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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Lower East Fork Poplar Creek  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is safe for limited water-contact recreational uses, such as wading in footwear. Eating fish from the creek is not recommended based upon the level of mercury in the fish. Are...

2

Lower East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar Creek Lower

3

Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

An Assessment of health risk associated with mercury in soil and sediment from East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from a study conducted to determine the toxicity of Mercury in soils sediments samples. Mice were fed via diet, soils and sediment, from various locations along the East Fork Poplar creek. Tissue distribution of pollutants was determined at various intervals. The tissue level relative to toxicity was used to determine the effect of a complex matrix on the gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the pollutants (other pollutants included cadmium and selenium).

Revis, N.; Holdsworth, G.; Bingham, G.; King, A.; Elmore, J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Final report for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IT Corporation (IT) was contracted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the effectiveness of thermal desorption as a remedial technology for removing mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain soil. Previous laboratory studies by Energy Systems suggested that this technology could reduce mercury to very low levels. This pilot-scale demonstration study was initiated to verify on an engineering scale the performance of thermal desorption. This report includes the details of the demonstration study, including descriptions of experimental equipment and procedures, test conditions, sampling and analysis, quality assurance (QA), detailed test results, and an engineering assessment of a conceptual full-scale treatment facility. The specific project tasks addressed in this report were performed between October 1993 and June 1994. These tasks include soil receipt, preparation, and characterization; prepilot (bench-scale) desorption tests; front-end materials handling tests; pilot tests; back-end materials handling tests; residuals treatment; and engineering scale-up assessment.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Black, M.C. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)] [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Remedial investigation work plan for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, located within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. The entire ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of CERCLA sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites under investigation require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) of potential remedial actions. The need to complete RIs in a timely manner resulted in the establishment of the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Characterization Area (CA) and the Bear Creek CA. The CA approach considers the entire watershed and examines all appropriate media within it. The UEFPC CA, which includes the main Y-12 Plant area, is an operationally and hydrogeologically complex area that contains numerous contaminants and containment sources, as well as ongoing industrial and defense-related activities. The UEFPC CA also is the suspected point of origin for off-site groundwater and surface-water contamination. The UEFPC CA RI also will address a carbon-tetrachloride/chloroform-dominated groundwater plume that extends east of the DOE property line into Union Valley, which appears to be connected with springs in the valley. In addition, surface water in UEFPC to the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek CA boundary will be addressed. Through investigation of the entire watershed as one ``site,`` data gaps and contaminated areas will be identified and prioritized more efficiently than through separate investigations of many discrete units.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data are presented in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, along with the required data evaluations specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime. This report provides additional evaluation of the CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater contamination and long-term concentration trends for regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Recent Approaches to Modeling Transport of Mercury in Surface Water and Groundwater - Case Study in Upper East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, TN - 13349  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this case study, groundwater/surface water modeling was used to determine efficacy of stabilization in place with hydrologic isolation for remediation of mercury contaminated areas in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watershed in Oak Ridge, TN. The modeling simulates the potential for mercury in soil to contaminate groundwater above industrial use risk standards and to contribute to surface water contamination. The modeling approach is unique in that it couples watershed hydrology with the total mercury transport and provides a tool for analysis of changes in mercury load related to daily precipitation, evaporation, and runoff from storms. The model also allows for simulation of colloidal transport of total mercury in surface water. Previous models for the watershed only simulated average yearly conditions and dissolved concentrations that are not sufficient for predicting mercury flux under variable flow conditions that control colloidal transport of mercury in the watershed. The transport of mercury from groundwater to surface water from mercury sources identified from information in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System was simulated using a watershed scale model calibrated to match observed daily creek flow, total suspended solids and mercury fluxes. Mercury sources at the former Building 81-10 area, where mercury was previously retorted, were modeled using a telescopic refined mesh with boundary conditions extracted from the watershed model. Modeling on a watershed scale indicated that only source excavation for soils/sediment in the vicinity of UEFPC had any effect on mercury flux in surface water. The simulations showed that colloidal transport contributed 85 percent of the total mercury flux leaving the UEFPC watershed under high flow conditions. Simulation of dissolved mercury transport from liquid elemental mercury and adsorbed sources in soil at former Building 81-10 indicated that dissolved concentrations are orders of magnitude below a target industrial groundwater concentration beneath the source and would not influence concentrations in surface water at Station 17. This analysis addressed only shallow concentrations in soil and the shallow groundwater flow path in soil and unconsolidated sediments to UEFPC. Other mercury sources may occur in bedrock and transport though bedrock to UEFPC may contribute to the mercury flux at Station 17. Generally mercury in the source areas adjacent to the stream and in sediment that is eroding can contribute to the flux of mercury in surface water. Because colloidally adsorbed mercury can be transported in surface water, actions that trap colloids and or hydrologically isolate surface water runoff from source areas would reduce the flux of mercury in surface water. Mercury in soil is highly adsorbed and transport in the groundwater system is very limited under porous media conditions. (authors)

Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States); Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)] [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Post-closure permit application for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 Plant: New Hope Pond and Eastern S-3 ponds plume. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this Post-Closure, Permit Application (PCPA) is to satisfy the post-closure permitting requirements of the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-1-11. This application is for the entire Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), which is within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV). This PCPA has been prepared to include the entire East Fork Regime because, although there are numerous contaminant sources within the regime, the contaminant plumes throughout the East Fork Regime have coalesced and can no longer be distinguished as separate plumes. This PCPA focuses on two recognized Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units: New Hope Pond (NHP) and the eastern S-3 Ponds plume. This PCPA presents data from groundwater assessment monitoring throughout the regime, performed since 1986. Using this data, this PCPA demonstrates that NHP is not a statistically discernible source of groundwater contaminants and that sites upgradient of NHP are the likely sources of groundwater contamination seen in the NHP vicinity. As such, this PCPA proposes a detection monitoring program to replace the current assessment monitoring program for NHP.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Lower East Fork Poplar Creek  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*)BoydLoretta RobinsonVehiclesModeling5 Lower East

17

Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC Appendices, Volume 3, Appendix V-B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of appendix V-B which contains the final verification run data package. Validation of analytical data is presented for Ecotek LSI. Analytical results are included of both soil and creek bed samples for the following contaminants: metals; metals (TCLP); uranium; gross alpha/beta; and polychlorinated biphenyls.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar CreekWatts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Upper East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New12.'6/0.2 ...... 13:27DepartmentUpdating

22

Structural geology of the Irons Fork - North Fork Creek area, Lake Ouachita, Arkansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Missouri Mountain shale, which is Silurian in age. The Blaylock sandstone, which is between the Polk Creek and Missouri Mount- ain shales in the southern Ouachitas, is absent in the study area. The Missouri Mountain contains olive brown to buff colored... estimated for the Missouri Mountain (Haley snd others, 1973b). Devonian ? Mississi ian S stem Arkansas Hovaculite. The Arkansas Novaculite overlies the Missouri Mountain shale. It is one of the predominant formations in the study 12 area, the other...

White, Marjorie Ann

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1: Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 4. Information related to the feasibility study and ARARs. Appendixes G, H, I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 3. Risk assessment information. Appendixes E, F  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 3 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

history of urban stream restoration. Aquatic Conservation:on Codornices Creek”. Restoration of Rivers and Streams.Restoration of Rivers and Streams, Water Resources

Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - area middle fork Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Middle Fork Coyote Creek (8286 Acres) Santa Clara County 2205300104 Kelly Cabin Canyon (4283 Acres... Berryessa EastForkCoyote Cow Calera Penitencia LasAnimas Arroyo...

30

Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit. Volume 4. Appendixes G, H, and I and information related to the feasibility study and ARARs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is Volume 4 of the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Report of Flood, Oil Sheen, and fish Kill Incidents on East Fork Poplar Creek at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water quality and plant opemtion irriiormation provided by the Y-12 Plant strongly suggest that a dechlorinating agent, applied to the raw water released below the North-South Pipes was responsible for the toxicity resulting in the fish kill of July 24. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in upper EFPC indicai e that low oxygen levels (3-5 ppm) occurred for a period of up to 30 min. This slug of low DO water traveling down EFPC to the lake could easily explain the massive fish kill and the resulting observations. Dissolved oxygen levels of 5.2 ppm or lower are documented as causing problems for warmwater fish species (Heath 1995). The presence of other stressors, including a range of petrochemicals, tends to lower resistance to low oxygen conditions. Given the sequence of events in upper EFPC in the few days prior to July 24, where extremely high flows were followed by inputs of a wide range of low concentrations of oils, the sensitivity to low DO conditions might be heightened. The possible toxic impact of ::he oils and other contaminants reaching EFPC as a result of the heavy rainfidl on July 22 doesn't appear significant enough to be the sole cause of the kill on July 24. Even during the height of the kill, a large school of fish remained immediately downstream of the North-South Pipes. If the toxicity of waters flowing through this outlet were the primary cause of the kill, then it would be expected that this school of fish would not have been present immediately below the pipes. Any impact of waters entering from other sources, such as pumping of basements WOUIC1 have produced a staggered pattern of mortality, with fishing dying in different localities at different times and rates. Further, it would be expected that the morta.lhy observed would have continued over several days at least, as more resistant individuals succumbed slowly to the toxic exposure. This would have provided freshly dead or dying fish for the surveys of July 25 and 28. In previous fish kills in this stream section, the impact on the fish community has been judged to be short-term only, with no significant long-term ecological effects. In fact, the numerous fish kills over the past 7 years do not appear to have dampened the growth of the stream fish populations. The magnit~de of these kills was far less than that of the July 24 kill; maximum mortality of 10-20o/0 of th{~ total population above Lake Reality. Because the current kill has tiected a much larger proportion of the resident population, the impacts are expected to extend for a longer period in this situation, perhaps up to a year. Decreased population levels should be evident through the fhll 1997 and spring 1998 samples. Depending on the success rate of reproduction during the summer cf 1998, the recovery of fish populations should be observed in the fdl 1998 population sample. However, complete recovery may take several reproductive seasons to reach the densities seen in 1997. The cyprinid species occurring in upper EFPC have tremendous reproductive capacities and should be able to repopulate this area with little or no long-term ecological impact. Even the redbreast sunfish should, at the worst, only endure a narrowing of its available gene pool, with little if any long-term impacts.

Skaggs, B.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Managing mercury bioaccumula0on in fish: lessons learned from 20 years of monitoring in Oak Ridge, TN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/7/13 1 Managing mercury bioaccumula0on in fish: lessons learned from 20 Poplar Creek White Oak Creek Outline · Mercury in the aqua0c environment · Mercury at Oak Ridge: · East Fork Poplar Creek vs White Oak Creek · Other

Gray, Matthew

33

Camel Creek Minnamoolka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek Tr ebonne California Ly nd Hellhole Pac ksad dle Little Star River Ella M ic hael Davidson M eunga Echo Mid dle Leich hardt Blund er NobCreek Stony Barron Martin Deception Paddys Creek Broken River

Greenslade, Diana

34

fork(), exit(), exec() signals, sockets client/server, shared memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

memory semaphores - 2 - #12; µ µ µ UNIX µ µ fork fork µ µ µ fork pid = fork(); fork µµ ( ) µ µ pid - pid (ID) - - pid = 0 ? - 3 - #12;- 4 - #include main() { int pid = 0; printf("hello world\

Triantafillou, Peter

35

Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Efficient Appliance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who...

36

Sustainable forest management and poplar plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with poplar · 2,250,000 ha in Canada (4 FMUs) · 87,000 in USA (9 FMU) · 31,600 ha in Romania (1 FMU) · 53

Pettenella, Davide

37

Finding Fingerprints of Selection in Poplar Genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the DOE JGI talks about poplar trees as models for selective adaptation to an environment. This video complements a study published ahead online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics.

Tuskan, Gerald

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Finding Fingerprints of Selection in Poplar Genomes  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Jerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the DOE JGI talks about poplar trees as models for selective adaptation to an environment. This video complements a study published ahead online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics.

Tuskan, Gerald

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

39

December 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed addresses some of the specific mercury abatement needs and the removal of the Y-12 scrap yard. The second ROD included characterizing...

40

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Squeezer Creek.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20-acre conservation easement in northwest Montana to protect critical habitat for bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout in a reach of Squeezer Creek in Lake County. Squeezer...

42

Investigations of the cause of fishkills in fish-rearing facilities in Raven Fork watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of fishkills in trout-rearing facilities located adjacent to Raven Fork Creek within the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina. Approximately 50,000 rainbow trout were lost at the Blankenship trout farm-a commercial facility-following eight storm events between March 31 and December 2, 1981. In addition, 524 trophy-size trout died in three ponds operated by the Cherokee tribe for stocking reservation streams. It was found fishkills in the trout farm could be prevented by adding lime to water from the creek as it was pumped into the facility; this strengthened the assumption acidity (H/sup +/) was responsible for the fishkills. Mortality of trophy trout was stopped by routing water from nearby springs to the ponds during and following rain events. Because of concern that these fishkills might be caused by acid rain, TVA was requested by the Cherokee tribe to assist in determining the cause. Limited studies were conducted during March through August 1982 to test two hypotheses: (1) concentrations of H/sup +/ and soluble aluminum in Raven Fork following storm events were high enough to kill rainbow trout and (2) atmospheric deposition was a greater source of stream H/sup +/ than acid-producing geologic formations or the forest soils.

Jones, H.C.; Noggle, J.C.; Young, R.C.; Kelly, J.M.; Olem, H.; Ruane, R.J.; Pasch, R.W.; Hyfantis, G.J.; Parkhurst, W.J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek Chicken Creek— Downstream Chicken Creek— UpstreamFork Strawberry Creek— Downstream N. Fork Strawberry Creek—Sample Chicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek Upstream Field

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chicken Creek Chicken Creek downstream of routine monitoringCreek Chicken Creek— Downstream Chicken Creek—Upstream ENV-Fork Strawberry Creek— Downstream N. Fork Strawberry Creek

Xu, Suying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

EERE SBIR Case Study: Improving Hybrid Poplars as a Renewable...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources saw potential in growing poplar trees-remarkable for their sheer biomass productivity-to make ethanol. sbirgreenwoodcasestudy.pdf More Documents & Publications...

46

Camas Creek.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

would connect two separate protect- ed areas owned by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, creating a contiguous wildlife area of almost 5,000 acres. Camas Creek and...

47

Manufacturing Battle Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer simulation Facilities design Finite element analysis Green manufacturing Industrial materialsManufacturing Research Center Kalamazoo Battle Creek The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences The Supporting manufacturing industries by providing opportunities for collaboration with faculty

de Doncker, Elise

48

Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial...

Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is aAg Products JumpFarmingdale,East Fork

54

Protect and Restore Mill Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. The Nez Perce Tribe and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership, more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Mill Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 2000. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing. Starting in FY 2002, continuing into 2004, trees were planted in riparian areas in the meadow of the upper watershed. In addition, a complete inventory of culverts at road-stream crossings was completed. Culverts have been prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed, and one high priority culvert was replaced in 2004. Maintenance to the previously built fence was also completed.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2ÂŁjLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

56

WATERSHED RESTORATION PLAN Big Creek, North Fork of the Flathead River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................................................. 26 2.5 NONPOINT POLLUTION SOURCE INVENTORY AND THE PROPOSED RESTORATION ACTIVITIES .. 27 SECTION 4 4.1 POLLUTANT REDUCTION: The average monthly air temperatures and average monthly precipitation at Glacier International Airport

57

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, bull trout were commonly known as dolly varden (Salvelinus malma) and were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) described the interior form as a distinct species, classifying it as Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1994). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from latitude 41{sup o}N to 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette subbasins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is likely that bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. McKenzie River bull trout were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls prior to 1963. Three populations were isolated following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs which include the mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir, mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls, and the South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. On June 10, 1998 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act and Buchanan et al. (1997) listed the bull trout population in the mainstem McKenzie as ''of special concern'', the South Fork McKenzie population as ''high risk of extinction,'' and the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as ''high risk of extinction.'' Bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette were listed as ''probably extinct.'' Our study area includes the three McKenzie populations, and a reintroduced population in the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques that include spawning surveys, juvenile trapping, electronic fish counters, and night snorkeling. We continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins, we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Oxley Creek Common Brisbane, Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

right about 100 m after the bridge over Oxley Creek. The gate is always open. Amenities The main and turn left before the bridge crossing Oxley Creek. If approaching from the west (Sherwood side) turn. Both Rainbow and Scaly-breasted Lorikeets fly over in small screeching flocks. Golden-headed Cisticola

Queensland, University of

59

Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek watershed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: ForemanCreek Manson Creek Mill Creek Malosky Creek...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek instream Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Creek Malosky Creek Spring Creek Silver Creek San...

