Projects/DeltaStream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DeltaStream DeltaStream < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.8757,"lon":-4.93919,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

Defect Based Spin Mediation in Delta-Phase Plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We earlier reported the measured decrease of electrical resistivity during isochronal-annealing of ion irradiation damage that was accumulated at low-temperature (10 or 20K), and the temperature dependence of the resistance of defect-populations produced by low-temperature damage-accumulation and annealing in a stabilized {delta}-phase plutonium alloy, Pu(3.3 at%Ga)[1]. We noted that the temperature dependence of the resistance of defects resulting from low-temperature damage accumulation and subsequent annealing exhibits a -ln(T) temperature dependence suggestive of a Kondo impurity. A discussion of a possible ''structure-property'' effect, as it might relate to the nature of the {delta}-phase of Pu, is presented.

Fluss, M J; Wirth, B D; Wall, M; Felter, T E; Caturla, M J; Kubota, A; Diaz de la Rubia, T

2003-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Savannah River Site Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/2014 7/2014 SEARCH GO News Releases Video Releases Upcoming Events 12.31.13 Dr. Sam Fink Earns Donald Orth Lifetime Achievement Award 12.31.13 Savannah River Remediation Issues Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report 12.18.13 Prototype System Brings Advantages of Wireless Technology to Secure Environment CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL NEWS RELEASES CLICK HERE for our email news service, govDELIVERY 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award - Click to play on YouTube 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award Finalist: SRS Recovery Act Project PLAY VIDEO CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL VIDEO RELEASES Enterprise.SRS - Safety and Security begin with me! SRS Status & Emergency Information * Cold War Patriot's Resource Fair - Aiken, SC (04.25.13) * 3rd Annual Small Modular Reactor Conference - Columbia, SC (04.16-17.13)

275

A Grand Delta(96) x SU(5) Flavour Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results from the Daya Bay and RENO reactor experiments have measured the smallest lepton mixing angle and found it to have a value of theta_13 approximately 9 degrees. This result presents a new challenge for the existing paradigms of discrete flavour symmetries which attempt to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. Here we propose a Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory of Flavour based on Delta(96) x SU(5), together with a U(1) x Z3 symmetry, including a full discussion of Delta(96) in a convenient basis. The Grand Delta(96) x SU(5) Flavour Model relates the quark mixing angles and masses in the form of the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin relation and realises the Georgi-Jarlskog mass relations between the charged leptons and down-type quarks. We predict a Bi-trimaximal (not Tri-bimaximal) form of neutrino mixing matrix, which, after including charged lepton corrections with zero phase, leads to the following GUT scale predictions for the atmospheric, solar, and reactor mixing angles: theta_23=36...

King, Stephen F; Stuart, Alexander J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Delta Resonance Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electroproduction of baryon resonances at high Q2 is examined. Analysis focuses on the Delta(1232) resonance via exclusive pseudoscalar meson production of 0 particles. Differential cross sections are extracted for exclusive 0 electroproduction. In the central invariant mass (W) region the cross sections are used to extract resonant multipole amplitudes. In particular, the ratio of the electric quadrupole to magnetic dipole amplitudes (E2/M1) will be discussed for the Delta(1232) resonance. The transition to pQCD is discussed in terms of E2/M1 and other multipoles. The helicity amplitude A3/2 can be used as a baryon helicity conservation meter in this context and will be discussed. The fast shrinking of the resonant contribution in the Delta region is observed at this high momentum transfer. Apart from the observables related to pQCD scaling, the transition form factor G#23;M is extracted along with the scalar to magnetic dipole ratio C2/M1.

Anthony Villano

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Marble River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Marble River Facility Marble River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDP Renewables North America LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Churubusco NY Coordinates 44.9406848°, -73.9303307° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9406848,"lon":-73.9303307,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

278

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Hawk Lake Fresno River R D 4 0 0 RD 415 HWY41 RD 207 REVISRD YO SEM ITE SP RINGS P KY LILLEY County Rosedale Ranch Revis Mountain Daulton Spring Red Top Lookout Buford Mountain Black Hawk Lake

Wang, Zhi

279

Caney River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Caney River Facility Caney River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Enel Green Power North America Inc. Developer Tradewind Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Tennessee Valley Authority Location Elk County KS Coordinates 37.448424°, -96.425027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.448424,"lon":-96.425027,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

280

River-Forced Estuarine Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development, maintenance, and dissipation of river-forced estuarine plumes with and without seaward sloping bottom are studied by use of a three-dimensional, primitive-equation model. Inside the estuary, discussion is focused on how the ...

Shenn-Yu Chao

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Savannah River Operations Office Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Savannah River Operations banner art and link to DOE Link to Energy.gov Link to Energy.gov National Day of Remembrance NOTICE TO USERS Use of this system constitutes consent to...

282

Colorado River Basin Hydroclimatic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of annual hydroclimatic variability in the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) for the period of 19062006 was performed to understand the dominant modes of multidecadal variability. First, wavelet-based spectral analysis was employed ...

Kenneth Nowak; Martin Hoerling; Balaji Rajagopalan; Edith Zagona

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow measures, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2000-2001 project year, there were 624 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 24 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), and 47 spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) counted at the Nursery Bridge Dam adult trap between December 27, 2000 and June 7, 2001. The Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap was not operated this year. The project transported 1600 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility and outplanted 1156 for natural spawning in the basin. The project also provided equipment for transportation of juveniles captured during the construction fish salvage at Nursery Bridge Dam.

Zimmerman, Brian C. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

BLM Humboldt River Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humboldt River Field Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM Humboldt River Field Office Short Name Humboldt River Parent Organization BLM Winnemucca District Office Address...

286

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River More Documents & Publications Integrated Project Team RM...

287

Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Savannah River Site: Plutonium Preparation Project (PuPP) at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary...

288

Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority on Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying...

289

The 'Watcher's Stage' in Lower Colorado River Indian Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primitive Subsistence on the Lower Colorado and Gila Rivers.Watcher's Stage' in Lower Colorado River Indian AgricultureIndian tribes along the Colorado River to various interior

Lawton, Harry W.; Wilke, Philip J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

PP-41 Mirias River Electric Cooperative, Inc. | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Mirias River Electric Cooperative, Inc. PP-41 Mirias River Electric Cooperative, Inc. Presidential Permit authorizing Mirias River Electric Cooperative, Inc. to constuct,...

291

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep...

292

Engineering shallow spins in diamond with nitrogen delta-doping  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate nanometer-precision depth control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center creation near the surface of synthetic diamond using an in situ nitrogen delta-doping technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Despite their proximity to the surface, doped NV centers with depths (d) ranging from 5 to 100 nm display long spin coherence times, T{sub 2} > 100 {mu}s at d = 5 nm and T{sub 2} > 600 {mu}s at d {>=} 50 nm. The consistently long spin coherence observed in such shallow NV centers enables applications such as atomic-scale external spin sensing and hybrid quantum architectures.