62

South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Lyons Creek boat remains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and artifacts dating to the colonial era were discovered during a dredging operation at Lyons Creek, a tributary of the Patuxent River, Calvert County, Maryland. Also recovered from the spoil area were ceramics, wine bottles, and kaolin tobacco pipes, which... strip of dry land zeaches the northezn shore of the creek. At the mouth of the creek, a highland of sixty feet elevation rises above the southern shore. The cliffs of the highland aze of a diatomacious earth, which once weze mined for silica...

Neyland, Robert Stephen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Restore McComas Meadows; Meadow Creek Watershed, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed are coordinated and cost shared with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, planting trees in riparian areas within the meadow and its tributaries, prioritizing culverts for replacement to accommodate fish passage, and decommissioning roads to reduce sediment input. During this contract period work was completed on two culvert replacement projects; Doe Creek and a tributary to Meadow Creek. Additionally construction was also completed for the ditch restoration project within McComas Meadows. Monitoring for project effectiveness and trends in watershed conditions was also completed. Road decommissioning monitoring, as well as stream temperature, sediment, and discharge were completed.

McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Case Study: Goose Creek CISD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GOOSE CREEK CISD FINANCIALS • $4,866,124 project • $600k annual savings • 5,954,383 kWh annual savings IMPROVEMENTS • Lighting and water efficiency, computer power management, HVAC, controls redesign case study McKinstry first worked with Goose... Creek CISD performing retro-commissioning through the Centerpoint/Nexant RCx rebate program. McKinstry found additional projects with good returns on investment, warranting a performance contract. Working with the district to apply for the State...

White, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral meristem identity gene (APETALA1 or AP1), auxin response factor gene (ETTIN), the gene encoding transcriptional factor of WD40 family (TRANSPARENTTESTAGLABRA1 or TTG1), and the auxin efflux carrier (PIN-FORMED2 or PIN2) gene. More than 220 transgenic lines of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd generations were analyzed for RNAi suppression phenotypes (Filichkin et. al., manuscript submitted). A total of 108 constructs were supplied by ORNL, UF and OSU and used to generate over 1,881 PCR verified transgenic Populus and over 300 PCR verified transgenic Arabidopsis events. The Populus transgenics alone required Agrobacterium co-cultivations of 124.406 explants.

Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - area forked river Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

near .Iasper; vValnut Fork of the Piney River... of the White River are the War Eagle, Kings, BUffalo, and Little Red rivers, on the south, and the North Fork... of the Arkansas...

70

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Flood analyses for Department of Energy Y-12, ORNL and K-25 Plants. Flood analyses in support of flood emergency planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study involved defining the flood potential and local rainfall depth and duration data for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and K-25 plants. All three plants are subject to flooding from the Clinch River. In addition, the Y-12 plant is subject to flooding from East Fork Poplar and Bear Creeks, the ORNL plant from Whiteoak Creek and Melton Branch, and the K-25 plant from Poplar Creek. Determination of flood levels included consideration of both rainfall events and postulated failures of Norris and Melton Hill Dams in seismic events.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The “Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed” project was developed in response to the creek’s listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

73

Putah Creek Terrestrial Wildlife Monitoring Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;MAP EXHIBITS C1-36 Avian Focal Species Distribution Maps Putah Creek and Yolo-Sutter Bypass Sites, OX=Oxbow, DC=Dry Creek Confluence, WN=Winters Putah Creek Park, YH=Yolo Housing, LB=Center for Land

Todd, Brian

74

City of Poplar Bluff, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby, Illinois (Utility Company)InformationPocahontas,Poplar

75

EIS-0184: South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes the Seattle City Light, a Department of the City of Seattle proposal to construct a hydroelectric project with an installed capacity of 15 MW on the South Fork Tolt River near the town of Carnation located in King County in the State of Washington.

76

Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Access of Cellulase to Cellulose and Lignin for Poplar Solids Produced by Leading Pretreatment and adsorption of b-glucosidase for lignin left after enzymatic digestion of the solids from these pretreatments effectiveness was determined. Furthermore, Avicel hydrolysis inhibition by enzymatic and acid lignin of poplar

California at Riverside, University of

77

Metagenome of an Anaerobic Microbial Community Decomposing Poplar Wood Chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L. L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Codornices Creek Corridor: Land Use Regulation, Creek Restoration, and their Impacts on the Residents’ Perceptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and perception of biodiversity and ecology is their activecommunity and perception of area ecology: individual-levelOutcomes 2 & 3: Perception of Area Ecology & Creek’s Role in

Stokenberga, Aiga; Sen, Arijit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Lagrangian Sampling of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian Sampling of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile of wastewater treatment plant effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, during the summer........................................................................................................................................................... 5 Field Measurements, Nutrients, Carbon, Major Ions, Trace Elements, and Biological Components

80

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Wolf Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 2012" "Next Release Date: February 2013" "Wolf Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Oyster Creek  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oyster Creek" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

82

Microsoft Word - Coyote Creek CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of funds to acquire a conservation easement over the 310-acre Coyote Creek property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, Contract BPA-006468 Categorical Exclusion...

83

Microsoft Word - Ninemile_Creek_CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tribes of the Colville Reservation for purchase of the Ninemile Creek property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-104-00, BPA-005670 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from...

84

Microsoft Word - CoyoteCreekNE_CX  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Coyote Creek Property Acquisition Funding Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2011-003-00, Contract BPA-007521 Categorical Exclusion...

85

Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place: Missouri References: EIASpanish Fork City Corporation

86

Spanish Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place: Missouri References: EIASpanish Fork City

87

The Copper Creek Clovis Point from Hells Canyon, Northeastern Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. 1 (2008) | pp. 75-84 The Copper Creek Clovis Point fromside of the Snake River to the Copper Creek point discovery1 (2008) 5 cm Figure 4. The Copper Creek Clovis point (tick

Reid, Kenneth C.; Root, Matthew J.; Hughes, Richard E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

89

Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Martin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration Owner’s Manual: FinalMartin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration in project documents,important component of stream restoration projects to assess

Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Preliminary Functional-Structural Modeling on Poplar (Salicaceae) Dongxiang Liu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is cultivated in plantations not only for paper, wood products and energy, but also for soil erosion control [1 of poplar at growing season [6]. These models are helpful to understand crop production and management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

91

Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project Draft Environmental Assessment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark ForkB O N

92

Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy, -105.3774934° Loading map...Fork, West Virginia:

93

American Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergy SystemsAmerican Energy Systems Inc Place:Fork, Utah:

94

Forked Deer Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (SmartHome Kyoung'sfor Action (FORMA) JumpForked

95

Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo FengBoulder,Research JumpEnergy InformationFork

96

Quartz Tuning Fork: Thermometer, Pressure- and Viscometer for Helium Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial quartz oscillators of the tuning-fork type with a resonant frequency of ~32 kHz have been investigated in helium liquids. The oscillators are found to have at best Q values in the range 10^5-10^6, when measured in vacuum below 1.5 K. However, the variability is large and for very low temperature operation the sensor has to be preselected. We explore their properties in the regime of linear viscous hydrodynamic response in normal and superfluid 3He and 4He, by comparing measurements to the hydrodynamic model of the sensor.

R. Blaauwgeers; M. Blazkova; M. Clovecko; V. B. Eltsov; R. de Graaf; J. Hosio; M. Krusius; D. Schmoranzer; W. Schoepe; L. Skrbek; P. Skyba; R. E. Solntsev; D. E. Zmeev

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

98

Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020[degree]F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

Virr, M.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Toms Creek IGCC Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toms Creek Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project was selected by DOE in September 1991 to participate in Round Four of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The project will demonstrate a simplified IGCC process consisting of an air-blown, fluidized-bed gasifier (Tampella U-Gas), a gas cooler/steam generator, and a hot gas cleanup system in combination with a gas turbine modified for use with a low-Btu content fuel and a conventional steam bottoming cycle. The demonstration plant will be located at the Toms Creek coal mine near Coeburn, Wise County, Virginia. Participants in the project are Tampella Power Corporation and Coastal Power Production Company. The plant will use 430 tons per day of locally mined bituminous coal to produce 55 MW of power from the gasification section of the project. A modern pulverized coal fired unit will be located adjacent to the Demonstration Project producing an additional 150 MW. A total 190 MW of power will be delivered to the electric grid at the completion of the project. In addition, 50,000 pounds per hour of steam will be exported to be used in the nearby coal preparation plant. Dolomite is used for in-bed gasifier sulfur capture and downs cleanup is accomplished in a fluidized-bed of regenerative zinc titanate. Particulate clean-up, before the gas turbine, will be performed by high temperature candle filters (1020{degree}F). The demonstration plant heat rate is estimated to be 8,700 Btu/kWh. The design of the project goes through mid 1995, with site construction activities commencing late in 1995 and leading to commissioning and start-up by the end of 1997. This is followed by a three year demonstration period.

Virr, M.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III [Normandeau Associates, Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

Hillson, Todd D. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drilling of a 5000-foot exploratory gas and oil well by Marathon Oil Company is proposed for Section 34, T52N, R106W, near Pagoda Creek in the Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming. An area 75 feet by 80 feet would be cleared of all vegetation and graded nearly flat for the drill pad and reserve pit. The drilling rig, pipe rack, generator, tool house, living facilities, drilling mud pump, pit, and supply platform all would be built on the drill pad. A blooie hole would contain cuttings and dust from the air drilling. Support facilities would include a helicopter staging area along Clocktower Creek approximately one mile south of the Yellowstone Highway and a 2550-foot temporary water pipeline from Pagoda Creek to the well site. Personnel, equipment, and supplies would be trucked to the helicopter staging area and shuttled to the proposed location by helicopters. Lease stipulations prohibit drilling before September 8; therefore, the starting date would be the late fall of the respective year and would have to be completed by the following January 1. Approval of the exploratory well would not include approval of production facilities.

Not Available

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hoe Creek groundwater restoration, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1989, approximately 6.5 million gallons of contaminated groundwater were pumped from 23 wells at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site, near Gillette, Wyoming. The organic contaminants were removed using activated carbon before the water was sprayed on 15.4 acres at the sites. Approximately 2647 g (5.8 lb) of phenols and 10,714 g (23.6 lb) of benzene were removed from the site aquifers. Phenols, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene concentrations were measured in 43 wells. Benzene is the only contaminant at the site exceeds the federal standard for drinking water (5 {mu}g/L). Benzene leaches into the groundwater and is slow to biologically degrade; therefore, the benzene concentration has remained high in the groundwater at the site. The pumping operation affected groundwater elevations across the entire 80-acre site. The water levels rebounded quickly when the pumping operation was stopped on October 1, 1989. Removing contaminated groundwater by pumping is not an effective way to clean up the site because the continuous release of benzene from coal tars is slow. Benzene will continue to leach of the tars for a long time unless its source is removed or the leaching rate retarded through mitigation techniques. The application of the treated groundwater to the surface stimulated plant growth. No adverse effects were noted or recorded from some 60 soil samples taken from twenty locations in the spray field area. 20 refs., 52 figs., 8 tabs.

Renk, R.R.; Crader, S.E.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

105

EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

106

TR-025 Geomorphology March 2003 Schmidt Creek Sediment Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-025 Geomorphology March 2003 Schmidt Creek Sediment Sources and the Johnstone Strait Killer, Thomas. 2003. Schmidt Creek Sediment Sources and the Johnstone Strait Killer Whale Rubbing Beach. Res.................................................................................................................... 2 3. Sediment Sources - Natural and Logging Related

107

Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

109

Biomass production and stool mortality in hybrid poplar coppiced twice a year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Biomass production and stool mortality in hybrid poplar coppiced twice a year D Auclair L Bouvarel 1 INRA, Station de Sylviculture; 2INRA, Unité expérimentale biomasse forestière et forêt paysanne biomass production, and to high stool mortality. Some aspects of the physiology of coppicing are discussed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen Stefan G. Schreiber1 , Uwe G. Hacke2 , Andreas Hamann1 and Barb R. Thomas1,3 1 Department of Renewable of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 442 Earth Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E3; 3

Hacke, Uwe

111

Effect of coppicing on hybrid poplar fine root dynamics M. Bdneau D. Auclair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of coppicing on hybrid poplar fine root dynamics M. Bédéneau D. Auclair Station de takes advantage of the very strong growth potential of coppice shoots during the first years after coppicing. Growth of the aboveground compartment of coppice has been extensively studied in recent years

Boyer, Edmond

112

Range Creek Calibrated Dates Beta-202190  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range Creek Calibrated Dates 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Beta-202190 Beta-175753 Beta-175755 Beta-235067 Beta-202189 Beta-214831 Beta-202188 Beta-202191 Beta-203630 Beta-214832 Beta-175754 Beta a Carbon-14 calibrated date (95% CI) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. (Figure 5: Beta-235067). The calibrated

Provancher, William

113

Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk Management Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) of 1996 requires four distinct steps for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects were conducted and displayed in the Economic Appendix ­ Economic Evaluation. The non-Federal projects (FEMA buyout and detention on Marys Creek) augments

US Army Corps of Engineers

114

Lower Freezing DEF For Higher NOx Reduction Attainment | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar Creek

115

Depositional framework and reservoir distribution of Red Fork sandstone in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of southward progradation across most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several cyclothemic (transgressive-regressive) sequences developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes and stability of the depositional area were dominant factors in determining the general stratigraphic characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the distal, more subsident part of the basin during lower sea level stands, and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. Red Fork sandstone trends depict an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northern part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope/basin-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock data and log data, with logs calibrated to cores for estimating depositional environments and assessing diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, some of which represent channelized sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. Secondary chlorite, in particular, is associated locally with development of productive reservoirs showing microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities.

Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C. (Masera Corp., Tulsa, OK (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Burnup verification at Arkansas Nuclear One-unit 1 using the Fork measurement system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fork measurement system, designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards program, has been used for several years to examine spent fuel assemblies at nuclear reactors around the world. The objective of the test program described here is to demonstrate the ability of the Fork system to verify the records for assembly burnup at U.S. nuclear utilities. The measurements described here were performed at Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Energy Operations, Inc. The Fork system was used to examine 34 assemblies in the storage pool of Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 1. The correlation between the neutron measurements and the reactor records produced an average random deviation in burnup of 3.0% from the calibration, which translates into an average variation of 2.2% in the reactor records for burnup. The system proved to be compatible with utility operations.

Ewing, R.I. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bosler, G.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Priore, J. [Entergy Oerations, Inc., Russellville, AR (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

Bowers, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y. [Normandeau Associates Inc., New Ellenton, SC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull Creek Wind Farm Jump to:

120

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Microsoft Word - Trimble_Creek_Acquisition_CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

funds to the Kalispel Tribe (Kalispel) for purchase of Trimble Creek (Doramus) Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-061-00, Contract BPA-004991 Categorical Exclusion...

122

Microsoft Word - CX_ThorneCreek_Final.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes for purchase of the Thorne Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract CR-201269 Categorical Exclusion Applied...

123

Microsoft Word - CX_Beaver Creek.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(BPA) funding to acquire the Beaver Creek property and to maintain this property for fish and wildlife habitat protection. Budget Information: Work Order 00225478 Fish and...

124

Assessing the Feasibility of Creek Daylighting in San Francisco, Part II: A Preliminary Analysis of Yosemite Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or purchased properties) to daylight the stream? Or is itrestoration (Smith 2007). Why Daylight in San Francisco? Inof San Francisco to daylight Yosemite Creek, how and where

Smith, Brooke Ray

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

379 Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork length) were caught) Vertical movement patterns of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, California 92037-1508 Limited information on the vertical movements of skipjack tuna (Kat- suwonus pelamis

126

Exploration of Process Interaction in Operating Systems: A Pipe-Fork Simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploration of Process Interaction in Operating Systems: A Pipe-Fork Simulator Steven Robbins- structors to trace through a variety of programs and to show how the processes and pipes are connected scheduling affect the configuration of the processes and pipes as well as the output of the program. Students

Robbins, Steven

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - abernathy creek washington Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC 3304120102 Castlerock Falls (7371...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - allens creek nuclear Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek fencing Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC 3304120102 Castlerock Falls (7371...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek model Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Kings Creek (7770 Acres) 35,920 Hectares 4th Field HUC...

131

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reedy Creek Improvement Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerType Jump to:Co JumpRETScreenJam HomeReedy Creek

133

Stony Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACAOpen Energy InformationStony Creek Wind Farm Jump

134

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Indian Creek Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000Technology |TheoryTufteTakeIndian Creek

135

Bear Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass Facility Jump to:SectorBear Canyon GeothermalCreek

136

Willow Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEdit JumpWill County, Illinois: Facility Willow Creek

137

Edwards Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThisEcoGridCounty, South Dakota: EnergyKansas. ItsCreek

138

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives for this summer research were to: 1.) determine how much heavy metal pollution has accumulatedTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

139

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach) ACRES: 1.5 acres riparian habitat; 0.3 miles of stream channel-modified, straightened, and downcut channel; relocate the farm road and fences paralleling the stream to provide

US Army Corps of Engineers

140

Hoe Creek 1990 quarterly sampling cumulative report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for benzene and for total phenols three times during 1990. This report summarizes the results of these sampling events and compares the results with those obtained in previous years. Possible further options for remediation of the Hoe Creek site was addressed. Three underground coal gasification (UCG) burns were performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy in 1976, 1977, and 1979 at the Hoe Creek site, which is about 20 miles south of Gillette, Wyoming. As a result of these burns, there has been considerable contamination of groundwater by various organic compounds. There have been three efforts at remediating this situation. In 1986 and again in 1987, contaminated water was pumped out, treated, and reinjected. In 1989, the water was pumped, treated, and sprayed into the atmosphere. Benzene and total phenols have been monitored at various monitoring wells as the site during 1990. The highest detected benzene concentration in 1990 was 220 {mu}g/L, and the highest total phenols concentration was 430 {mu}g/L. It is apparent that contamination is still above baseline levels, although the concentration of total phenols is far less than immediately after the burns. The burned coal seams are still releasing organic compounds into the groundwater that passes through them.

Crader, S.E.; Huntington, G.S.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The metagenome of an anaerobic microbial community decomposing poplar wood chips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to lignin-modification or depolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

van der Lelie D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L.-L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S.-Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Decreasing aqueous mercury concentrations to achieve safe levels in fish: examining the water-fish relationship in two point-source contaminated streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) and White Oak Creek (WOC) are two mercury-contaminated streams located on the Department of Energy s Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. East Fork Poplar Creek is the larger and more contaminated of the two, with average aqueous mercury (Hg) concentrations exceeding those in reference streams by several hundred-fold. Remedial actions over the past 20 years have decreased aqueous Hg concentrations in EFPC by 85 %. Fish fillet concentrations, however, have not responded to this decrease in aqueous Hg and remain above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency s ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) of 0.3 mg/kg. The lack of correlation between aqueous and fish tissue Hg concentrations in this creek has led to questions regarding the usefulness of target aqueous Hg concentrations and strategies for future remediation efforts. White Oak Creek has a similar contamination history but aqueous Hg concentrations in WOC are an order of magnitude lower than in EFPC. Despite the lower aqueous Hg concentrations, fish fillet concentrations in WOC have also been above the AWQC, making the most recent aqueous Hg target of 200 ng/L in EFPC seem unlikely to result in an effective decrease in fillet Hg concentrations. Recent monitoring efforts in WOC, however, suggest an aqueous total Hg threshold above which Hg bioaccumulation in fish may not respond. This new information could be useful in guiding remedial actions in EFPC and in other point-source contaminated streams.

Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Valentine, Charles S [ORNL; Gregory, Scott M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-019 Hydrology March 2002 Roberts Creek Study Forest: effects of partial retention harvesting, 250-751-7001 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Abstract

144

Microsoft Word - JockoSpringCreek_Scott_Acquisition_CX_Final...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

purchase of Jocko Spring Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract BPA-44646 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):...

145

Microsoft Word - CX_PistolCreek_Final.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes for purchase of the Pistol Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

146

Microsoft Word - MissionCreek_Kingston_Acquisition_CX_final.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

purchase of the Mission Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2002-003-00, Contract BPA-44646 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25...

147

White Creek and Nine Canyon wind farms Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MW) of wind storage and shaping service to help integrate power from the proposed White Creek Wind Project in Klickitat Co., Wash., into the Northwest power system. BPA also...

148

HYDROLOGY OF BISHOP CREEK, CALIFORNIA: AN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diverting Bishop creek water for hydroelectric power for many years. Recently there has been concern that must be released from the hydroelectric power plants to the channel, during certain times of the year

Standiford, Richard B.

149

Effects of polyethylene mulch in a short-rotation, poplar plantation vary with weed-control strategies,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of polyethylene mulch in a short-rotation, poplar plantation vary with weed polyethylene mulch (poly mulch) across a range of site conditions, weed-control treatments and genotypes rights reserved. Keywords: Polyethylene mulch; Woody crops; Weed control Forest Ecology and Management

Green, Scott

150

An economic evaluation of the Green Creek Watershed Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can never be given their true value. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page INTRODUCTION Statement of the Problem Purpose of the Study Objectives II. BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS III DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA AND THE FLOOD PROBLEH IV. PROCEDURE AND NETEODOLOGY...: DISCOUNTING PROCEDURES 64 74 VITA LlST CF TABLES Table Page Completion Schedule of Flood Water Retarding Structures 17 Design Features of Flood Mater Retarding Structures Green Creek Watershed Project 18 3. Rainfall Record - Green Creek Watershed...

Gray, Roy Mack

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cedar Creek: a significant paleotectonic feature of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cedar Creek is the major anticlinal structure demarcating the southwest flank of the Williston basin. This pronounced fold developed through a geologic history of recurrent tectonic movements along a northwest-southeast striking fault zone. The four major periods of tectonism documentable in the Cedar Creek area from early Paleozoic through mid-Tertiary affected the local and regional distribution, erosion, and/or preservation, and, though moderately, the depositional facies of sedimentary strata since Ordovician time.

Clement, J.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

An insoluble residue study of the Cretaceous Cow Creek Limestone of Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Stratigr chy. Local Stratigrapby 14 14 Honeycut Bend. Cyoress Creek. Hickory Creek. Cox Crossing Hamilton Pool. IB 19 2O 21 21 Rebecca Creek. PALEONTOLOGY MINERALOGY 23 25 Page Introduction 27 Constituents of the Sand... of the Cow. Creek Limestone on the basis of the silt-clay fraction 46 10. Zonation and suggested corr . lation of the Cow Creek Limestone on the basis of feldspar content of the sand-size fraction. 47 11. Zonation of the Cow Creek Limestone on the basis...

Morton, William Rogers

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Burris, J.A. [C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project 1 Finding of No Significant Impact for Final Environmental Assessment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartment of Energy ClarkClark Fork

155

Steam gasification of tyre waste, poplar, and refuse-derived fuel: A comparative analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the field of waste management, thermal disposal is a treatment option able to recover resources from 'end of life' products. Pyrolysis and gasification are emerging thermal treatments that work under less drastic conditions in comparison with classic direct combustion, providing for reduced gaseous emissions of heavy metals. Moreover, they allow better recovery efficiency since the process by-products can be used as fuels (gas, oils), for both conventional (classic engines and heaters) and high efficiency apparatus (gas turbines and fuel cells), or alternatively as chemical sources or as raw materials for other processes. This paper presents a comparative study of a steam gasification process applied to three different waste types (refuse-derived fuel, poplar wood and scrap tyres), with the aim of comparing the corresponding yields and product compositions and exploring the most valuable uses of the by-products.

Galvagno, S. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Portici, via Vecchio Macello loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy)], E-mail: sergio.galvagno@portici.enea.it; Casciaro, G. [Department of Physical Technologies and New Materials, C.R. ENEA Brindisi, SS. 7 Appia-km 706, 72100 Brindisi (Italy); Casu, S. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Bologna, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Martino, M. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Trisaia, SS 106 Jonica km 419-500, 75026 Rotondella (Italy); Mingazzini, C. [Department of Physical Technologies and New Materials, C.R. ENEA Faenza, via Ravegnana 186, 48018 Faenza (Italy); Russo, A. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Trisaia, SS 106 Jonica km 419-500, 75026 Rotondella (Italy); Portofino, S. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Portici, via Vecchio Macello loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

157

Spatial and temporal variation in fish assemblage structure at Village Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish assemblages were sampled seasonally at Village Creek, a blackwater tributary of the Neches River in Hardin County, Texas. Forty four fish species were captured at Village Creek from diverse aquatic mesohabitats, (e.g., backwater pools, deep...

Moriarty, Loren Joan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Fish Creek`  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea named `Fish Creek`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 30% more woody biomass than either of its parents (`94001` and `94006`) and 20% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Fish Creek` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Fish Creek` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Fish Creek`  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea named `Fish Creek`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 30% more woody biomass than either of its parents (`94001` and `94006`) and 20% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Fish Creek` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Fish Creek` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

160

Protect and Restore Lolo Creek Watershed : Annual Report CY 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed are coordinated with the Clearwater National Forest and Potlatch Corporation. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Lolo Creek watershed of the Clearwater River in 1996. Fencing to exclude cattle for stream banks, stream bank stabilization, decommissioning roads, and upgrading culverts are the primary focuses of this effort. The successful completion of the replacement and removal of several passage blocking culverts represent a major improvement to the watershed. These projects, coupled with other recently completed projects and those anticipated in the future, are a significant step in improving habitat conditions in Lolo Creek.

McRoberts, Heidi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analysis of geothermal electric-power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, Lemhi County, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Big Creek Hot Springs was evaluated as a source of electrical power for the Blackbird Cobalt Mine, approximately 13 miles south of the hot spring. An evaluaton of the geothermal potential of Big Creek Hot Springs, a suggested exploration program and budget, an engineering feasibility study of power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, an economic analysis of the modeled power generating system, and an appraisal of the institutional factors influencing development at Big Creek Hot Springs are included.

Struhsacker, D.W. (ed.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impact Report, Upper York Creek Ecosystem Restoration Project on April 8, 2008 to learn more about the history

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Seismic expression of Red Fork channels in Major and Kay Counties, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the application of regional seismic to exploration and development Red Fork sands of the Cherokee Group, in Major and Kay Counties, Oklahoma. A computer-aided exploration system (CAEX) was used to justify the subtle seismic expressions with the geological interpretation. Modeling shows that the low-velocity shales are the anomalous rock in the Cherokee package, which is most represented by siltstone and thin sands. Because the Red Fork channel sands were incised into or deposited with laterally time-equivalent siltstones, no strong reflection coefficient is associated with the top of the sands. The objective sands become a seismic anomaly only when they cut into and replace a low-velocity shale. This knowledge allows mapping the channel thickness by interpreting the shale thickness from seismic data. A group shoot line in Major County, Oklahoma, has been tied to the geologic control, and the channel thicknesses have been interpreted assuming a detectable vertical resolution of 10 ft. A personal computer-based geophysical work station is used to construct velocity logs representative of the geology to produce forward-modeled synthetic seismic sections, and to display, in color, the seismic trace attributes. These synthetic sections are used as tools to compare with and interpret the seismic line and to evaluate the interpretative value of lowest cost, lesser quality data versus reprocessing or new data acquisition.

Hanoch, C.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Geology of the Salt Creek area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to the entrapment of. surface water in the fractures. GEOLXiBPBOLOGY The Salt Creek area in @aeon County, Texas is located on the southwestern flank of the Llano Uplift, a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes.... STSUCT "SALCEOL00Y IIegional Structure The Llano region, which includes the Salt Creek area, is a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes. The dose is roughly elliptical with a maximum diameter...

Harwood, William Eugene

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Roberts Creek Study Forest: the effects of shelterwood harvesting and blowdown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is sediment produc- tion in domestic water supply creeks. The effects of timber harvesting on sedimentRoberts Creek Study Forest: the effects of shelterwood harvesting and blowdown on sediment production in a small zero-order creek by Robert O. Hudson and Brian D'Anjou KEYWORDS: Shelterwood harvest

166

Volunteers begin transforming Rock Creek-Clark Fork land back to prairie http://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/volunteers-begin-process-of-transforming-rock-creek-clark-fork-land/article_0a662764-afa2-11e2-bfb5-0019bb2963f4.html[4/28/2013 8:41:30  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Wildlife Conservation Trust, Trout Unlimited, Resources Legacy Fund and private donors. But getting is only recorded a telephone conversation in 2011 in which one of the Boston bombing s... Bangladesh Factory Collapse Death Toll Nears 350 Police in Bangladesh took six people into custody in connection

Vonessen, Nikolaus

167

Vol. 20, No. 1 A Publication of the Brushy Fork Institute Spring-Summer 2010 Mountain Promise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooled, gas prices dropped and most of us were pretty happy about that. But when energy sector prices today. The key sectors we are trying to move--economic development, education, energy, government. The Brushy Fork Institute carries forward this commit- ment by working to develop strong leadership

Baltisberger, Jay H.

168

sanfranciscoestuaryinstitute//finalreport Coyote Creek/Coyote Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laguna Seca Coyote Creek Fisher Cr. #12;III - 49 sanfranciscoestuaryinstitute//finalreport Map 4B-ca.1800, green; project boundary, white (scale 1:40,000; 1"~3300'; 1 square inch ~250 acres; original photographs, with historicaL Landscape features overLay. Historical fluvial features in blue; other features, green; project

169

Okanogan Focus Watershed Salmon Creek : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY 1999 the Colville Tribes and the Okanogan Irrigation District (OID) agreed to study the feasibility of restoring and enhancing anadromous fish populations in Salmon Creek while maintaining the ability of the district to continue full water service delivery to it members.

Lyman, Hilary

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The geoarchaeology of Buttermilk Creek, Bell County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was conducted. Buttermilk Creek is a 13 km stream incised into limestone bedrock with a drainage basin size of 43 kM2 , a stream gradient of 8.5 m/km, and a sinuosity of 1.26. This project was undertaken with two objectives in mind-, to create a...

Gibson, Brandy Deanne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evidence of Streamflow and Sediment Effects on Juvenile Coho and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Lagunitas Creek and San Geronimo Creek, Marin County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resh. 2008. Quantitative linkages among sediment supply,streambed fine sediment, and benthic macroinvertebrates inData: Lagunitas Creek Sediment and Riparian Management Plan,

Ball, Joanie; Diver, Sibyl; Hwan, Jason

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

LowerColoradoRiver_Comments_FutureComms.pdf  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar CreekWatts

173

EA-1978: Sand Creek Winds, McCone County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Sand Creek Winds Project, a 75-MW wind farm between the towns of Circle and Wolf Point in McCone County, Montana. The proposed wind farm would interconnect to Western’s existing Wolf Point to Circle 115-kV transmission line approximately 18 miles north of Wolf Point.

174

An economic evaluation of the Sulphur Creek Watershed Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!IC CONS IDERATIQNS IN R SOURCE ALI. OCATIOiV 12 Social Choice Benef'ts and Costs ~ The Sulphur Creek Project IV. PROCEDURE AND METHODOLOGy 12 14 16 17 Determination of Co ts Determination of Benefits Comparison of Results with Origina! Study... analyses could be impzoved. A lack of funds and personnel have prevented govern- ment agencies from making studies which would determirte how accurate their forecasts have been. Sevezal economists familiar with the procedures used in benefit...

Burns, Henry Taylor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Early cavity growth during forward burn. [Hoe Creek III problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the early portion of the forward burn phase of the Hoe Creek III field experiment, the cavity progagated rapidly down the deviated borehole and to the top of the coal seam. As a first step to understanding this phenomena we have conducted small scale coal block experiments. Drying as well as combustion tests were performed. This paper describes the test hardware and the experimental results.

Shannon, M.J.; Thorsness, C.B.; Hill, R.W.

1980-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cedar Creek Wind Farm II (Nordex) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse, NYCedar Creek Wind Farm II

177

Moose Creek, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate ZoneMontrose, Wisconsin: EnergyMoodyMoose Creek, Alaska:

178

Pigeon Creek, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: EnergyPierce County, Nebraska: EnergyJump to: navigation,Creek,

179

Queen Creek, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County, Kentucky:County, Georgia:Quay County, NewQueen Creek,

180

City of Battle Creek, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalystPathwaysAltamontCreek, Nebraska (Utility Company)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hunters Creek Village, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Cogeneration LP JumpCreek

182

Yields of ten and eleven year-old hybrid poplars in the north central United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to determine commercially attainable biomass yields given the best site tending possible under the constraints of this extensive network. Biomass yields are reported from the best clones planted in one acre blocks on 8 sites over the four states. Biomass yields are presented of short rotation intensively cultured poplar plantations established in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota during 1987--88. It was reported at that time that the mean annual increment had not peaked in the plantations. Growth measurements were continued through the 1997 growing season when the plantations had completed their 10th and 11th growing season.

Netzer, D.; Tolsted, D.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana. (August 1986) Peter Hill Hennings, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John H. Spang Field mapping on scales of 1:6, 000 and 1: 12, 000 indicate that the basement involved... in the Field Area Methodology DATA. PAGE I 3 7 10 12 17 25 25 28 Field Map. Interpretive Data: Cross Sections Dry Fork Ridge Anticline. Faole Point Anticline and the Mountain Flank. . Basement Geometry. Fracture Analysis...

Hennings, Peter Hill

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - area battlement creek Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Area Hydrologic Units Calwater Subbasins --- (Planning...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - area battle creek Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Units Calwater Subbasins ---(Planning Watersheds) 88,763 Acres 18060001 3304120101 Kings Creek (7770 Acres) Summary: Area Hydrologic Units Calwater Subbasins --- (Planning...