Ohno, Kenichi; Joseph Heremans, F.; Bassett, Lee C.; Myers, Bryan A.; Toyli, David M.; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.; Palmstrom, Christopher J.; Awschalom, David D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of tritium resources; by contributing to the stockpile surveillance program; and by assisting in the development of alternatives for large-scale pit disassembly/conversion capability. SRS also manages excess nuclear materials and supports nuclear nonproliferation initiatives. Environmental stewardship activities include the management, treatment, and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. Enforcement April 13, 2010 Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. -

296

Canadian River Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Canadian River Compact Commission The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by

297

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

298

Comment on Pion-nucleon bremsstrahlung and. Delta. electromagnetic moments''  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the definition of the electromagnetic moments of the dressed'' {Delta} introduced by Heller, Kumano, Martinez, and Moniz with respect to gauge invariance.

Weyrauch, M. (Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (AU))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Subsidence, sea level rise, and seismicity in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources. 1989. Delta subsidence investigation progressreversing the effects of subsidence in the Sacramento-SanC. 2004. Levee integrity and subsidence: tied at the hip for

Mount, Jeffrey; Twiss, Robert

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recent, and future subsidence, SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta,SJ, Rojstaczer S. 1996. Subsidence of agricultural lands invertical accretion, and subsidence at three Louisiana

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Delta Air Lines plans to increase jet fuel yield at Trainer ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Last year a few refineries had jet fuel yields in the range that Delta has planned for Trainer, but only for a few months of the year.

302

Oil enclave economy and sexual liaisons in Nigeria's Niger Delta region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the intersection of oil enclave economy and the phenomenon of sexual liaisons in Nigerias Niger Delta region. The particular focus of this (more)

Gandu, Yohanna Kagoro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Delta Subsidence Reversal, Levee Failure, and Aquatic HabitatA Cautionary Tale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for subsidence- reversal projections, and illustrate some1. Together, these projections estimate the probabilityDISCUSSION Delta Flooding Projections and Simulations The

Bates, Matthew E.; Lund, Jay R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Framework and Evolution of a Transgressed Delta Lobe: St. Bernard Shoals, Northern Gulf of Mexico, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework and Evolution of a Transgressed Delta Lobe: St. Bernard Shoals, Northern Gulf of Mexico.......................................................................................7 Quaternary Sea-Level for the Northern Gulf of Mexico

Kulp, Mark

305

Federal-State Conflicts over the Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A RIVER No MORE: THE COLORADO RIVER AND THE WEST (1981). 3.agricultural use in the Colorado River Basin in California.and California's dispute over Colorado River water, spanning

Kaplan, David

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage is a key factor in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard.

Walker,I.S.; Sherman,M.H.; Wempen, J.; Wang, D.; McWilliams, J.A.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

308

Savannah River National Laboratory - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art Top Menu Bar SRNL Update: Embassy Fellows Report A report co-authored by Savannah River National Laboratory Senior Advisory Engineer, Dr. Robert Sindelar, has been released. The report to the Government of Japan - Ministry of the Environment provides observations and recommendations on decontamination work and progress... >>MORE Portable Power Research at SRNL Hadron Technologies, Inc., a microwave technology and systems development and manufacturing company with offices in Tennessee and Colorado, has signed a license for a Hybrid Microwave and Off-Gas Treatment System developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory, the Department of Energy's applied science laboratory located at the Savannah River Site. >>MORE

309

Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habi

Geist, David R.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

River Network Routing on the NHDPlus Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mapped rivers and streams of the contiguous United States are available in a geographic information system (GIS) dataset called National Hydrography Dataset Plus (NHDPlus). This hydrographic dataset has about 3 million river and water body ...

Cdric H. David; David R. Maidment; Guo-Yue Niu; Zong-Liang Yang; Florence Habets; Victor Eijkhout

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Flambeau River Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flambeau River Biofuels Flambeau River Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Flambeau River Biofuels Place Park Falls, Wisconsin Sector Biomass Product A subsidiary of Flambeau River Papers LLC that plans to develop a Fischer Tropsch diesel project in Park Falls, Wisconsin that will process residual wood biomass from forest and agricultural sources. References Flambeau River Biofuels[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Flambeau River Biofuels is a company located in Park Falls, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Flambeau River Biofuels" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flambeau_River_Biofuels&oldid=345407" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

312

Savannah River Site Environmental Implentation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the organizational responsibilities for the Savannah River Site Environmental program. Operations, Engineering and projects, Environment, safety, and health, Quality assurance, and the Savannah River Laboratory are described.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

314

River Corridor Closure Project Partnering Performance Agreement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WCH and DOE have a mission to complete the clsoure of the Hanford River Corridor by 2015. Early and efficient completion of this work scope law the River Corridor Closure Contract (DE-AC06...

315

A Family By Yellow River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

River, opposite to Shenxi Province across the River, is within the central zone of Huangtu Plateau Culture in midland China. In history Qikou was a transport hinge connecting Sichuan to the west and Baotou (Inner Mongolia) to the northwest. Still seen... . They own seven mu (a mu is one fifteenth of a hectare) of jujube trees, which is an area expanded on a basis of one mu last year. The labour is tough with a typical droughty climate of Loess Plateau. Shouldering a pole with two buckets at either end...

China Central Television (CCTV)

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Local structure and vibrational properties of alpha'-Pu martensitein Ga-stabilized delta-Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used to investigate the local atomic environment and vibrational properties of plutonium and gallium atoms in the {alpha}{prime} and {delta} phases of a mixed phase Pu-Ga alloy. EXAFS results measured at low temperature compare the structure of the mixed phase sample with a single-phase {delta}-Pu sample. EXAFS spectral components attributed to both {alpha}{prime}-Pu and {delta}-Pu were observed in the mixed phase sample. Ga K-edge EXAFS spectra indicate local atomic environments similar to the Pu LIII-edge EXAFS results, which suggests that Ga is substitutional for Pu atoms in both the monoclinic {alpha}{prime}-Pu and the fcc {delta}-Pu structures. In {delta}-Pu, we measure a Ga-Pu bond length contraction of 0.11 Angstroms with respect to the Pu-Pu bond length. The corresponding bond-length contraction around Ga in {alpha}{prime}-Pu is only 0.03 Angstroms. Results from temperature-dependent Pu LIII-edge EXAFS measurements are fit to a correlated Debye model, and a large difference in the Pu-Pu bond Debye temperature is observed for the {alpha}{prime} and {delta} phases: {theta}{sub cD}({alpha}{prime})=159{+-}13 K versus {theta}{sub cD}({delta})=120{+-}3 K. The corresponding analysis for the Ga K EXAFS determines a Ga-Pu bond Debye temperature of {theta}{sub cD}({delta})=188{+-}12 K in the {delta}-Pu phase. These results are related to the observed solubility of Ga in {delta}-Pu, the ''stabilization'' of {delta}-Pu by Ga at room temperature, and the insolubility of Ga in {alpha}{prime}-Pu.