187

Hydrology of Deer Creek and its tributaries : a contribution to planning a restoration project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data is not useful in developing a flood frequency curve for Deer Creek because the gauge records discharge from the powerhouse. (

Skrtic, Lana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Microsoft Word - 2012_Rapid_Lightening_Creek_Easement_CX_Rev2...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: AMENDED Provision of funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to purchase the Rapid Lightning Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife...

189

Microsoft Word - Spring Creek Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Spring Creek Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical...

190

Microsoft Word - CX_PerryCreek_4.29.11.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks for purchase of the Perry Creek Property. Fish and Wildlife Project...

191

Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Assessment of Park Water Resources.......................................................................25 resources........................................................................15 Biological resources

Mallin, Michael

192

A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be sustainable considering the hydrologic processes remainprocess of applying the WFD to Sausal Creek, we identified opportunities to improve the sustainable

Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydrogeologic aspects of brine disposal in the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The East Poplar Oil Field encompasses about 70 square miles in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Oil production began in 1952 from the Mississippian Madison Group. Production depths range from about 5,500 to 6,000 feet below land surface. Large quantities of brine (water having a dissolved-solids concentration greater than 35,000 milligrams per liter) have been produced with the oil. The brine has a dissolved-solids concentration of as much as 160,000 milligrams per liter. Most of the brine has been disposed of by injection into shallower subsurface formations (mainly the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone at depths of about 3,300 feet and the Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation at depths of about 1,000 feet). Smaller quantities of brine have been directed to storage and evaporation pits. Handling, transport, and disposal of the brine have resulted in its movement into and migration through shallow Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits along the Poplar River valley. Locally, domestic water supplies are obtained from these deposits. The major point, sources of shallow ground-water contamination probably is leakage of brine from corroded disposal-well casing and pipelines. Using electromagnetic geophysical techniques and auger drilling, three saline-water plumes in alluvial deposits and one plum in glacial deposits have been delineated. Dominant constituents in plume areas are sodium and chloride, whereas those in nonplume areas are sodium and bicarbonate.

Craigg, S.D.; Thamke, J.N. (Geological Survey, Helena, MT (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

T E C H N I C A L A D V A N C E Inoculation of hybrid poplar with the endophytic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their host, including enhanced growth. Inoculating biofuel species with endophytic bacteria is therefore an attractive option to increase the productivity of biofuel feedstocks. Here, we investigated the effect in the environmental and economic viability of poplar as a biofuel feedstock is possible when inoculated

Rogers, Alistair

197

Sequence stratigraphy, depositional environments, and regional mapping of the late Devonian interval, upper Three Forks Formation, Sanish Member, and lower Bakken Shale, U.S. portion of the Williston Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cores of the Late Devonian upper Three Forks, Sanish, and lower Bakken units from eight wells were examined and described at the North Dakota core… (more)

Sesack, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Assessing the Feasibility of Creek Daylighting in San Francisco, Part I: A Synthesis of Lessons Learned from Existing Urban Daylighting Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Leonardson 2004). Why Daylight? In San Francisco, creekof San Francisco to daylight historical urban creeks withincity governments to daylight urban creeks, with successful

Smith, Brooke Ray

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed A Thesis Presented Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed," has been reviewed in final form ____________________________________Date____________ Margrit von Braun #12;iii iii A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment

Fiedler, Fritz R.

200

Ballenger Creek, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: EnergyAustin EnergyBacliff,Ballenger Creek, Maryland: Energy Resources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Beaver Creek, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers PointEnergy Information HotUtah: Energy Resources JumpCreek,

202

LaCreek Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach,October, 2012 - 08:20 Event linkedLaCreek

203

Birch Creek Village Elec Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS PAGE IS UNDER(RedirectedBiomass:Birch Creek

204

Cantua Creek, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahan DivideCannon (Various) Jump to:IICantua Creek,

205

Smith Creek Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardtonManagement,SmartestEnergy Ltd Jump to:Creek Valley

206

Owl Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesa IOvonic Battery CompanyOwl Creek

207

Panther Creek II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesaPPTAct YearBiofuelsPanther Creek II

208

Panther Creek III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesaPPTAct YearBiofuelsPanther Creek

209

Big Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon: EnergyBiofuelsBig BendCreek Hot

210

Williams Creek, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview,GeothermalHawaii:SageWillard, Ohio:Creek, Indiana:

211

Oak Creek Phase I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii: Energy ResourcesOak Creek

212

Todd Creek, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd JumpOperations Jump to:National EnvironmentalCreek, Colorado:

213

Two Creeks, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformationTulsa,Tuscarawas County,Florida:Creeks, Wisconsin:

214

Indian Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip: 55344ESMAP LowChange |Creek

215

An analysis of energy expenditure in Goodwin Creek Peter Molnar and Jorge A. Ramirez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of energy expenditure in Goodwin Creek Peter Molna´r and Jorge A. Rami´rez Department with recent observations of channel change in Goodwin Creek. This energy expenditure analysis suggests of energy dissipation per unit channel area, Pa, is constant throughout the river network is explored

RamĂ­rez, Jorge A.

216

Results of the radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York (TNY002)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in November 1991 and May 1996. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been transported into the creek. The survey included a surface gamma scan in accessible areas near the creek and the collection of soil, sediment, and core samples for radionuclide analyses. Survey results indicate that no significant material originating at the Linde plant is presently in the creek. Three of the 1991 soil sample locations on the creek bank and one near the lake contained slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U with radionuclide distributions similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site.

Murray, M.E.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Vegetation survey of Four Mile Creek wetlands. [Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of forested wetlands along upper Four Mile Creek was conducted. The region from Road 3 to the creek headwaters was sampled to evaluate the composition of woody and herbaceons plant communities. All sites were found to fall into either the Nyssa sylvatica (Black Gum) -- Persea borbonia (Red Bay) or Nyssa sylvatica -- Acer rubrum (Red Maple) types. These community types are generally species-rich and diverse. Previous studies (Greenwood et al., 1990; Mackey, 1988) demonstrated contaminant stress in areas downslope from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. In the present study there were some indications of contaminant stress. In the wetland near H-Area, shrub basal area, ground cover stratum species richness, and diversity were low. In the area surrounding the F-Area tree kill zone, ground cover stratum cover and shrub basal area were low and ground cover stratum species richness was low. The moderately stressed site at F-Area also showed reduced overstory richness and diversity and reduced ground cover stratum richness. These results could, however, be due to the very high basal area of overstory trees in both stressed F-Area sites that would reduce light availability to understory plants. No threatened or endangered plant species were found in the areas sampled. 40 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Loehle, C.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

Browne, Dave

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Remediation cleanup options for the Hoe Creek UCG site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy must restore groundwater quality at the Hoe Creek, Wyoming, underground coal gasification site using the best proven practicable technology. Six alternative remediation methods are evaluated in this project: (1) excavation, (2) three variations of groundwater plume containment, (3) in situ vacuum extraction, (4) pump and treat using a defined pattern of pumping wells to obtain an effective matrix sweep, (5) in situ flushing using a surfactant, and (6) in situ bioremediation. Available site characterization data is insufficient to accurately project the cost of remediation. Several alternative hypothetical examples and associated costs are described in the text and in the appendices. However, not enough information is available to use these examples as a basis for comparison purposes. Before a cleanup method is selected, core borings should be taken to define the areal extent and depth of contaminated matrix material. Segments of these core borings should be analyzed for organic contaminants in the soil (e.g., benzene) and their relationship to the groundwater contamination. These analyses and subsequent treatability studies will show whether or not the contaminants can be effectively removed by surface on in situ volatilization, leached from the matrix using washing solutions, or removed by bioremediation. After this information is obtained, each technology should be evaluated with respect to cost and probability of success. A decision tree for implementing remediation cleanup at the Hoe Creek site is presented in this report. 26 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Nordin, J.; Griffin, W.; Chatwin, T.; Lindblom, S.; Crader, S.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Groundwater contamination near the Hoe Creek UCG experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual gasification products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the groundwater. However, our field studies, conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Hoe Creek site, have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may be interconnected with the coal aquifer, and contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have provided us with opportunities to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. Our preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than the water in the gasified coal aquifer. In conducting these field investigations, we have also learned valuable lessons concerning groundwater monitoring. A suggested monitoring strategy will be discussed.

Wang, F.T.; Mead, S.W.; Stuermer, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Log-derived evaluation of gas-bearing Cherokee, Red Fork, and Morrow formations, Custer County, OK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medium to low porosity and rather tight Cherokee, Red Fork and Morrow sands, located in Oklahoma, contain significant hydrocarbon resources. To evaluate the commercial importance of wells drilled in Custer County, Oklahoma, an innovative digital shaly sand analysis approach (CLASS - Epilog) has been applied, which provides information on total and effective reservoir porosity, total and effective fluid distribution based on the Waxman-Smits equation, shaliness, clay typing, and reservoir productivity. Several field case examples are presented and discussed based on (1) open hole logging suite, consisting of induction, compensated density/neutron and Spectralog, (2) CLASS analysis, (3) well completion and stimulation data, and (4) the resulting production test results.

Busch, E.A.; Fertl, W.H.; Neill, B.E.; Sinha, A.K.; Sobkowich, K.N.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Water Conservation Study for Manastash Creek Water Users, Kittias County, Washington, Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manastash Creek is tributary of the Yakima River and is located southwest and across the Yakima River from the City of Ellensburg. The creek drains mountainous terrain that ranges in elevation from 2,000 feet to over 5,500 feet and is primarily snowmelt fed, with largest flows occurring in spring and early summer. The creek flows through a narrow canyon until reaching a large, open plain that slopes gently toward the Yakima River and enters the main stem of the Yakima River at river mile 154.5. This area, formed by the alluvial fan of the Creek as it leaves the canyon, is the subject of this study. The area is presently dominated by irrigated agriculture, but development pressures are evident as Ellensburg grows and develops as an urban center. Since the mid to late nineteenth century when irrigated agriculture was established in a significant manner in the Yakima River Basin, Manastash Creek has been used to supply irrigation water for farming in the area. Adjudicated water rights dating back to 1871 for 4,465 acres adjacent to Manastash Creek allow appropriation of up to 26,273 acre-feet of creek water for agricultural irrigation and stock water. The diversion of water from Manastash Creek for irrigation has created two main problems for fisheries. They are low flows or dewatered reaches of Manastash Creek and fish passage barriers at the irrigation diversion dams. The primary goal of this study, as expressed by Yakama Nation and BPA, is to reestablish safe access in tributaries of the Yakima River by removing physical barriers and unscreened diversions and by adding instream flow where needed for fisheries. The goal expressed by irrigators who would be affected by these projects is to support sustainable and profitable agricultural use of land that currently uses Manastash Creek water for irrigation. This study provides preliminary costs and recommendations for a range of alternative projects that will partially or fully meet the goal of establishing safe access for fisheries in Manastash Creek by reducing or eliminating diversions and eliminating fish passage barriers. Further study and design will be necessary to more fully develop the alternatives, evaluate their environmental benefits and impacts and determine the effect on Manastash Creek water users. Those studies will be needed to determine which alternative has the best combination of benefits and costs, and meets the goal of the Manastash Creek water users.

Montgomery Watson Harza (Firm)

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

229

Review of underground coal gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LLNL has conducted three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, WY. Three different linking methods were used: explosive fracturing, reverse burning and directional drilling. Air was injected on all three experiments and a steam/oxygen mixture during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the linking method didn't influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters, but declined from its initial value over a period of time. This was due to heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Review of underground coal gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, WY, LLNL applied three different linking methods: explosive fracture, reverse burning, and directional drilling. Air was injected in all three experiments; a steam/oxygen mixture, during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the type of linking method did not influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters but declined from its initial value over a period of time because of heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geothermal space heating applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Final report, August 20, 1979-May 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a first-stage evaluation of the overall feasibility of utilizing geothermal waters from the Madison aquifer in the vicinity of Poplar, Montana for space heating are reported. A preliminary assessment of the resource characteristics, a preliminary design and economic evaluation of a geothermal heating district and an analysis of environmental and institutional issues are included. Preliminary investigations were also made into possible additional uses of the geothermal resource, including ethanol production. The results of the resource analysis showed that the depth to the top of the Madison occurs at approximately 5,500 feet at Poplar, and the Madison Group is characterized by low average porosity (about 5 percent) and permeability (about 0.004 gal/day-ft), and by hot water production rates of a few tens of gallons per minute from intervals a few feet thick. The preliminary heating district system effort for the town of Poplar included design heat load estimates, a field development concept, and preliminary design of heat extraction and hot water distribution systems. The environmental analysis, based on current data, indicated that resource development is not expected to result in undue impacts. The institutional analysis concluded that a Tribal geothermal utility could be established, but no clear-cut procedure can be identified without a more comprehensive evaluation of legal and jurisdistional issues. The economic evaluation found that, if the current trend of rapidly increasing prices for fossil fuels continues, a geothermal heating district within Poplar could be a long-term, economically attractive alternative to current energy sources.

Birman, J.H.; Cohen, J.; Spencer, G.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) in Rabbit Creek-Cat Creek Watershed, Summer 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is a method for evaluating the health of water bodies and watersheds by analyzing sample catches of fishes. Sites are scored on a numerical scale of 12--60 and on that basis assigned to a ``bioclass`` ranging from ``very poor`` to ``excellent.`` Overall, the major causes of depressed IBI scores in the Rabbit Creek watershed would appear to be: Organic pollution, mostly from livestock, but also from agricultural runoff and possible septic tank failures; sedimentation, principally from stream bank damage by cattle, also possibly from agriculture and construction; toxic pollution from agrochemicals applied to Holly Springs Golf course and agricultural fields` and Warming of water and evaporation loss due to elimination of shade on stream banks and construction of ponds.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Review of underground coal-gasification field experiments at Hoe Creek. [Hoe Creek 1, 2, and 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LLNL has conducted three underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek site near Gillette, Wyoming. Three different linking methods were used: explosive fracture, reverse burning and directional drilling. Air was injected on all three experiments and a steam/oxygen mixture during 2 days of the second and most of the third experiment. Comparison of results show that the linking method didn't influence gas quality. The heat of combustion of the product gas was higher with steam/oxygen injection, mainly because of reduced inert diluent. Gas quality was generally independent of other operating parameters, but declined from its initial value over a period of time. This was due to heat loss to the wet overburden and extensive roof collapse in the second and third experiments.

Thorsness, C.B.; Creighton, J.R.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrocarbon trapping mechanisms in the Miller Creek area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'' 1975 43'W'79 ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon Trapoing Mechanisms in the Miller Creek Area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. (May 1975) Jennifer Ann Armstrong, B. S. , University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: 17r. Robert. R. Berg...

Armstrong, Jennifer Ann

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Microsoft Word - CX-SpringCreek-WineCountry-TowerRelocationFY13...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 29, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Justin Estes Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Spring Creek - Wine County No. 1...

236

Tribal Decision-Making and Intercultural Relations: Crow Creek Agency, 1863-1885  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lower Yanktonai residents experienced great change during the first two decades at the Crow Creek agency in Dakota Territory. This essay traces the evolution of relations between tribal members, federal agents, and ...

Galler, Robert

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes the calmodulin-binding protein in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes and abolish the ability of Hcm1p to act as a suppressor of calmodulin mutants. The promoter of SPC110 contains a match to the consensus binding site. Deletion of HCM1 does not affect the basal level of SPC110

Davis, Trisha N.

238

Wetland Survey of Selected Areas in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Area of Responsibilty, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared to summarize wetland surveys performed in the Y- 1 2 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994. Wetland surveys were conducted in three areas within the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994: the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Operable Unit (OU), part of the Bear Creek Valley OU (the upper watershed of Bear Creek from the culvert under Bear Creek Road upstream through the Y-12 West End Environmental Management Area, and the catchment of Bear Creek North Tributary 1), and part of Chestnut Ridge OU 2 (the McCoy Branch area south of Bethel Valley Road). Using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual, 18 wetland areas were identified in the 3 areas surveyed; these areas were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin. Fourteen wetlands and one wetland/pond area that are associated with disturbed or remnant stream channels and seeps were identified in the UEFPC OU. Three wetlands were identified in the Bear Creek Valley OU portion of the survey area. One wetland was identified in the riparian zone of McCoy Branch in the southern portion of Chestnut Ridge OU 2.

Rosensteel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The investigation of the Caney Creek shipwreck archaeological site 41MG32  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Matagorda, Texas, 1860, Produced by Ed Lang. . . . , , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. Fitnire 10. Location of Caney Creek in Southeast Texas. . Soil types of Matagorda County. Portrait of J. B. Hawkins. Map showing... of the Caney Creek Shipwreck Archaeological Site 4 IMG32. (August 1998) David Layne Hedrick, B. A. , University of North Texas Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Frederick M Hocker The history of river transportation in the interior of Texas has received...

Hedrick, David Layne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geology of the Middle Beaver Creek area, Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AREA, NASGR AEG GILhNPIR COGRTIES, TEIAB ABSTRACT The Middle Beaver Creek area is situated on the soutlwsst flank of the Llano ?plift region in Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texas Hooks of Presa?brian, Psleosoie, Mesosois, and Genosois age... ' Figure 1. ? Map of' part of Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texass showing location of' the Middle Beaver Creek Area, on aoetats oosered aerial photographs. In order to aoourateIp locate and plot the oontaots asd faults, the photographs vere studies...

Peterson, Don Hamilton

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Trout Creek, Oregon Watershed Assessment; Findings, Condition Evaluation and Action Opportunities, 2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the assessment is to characterize historical and current watershed conditions in the Trout Creek Watershed. Information from the assessment is used to evaluate opportunities for improvements in watershed conditions, with particular reference to improvements in the aquatic environment. Existing information was used, to the extent practicable, to complete this work. The assessment will aid the Trout Creek Watershed Council in identifying opportunities and priorities for watershed restoration projects.

Runyon, John

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Correlation of stratigraphy with revegetation conditions at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORRELATION OF STRATIGRAPHY WITH REVEGETATION CONDITIONS AT THE GIBBONS CREEK LIGNITE MINE, GRIMES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by LAURENCE D. PARISOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Geology CORRELATION OF STRATIGRAPHY WITH REVEGETATION CONDITIONS AT THE GIBBONS CREEK LIGNITE MINE, GRIMES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by LAURENCE D. PARISOT ; Approved...

Parisot, Laurence D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2000 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant that will be managed by tie Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2000 will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at the Y-12 Plant: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of the Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant GWPP during CY 2000 will comply with: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation regulations governing detection monitoring at nonhazardous Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (SWDF); and DOE Order 5400.1 surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring. Some of the data collected for these monitoring drivers also will be used to meet monitoring requirements of the Integrated Water Quality Program, which is managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC. Data from five wells that are monitored for SWDF purposes in the Chestnut Ridge Regime will be used to comply with requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act post closure permit regarding corrective action monitoring. Modifications to the CY 2000 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in regulatory or programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 Plant GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

None

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Improving Remedial Planning Performance: The Rattlesnake Creek Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Buffalo District, has responsibility for characterizing and remediating radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Most of these FUSRAP sites include radionuclide contamination in soils where excavation and offsite disposal is the selected remedial action. For many FUSRAP soil remediation projects completed to date, the excavated contaminated soil volumes have significantly exceeded the pre-excavation volume estimates that were developed for project planning purposes. The exceedances are often attributed to limited and sparse datasets that are used to calculate the initial volume estimates. These volume exceedances complicate project budgeting and planning. Building on these experiences, the USACE took a different approach in the remediation of Rattlesnake Creek, located adjacent to the Ashland 2 site, in Tonawanda, New York. This approach included a more extensive pre-design data collection effort to improve and reduce the uncertainty in the pre-excavation volume estimates, in addition to formalizing final status survey data collection strategies prior to excavation. The final status survey sampling was fully integrated with the pre-design data collection, allowing dual use of the pre-design data that was collected (i.e., using the data to close out areas where contamination was not found, and feeding the data into volume estimates when contamination was encountered). The use of real-time measurement techniques (e.g., X-ray fluorescence [XRF] and gamma walkover surveys) during pre-excavation data collection allowed the USACE to identify and respond to unexpected contamination by allocating additional data collection to characterizing new areas of concern. The final result was an estimated soil volume and excavation footprint with a firm technical foundation and a reduction in uncertainty. However, even with extensive pre-design data collection, additional contamination was found during the excavation that led to an increase in the soil volume requiring offsite disposal. This paper describes the lessons learned regarding improving remedial planning performance from the Rattlesnake Creek experience and evaluates the level of project uncertainty reduction achieved through pre-design data collection. (authors)

Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L.; Andrews, S.M. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Durham, L. A.; Johnson, R. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., EVS 900, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Racino, R. R. [Cabrera Services, Inc., 29 Railroad Avenue, Middletown, NY 10940 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NORTH HILL CREEK 3-D SEISMIC EXPLORATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind River Resources Corporation (WRRC) received a DOE grant in support of its proposal to acquire, process and interpret fifteen square miles of high-quality 3-D seismic data on non-allotted trust lands of the Uintah and Ouray (Ute) Indian Reservation, northeastern Utah, in 2000. Subsequent to receiving notice that its proposal would be funded, WRRC was able to add ten square miles of adjacent state and federal mineral acreage underlying tribal surface lands by arrangement with the operator of the Flat Rock Field. The twenty-five square mile 3-D seismic survey was conducted during the fall of 2000. The data were processed through the winter of 2000-2001, and initial interpretation took place during the spring of 2001. The initial interpretation identified multiple attractive drilling prospects, two of which were staked and permitted during the summer of 2001. The two initial wells were drilled in September and October of 2001. A deeper test was drilled in June of 2002. Subsequently a ten-well deep drilling evaluation program was conducted from October of 2002 through March 2004. The present report discusses the background of the project; design and execution of the 3-D seismic survey; processing and interpretation of the data; and drilling, completion and production results of a sample of the wells drilled on the basis of the interpreted survey. Fifteen wells have been drilled to test targets identified on the North Hill Creek 3-D Seismic Survey. None of these wildcat exploratory wells has been a dry hole, and several are among the best gas producers in Utah. The quality of the data produced by this first significant exploratory 3-D survey in the Uinta Basin has encouraged other operators to employ this technology. At least two additional 3-D seismic surveys have been completed in the vicinity of the North Hill Creek Survey, and five additional surveys are being planned for the 2004 field season. This project was successful in finding commercial oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids production on a remote part of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation. Much of the natural gas and natural gas liquids are being produced from the Wingate Formation, which to our knowledge has never produced commercially anywhere. Another large percentage of the natural gas is being produced from the Entrada Formation which has not previously produced in this part of the Uinta Basin. In all, at least nine geologic formations are contributing hydrocarbons to these wells. This survey has clearly established the fact that high-quality data can be obtained in this area, despite the known obstacles.

Marc T. Eckels; David H. Suek; Denise H. Harrison; Paul J. Harrison

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Postburn core-drilling results from Hoe Creek 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents interpretations derived from the analysis of the postburn drilling results from the Hoe Creek 3 experiment. Sixteen partially cored boreholes were drilled using an HQ triple-tube core barrel. The general objectives of this work were to establish the characteristics of the burn cavity and of the materials within and surrounding the cavity. The lateral extent of the burn and the characteristics of the collapsed region overlying the burn cavity were also to be investigated. Important conclusions derived from this study include the following: (1) The horizontally drilled link borehole strongly controlled burn cavity shape and location; no significant combustion occurred below the link; (2) the slag may have acted as an insulation blanket, protecting the coal below the horizontal link borehole; (3) significant roof collapse occurred during the course of the experiment, probably inducing substantial heat losses; (4) the lateral extent of the burn was greatest along the Felix 2 seam; the cavity outline in plan view is shaped like a teardrop; a vertical transverse cross section through the cavity shows a mushroom-shaped outline; (5) roof collapse after the end of the experiment filled much of the space within and above the cavity, producing a mechanically disturbed zone full of voids and weak materials. A zone of fractures or loosened material exists in the remaining (uncollapsed) roof and wall materials, surrounding and paralleling the upper margins of the collapsed region. A void zone was found near the bottom of the collapsed region.

Ramirez, A.L.; Ganow, H.C.; Wilder, D.G.

1981-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

248

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Floods on Nottely River and Martin, Peachtree, and Slow Creeks in Cherokee County, North Carolina. Flood report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the flood situation along the Nottely River from the North Carolina-Georgia State line, at stream mile 18.72, downstream to the head of Hiwassee Reservoir backwater, stream mile 6.50; Martin Creek from mile 6.12 downstream to mile 1.38; Peachtree Creek from Ammon Bottom at mile 4.78 downstream to its mouth at Hiwassee River mile 100,68; and Slow Creek from mile 3.15 downstream to its mouth at Peachtree Creek mile 1.98.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Stream migration and sediment movement on Lower Cache Creek from Capay Dam to Interstate 5 at Yolo, CA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The geomorphology of waterways like Cache Creek has been modified not only by natural flooding events, but also by human activity. Aggregate mining, agriculture and… (more)

Leathers, Tami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Simulation of contaminated sediment transport in White Oak Creek basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a systematic approach to management of the contaminated sediments in the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The primary contaminant of concern is radioactive cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which binds to soil and sediment particles. The key components in the approach include an intensive sampling and monitoring system for flood events; modeling of hydrological processes, sediment transport, and contaminant flux movement; and a decision framework with a detailed human health risk analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling of watershed rainfall-runoff and contaminated sediment transport during flooding periods using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- Fortran (HSPF) model. Because a large number of parameters are required in HSPF modeling, the major effort in the modeling process is the calibration of model parameters to make simulation results and measured values agree as closely as possible. An optimization model incorporating the concepts of an expert system was developed to improve calibration results and efficiency. Over a five-year simulation period, the simulated flows match the observed values well. Simulated total amount of sediment loads at various locations during storms match with the observed values within a factor of 1.5. Simulated annual releases of {sup 137}Cs off-site locations match the data within a factor of 2 for the five-year period. The comprehensive modeling approach can provide a valuable tool for decision makers to quantitatively analyze sediment erosion, deposition, and transport; exposure risk related to radionuclides in contaminated sediment; and various management strategies.

Bao, Y.; Clapp, R.B.; Brenkert, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moore, T.D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fontaine, T.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Dissolved Oxygen in Allen CreekDissolved Oxygen in Allen Creek Dissolved oxygen (DO) enters the water by diffusion from air, as a by-product of photosynthesis and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissolved Oxygen in Allen CreekDissolved Oxygen in Allen Creek Dissolved oxygen (DO) enters and rapids. There is an inverse relationship between temperature and DO, i.e. colder water holds more oxygen it supplies oxygen to aquatic organisms. Higher DO levels also give the water a better taste. Figure 2. During

Tyler, Christy

253

Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

Specht, W.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Conditions in Hot Creek can change very quickly. These fish--caught in a burst of high-temperature water" or intermittently spurting very hot, sediment-laden water as high as 6 feet (2 m) above the stream surface. At timesBoiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley

Torgersen, Christian

255

Depth-gradient analysis of the Colony Creek Cycle (late Pennsylvanian) of north Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek Cycle in the Brazos River valley (Brad locality). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2-9 Stratigraph1c section of the upper part of the Colony Creek Cycle in the Brazos River valley (North locality) . . . . . ~ . . ~ . ~ . . . . 32 5-2 Schematic...-1 Fusulinid Association (BRAD01). 5-2 Permophorus Association (LAKE09). 5-3 Linoproductus Association (PARK09). 5-4 Crurithyris Association (PARKOB). 5-5 Hemi zyga Association (NRTH09). 5-6 Nuculoid Association (NRTH01). 5-7 Ammonoid Association (PARK01...

Kennedy, Noel Lynne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Steam tracer experiment at the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water plays an important role in in-situ coal gasification. To better understand this role, we conducted a steam tracer test during the later stages of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test. Deuterium oxide was used as the tracer. This report describes the tracer test and the analysis of the data obtained. The analysis indicates that at Hoe Creek the injected steam interacts with a large volume of water as it passes through the underground system. We hypothesize that this water is undergoing continual reflux in the underground system, resulting in a tracer response typical of a well-stirred tank.

Thorsness, C.B.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Atmospheric Mercury Concentrations Near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir - Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental and reactive gaseous mercury (EGM/RGM) were measured in ambient air concentrations over a two-week period in July/August 2005 near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir, a popular fishery located 50 km southwest of Twin Falls, Idaho. A fish consumption advisory for mercury was posted at the reservoir in 2002 by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. The air measurements were part of a multi-media (water, sediment, precipitation, air) study initiated by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 to identify potential sources of mercury contamination to the reservoir. The sampling site is located about 150 km northeast of large gold mining operations in Nevada, which are known to emit large amounts of mercury to the atmosphere (est. 2,200 kg/y from EPA 2003 Toxic Release Inventory). The work was co-funded by the Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Assistance Program and has a secondary objective to better understand mercury inputs to the environment near the INL, which lies approximately 230 km to the northeast. Sampling results showed that both EGM and RGM concentrations were significantly elevated (~ 30 – 70%, P<0.05) compared to known regional background concentrations. Elevated short-term RGM concentrations (the primary form that deposits) were likely due to atmospheric oxidation of high EGM concentrations, which suggests that EGM loading from upwind sources could increase Hg deposition in the area. Back-trajectory analyses indicated that elevated EGM and RGM occurred when air parcels came out of north-central and northeastern Nevada. One EGM peak occurred when the air parcels came out of northwestern Utah. Background concentrations occurred when the air was from upwind locations in Idaho (both northwest and northeast). Based on 2003 EPA Toxic Release Inventory data, it is likely that most of the observed peaks were from Nevada gold mine sources. Emissions from known large natural mercury sources in that area cannot account for the observed EGM peaks due to their diffuse source geometry and the large (170 km) transport distance involved. The EGM peak originating from northwestern Utah air may be from three known mercury sources west of Salt Lake City (Kennecott, US Magnesium, Clean Harbors Aragonite) and/or the 1600 MW coal-fired Intermountain Power plant near Delta. However, the relative importance of these short-term peaks for long-term watershed mercury loading (critical factor affecting fish concentrations) is not known, and there is a need to better quantify the annual frequency and magnitude of these different inputs over a longer period of time.

M. L. Abbott

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Atmospheric Mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in Southern Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over two-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran mercury analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate mercury (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize mercury air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate mercury dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally-averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2 – 12 ng m-3) and RGM (50 - 150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicated predominant source directions from the southeast (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) through the southwest (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the northwest (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

F. Jerry Lucia

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Measurements on spent-fuel assemblies at Arkansas Nuclear One using the Fork system. Final report, January 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fork measurement system has been used to examine spent-fuel assemblies at the two reactors of Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Entergy Operations, Inc. The Unit 1 reactor is a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) design, and the Unit 2 reactor is a Combustion Engineering (CE) design. The neutron and gamma-ray emissions from individual spent-fuel assemblies were measured in the storage pools by raising each assembly pathway out of the storage rack and performing a measurement near the center of the assembly. The overall accuracy of the measurements after corrections is about 2%. Thirty-four assemblies were examined at Unit 1, and forty-one assemblies at Unit 2. The average deviation of the burnup measurements from the calibration was 3.0% at Unit 1 and 3.5% at Unit 2, indicating 2 to 3% random variation among the reactor records. There was no indication of clearly anomalous assemblies. Axial Scans of the variation in neutron and gamma ray emission were obtained by collecting data at several locations along the length of three assemblies at Unit 2. Two of these assemblies were nonstandard in that each contained a small neutron source. The sources were detected by the axial scans. The test program was a cooperative effort involving Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Entergy Operations, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy.

Ewing, R.I.; Bronowski, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bosler, G.E.; Siebelist, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Priore, J.; Hansford, C.H.; Sullivan, S. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Russellville, AR (United States). Arkansas Nuclear One

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Report on the biological monitoring program for Bear Creek at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 1989-1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bear Creek Valley watershed drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in the Bear Creek Valley resulted in the contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Ecological monitoring by the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was initiated in the Bear Creek watershed in May 1984 and continues at present. Studies conducted during the first year provided a detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek. The initial characterization was followed by a biological monitoring phase in which studies were conducted at reduced intensities.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.] [ed.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Cada, G.F.; Peterson, M.J. [and others] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

IMPACT OF MINE DRAINAGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF METAL LOADING SOURCES IN THE JAMES CREEK WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek watershed contributes directly to the water supply for Jamestown, Colorado, a town the past several decades has led to widespread concern about the adverse effects that heavy mining has had on the environment. These effects are felt particularly in the form of water contamination from acid mine drainage

Ryan, Joe

263

Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY*******  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY --------------------------­ · Astronomers primarily interested in astronomy. ­ Data reduction preoccupies radio astronomy specialists,f,p Bandpass( )f PolCal( )f,p Gains( )s,f,p S Beam Imager Astronomy Solver I2 ( ) )^(^, 2sVpfV - å ¹kj X Solver

Militzer, Burkhard

264

OCEANOGRAPHY Stratigraphic Distribution of Amino Acids in Peats from Cedar Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Peats from Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota, and Dismal Swamp, Virginia' F. M. SWAIN, A. BLUMENTALS, AND R the bog waters and waters squeezed from the peats. Attempts to detect proteins in these substances by means of paper electrophoresis were unsuccessful. Fibrous proteins may be present, however. In both peat

Minnesota, University of

265

EA-1967: Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild, Lane County, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of its 26-mile 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Hills Creek-Lookout Point transmission line, which is generally located between Lowell and Oakridge, in Lane County, Oregon.