Nelson, E.J.; Blobaum, K.J.M.; Wall, M.A.; Allen, P.G.; Schwartz,A.J.; Booth, C.H.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

Detecting atmospheric rivers in large climate datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme precipitation events on the western coast of North America are often traced to an unusual weather phenomenon known as atmospheric rivers. Although these storms may provide a significant fraction of the total water to the highly managed western ... Keywords: atmospheric rivers, automatic detection of atmospheric rivers, connected component labeling, extreme climate events

Surendra Byna; Prabhat; Michael F. Wehner; Kesheng John Wu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Jacobs, Karl C.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Smoky Hill and River Valleys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................3 - 13 Wind Energy and the Meridian Way Wind Farm County. This location is the site of a new wind farm development by Westar Energy, Horizon Wind EnergySmoky Hill and Republican River Valleys Water, Wind, and Economic Development 2008 Field Conference

Peterson, Blake R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Delta T optimisation of district heating network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Delta T optimisation of district heating of any network. Most existing district heating systems work at small (10-15 C) delta T. Although for the conventional and optimised design of the district heating network. The network operation will be simulated

Evans, Paul

322

U-171: DeltaV Products Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71: DeltaV Products Multiple Vulnerabilities 71: DeltaV Products Multiple Vulnerabilities U-171: DeltaV Products Multiple Vulnerabilities May 17, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: DeltaV Products Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: DeltaV and DeltaV Workstations versions 9.3.1, 10.3.1, 11.3, and 11.3.1 DeltaV ProEssentials Scientific Graph version 5.0.0.6 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in DeltaV products, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting attacks, SQL injection attacks, cause a DoS (Denial of Service), and compromise a vulnerable system. Reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA49210 CVE-2012-1814 CVE-2012-1815 CVE-2012-1816 CVE-2012-1817 CVE-2012-1818 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: 1) Certain unspecified input is not properly sanitised before being returned to the user. This can be exploited to execute arbitrary HTML and

323

Adaptive sensing and optimal power allocation for wireless video sensors with sigma-delta imager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider optimal power allocation for wireless video sensors (WVSs), including the image sensor subsystem in the system analysis. By assigning a power-rate-distortion (P-R-D) characteristic for the image sensor, we build a comprehensive P-R-D optimization ... Keywords: image sensors, power-rate-distortion (P-R-D), resource management, sigma-delta (?Delta;) modulation, wireless video

Malia Marijan; Ilker Demirkol; Danijel Mari?i?; Gaurav Sharma; eljko Ignjatovi?

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Asynchronous Sigma-Delta analog-to digital converter based on the charge pump integrator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of the asynchronous Sigma-Delta analog-to-digital converter (ASD-ADC) based on the charge pump integrator is discussed in the paper. A two-level conversion scheme is utilized. The first level is accomplished by amplitude-to-pulse-width mapping ... Keywords: Asynchronous Sigma-Delta modulation, Asynchronous circuits, Charge pump, Time quantization, Time-to-digital conversion

Dariusz Ko?cielnik; Marek Mi?kowicz

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A self-calibration scheme for extended frequency-band-decomposition sigma-delta ADC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequency-band-decomposition (FBD) is a good candidate to be used to increase the bandwidths of ADC converters based on sigma-delta modulators for software and cognitive radio applications where we need to convert wide bandwidths. Each modulator processes ... Keywords: Analog-to-digital conversion, Bandpass, Filter bank, Frequency-band-decomposition, Self-calibration, Sigma-delta

Philippe Benabes; Ali Beydoun

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Delta-sigma A/D conversion via time-mode signal processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a signal processing methodology is proposed that performs delta-sigma (??) analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion on voltage signals while implementing all the circuits in a digital CMOS logic style. This methodology, called time-mode ... Keywords: A/D conversion, CMOS, delta-sigma (??) modulation, low power, small area, time-mode signal processing (TMSP)

Christopher S. Taillefer; Gordon W. Roberts

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Elastic and radiative pi^+p scattering and properties of the Delta^{++} resonance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Delta^{++} contributions to elastic and radiative \\pi^+p scattering within an effective Lagrangian model which incorporates the Delta, N, rho and sigma meson degrees of freedom. This model provides a description of the Delta resonance and its interactions that respects electromagnetic gauge invariance and invariance under contact transformations when finite width effects are incorporated. Following recent developments in the description of unstable gauge bosons, we use a complex mass scheme to introduce the finite width of the Delta^{++} without spoiling gauge invariance. The total cross section of elastic \\pi^+p scattering, whose amplitude exhibits the resonant plus background structure of S-matrix theory, is used to fix the mass, width and strong coupling of the \\Delta resonance. The differential cross section of elastic scattering is found in very good agreement with experimental data. The magnetic dipole moment of the Delta^{++}, \\mu_{Delta}, is left as the only adjustable parameter in radiative \\pi^+p scattering. From a fit to the most sensitive configurations for photon emission in this process, we obtain \\mu_{\\Delta} = (6.14 +-0.51)e/2m_p, in agreement with predictions based on the SU(6) quark model.

G. Lopez Castro; A. Mariano

2000-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Automated synthesis of discrete-time sigma-delta modulators from system architecture to circuit netlist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A synthesis tool consisting of coefficient synthesis of architecture, circuit specifications synthesis, and CMOS operational-amplifier (op-amp) synthesis for discrete-time sigma-delta modulators (SDMs) is presented. In circuit specifications synthesis, ... Keywords: Automated synthesis, Behavioral modeling, Geometric programming, Op-amp synthesis, Sigma-delta modulator, Transistor sizing

Shuenn-Yuh Lee; Chih-Yuan Chen; Jia-Hua Hong; Rong-Guey Chang; Mark Po-Hung Lin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Delta-Montrose Electric Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Delta-Montrose Electric Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Lighting Replacement Program: $20,000 LED Refrigerator Case Lighting: $3,000 Street/Area Lighting (LED and Induction): $20,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Source Heat Pump: $125 - $150/ton; plus $150 Energy Star bonus Terminal Units: $85/unit; plus $150 Energy Star bonus Lighting Replacement Program: $250/kW saved LED Refrigerator Case Lighting: $60/door Street/Area Lighting (LED and Induction): 25% of head costs, up to

330

Impurity scattering from {delta}-layers in giant magnetoresistance systems  

SciTech Connect

The properties of the archetypal Co/Cu giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin-valve structure have been modified by the insertion of very thin (submonolayer) {delta}-layers of various elements at different points within the Co layers, and at the Co/Cu interface. Different effects are observed depending on the nature of the impurity, its position within the periodic table, and its location within the spin valve. The GMR can be strongly enhanced or suppressed for various specific combinations of these parameters, giving insight into the microscopic mechanisms giving rise to the GMR. In particular, the doping of Fe and Ni into the spin valve close to, but not at the interface, leads to an increase in GMR, as does the introduction of Cu, a nonmagnetic impurity, into the Co layers.

Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 September 2010 Participation in the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the review of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review for 2010. The review was conducted during the period of August 23 to September 2, 2010, and focused on six functional areas: corrective action management, work planning and control, radiological protection, environmental protection, emergency preparedness, and

333

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: 1993 groundwater quality data interpretations and proposed program modifications  

SciTech Connect

This Groundwater Quality Report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). The groundwater quality data are presented in Part 1 of the GWQR submitted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in February 1994 (HSW Environmental Consultants, Inc. 1994a). Groundwater quality data evaluated in this report were obtained at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste management facilities and underground storage tanks (USTS) located within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements and in accordance with DOE Orders and Energy Systems corporate policy. The annual GWQR for the East Fork Regime is completed in two parts. Part 1 consists primarily of data appendices and serves as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each CY under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. Part 2 (this report) contains an evaluation of the data with respect to regime-wide groundwater quality, presents the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describes changes in monitoring priorities, and presents planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis program for the following calendar year.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the seventy-nine soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley (Zohdy and others, 1975) and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location, number, and azimuth of all 149 Schlumberger sounding stations are presented. The location of the new

337

G. A. Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W S R C: M S- 9 5 -0 0 0 8 W S R C: M S- 9 5 -0 0 0 8 Analytical Considerations in the Code Qualification of Piping Systems (U) by G. A. Antaki Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, South Carolina 29808 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or respnsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

338

Optimization of annealing conditions for controlling composition of (Pb{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}){sub 1-{delta}}Te{sub 1+{delta}} crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One common way of controlling the composition of semiconductor materials is by two- or three-zone annealing. Compared to doping during growth, such anneals ensure more uniform distribution of impurities and better reproducibility of galvanomagnetic and photoelectric properties. For (A{sub 1{minus}x}B{sub x}){sub 1{minus}{delta}}C{sub 1+{delta}} chalcogenide solid solutions, the A/B ratio can be controlled by introducing an additional source of B or A, whereas off-stoichiometry {Delta} can be varied using a source of chalcocren C. The purpose of this work was to optimize the conditions for preparing homogeneous crystals of (Pb{sub 1{minus}}x Ge{sub x}){sub 1{minus}{delta}}Te{sub 1+{delta}} (0delta} const. Annealing conditions are considered optimal if a homogeneous material can be obtained within a minimum time and with minimum possible losses caused by transport of sublimed material to the cold zone. Such conditions can be chosen by modeling processes occurring in vapor and solid phases. Problems related to controlling the composition of the vapor phase and solid solutions by annealing were considered. Investigation of the Pb{sub 0.93}Sn{sub 0.07}{sub 1{minus}{delta}} solid solution showed that, under conditions commonly used for annealing IV-VI materials, mass transport to the cold zone is insignificant. This information is, however, insufficient for choosing optimal process parameters since the minimum annealing time remains to be determined. In this work, we calculated the optimal annealing parameters for preparing homogeneous crystals of Pb{sub 1{minus}x}Ge{sub x}Te (O < x <{le}0.05). In calculations we used kinetic equations describing mass transport in the solid and vapor phases and the measured temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient for germanium in PbTe.

Yahsina, L.V.; Bobruiko, V.B.; Zlomanov, V.P. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities that occurred over Fiscal Year 2002 (FY 02). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 02. A description of the progress during FY 02 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are given. OBJECTIVE 1--Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administration oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts and personnel was provided. OBJECTIVE 2--Develop, coordinate, and implement the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document is utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan, ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document was updated and revised to reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River basin based upon other documents and actions taken in the basin. OBJECTIVE 3--Assist Middle Fork Irrigation District in developing an alternative irrigation water source on Evans Creek (Hutson pond and Evans Creek diversion), eliminating the need for irrigation diversion dams which happen to be partial fish barriers. Upon completion, this project will restore 2.5 miles of access for winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. During FY 02 the final engineering was completed on this project. However, due to a lengthy permitting process and NMFS consultation, this project was inadvertently delayed. Project completion is expected in July 2003. OBJECTIVE 4--Assist the Farmers Irrigation District (FID) in construction and installation of a new fish screen and bypass system on the mainstem Hood River (Farmers Canal). Final engineering and design for the horizontal screen was completed during the winter of 2001. In December 2001 and January 2002, the concrete work was completed and the head gates were mounted. During the spring the secondary head level control gates were installed. In September 2002, the jersey barriers and vortex tubes were installed. These are located upstream of the old drum screen, and are the primary means of dealing with bedload and suspended load from the diversion. The screen surface was also installed in September 2002 and the system accommodated water soon after. Monitoring of these structures in regards to efficiency and possible effects to fish migration is scheduled to occur in spring 2003. The transition from the old canal to the new screen is smooth and currently does not present any problems. The old drum screen is going to remain in place until all the biological and hydrological monitoring is complete to ensure compliance and satisfaction of all agencies involved. OBJECTIVE 5--Assist the East Fork Irrigation District (EFID) in final engineering design and construction of the Central Lateral Canal upgrade and invert siphon. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. During FY 02, a significant portion of the engineering and design work was completed on the EFID Central Lateral Canal upgrade and invert siphon. There were some changes in canal alignment that required further design work and easement acquisition. Time was also spent looking for matching funds and securing a loan by the EFID. Construction initiation is now scheduled for summer 2003. OBJECTIVE 6--Modify and/or eliminate five culverts, three on Baldwin Creek, one on Graham Creek, and one on Evans Creek, which function as barriers to upstream and downstream fish migration. This objective was revised and included in the FY 03 Statement of Work for Project No. 1998-021-00. There are only two culverts on Baldwin Creek that will be eliminated

Vaivoda, Alexis

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

delta. /sub 33/ resonance in pion nucleus elastic, single, and double charge exchange scattering  

SciTech Connect

The ..delta../sub 33/ resonance is strongly excited in pion-nucleon scattering, but there is clearly only a limited amount of information that can be learned in scattering the pion from an isolated nucleon. One learns that there is a resonance of mass 1232 MeV, width 115 MeV, and, if one is willing to introduce a dynamical model, something about the off-shell extension of the amplitude. One stands to learn much more from pion-nucleus scattering because in this case the ..delta../sub 33/ resonance has an opportunity to scatter from nucleons, and how this occurs is not well understood. What do we know about the ..delta..-N interaction for pion-nucleus scattering. The isobar-hole model was invented to deal directly with the ..delta../sub 33/-nucleus dynamics, and a phenomenological determination of the isobar shell-model potential was attempted. The unknown dynamics deltaU/sub ..delta../ is contained in a central isoscalar spreading potential of strength W/sub 0/ and a spin orbit potential deltaU/sub 0/ = W/sub 0/rho + spin-orbit. The real part of W/sub 0/rho is measured relative to the nucleon-nucleus potential. From a more theoretical point of view, one would like to be able to calculate deltaU/sub ..delta../, including its isospin dependence, from an underlying dynamical model which is formulated in terms of the basic effective meson-baryon couplings. Some salient properties of these couplings can be determined from models of quark-bag structure, which raises the exciting possibility of learning about these fundamental issues from pion scattering. Attempts at Los Alamos to build a theoretical framework to deal with these and other issues are described. (WHK)

Johnson, M.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Operation - June 2010 Savannah River Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the DOE Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) self-assessment of the Technical Qualification Program (TQP). Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Savannah River

344

Wing River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wing River Wind Farm Facility Wing River Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wing River Wind Farm Developer Wing River Wind Farm Location Hewitt MN Coordinates 46.3254°, -95.0864° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.3254,"lon":-95.0864,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Operations Savannah River Operations Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Savannah River Operations Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 10, 2013 CX-010669: Categorical Exclusion Determination 484-17D Coal Yard Remediation CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 1, 2013 CX-010837: Categorical Exclusion Determination Disassembly, Relocation, and Reassembly of a Metal-framed Quonset Hut CX(s) Applied: B1.22 Date: 08/01/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office August 1, 2013 CX-010836: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subcontractor Roof Repair at 717-12S CX(s) Applied: B1.3

346

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

DOE to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River Site to September 2016 DOE to Extend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Contract at Savannah River Site to September 2016 September 6, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Aiken, SC -- The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office today exercised its option to extend the current Savannah River Site Management and Operating contract with Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) for an additional 38 months, from August 1, 2013 to September 2016. The SRNS contract was competatviely awareded January 10, 2008. The total value of the SRNS contract with the extension is approximately $8 billion. The current contract provides for management and operations of Savannah

348

North Woods River: The St. Croix River in Upper Midwest History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

>, PhD Student, Department of History, PO Box 6023, BuildingRiver in Upper Midwest History. By McMahon, Eileen M. andRiver in Upper Midwest History. Madison, WI: University of

Karalus, Daniel E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the proposed corrective actions discussed in...

350

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah...

351

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and communications campaign known as "Safety Begins with Me" led by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS). Banners are flying over roadways, safety-related stories fill...

352

Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

353

Savannah River Site, Health Physics Instrument Calibration ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Send E-Mail to Laboratory: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC ... for Alarming Personal Radiation Detection for Homeland Security, Clause 7 ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

354

Kings River Conservation Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kings River Conservation Dist Place California Utility Id 10325 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity...

355

Land UseIron Pollution in Mangrove Habitat of Karachi, Indus Delta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coastal area of Karachi, Pakistan, which lies at the northwestern part of the Indus delta, is heavily polluted particularly in the mangrove habitat. The present study traces the pathway of trace metal iron from the source to the different ...

S. M. Saifullah; Sarwat Ismail; S. H. Khan; M. Saleem

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Delta-Sigma digital-RF modulation for high data rate transmitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low power, wideband wireless transmitter utilizing [Delta]-[Sigma] direct digital modulation of an RF carrier is presented. The transmitter architecture replaces high dynamic range analog circuits with high speed digital ...

Jerng, Albert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

New large-Nc relations among the nucleon and nucleon-to-Delta GPDs  

SciTech Connect

We establish relations which express the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describing the N {yields} {Delta} transition in terms of the nucleon GPDs. These relations are based on the known large-N{sub c} relation between the N {yields} {Delta} electric quadrupole moment and the neutron charge radius, and a newly derived large-N{sub c} relation between the electric quadrupole (E2) and Coulomb quadrupole (C2) transitions. Namely, in the large-N{sub c} limit we find C2=E2. The resulting relations among the nucleon and N {yields} {Delta} GPDs provide predictions for the N {yields} {Delta} electromagnetic form factors which are found to be in very good agreement with experiment for moderate momentum transfers.

Marc Vanderhaeghen; Vladimir Pascalutsa

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Synthesis and oxygen content dependent properties of hexagonal DyMnO{sub 3 + sub delta}.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxygen deficient polycrystalline samples of hexagonal P6{sub 3}cm (space group No.185) DyMnO{sub 3+{delta}} ({delta} stoichiometric in oxygen content ({delta} = 0). Chemical expansion of the crystal lattice corresponding to these large changes of oxygen was found to be 3.48 x 10{sup -2} mol{sup -1}. Thermal expansion of stoichiometric phases were determined to be 11.6 x 10{sup -6} and 2.1 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} for the P6{sub 3}cm and Hex{sub 2} phases, respectively. Our measurements also indicate that the oxygen non-stoichiometry of hexagonal RMnO{sub 3+{delta}} materials may have important influence on their multiferroic properties.

Remsen, S.; Dabrowski, B.; Chmaissem, O.; Mais, J.; Szewczyk, A. (Materials Science Division); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (Polish Acad. Sci.)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Tuning Forks for Vibrant Teaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average student cannot distinguish between galvanized steel and stainless steel, between aluminum and tin, or between gold and polished brass. With the...

360

Radar interferometry for monitoring land subsidence and coastal change in the Nile Delta, Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land subsidence and coastal erosion are worldwide problems, particularly in densely populated deltas. The Nile Delta is no exception. Currently, it is undergoing land subsidence and is simultaneously experiencing retreat of its coastline. The impacts of these long-term interrelated geomorphic problems are heightened by the economic, social and historical importance of the delta to Egypt. Unfortunately, the current measures of the rates of subsidence and coastal erosion in the delta are rough estimates at best. Sustainable development of the delta requires accurate and detailed spatial and temporal measures of subsidence and coastal retreat rates. Radar interferometry is a unique remote sensing approach that can be used to map topography with 1 m vertical accuracy and measure surface deformation with 1 mm level accuracy. Radar interferometry has been employed in this dissertation to measure urban subsidence and coastal change in the Nile Delta. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of 5.66 cm wavelength acquired by the European Radar Satellites (ERS-1 and ERS- 2) spanning eight years (1993-2000) have been used in this investigation. The ERS data have been selected because the spatial and temporal coverage, as well as the short wavelength, are appropriate to measure the slow rate of subsidence in the delta. The ERS tandem coherence images are also appropriate for coastal change detection. The magnitude and pattern of subsidence are detected and measured using Permanent Scatterer interferometry. The measured rates of subsidence in greater Cairo, Mansura, and Mahala are 7, 9, and 5 mm yr-1, respectively. Areas of erosion and accretion in the eastern side of the delta are detected using the ERS tandem coherence and the ERS amplitude images. The average measured rates of erosion and accretion are -9.57 and +5.44 m yr-1, respectively. These measured rates pose an urgent need of regular monitoring of subsidence and coastline retreat in the delta. This study highlighted the feasibility of applying Permanent Scatterer interferometry in inappropriate environment for conventional SAR interferometry. The study addressed possibilities and limitations for successful use of SAR interferometry within the densely vegetated delta and introduced alternative strategies for further improvement of SAR interferometric measurements in the delta.

Aly, Mohamed Hassan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective  

SciTech Connect

We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

The dynamic electric polarizability of a particle bound by a double delta potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we derive an expression for the dynamic electric polarizability of a particle bound by a double delta potential for frequencies below and above the absolute value of the particle's ground state energy. The derived expression will be used to study some of the fundamental features of the system and its representation of real systems. In addition we derive a general expression of the dynamic electric polarizability for a potential of multi-delta functions.

M. A. Maize; J. J. Smetanka

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Modification of {Delta}{sup Prime} by magnetic feedback and kinetic effects  

SciTech Connect

Two possible ways of modifying the linear tearing mode index, by active magnetic feedback and by drift kinetic effects of deeply trapped particles, are analytically investigated. Magnetic feedback schemes, studied in this work, are found generally stabilizing for {Delta}{sup Prime }. The drift kinetic effects from both thermal particles and hot ions tend to reduce the power of the large solution from the outer region. This generally leads to a destabilization of {Delta} Prime for the toroidal analytic equilibria considered here.