266

Urban Influences on Stream Chemistry and Biology in the Big Brushy Creek Watershed, South Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and rural sites. Discharge of wastewater treatment plant effluent at one rural location caused an increase land cover. wastewater treatment plant 1 Introduction The expansion of urban land areas affects between urban and rural sites may indicate that urban development in the Big Brushy Creek watershed has

267

Geology of the Schep-Panther Creek Area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Psiat Posh shale asahor QsrSsa Crash liosstoos asahsr salSs eass&t~ osahsr Rilar f~tiaa CJQOR14N SEMI All of the reoogafssd aaEwrs of the Upper Caabrisa fa the L)?ae uplift oro repreeeated is tho Bebop - yuatber Creek ense lUddle ~ a4 Loser...

Bryant, George Frank

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Environmental evaluation and restoration plan of the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site, Wyoming: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments were conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the Hoe Creek Site, Wyoming; the Hoe Creek I experiment was conducted in 1976, the Hoe Creek II experiment in 1977, and the Hoe Creek III experiment in 1979. These experiments have had an impact on the land and groundwater quality at the site, and the Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that Western Research Institute (WRI) develop and implement a site restoration plan. The purpose of the plan is to restore the site to conditions being negotiated with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ). To prepare for developing a plan, WRI compiled background information on the site. The geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the site were determined, and the water quality data were analyzed. Modelling the site was considered and possible restoration methods were examined. Samples were collected and laboratory tests were conducted. WRI then developed and began implementing a field-scale restoration test. 41 refs, 46 figs., 13 tabs.

Barteaux, W.L.; Berdan, G.L.; Lawrence, J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Groundwater restoration field test at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground coal gasification burns were conducted at the Hoe Creek Site in the Powder River Basin. Some contaminants were released in the groundwater. The Department of Energy (DOE) analyzed the water from a network of wells. Two million gallons of groundwater were pumped from wells adjacent to the Hoe Creek II underground coal gasification cavity, passed through filters and carbon adsorbers, and reinjected into the cavity. Phenol was the target compound of the water treatment system. The phenol concentration pumped from well WS-10 decreased from 974 parts per billion (ppB) when treatment began on July 2, 1987, to about 200 ppB when treatment ceased on August 29, 1987. Phenol concentrations pumped from well WS-22 fluctuated during the tests, but they decreased to the 150 to 200 ppB range by the time treatment was terminated. The phenol concentration of treated water reinjected into the Hoe Creek II cavity was below detectable limits (less than 20 ppB). Pumping rates were about 18 gallons per minute (gpm) from well WS-10 and 6 to 8 gpm from well WS-22. Hoe Creek is located approximately 20 miles southwest of Gillette, Wyoming. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Nordin, J.S.; Barrash, W.; Nolan, B.T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c:es .B~l:JJ:. }eti. ',~, Colorado School of Mines, VoL 2'1,v Piceance Creek Basin v Colorado r and 9 p' 1974. Pc:u:~·tBetween 'che White and Colorado Rivers, '! \\lo:ci:hwegt:ern

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

EIS-0134: Charlie Creek-Belfield Transmission Line Project, North Dakota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Western Area Power Administration developed this EIS to assess the environmental impact of constructing a high voltage transmission line between Charlie Creek and Belfield, North Dakota, and a new substation near Belfield to as a means of adding transmission capacity to the area.

272

Development and chemical quality of a ground-water system in cast overburden as the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-water conditions which develop in response to surface mining. TMPA has supported research at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in order to meet the needs of mine develop- ment and permitting, Most of the data on ground-water conditions 1n reclaimed spoil has been... on the west by the Navasota River, on the south by Gibbons Creek, and on the north by State Highway 30 (Figure 1). This area includes the Gibbons Creek Steam Electric Station. Lignite is extracted from two pits within the permit boundary, termed the A...

Borbely, Evelyn Susanna

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

Ketelle R.H.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

ARCHAEOLOGY, LATE-QUATERNARY LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE UPPER DRIFTWOOD CREEK BASIN, BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study focused on valley fills in the upper Driftwood Creek basin, a 3rd order drainage network in south-central Kansas to determine the geologic potential for stratified cultural material and to reconstruct a record of Late...

Kessler, Nicholas Victor

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word Call for Nominations: Graduate Student Research and Writing Retreat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature, and the Written Word Call for Nominations: Graduate Student on a collaborative project or two graduate students who each have individual projects are invited to nominate graduate students in the humanities or environmental sciences

GrĂĽnwald, Niklaus J.

276

Abstract At the time of this study Fossil Creek was being considered as a site for the restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This study was conducted prior to a hydroelectric dam decommissioning project in Fossil Creek where full limitation Ă? Phosphorous Ă? Nitrogen Ă? Invertebrate Ă? Dam Ă? Hydroelectric Ă? Native fish Ă? Food base

277

LLL in situ coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979. [Hoe Creek No. 3 and planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major effort this quarter has been postexperiment analysis of Hoe Creek No. 3 and planning for future gasification experiments. Hoe Creek No. 3: Thermal data have been analyzed to determine the performance of the drilled horizontal channel during forward gasification. Thermal and material balance data are combined to determine late-time burn boundaries for the experiment. Surface subsidence after the experiment was completed is described. Process wells were inspected to determine failure characteristics and pinpoint late-time injection location. Ground-water quality before and after Hoe Creek No. 3 and the effects of aquifer interconnection on hydraulic measurements at the Hoe Creek No. 2 and No. 3 sites are discussed. Future experiments: Potential UCG sites are being characterized for future tests. Two sites in the Powder River Basin near Gillette, Wyoming are discussed. Preliminary plans for a deep site gasification experiment and a new method for in situ gasification of thick seams are presented.

Cena, R.J.; Strack, B.S. (eds.)

1980-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Hanna and Hoe Creek underground coal gasification test sites: Status report, (June 1986-June 1987)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To comply with a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Western Research Institute (WRI) is required to submit an annual report summarizing the status of environmentally related work performed by WRI at the Hanna and Hoe Creek underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. The following is a summary of work performed at these two sites from June 1986 to June 1987. Several tasks for restoring the water quailty at Hoe Creek were: (1) groundwater treatment demonstration (1986); (2) bench-scale carbon adsorption experiments (1987); (3) design of the scaled-up treatment system (1987); (4) well-pumping test (1987). A summary of the results of each task is presented. 6 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Berdan, G.L.; Nolan, B.T.; Barteaux, W.L.; Barrash, W.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Pond Creek coal seam in eastern Kentucky - new look at an old resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle Pennsylvania/Westphalian B Pond Creek Coal is an important low-sulfur resource in Pike and Martin Counties, Kentucky. The Breathitt Formation seam, also known as the lower Elkhorn coal, accounted for nearly 40% of Pike County's 1983 production of 22 million tons. Although the coal is nearly mined out through central Pike County, substantial reserves still exist in the northern part of the county. Past studies of the seam by the US Bureau of Mines concentrated on the utility of the seam as a coking blend, with additional consideration of the megascopic and microscopic coal petrology. The authors research has focused on the regional variations in the Pond Creek seam, with emphasis on the petrographic variations.

Hower, J.C.; Pollock, J.D.; Klapheke, J.G.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Environmental geophysics at Kings Creek Disposal Site and 30th Street Landfill, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geophysical studies on the Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, delineate landfill areas and provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low seal levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits in the Kings Creek area. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal a paleochannel greater than 50 ft deep, with a thalweg trending offshore in a southwest direction into Kings Creek. Onshore, the ground-penetrating radar data indicate a 35-ft-deep branch to the main channel, trending to the north-northwest directly beneath the 30th Street Landfill. Other branches are suspected to meet the offshore paleochannel in the wetlands south and east of the 30th Street Landfill. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Electromagnetic surveys have delineated the pre-fill lowland area currently occupied by the 30th Street Landfill. Magnetic and conductive anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, large-scale dumping has not occurred north of the Kings Creek Disposal Site or east of the 30th Street Landfill.

Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Stefanov, J.E.; Benson, M.A.; Padar, C.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hoe Creek experiments: LLNL's underground coal-gasification project in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and predecessor organizations, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory carried out a laboratory program and three field, underground coal gasification tests near Gillette, Wyoming. This report summarizes that work. Three methods of linking or connecting injection and production wells were used for the UCG field tests: Hoe Creek No. 1 employed explosive fracturing, Hoe Creek No. 2 featured use of reverse combustion, and directional drilling was used for the Hoe Creek No. 3. The Gas Research Institute cosponsored the latter test. Laboratory experiments and modeling, together with a laboratory and field environment program, are necessary adjuncts to the field program. Explosive fracturing in coal was simulated using computer models and laboratory tests. We developed a relationship of total inelastic strains to permeability, which we used to design and interpret a coal outcrop, explosive fracturing experiment at Kemmerer, Wyoming. Coal gasification was also simulated in laboratory experiments and with computer models. The primary aim has been to predict and correlate reaction, thermal-front propagation rates, and product gas composition as a function of bed properties and process operating conditions. Energy recovery in the form of produced gas and liquids amounted to 73% of the energy in the consumed coal. There were essentially no losses to the subsurface formation. The greatest energy loss was in steam production.

Stephens, D.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

Environment Compliance Department

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Final technical report; Mercury Release from Organic matter (OM) and OM-Coated Mineral Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final technical report for a project designed to address fundamental processes controlling the release of mercury from flood plain soils associated with East Fork Poplar Creek, Tennessee near the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge facility. The report summarizes the activities, findings, presentations, and publications resulting from an award to the U.S. Geological that were part of a larger overall effort including Kathy Nagy (University of Illinois, Chicago, Ill) and Joseph Ryan (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO). The specific charge for the U.S.G.S. portion of the study was to provide analytical support for the larger group effort (Nagy and Ryan), especially with regard to analyses of Hg and dissolved organic matter, and to provide information about the release of mercury from the floodplain soils.

Aiken, George

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Depositional and diagenetic controls on reservoir quality and their petrophysical predictors within the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Doe Creek Member of the Kaskapau Formation at Valhalla Field, Northwest Alberta.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Valhalla Field, discovered in 1979 and located in northwest Alberta, produces from the Upper Cretaceous Doe Creek Member of the Kaskapau Formation. Original reserves in… (more)

Ball, Nathaniel H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations and modeling of convective clouds in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene and Jeffrey S Tilley, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was funded by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through a contract with Weather Modification Inc (WMI). We also in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene and Jeffrey S Tilley, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND Terry Krauss, Weather Modification, Inc., Fargo, ND ` Introduction Photographs of ice accumulation

Delene, David J.

291

SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY AND FACIES ANALYSIS OF THE ROLLINS SANDSTONE MEMBER (MOUNT GARFIELD FORMATION) AND RE-EXAMINATION OF THE CONTACT BETWEEN THE MOUNT GARFIELD AND WILLIAMS FORK FORMATIONS (LATE CRETACEOUS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there is no upward-climbing geometry at the top of the Mount Garfield Formation, and the Rollins Sandstone Member and the Cameo Wheeler coal zone (of the Williams Fork Formation) are not time-equivalent units. The marine- shoreface deposits within the Rollins...

Thompson, Jesse David

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

CTUIR Grande Ronde River Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1995-1999 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contract agreement beginning in 1996 to fund watershed restoration and enhancement actions and contribute to recovery of fish and wildlife resources and water quality in the Grande Ronde River Basin. The CTUIR's habitat program is closely coordinated with the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program and multiple agencies and organizations within the basin. The CTUIR has focused during the past 4 years in the upper portions of the Grande Ronde Subbasin (upstream of LaGrande, Oregon) on several major project areas in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek watersheds and along the mainstem Grande Ronde River. This Annual Report provides an overview of individual projects and accomplishments.

Childs, Allen B.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Characterization of DOE reference oil shales: Mahogany Zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation Oil Shale, and Clegg Creek Member, New Albany Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Exxon Colony mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. Kerogen concentrates were prepared from both shales. The measured properties of the reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. There was poor agreement between measured and calculated molecular weights for the total shale oil produced from each shale. However, measured and calculated molecular weights agreed reasonably well for true boiling point distillate fractions in the temperature range of 204 to 399/sup 0/C (400 to 750/sup 0/F). Similarly, measured and calculated viscosities of the total shale oils were in disagreement, whereas good agreement was obtained on distillate fractions for a boiling range up to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F). Thermal and dielectric properties were determined for the shales and shale oils. The dielectric properties of the reference shales and shale oils decreased with increasing frequency of the applied frequency. 42 refs., 34 figs., 24 tabs.

Miknis, F. P.; Robertson, R. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Some improvements will be almost immediate...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will take decades... Riparian planting, Middle Fork John Day River Jack Creek, Deschutes National Forest #12 Reproductive Success Steelhead Non-local "domestic" stocks

295

Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Uranium in the Oatman Creek granite of Central Texas and its economic potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, the need to explore for new materials containing uranium will incr ease as the high grade sedimentary uranium deposits become depleted. A logical place to begin this search lies with the source rock for many of the known sedimentary uranium... potential uranium source. Th1s study focuses on an 80 acre outcrop of the Oatman Creek granite known as Bear Mountain, in Gillespie County, Texas. The gran1te is a medium-grained, gray to pink rock. Nodal analysis indicates the composit1on 1s 35. 5...

Conrad, Curtis Paul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Water quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Post-burn monitoring of the ground water near to the Hoe creek underground coal gasification site showed that a broad range of gasification products had been introduced into the water system. Although many of these contaminants were eventually absorbed by the surrounding coal, some chemicals continued to appear in the water in concentrations higher than pre-test levels for several years after gasification. Possible mechanisms by which the contaminants entered the ground water include: (1) leakage of pyrolysis products; (2) post-burn leaching of coal ash and overburden rubble by returning ground water; and (3) dissolution of minerals outside the cavity by the CO/SUB/2 generated during gasification.

Wang, F.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Changes in major organic contaminants in the groundwater at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of groundwater analysis at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification (UCG) site have indicated that, after gasification, the phenolic compounds and neutral aromatic hydrocarbons decrease more slowly than expected on the basis of our laboratory studies. The field data also fail to confirm the expected inverse relationship between a contaminant's water solubility and the extent to which it is sorbed by surrounding coal. The authors described a mechanism for the deposition of coal pyrolysis products that may help to elucidate the observed behavior of these organic contaminants. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Wang, F.; Mead, W.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

EA-1895: Lolo Creek Permanent Weir Construction near town of Weippe, Clearwater County, Idaho  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of replacing an existing seasonal fish weir with a permanent weir, which would be used to monitor federally-listed Snake River steelhead and collect spring Chinook salmon adults to support ongoing supplementation programs in the watershed. The Bureau of Land Management, a cooperating agency, preliminarily determined Lolo Creek to be suitable for Congressional designation into the Wild and Scenic River System. The EA includes a Wild and Scenic River Section 7 analysis.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Calispell Creek Watershed - FACT SHEET- November 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies OfficeAccountingGuide the Calispell Creek

302

Overview of GRI research at the Rock Creek Site, Black Warrior Basin. Overview of GRI research at Rock Creek: Eight years of cooperative research, coalbed methane shortcourse. Held in Abingdon, Virginia on October 23, 1992. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation slides from the October 23, 1992 workshop on coalbed methane exploration and production are assembled in this volume. They illustrate the following discussions: Overview of GRI Research at Rock Creek: Eight Years of Cooperative Research, Drilling and Completing Coalbed Methane Wells: Techniques for Fragile Formations, Connecting the Wellborne to the Formation: Perforations vs. Slotting, Coalbed Methane Well Testing in the Warrior Basin, Reservoir Engineering: A Case Study at Rock Creek, Fraccing of Multiple Thin Seams: Considerations and Constraints, Implementing Coal Seam Stimulations: Requirements for Successful Treatments, Coal-Fluid Interactions, Mine-Through Observations of Coal Seam Stimulations: Reality vs. Theory, and Recompleting Coalbed Methane Wells: The Second Try at Success.

Schraufnagel, R.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Improvement of Anadromous Fish Habitat and Passage in Omak Creek, 2008 Annual Report : February 1, 2008 to January 31, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 2008 season, projects completed under BPA project 2000-100-00 included installation of riparian fencing, maintenance of existing riparian fencing, monitoring of at-risk culverts and installation of riparian vegetation along impacted sections of Omak Creek. Redd and snorkel surveys were conducted in Omak Creek to determine steelhead production. Canopy closure surveys were conducted to monitor riparian vegetation recovery after exclusion of cattle since 2000 from a study area commonly known as the Moomaw property. Additional redd and fry surveys were conducted above Mission Falls and in the lower portion of Stapaloop Creek to try and determine whether there has been successful passage at Mission Falls. Monitoring adult steelhead trying to navigate the falls resulted in the discovery of shallow pool depth at an upper pool that is preventing many fish from successfully navigating the entire falls. The Omak Creek Habitat and Passage Project has worked with NRCS to obtain additional funds to implement projects in 2009 that will address passage at Mission Falls, culvert replacement, as well as additional riparian planting. The Omak Creek Technical Advisory Group (TAG) is currently revising the Omak Creek Watershed Assessment. In addition, the group is revising strategy to focus efforts in targeted areas to provide a greater positive impact within the watershed. In 2008 the NRCS Riparian Technical Team was supposed to assess areas within the watershed that have unique problems and require special treatments to successfully resolve the issues involved. The technical team will be scheduled for 2009 to assist the TAG in developing strategies for these special areas.