Liu Yueqiang; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

Synthesis and oxygen content dependent properties of hexagonal DyMnO[subscript 3+delta  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen deficient polycrystalline samples of hexagonal P6{sub 3}cm (space group No.185) DyMnO{sub 3+{delta}} ({delta} < 0) were synthesized in Ar by intentional decomposition of its perovskite phase obtained in air. The relative stability of these phases is in accord with our previous studies of the temperature and oxygen vacancy dependent tolerance factor. Thermogravimetric measurements have shown that hexagonal samples of DyMnO{sub 3+{delta}} (0 {le} {delta} {le} 0.4) exhibit unusually large excess oxygen content, which readily incorporates on heating near 300 C in various partial-pressures of oxygen atmospheres. Neutron and synchrotron diffraction data show the presence of two new structural phases at {delta} {approx} 0.25 (Hex{sub 2}) and {delta} {approx} 0.40 (Hex{sub 3}). Rietveld refinements of the Hex{sub 2} phase strongly suggest it is well modeled by the R3 space group (No.146). These phases were observed to transform back to P6{sub 3}cm above {approx} 350 C when material becomes stoichiometric in oxygen content ({delta} = 0). Chemical expansion of the crystal lattice corresponding to these large changes of oxygen was found to be 3.48 x 10{sup -2} mol{sup -1}. Thermal expansion of stoichiometric phases were determined to be 11.6 x 10{sup -6} and 2.1 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} for the P6{sub 3}cm and Hex{sub 2} phases, respectively. Our measurements also indicate that the oxygen non-stoichiometry of hexagonal RMnO{sub 3+{delta}} materials may have important influence on their multiferroic properties.

Remsen, S.; Dabrowski, B.; Chmaissem, O.; Mais, J.; Szewczyk, A. (NIU); (Polish)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

WASTE INVENTORY DATA AT OAK RIDGEAND SAVANNAH RIVER, IG-0434...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASTE INVENTORY DATA AT OAK RIDGEAND SAVANNAH RIVER, IG-0434 WASTE INVENTORY DATA AT OAK RIDGEAND SAVANNAH RIVER, IG-0434 The Oak Ridge and Savannah River Operations Offices are...

368

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy, and are managed and operated by Savannah River Nuclear...

369

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River More Documents & Publications Accelerating Clean-up at...

370

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River More Documents & Publications Project NameDescription Slide...

371

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

validity of data Patent applied for Savannah River National Laboratory The Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory are owned by the U.S. Department of...

372

Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring; Hydroacoustic Assessment of Chinook Salmon Escapement to the Secesh River, Idaho, 2002-2004 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurate determination of adult salmon spawner abundance is key to the assessment of recovery actions for wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha), a species listed as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Program, the Nez Perce Tribe operates an experimental project in the South Fork of the Salmon River subbasin. The project has involved noninvasive monitoring of Chinook salmon escapement on the Secesh River between 1997 and 2000 and on Lake Creek since 1998. The overall goal of this project is to accurately estimate adult Chinook salmon spawning escapement numbers to the Secesh River and Lake Creek. Using time-lapse underwater video technology in conjunction with their fish counting stations, Nez Perce researchers have successfully collected information on adult Chinook salmon spawner abundance, run timing, and fish-per-redd numbers on Lake Creek since 1998. However, the larger stream environment in the Secesh River prevented successful implementation of the underwater video technique to enumerate adult Chinook salmon abundance. High stream discharge and debris loads in the Secesh caused failure of the temporary fish counting station, preventing coverage of the early migrating portion of the spawning run. Accurate adult abundance information could not be obtained on the Secesh with the underwater video method. Consequently, the Nez Perce Tribe now is evaluating advanced technologies and methodologies for measuring adult Chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River. In 2003, the use of an acoustic camera for assessing spawner escapement was examined. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in a collaborative arrangement with the Nez Perce Tribe, provided the technical expertise to implement the acoustic camera component of the counting station on the Secesh River. This report documents the first year of a proposed three-year study to determine the efficacy of using an acoustic camera to count adult migrant Chinook salmon as they make their way to the spawning grounds on the Secesh River and Lake Creek. A phased approach to applying the acoustic camera was proposed, starting with testing and evaluation in spring 2003, followed by a full implementation in 2004 and 2005. The goal of this effort is to better assess the early run components when water clarity and night visibility preclude the use of optical techniques. A single acoustic camera was used to test the technology for enumerating adult salmon passage at the Secesh River. The acoustic camera was deployed on the Secesh at a site engineered with an artificial substrate to control the river bottom morphometry and the passage channel. The primary goal of the analysis for this first year of deployment was to validate counts of migrant salmon. The validation plan involved covering the area with optical video cameras so that both optical and acoustic camera images of the same viewing region could be acquired simultaneously. A secondary test was contrived after the fish passage was complete using a controlled setting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in which we tested the detectability as a function of turbidity levels. Optical and acoustic camera multiplexed video recordings of adult Chinook salmon were made at the Secesh River fish counting station from August 20 through August 29, 2003. The acoustic camera performed as well as or better than the optical camera at detecting adult Chinook salmon over the 10-day test period. However, the acoustic camera was not perfect; the data reflected adult Chinook salmon detections made by the optical camera that were missed by the acoustic camera. The conditions for counting using the optical camera were near ideal, with shallow clear water and good light penetration. The relative performance of the acoustic camera is expected to be even better than the optical camera in early spring when water clarity and light penetration are limited. Results of the laboratory tests at the Pacific North

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Mueller, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

D-state effects in the electromagnetic N{delta} transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider here a manifestly covariant quark model of the nucleon and the {delta}, where one quark is off shell, and the other two quarks form an on-shell diquark pair. Using this model, we have shown previously that the nucleon form factors and the dominant form factor for the {gamma}N{yields}{delta} transition (the magnetic dipole (M1) form factor) can be well described by nucleon and {delta} wave functions with S-state components only. In this paper, we show that nonvanishing results for the small electric (E2) and Coulomb (C2) quadrupole form factors can be obtained if D-state components are added to the {delta} valence quark wave function. We present a covariant definition of these components and compute their contributions to the form factors. We find that these components cannot, by themselves, describe the data. Explicit pion cloud contributions must also be added, and these contributions dominate both the E2 and the C2 form factors. By parametrizing the pion cloud contribution for the transition electric and Coulomb form factors in terms of the neutron electric form factor, we estimate that the contributions of the {delta} D-state coupled to quark core spin of 3/2 is of the order of 1%, and the contributions of the {delta} D-state coupled to quark core spin 1/2 is of the order of 4%.

Ramalho, G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Pena, M. T. [Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Department of Physics, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Gross, Franz [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive...

375

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah...

376

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

377

Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC for Worker Safety and Health...

378

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This...

379

New River Geothermal Research Project, Imperial Valley, California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Research Project, Imperial Valley, California Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title New River Geothermal...

380

Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1, November 12 to December 23, 2005, Summary Report Trona Injection Tests: Mirant Potomac River Station, Unit 1, November...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Elk River Reactor - MN 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Elk River Reactor - MN 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Elk River Reactor (MN.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Reactor was dismantled and decommissioned by 1974...

382

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

383

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA...

384

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy In order to meet the...

385

Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy Savannah River's Biomass Steam Plant Success with Clean and Renewable Energy In order to meet the federal energy...

386

Consolidation of Surplus Plutonium at Savannah River Site | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Consolidation of Surplus Plutonium at Savannah River Site Consolidation of Surplus Plutonium at Savannah River Site Waste...

387

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at...

388

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review...

389

Principal Media Contact: DT Townsend Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Savannah River Area that have previously participated in the DOE Savannah River Science Bowl academic competition. These students have a demonstrated interest and...