Dasher, Rhonda; Fisher, Christopher [Colville Confederated Tribes

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. The New Albany Shale was both the hydrocarbon source and top seal to the fossil Pipe Creek Jr. oil field with original oil in place estimated at 11 million bbl. The level of organic metamorphism of the New Albany Shale, the oil residue, and the two-phase fluid inclusions in the burial cements suggest that sediments accumulated on the platform throughout Mississippian time.

Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water-quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual gasification products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the groundwater. However, our field studies at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may be interconnected with the coal aquifer. Contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have enabled us to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. Our preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than that in the gasified coal aquifer. In conducting these field investigations, we have also learned valuable lessons concerning a strategy for groundwater monitoring. 21 figures.

Wang, F.T.; Mead, S.W.; Stuermer, D.H.

1983-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

Burn cavity growth during the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed history is given of the growth of the burn cavity during the first month of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment near Gillette, Wyoming, in 1979. The changing shape of the cavity with time is inferred from data from three types of instruments installed throughout the experimental zone: (1) thermocouples at various levels in a number of holes, to map temperatures; (2) extensometers at various levels in other holes, to detect motions of the overburden material; and (3) high-frequency electromagnetic (HFEM) scans made between various pairs of holes, to detect cavities and zones of burning coal. Additional data on the final shape of the underground cavity are derived from the results of a core drilling program carried out from the surface after the burn had ended. This study of cavity growth history has contributed significantly to our understanding of how the in situ coal gasification process operates in sites like Hoe Creek. The diagnostic system provided invaluable information on cavity growth and on the interaction between the two coal seams. Some new problems with injection well survival and slag production in oxygen-steam burns were brought out, and the importance of understanding and controlling heat loss mechanisms was amply demonstrated. Although no one system of underground diagnostics can give all of the information needed to fully describe the in situ process, a combination of several diagnostic systems can be used to deduce a self-consistent description.

Hill, R.W.

1981-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

Water quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the groundwater. However, our field studies at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may become interconnected with the cavity. Contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have enabled us to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. The preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than that in the gasified

Wang, F.T.; Mead, S.W.; Sturmer, D.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Burn cavity growth during the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground-coal-gasification experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed history is given of the growth of the burn cavity during the first month of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment near Gillette, Wyoming, in 1979. The changing shape of the cavity with time is inferred from data from three types of instruments installed throughout the experimental zone: (1) thermocouples at various levels in a number of holes, to map temperatures; (2) extensometers at various levels in other holes, to detect motions of the overburden material; and (3) high-frequency electromagnetic scans made between various pairs of holes, to detect cavities and zones of burning coal. Additional data on the final shape of the underground cavity is derived from the results of a core drilling program carried out from the surface after the burn had ended. This study of cavity growth history has contributed significantly to our understanding of how the in-situ coal gasification process operates in sites like Hoe Creek. The diagnostic system provided invaluable information on cavity growth and on the interaction between the two coal seams. Some new problems with injection well survival and slag production in oxygen-steam burns were brought out, and the importance of understanding and controlling heat loss mechanisms was amply demonstrated. Although no one system of underground diagnostics can give all of the information needed to fully describe the in-situ process, a combination of several diagnostic systems can be used to deduce a self-consistent description.

Hill, R.W.

1981-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

309

Water-quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual gasification products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the ground water. However, field studies, conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Hoe Creek site, have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may be interconnected with the coal aquifer, and contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have provided opportunities to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. Preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than the water in the gasified coal aquifer. In conducting these field investigations, valuable lessons ere learned concerning groundwater monitoring. A suggested monitoring strategy is discussed.

Wang, F T; Mead, S W; Stuermer, D H

1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted 'active' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted 'inactive' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). As specified in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC [B&W Y-12] 2009a), this plan will be reviewed and updated every three years.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The area of North King County was once forested with deep woods and braided with creeks, where wild-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The area of North King County was once forested with deep woods and braided with creeks, where wild distinct identities, of the historic communities of North King County. www.ci.woodinville.wa.us www and a jumping-off point for the Burke-Gilman trail. Tracy Owen was a King county council mem- ber from 1969

Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

312

The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

Johnson, R.O.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Re-Introduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, two methods of reintroduction are being simultaneously evaluated at Duncan Creek. Recolonization is occurring by introducing adult chum salmon from the Lower Gorge (LG) population into Duncan Creek and allowing them to naturally reproduce. The supplementation strategy required adults to be collected and artificially spawned, incubated, reared, and released at the mouth of Duncan Creek. All eggs from the artificial crossings at Washougal Hatchery were incubated and the fry reared to release size at the hatchery. The Duncan Creek chum salmon project was very successful in 2003-04, providing knowledge and experience that will improve program execution in future years. The gear used to collect adult brood stock was changed from tangle nets to beach seines. This increased efficiency and the speed at which adults could be processed in the field, and most likely reduced stress on the adults handled. Certain weaknesses exposed in past seasons still exist and new ones were exposed (e.g. inadequate incubation and rearing space at Washougal Hatchery for any large salvage operation and having to move the rearing troughs outside the raceway in 2004). Egg-to-fry survival rates of 64% and 58% showed that the channels are functioning at the upper end of what can be expected from them. Possibly the most important event this season was the ability to strontium mark and release all naturally-produced fry from the spawning channels. Channel and floodplain modifications reduced the likelihood that floods will damage the channels and negatively impact survival rates.

Hillson, Todd D. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Smelter Site, Mill Creek, Montana (first remedial action), October 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 160-acre community of Mill Creek is located in Deerlodge County, Montana, immediately adjacent to the Anaconda Smelter NPL site. The community of Mill Creek has been contaminated for over 100 years with smelter emissions, fugitive emissions of flu dust at the smelter, and continued fugitive emissions emanating from adjacent highly contaminated soils. Settled flue emissions in the community of Mill Creek, from the now-defunct copper-smelting operation, contain arsenic, cadmium, and lead. Environmental siting of the community and biological testing of pre-school children, led EPA to conclude that contamination in the Mill Creek area poses an imminent and substantial endangerment to the health of individuals residing there. The primary contaminant of concern at this site is arsenic. Cadmium and lead are secondary contaminants of concern. The selected remedial action for the site includes: permanent relocation of all residents (8 homes) with temporary erosional stabilization of disturbed areas by establishing and maintaining a vegetative cover; demolition, consolidation, and storage.

Not Available

1988-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina, March 1990--July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Runs Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F/H area effluent on the creek, the study included qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites (see map), chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. In a March 1990 study of the potential impact of F/H Area effluent on the macroinvertebrate communities of Upper Three Runs Creek was extended, with reductions in the number of sites to be sampled and in the frequency of water chemistry sampling. This report presents the results of macroinvertebrate stream surveys at three sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent and water chemistry analysis of the three stream sites and the effluent from March 1990 to July 1991.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Risk based optimization of the frequency of EDG on-line maintenance at Hope Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study to optimize the frequency of on-line maintenance of the emergency diesel generators at Hope Creek. This study was directed towards identifying, analyzing, and modifying maintenance planning and scheduling practices to assure the high availability of emergency diesel generators. Input from application of a recently developed reliability model, from considerations of probabilistic safety assessment, plant-specific experience, insights from personnel involved in EDG maintenance, and other practical issues were used to define a maintenance schedule that balances its beneficial and adverse impacts. Conclusions resulted in feasible recommendations to optimize and reduce the frequency of diesel on-line maintenance, allowing additional resources to better maintain other equipment important to safety.

Knoll, A. [Public Service Electric & Gas, Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States); Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International, Dublin, OH (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Results of long term ground surface measurements at the Hoe Creek III site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground surface subsidence was first observed over the Hoe Creek III burn cavity 21 days after gasification ceased. It manifested itself as a small circular depression or sink and was followed five days later by the formation of a second collapse structure. Concurrently, a single large elliptically shaped depression, whose major axis parallels the experimental axis, slowly formed over the burn cavity. These features appear to represent two distinctly different deformation modes. The first mode includes discrete voids that propagate rapidly upward. The second mode is represented by the elliptically shaped classical subsidence depression that forms slowly by a strata bending. Seventeen isolation type survey monuments have been used to track both the horizontal (one dimensional) and vertical motion components intermittently over a 54 month span. The resulting data set is combined with ground surface sketches and post-burn core drilling results and provides an important case study against which numerical and centrifugation model results can be compared. 5 references, 13 figures.

Ganow, H.C.

1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. These contaminants may be of environmental significance if they find their way, in sufficient concentrations, into surface waters, or into aquifers from which water is extracted for drinking or agricultural purposes. Fortunately, the concentrations of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, recent field measurements indicate that there may be significant limitations on this natural cleansing process. The contaminants of potential concern, and the mechanisms that affect their deposition and persistence have been identified.

Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Water Quality Dept.)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Structural characterization of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides from Pinal Creek, AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial catalysis of Mn(II) oxidation is believed to be a dominant source of abundant sorption- and redox-active Mn oxides in marine, freshwater, and subsurface aquatic environments. In spite of their importance, environmental oxides of known biogenic origin have generally not been characterized in detail from a structural perspective. Hyporheic zone Mn oxide grain coatings at Pinal Creek, Arizona, a metals-contaminated stream, have been identified as being dominantly microbial in origin and are well studied from bulk chemistry and contaminant hydrology perspectives. This site thus presents an excellent opportunity to study the structures of terrestrial microbial Mn oxides in detail. XRD and EXAFS measurements performed in this study indicate that the hydrated Pinal Creek Mn oxide grain coatings are layer-type Mn oxides with dominantly hexagonal or pseudo-hexagonal layer symmetry. XRD and TEM measurements suggest the oxides to be nanoparticulate plates with average dimensions on the order of 11 nm thick x 35 nm diameter, but with individual particles exhibiting thickness as small as a single layer and sheets as wide as 500 nm. The hydrated oxides exhibit a 10-A basal-plane spacing and turbostratic disorder. EXAFS analyses suggest the oxides contain layer Mn(IV) site vacancy defects, and layer Mn(III) is inferred to be present, as deduced from Jahn-Teller distortion of the local structure. The physical geometry and structural details of the coatings suggest formation within microbial biofilms. The biogenic Mnoxides are stable with respect to transformation into thermodynamically more stable phases over a time scale of at least 5 months. The nanoparticulate layered structural motif, also observed in pure culture laboratory studies, appears to be characteristic of biogenic Mn oxides and may explain the common occurrence of this mineral habit in soils and sediments.

Bargar, John; Fuller, Christopher; Marcus, Matthew A.; Brearley, Adrian J.; Perez De la Rosa, M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Caldwell, Wendel A.

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

The effect of fractures, faults, and sheared shale zones on the hydrology of Bear Creek Burial Grounds A-South, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous hydrologic models of flow in Bear Creek Valley have presented lateral flow as occurring through the Nolichucky Shale in parallel to strike fractures within thin carbonate beds; the effects of faults were not considered. This study presents...

Hollon, Dwight Mitchell

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Reservoir Simulation and Evaluation of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate and Grainstone-Packstone Reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an integrated study of mature carbonate oil reservoirs (Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation) undergoing gas injection in the Little Cedar Creek Field located in Conecuh County, Alabama. This field produces from two reservoirs...

Mostafa, Moetaz Y

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D. [Nez Perce Tribe

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 2. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a study on sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the effect of sediment on the transport of radionuclides in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York. A source of radioactivity in these creeks is the Western New York Nuclear Service Center which consists of a low-level waste disposal site and a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Other sources of radioactivity include fallout from worldwide weapons testing and natural background radioactivity. The major objective of the PNL Field Sampling Program is to provide data on sediment and radionuclide characteristics in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks to verify the use of the Sediment and Radionuclide Transport model, SERATRA, for nontidal rivers. This report covers the results of field data collection conducted during September 1978. Radiological analysis of sand, silt, and clay size fractions of suspended and bed sediment, and water were performed. Results of these analyses indicate that the principal radionuclides occurring in these two water courses, with levels significantly higher than background levels, during the Phase 2 sampling program were Cesium-137 and Strontium-90. These radionuclides had significantly higher activity levels above background in the bed sediment, suspended sediment, and water samples. Other radionuclides that are possibly being released into the surface water environment by the Nuclear Fuel Services facilities are Plutonium-238, 239, and 240, Americium-241, Curium-244, and Tritium. More radionuclides were consistently found in the bed sediment as compared to suspended sediment. The fewest radionuclides were found in the water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. The higher levels were found in the bed sediments for the gamma-emitters and in the suspended sediment for the alpha and beta-emitters (not including Tritium).

Walters, W.H.; Ecker, R.M.; Onishi, Y.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers. Phase 3. Field sampling program for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field sampling program was conducted on Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York during April 1979 to investigate the transport of radionuclides in surface waters as part of a continuing program to provide data for application and verification of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) sediment and radionuclide transport model, SERATRA. Bed sediment, suspended sediment and water samples were collected during unsteady flow conditions over a 45 mile reach of stream channel. Radiological analysis of these samples included gamma ray spectrometry analysis, and radiochemical separation and analysis of Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241 and Cm-244. Tritium analysis was also performed on water samples. Based on the evaluation of radionuclide levels in Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, the Nuclear Fuel Services facility at West Valley, New York, may be the source of Cs-137, Sr-90, Cs-134, Co-60, Pu-238, Pu-239, 240, Am-241, Cm-244 and tritium found in the bed sediment, suspended sediment and water of Buttermilk and Cattaraugus Creeks. This field sampling effort was the last of a three phase program to collect hydrologic and radiologic data at different flow conditions.

Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Onishi, Y.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David George

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. Carbonate grew and fibrous cements precipitated in an open marine environment. During Late Silurian an increasingly restricted environment stopped reef growth and dolomite replaced mud-rich faces. The reefs were then subaerially exposed and two meteoric cement sequences, non-luminescent to bright luminescent, precipitated prior to Mid-Devonian fracture-controlled karsting. Caves and fractures crosscut former cement stages and were filled by sandstones. Later, the platform was buried by the late Mid-Devonian organic-rich New Albany Shale, and clear, dull CL calcite cement and ferroan dolomite precipitated. Hydrocarbon migration postdates all cements and created minor moldic porosity and predates stylolitization.

Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Vegetation trends in reclaimed areas at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vegetation productivity and cover studies have been conducted annually at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine since 1989, and multiple annual clippings have been collected since 1991. The primary purpose of these studies was to examine revegetation success, in terms of herbaceous productivity, for various post-mine soil types. However, the studies also contain detailed information on species composition. For the years in which multiple annual clippings have been collected (1991 through 1996), total vegetation cover increased, with the mean proportion of bare ground dropping from 12% in 1991 to 1% in 1996. Relative proportions of most introduced and native grasses were virtually static from 1991 through 1994; in 1995, however, herbicide applications to reduce clover cover resulted in a dramatic increase in total grass cover, especially in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and Indiangrass (Sorgastrum nutans). In contrast to the trends of other introduced and native grasses, bahiagrass increased in cover throughout the study period, increasing from 7% in 1991 to 21 % in 1996. Annual and weedy grass species decreased in cover throughout the study period, falling from 12% cover in 1991 to 2% in 1996. This trend of displacement of annuals by perennials is typically observed during ecological succession in natural vegetation communities, and appears to have been accelerated by the herbicide application.

Westerman, C.A. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Mechanisms for groundwater contamination by UCG: preliminary conclusions from the Hoe Creek study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have monitored groundwater quality changes in approximately 60 wells constructed near the 3 underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments carried out at our Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. A broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the groundwater system as a result of the UCG process. These groundwater contaminants may be of environmental significance if they find their way, in sufficient concentrations, into surface waters or aquifers from which water is extracted for drinking or agricultural purposes. In seeking to identify effective control technologies or mitigation measures, we have found it important to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the formation and dispersal of the contaminants. For example, an important mechanism for the production of organic contaminants may be pyrolysis reactions along the surfaces of cracks through which hot product gases escape from the cavity during gasification. As gasification continues, these pyrolysis products will be distilled further out in the surrounding coal and deposited on the coal surfaces. Other mechanisms that are believed to be important are post-burn pyrolysis as a result of residual cavity heat and the liberation of minerals from the coal by the action of dissolved CO/sub 2/.

Wang, F.T.; Mead, S.W.; Stuermer, D.H.

1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

331

Results from the third LLL underground coal gasification experiment at Hoe Creek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major objective of the US Energy Program is the development of processes to produce clean fuels from coal. Underground coal gasification is one of the most promising of these processes. If successful, underground coal gasification (UCG) would quadruple the proven reserves of the US coal. Cost for products produced from UCG are projected to be 65 to 75% of those from conventional coal conversion. Finally, UCG appears to possess environmental advantages since no mining is involved and there are less solid wastes produced. In this paper we describe results from the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification test. The experiment employed a drilled channel between process wells spaced 130' apart. The drilled channel was enlarged by reverse combustion prior to forward gasification. The first week of forward gasification was carried out using air injection, during which 250 tons of coal were consumed yielding an average dry product gas heating value of 114 Btu/scf. Following this phase, steam and oxygen were injected (generally a 50-50 mixture) for 47 days, during which 3945 tons of coal were consumed at an average rate of 84 tons of coal per day and an average dry gas heating value of 217 Btu/scf. The average gas composition during the steam-oxygen phase was 37% H/sub 2/, 5% CH/sub 4/, 11% CO, and 44% CO/sub 2/. Gas recovery was approximately 82% during the test, and the average thermochemical efficiency was near 65%.

Hill, R.W.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.; Aiman, W.R.; Stephens, D.R.

1980-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A study of post-thermal recovery of the macroinvertebrate community of Four Mile Creek, June 1985--September 1987. [Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four Mile Creek is one of several streams at the Savannah River Site which has received thermal effluents ({le}70{degrees}C water) from nuclear production operations. From 1955--mid-1985, Four Mile Creek received thermal effluent from C-Reactor as well as non-thermal discharges from F and H Separation Areas. Total discharges from all of these facilities was about ten times higher than the natural flow of the creek (Firth et al. 1986). All water being discharged into Four Mile Creek was originally pumped from the Savannah River. This study reports the results of the artificial substrate sampling of macroinvertebrate communities of Four Mile Creek from June 1985 through September 1987, when sampling was terminated. Macroinvertebrate taxa richness, densities, and biomass data from this study are compared to Four Mile data collected prior to the shutdown of C-Reactor (Kondratieff and Kondratieff 1985 and Firth et al. 1986), and to comparable macroinvertebrate data from other Savannah River Site streams. 29 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Lauritsen, D.; Starkel, W.; Specht, W.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Calendar Year 2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2008 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2008 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2008 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2008 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0).

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y. [PHILOSOPHIA, Inc., Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

PMI: Plant-Microbe Interfaces (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Christopher Schadt of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Plant-Microbe Interactions" in the context of poplar trees at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 held in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Schadt, Christopher [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Stratigraphic variations and secondary porosity within the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate groundwater and surface water contamination and migration near the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, a Comprehensive Groundwater Monitoring Plan was developed. As part of the Maynardville exit pathways monitoring program, monitoring well clusters were ii installed perpendicular to the strike of the Maynardville Limestone, that underlies the southern part of the Y-12 Plant and Bear Creek Valley (BCV). The Maynardville Project is designed to locate potential exit pathways of groundwater, study geochemical characteristics and factors affecting the occurrence and distribution of water-bearing intervals, and provide hydrogeologic information to be used to reduce the potential impacts of contaminants entering the Maynardville Limestone.

Goldstrand, P.M. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Archaeological investigations at the Kent Creek site (41HL66): evidence of Mogollon influence on the Southern Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

panhandle and a number of other sites in the Panhandle Plains region allows for a redefinition of the Palo Duro complex and for its reassignment as a phase. The investigations at the Kent Creek site have revealed the remains of two functionally distinct... thanks goes to the members of the Panhandle Archaeological Society (PAS) who participated in the excavations at the site. Several of the PAS members gave up their weekends to help with the excavations and without their efforts the work could not have...

Cruse, Jimmy Brett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

Peplow, Dan

1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Second report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC); selected tributaries of WOC, including Fifth Creek, First Creek, Melton Branch, and Northwest Tributary; and the Clinch River. BMAP consists of seven major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota; (3) biological indicator studies; (4) instream ecological monitoring; (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment; (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake (WOL); and (7) contaminant transport, distribution, and fate in the WOC embayment-Clinch River-Watts Bar Reservoir system. This document, the second of a series of annual reports, described the results of BMAP studies conducted in 1987.

Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Bailey, R.D.; Blaylock, B.G.; Boston, H.L.; Cox, D.K.; Huston, M.A.; Kimmel, B.L.; Loar, J.M.; Olsen, C.R.; Ryon, M.G.; Shugart, L.R.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.; Walton, B.T.; Talmage, S.S.; Murphy, J.B.; Valentine, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Appellanis, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D. [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico)] [Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan (Puerto Rico); Huq, M.V. [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States)] [Connecticut Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hamden, CT (United States); Meyers-Schone, L.J. [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany)] [Frankfurter, Gross-Gerau (Germany); Mohrbacher, D.A. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Olsen, C.R. [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.] [USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Stout, J.G. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)] [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advanced stimulation technology deployment program, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company, Eagle Gas Sands, Cedar Creek Anticline, Southeastern Montana. Topical report, August-December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company (WBI) implemented an AST pilot program to improve production from wells completed in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline in southeastern Montana. Extensive pre- and post-fracture Absolute Open Flow Testing was used to evaluate the benefits of stimulation. Additional, gas production doubled when compared to direct offsets completed in previous years. This report summarizes the documentation of AST methodologies applied by WBI to an infill drilling program in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline.

Green, T.W.; Zander, D.M.; Bessler, M.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Phase 1 report on the Bear Creek Valley treatability study, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bear Creek Valley (BCV) is located within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes associated with past operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The BCV Remedial Investigation determined that disposal of wastes at the S-3 Site, Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) has caused contamination of both deep and shallow groundwater. The primary contaminants include uranium, nitrate, and VOCs, although other metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and cadmium persist. The BCV feasibility study will describe several remedial options for this area, including both in situ and ex situ treatment of groundwater. This Treatability Study Phase 1 Report describes the results of preliminary screening of treatment technologies that may be applied within BCV. Four activities were undertaken in Phase 1: field characterization, laboratory screening of potential sorbents, laboratory testing of zero valent iron products, and field screening of three biological treatment systems. Each of these activities is described fully in technical memos attached in Appendices A through G.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Clinoptilolite and associated authigenic minerals in Miocene tuffaceous rocks in the Goose Creek Basin, Cassia County, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miocene tuffaceous fluviolacustrine deposits in the southeastern part of the Goose Creek basin contain a variety of authigenic minerals, including clinoptilolite, smectite, pyrite, gypsum, and calcite. Clinoptilolite is the primary mineral in the diagenetically altered rhyolitic vitric tuffs in the study area. These zeolitic tuffs locally attain thicknesses of as much as 30 meters. Examinations of samples of the altered tuff beds using the scanning electron microscope reveal that the clinoptilolite usually occurs as clean, well-formed tabular crystals about 0.005 mm across in a matrix of smectite. Prismatic clinoptilolite crystals, as much as 0.06 mm long, are present in the larger vugs. During the Miocene, thick beds of air-fall rhyolitic vitric volcanic ash accumulated in the Goose Creek basin in a coalescing fluviolacustrine depositional setting. In the southeastern part of the basin, the volcanic ash was deposited in a lacustrine fan delta, where it was partly reworked and interbedded with sandstone and siltstone. Diagenetic alteration of the ash beds proceeded in an open hydrologic system. Solution and hydrolysis by ground water initially altered the glass shards to form smectite and silica gel. Clinoptilolite subsequently precipitated on the altered shard surfaces. The paragenesis of pyrite, gypsum, and calcite in the zeolitic tuffs is uncertain.

Brownfield, M.E.; Hildebrand, R.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis of salt concentrations in the Brazos River Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 48 . Nov 51 Oct 48 Nov 51 08080540 NcDcnsld Creek Neer Post 080810DD Selt Fork Srszon River Neer I'escock MMI200 Croton Creek Neer Jsyton 08081500 Salt Croton Creek Near Aspermont 08082000 Salt Fork Srszos Aiver Near Anperamnt 103 4, 619 64..., 988 Nov 49 . Nov df- Oct 81 Sep Sl Sep 79 Sep 84 Nov 49 . Nov 67 . Oct 81 Scp 51 Sep 79 Sep 84 0808605 D 08086100 08086150 08086212 08086260 08086290 08086300 08086500 08087300 08088000 Deep Creek at Horan HiARerd Creek Near...

Ganze, Charles Keith

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

ILLUSTRATIONS. GOLDEN TROUT OF TilE SOUTHERN HIGH SIERRAS: Facing page.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trout of Volcano Creek, Salmo roosevelt!................. 3 II. (1) Marble Fork of Kaweah River, (2 River. (5) First series of Ialls in Little Kern River. (6) Upper part of first series of falls in Little third falls. (18) Broder Falls, Coyote Creek. (19) Fonrth falls In Coyote Creek

349

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pinole Creek Watershed Sediment Source Assessment: A sediment budget approach highlighting watershed-scale sediment-related processes and supply to the Bay Pearce,S.1 ,McKee,L.1 ,Arnold,C.2 ,and,landowners,stakeholders,agencies and regula- tors are facing many watershed-scale sediment-related issues such as erosion,degraded water

351

Modeling the effects of low flow augmentation by discharge from a wastewater treatment plant on dissolved oxygen concentration in Leon Creek, San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A GIS-based hydrological/water quality model called Non Point Source Model (NPSM) was used to simulate various physical, chemical and biological processes taking place in the Leon Creek Watershed, near San Antonio, Texas. The model was then used...

Gholkar, Tejal A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Modeling the Effects of Low Flow Augmentation by Discharge from a Wastewater Treatment Plant on Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Leon Creek, San Antonio, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A GIS-based hydrological/water quality model called Non Point Source Model (NPSM) was used to simulate various physical, chemical and biological processes taking place in the Leon Creek Watershed, near San Antonio, Texas. The model was then used...

Matlock, Dr. Marty D.; Hann, Dr. Roy W. Jr.; Gholkar, Tejal A.

353

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: • Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways • Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually • Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or “compartment” • Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU • Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, • Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs • Computing the radionuclide inventory of each DOE-added radionuclide for the compartments of each IOU by applying the representative, central value concentration to the mass of contaminated soil • Totaling the inventory for all compartments associated with each of the IOUs Using this approach the 2013 radionuclide inventories for each sub-compartment associated with each of the three IOUs were computed, by radionuclide. The inventories from all IOU compartments were then rolled-up into a total inventory for each IOU. To put the computed estimate of radionuclide activities within FMB, PB, and SC IOUs into context, attention was drawn to Cs-137, which was the radionuclide with the largest contributor to the calculated dose to a member of the public at the perimeter of SRS within the 2010 SRS CA (SRNL 2010). The total Cs-137 activity in each of the IOUs was calculated to be 9.13, 1.5, and 17.4 Ci for FMB, PB, and SC IOUs, respectively. Another objective of this investigation was to address the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimated residual radionuclide activity that is calculated for the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Two primary contributing factors to overall uncertainty of inventory estimates were identified and evaluated. The first related to the computation of the mass of contaminated material in a particular IOU compartment and the second to the uncertainty associated with analytical counting errors. The error ranges for the mass of contaminated material in each IOU compartment were all calculated to be approximately +/- 9.6%, or a nominal +/-10%. This nominal value was added to the uncertainty associated with the analytical counting errors that were associated with each radionuclide, individually. This total uncertainty was then used to calculate a maximum and minimum estimated radionuclide inventories for each IOU.

Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

355

Shallow meteoric alteration and burial diagenesis of massive dolomite in the Castle Reef Formation, northwest Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Sawmill Creek (SC), Half Dome Crag (HDC), Morningstar Mountain (MM), Mount Field (MF), Gateway Pass (GP), North Fork of Dupuyer Creek (NFD), South Fork of Dupuyer Creek (SFD), Volcano Reef (VR), North Fork of Teton River (NFT), Teton River (TR), Cave...SHALLOW METEORIC ALTERATION AND BURIAL DIAGENESIS OF MASSIVE DOLOM I TE I N THE CASTLE REEF FORMAT I ON ~ NORTHWEST MONTANA A Thesis by PHILIP MARK WHITSITT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

Whitsitt, Philip Mark

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Hoe Creek No. 3 - First long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the first long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection. In the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground experiment, linkage paths were established between the injection and production wells by drilling a horizontal borehole between them near the bottom of the coal seam. The drilled linkage hole was enlarged by reverse burning, and then the forward gasification process was started - first with air injection for one week, then with oxygen-steam injection for the remainder of the experiment. During the oxygen-steam injection period, about 3900 tons of coal were gasified in 47 days, at an average rate of 83 tons per day. The heating value of the dry product gas averaged 218 Btu/scf, suitable for input to a processing plant for upgrading to pipeline quality, which is about 900 Btu/scf.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Laboratory studies on evaluation of in situ biodegradation at the Hoe Creek UCG (underground coal gasification) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential for in situ biodegradation in the contaminated groundwater aquifer at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site. Experiments were performed in electrolytic respirometric cells under simulated environmental conditions. An orthogonal, fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the following factors on phenol degradation: nutrient dose, amount of bacterial inoculum, temperature, light conditions, and substrate concentration. Microorganisms native to the environment were used as the inoculum, and phosphorus was used as the nutrient. The amount of inoculum introduced and the nutrient dose were found to have a positive effect on phenol degradation. Temperature changes from 15{degree}C (59{degree}F) to 25{degree}C (77{degree}F) had no significant effect. The light conditions (fluorescent or dark) also had no significant effect on phenol degradation. Higher concentrations of substrate required increased amounts of oxygen for biodegradation. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Nolan, B.T.; Suthersan, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

LLNL underground coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, July-Sep 1980. [Hoe Creek and Gorgas, Alabama tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory studies of forward gasification through drilled holes in blocks of coal have continued. Such studies give insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production. In addition to obtaining a qualitative comparison of the forward burn characteristics of two coals, we obtained information on the influence of bedding plane/cleat structure orientation on the early-time shape of the burn cavity in the Roland coal. We have improved our model of the coal drying rate during underground coal gasification (UCG) by adding refinements to the model. To aid in analyzing and predicting the performance of UCG tests, we have developed a simple gas-compositional model. When the model was tested against experimental data from the three Hoe Creek experiments, it was able to match very closely the observed gas compositions, energy fractions, and water influxes. This model can be used to make performance predictions consistent with the material and energy balance constraints of the underground system. A postburn coring and wireline-logging study is under way at the Hoe Creek No. 3 site to investigate the overall effect of the directionally-drilled, horizontal linking hole to better estimate the amount of coal gasified and the shape of the combustion front, and to provide additional information on subsurface deformation and thermal effects. The site reclamation work was completed, including the dismantling of all surface equipment and piping and the plugging and sealing of process and diagnostics wells. Final grading of the reclaimed land has been completed, and the area is ready for disk-seeding. Our survey of the UCG literature has continued with a review of the extensive tests at Gorgas, Alabama, carried on by the US Bureau of Mines from 1947 to 1959.

Olness, D.U. (ed.)

1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Association of coal metamorphism and hydrothermal mineralization in Rough Creek fault zone and Fluorspar District, Western Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ambient coal rank (metamorphism) of the Carboniferous coals in the Western Kentucky coalfield ranges from high volatile A bituminous (vitrinite maximum reflectance up to 0.75% R/sub max/) in the Webster syncline (Webster and southern Union Counties) to high volatile C bituminous (0.45 to 0.60% R/sub max/) over most of the remainder of the area. Anomalous patterns of metamorphism, however, have been noted in coals recovered from cores and mines in fault blocks of the Rough Creek fault zone and Fluorspar District. Coals in Gil-30 borehole (Rough Creek faults, Bordley Quadrangle, Union County) vary with no regard for vertical position, from high volatile C(0.55% R/sub max/) to high volatile A (0.89%R/sub max) bituminous. Examination of the upper Sturgis Formation (Missourian/Virgilian) coals revealed that the higher rank (generally above 0.75% R/sub max/) coals had vein mineral assemblages of sphalerite, twinned calcite, and ferroan dolomite. Lower rank coals had only untwinned calcite. Several sites in Webster County contain various coals (Well (No. 8) to Coiltwon (No. 14)) with vitrinite reflectances up to 0.83% R/sub max/ and associated sphalerite mineralization. Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian (Caseyville Formation Gentry coal) coals in the mineralized Fluorspar District have ranks to nearly medium volatile bituminous (1.03% R/sub max/). The regional rank trend exhibited by the fualt zones is generally higher rank than the surrounding areas. Sphalerite mineralization in itself is not unique within Illinois basin coals, but if it was partly responsible for the metamorphism of these coals, then the fluid temperature must have been higher within the above mentioned fault complexes.

Hower, J.C.; Fiene, F.L.; Trinkle, E.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Evaluation Of Calendar Year 1997 Groundwater and surface Water Quality Data For the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1997. The monitoring data were obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, and are