390

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and Universities Savannah River National Laboratory Meets with Historically Black Colleges and...

391

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the...

392

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Protection and Richland Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the...

393

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Savannah River Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the...

394

Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Snake River Plain...

395

Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location New River Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

396

Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

397

Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

398

Inspection of Savannah River Operations Office Managementof Emergency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Operations Office Managementof Emergency Response and Law Enforcement-Related Grants, IG-0604 Inspection of Savannah River Operations Office Managementof Emergency...

399

EIS-0037: Springfield City Utilities, James River Generating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Springfield City Utilities, James River Generating Station, Power Plants 3 and 4, Springfield, Greene County, Missouri EIS-0037: Springfield City Utilities, James River...

400

Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota) Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota) Eligibility Agricultural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

402

Understanding Uncertainties in Future Colorado River Streamflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado River is the primary water source for more than 30 million people in the U.S. and Mexico. Recent studies that project streamflow changes in the Colorado River all project annual declines, but the magnitude of the projected decreases range ...

Julie A. Vano; Bradley Udall; Daniel R. Cayan; Jonathan T. Overpeck; Levi D. Brekke; Tapash Das; Holly C. Hartmann; Hugo G. Hidalgo; Martin Hoerling; Gregory J. McCabe; Kiyomi Morino; Robert S. Webb; Kevin Werner; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

403

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

Arnett, M.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Powder River 0 20 40 KILOMETERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United The growing significance of the Powder River Basin's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) to United States domestic energy% of gas mostly methane, hence the name Coal Bed Methane (CBM). The types of coal, in increasing order

405

American Eel in the Susquehanna River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews and synthesizes factors affecting the potential benefits and adverse consequences of providing upstream passage for the American eel at hydroelectric facilities on the main stem of the Susquehanna River and other rivers on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of North America.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Willamette River Habitat Protection and Restoration Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................6 a. The Challenge of Restoration in a Large River/Flood Plain System.............6 b. The Need Goals: Anchor Habitats as Stepping Stones....................20 f. Measuring Results-purpose dams and reservoirs as part of the Federal Columbia River Power System, as well as 42 miles of bank

407

EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River 082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0082-S2: Savannah River Site Salt Processing, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This SEIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for separating the high-activity fraction from the low-activity fraction of the high-level radioactive waste salt solutions now stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The high-activity fraction of the high-level waste (HLW) salt solution would then be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and stored until it could be disposed of as HLW in a geologic repository. The low activity fraction would be disposed of as low-level waste (saltstone)

408

Environmental flow for Monsoon Rivers in India: The Yamuna River as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the flows of Monsoon Rivers in India that will permit the river to perform all its natural functions. About 80% of the total flow for Indian rivers is during the monsoon and the remaining 20% is during the non monsoon period. By carrying out a case study of the river Yamuna in Delhi we find that at least 50% of the virgin monsoon (July to September) flow is required for the transport of the full spectrum of soil particles in the river sediment. A similar flow is needed for adequate recharge of the floodplain aquifers along river. For the non monsoon period (October to June) about 60% of the virgin flow is necessary to avoid the growth of still water algae and to support river biodiversity.

Soni, Vikram; Singh, Diwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company  

SciTech Connect

Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incubation, early rearing, and final rearing facilities to the existing South Fork Walla Walla Adult Holding into the South Fork Walla Walla River, which is identified as the primary potential spring Chinook natural) is "establish self-sustaining natural populations in the South Fork Walla Walla River, Mill Creek, and Touchet

411

First Measurement of the Neutral Current Excitation of the Delta Resonance on a Proton Target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The parity-violating asymmetry arising from inelastic electron-nucleon scattering at backward angle (~95 degrees) near the Delta(1232) resonance has been measured using a hydrogen target. From this asymmetry, we extracted the axial transition form factor G^A_{N\\Delta}, a function of the axial Adler form factors C^A_i. Though G^A_{N\\Delta} has been previously studied using charged current reactions, this is the first measurement of the weak neutral current excitation of the Delta using a proton target. For Q^2 = 0.34 (GeV/c)^2 and W = 1.18 GeV, the asymmetry was measured to be -33.4 \\pm (5.3)_{stat} \\pm (5.1)_{sys} ppm. The value of G^A_{N\\Delta} determined from the hydrogen asymmetry was -0.05 \\pm (0.35)_{stat} \\pm (0.34)_{sys} \\pm (0.06)_{theory}. These findings agree within errors with theoretical predictions for both the total asymmetry and the form factor. In addition to the hydrogen measurement, the asymmetry was measured at the same kinematics using a deuterium target. The asymmetry for deuterium was determined to be -43.6 \\pm (14.6)_{stat} \\pm (6.2)_{sys} ppm.

G0 Collaboration; D. Androic; D. S. Armstrong; J. Arvieux; S. L. Bailey; D. H. Beck; E. J. Beise; J. Benesch; F. Benmokhtar; L. Bimbot; J. Birchall; P. Bosted; H. Breuer; C. L. Capuano; Y. -C. Chao; A. Coppens; C. A. Davis; C. Ellis; G. Flores; G. Franklin; C. Furget; D. Gaskell; J. Grames; M. T. W. Gericke; G. Guillard; J. Hansknecht; T. Horn; M. K. Jones; P. M. King; W. Korsch; S. Kox; L. Lee; J. Liu; A. Lung; J. Mammei; J. W. Martin; R. D. McKeown; A. Micherdzinska; M. Mihovilovic; H. Mkrtchyan; M. Muether; S. A. Page; V. Papavassiliou; S. F. Pate; S. K. Phillips; P. Pillot; M. L. Pitt; M. Poelker; B. Quinn; W. D. Ramsay; J. -S. Real; J. Roche; P. Roos; J. Schaub; T. Seva; N. Simicevic; G. R. Smith; D. T. Spayde; M. Stutzman; R. Suleiman; V. Tadevosyan; W. T. H. van Oers; M. Versteegen; E. Voutier; W. Vulcan; S. P. Wells; S. E. Williamson; S. A. Wood

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

Q sup 2 and A dependence of. Delta. (1232) electroexcitation in nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Inclusive electron scattering measurements from SLAC of {Delta} electroexcitation in nuclei are presented. Electrons with energies of 0.96, 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 GeV were scattered from H, {sup 4}He, C, Fe and W at 37.5{degree} and detected with the End Station A 1.6 GeV/c spectrometer. Q{sup 2} at the {Delta} peak ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 (GeV/c{sup 2}). For all nuclear targets the {Delta} peak position shifts for higher invariant mass as Q{sup 2} increases and in all but one case is above that of the free nucleon. Cross sections have been fitted by the form {sigma} = cA{sup b}. For the {Delta} region b varies from 0.99 to 1.02 with uncertainties of {plus minus}0.01. For the dip region A dependence is observed that is consistent with the effects of Fermi broadening of the quasielastic and {Delta} peaks. Transverse form factors have been calculated and fitted by the function 1/(1 + Q{sup 2}/{Lambda}{sup 2}). The A and invariant mass dependences of {Lambda} are discussed. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Sealock, R.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office- August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development.

414

Raft River Geothermal Aquaculture Experiment. Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Channel catfish, tilapia and Malaysian prawns were cultured directly in geothermal water for approximately seven months at the Department of Energy, Raft River Geothermal Site, to evaluate the organisms throughout a grow-out cycle. Parameters evaluated included survival, growth, bioaccumulation of metals and fluoride, collagen synthesis, and bone calcium levels. Growth at Raft River was slightly lower than at a companion commercial facility at Buhl, Idaho, but was attributed to facility differences rather than an adverse impact of geothermal water. No significant differences were recorded between Raft River and Buhl fish for bone calcium or collagen concentrations. No significant accumulation of heavy metals by fish or prawns was recorded.

Campbell, D.K.; Rose, F.L.; Kent, J.C.; Watson, L.R.; Sullivan, J.F.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ERP01C07. 515 p. [NRC] National Research Council.estuary & watershed science [NRC] National Research Council.Delta. Aquatic Toxicology [NRC] National Research Council.

Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Westem Area Power Administration Danger Tree Management on North Fork to Rifle 230-kV Transmission Line Delta, Mesa and Garfield Counties, Colorado A. Brief Description of...

418

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Curecanti to North Fork 230-kV Transmission Line Montrose and Delta Counties, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to...

419

Kootenai River Ecosystem Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kootenai River Ecosystem Kootenai River Ecosystem Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) June 2005 1 Department of Energy BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION Kootenai River Ecosystem Project Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Kootenai River Ecosystem Project. With this funding the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho (KTOI) and Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) would add liquid nitrogen and phosphorus to the Kootenai River from late June through September for up to five years to replace nutrients lost to the hydrosystem. The goal of this project is to help enhance native fish populations and river health. The nutrients are expected to stimulate production in the Kootenai River's

420

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

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421

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

422

EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Hood River Fisheries Program 1: Hood River Fisheries Program EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program SUMMARY This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and wildlife associated with the construction and operation of Federal hydro-power facilities in the Columbia River Basin. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 4, 2008 EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project May 16, 2005 EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project, Hood River County, Oregon Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project

423

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site September 4, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. August 5, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office July 25, 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design [HIAR SRS-2013-5-07] April 22, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013

424

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2007 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2007 ORERP fish population sampling near 10 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1,000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 011 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2011 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies that were conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River and to investigate associations with hydrological, ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2010 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River, and to investigate associations with hydrological, water ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2006 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2006 ORERP fish population sampling near 12 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

428

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2005 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2005 ORERP fish population sampling near the Ohio River power stations. In 2005, the program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies near 17 electric generating stations that covered nearly the entire (~1000 mile) length of the river.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

ISOTHERMAL (DELTA)/(ALPHA-PRIME) TRANSFORMATION AND TTT DIAGRAM IN A PLUTONIUM GALLIUM ALLOY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used as an alternative approach to determining the tine-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram for the martensitic delta to alpha-prime transformation in a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy. Previous work suggests that the TTT diagram for a similar alloy exhibits an unusual double-C curve for isothermal holds of less than 100 minutes. Here, we extend this diagram to 18 hours, and confirm the double-C curve behavior. When the sample is cooled prior to the isothermal holds, the delta to alpha-prime transformation is observed as several overlapping exothermic peaks. These peaks are very reproducible, and they are believed to be the result of different kinds of delta to alpha-prime martensitic transformation. This may be due to the presence of different nucleation sites and/or different morphologies.

Oudot, B P; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

430

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Production of benthic macroinvertebrates in a river used for commercial navigation :Kanawha River, West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to analyze the production of the benthic macroinvertebrates in a commercially navigated river in order to assess the (more)

Layton, Raymond Jay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response of the Columbia River Response of the Columbia River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish ­ presence, abundance, res. time, diet, growth rate, fitness Exchange ­ plant biomass, TOC, NOAA Fisheries, Hammond, OR Northwest Power and Conservation Council Columbia River Estuary Science

433

River Data Package for the 2004 Composite Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beginning in fiscal year 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. The river data package provides calculations of flow and transport in the Columbia River system. This document presents the data assembled to run the river module components for the section of the Columbia River from Vernita Bridge to the confluence with the Yakima River.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Patton, Gregory W.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Dynamical instabilities of warm n pe matter: the delta meson effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of the delta meson on the dynamical instabilities of cold and warm nuclear and stellar matter at subsaturation densities are studied in the framework of relativistic mean-field hadron models (NL3, NL{sub r}ho and NL{sub r}ho{sub d}elta) with the inclusion of the electromagnetic field. The crust-core transition density and pressure are obtained as a function of temperature of beta-equilibrium matter with and without neutrino trapping. The distillation effect is discussed. For beta-equilibrium matter with trapped neutrinos the pasta phase disappears for T>13.2 MeV (NL{sub r}ho and NL{sub r}ho{sub d}elta) or T>11.6 MeV (NL3). For neutrino free matter the non-homogeneous phase does not exist for T>3 MeV. The delta meson has a larger effect in neutron rich matter, larger densities and smaller temperatures. It reduces the extension of the spinodal. The distillation effect is stronger for larger densities and smaller temperatures. The delta meson increases the distillation effect, for larger densities. NL3 predicts larger clusters compared with the other two parametrizations, and a smaller extension of the non-homogeneous phase for all temperatures. At the transition densities, the NL{sub r}ho and NL{sub r}ho{sub d}elta predict clusters with the double of the size as compared with an intermediate density. Constraints at finite temperature on the EOS are required.

Pais, Helena; Santos, Alexandre; Providencia, Constanca [Centro de Fisica Computacional-Department of Physics, University of Coimbra-P-3004-516-Coimbra-Portugal (Portugal)

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

435

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 27, 2012 June 27, 2012 CX-008614: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Culvert on Road 3 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 27, 2012 CX-008613: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Awning, Building 735-A CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 26, 2012 CX-008618: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of Sorbent/Ion Exchangers for Radiochemical and Metal Separations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/26/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 26, 2012 CX-008617: Categorical Exclusion Determination Savannah River National Laboratory Building 735-13A Power Addition CX(s) Applied: B1.15

436

Predicting the Discharge of Global Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to simulate coupled energy and water fluxes over large continental river basins, in particular streamflow, was largely nonexistent a decade ago. Since then, macroscale hydrological models (MHMs) have been developed, which predict such ...

Bart Nijssen; Greg M. O'Donnell; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Dag Lohmann; Eric F. Wood

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

DuPage River Project - Student Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mini Lessons You will chose from a list of mini-lessons designed to teach you the skills you need to conduct river monitoring, care and raise smallmouth bass, maintain...

438

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will match Focus on Energy incentive to 5,000 Commercial Central AC Tune-Up: 50 LED Exit Signs: Free Installation River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) offers a variety of...

440

Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Wind Farm Sky River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork river delta" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 24, 2011 February 24, 2011 CX-005504: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Methods for Radiochemical Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office February 24, 2011 CX-005503: Categorical Exclusion Determination Drain Line Replacement West of 735-A CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office February 24, 2011 CX-005502: Categorical Exclusion Determination Implement Savannah River National Laboratory Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 2004-2 Gap Closure Activity CX(s) Applied: B2.3 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

442

Elk River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Elk River Wind Farm Facility Elk River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Empire District Electric Co. Location Butler County KS Coordinates 37.586575°, -96.547093° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontable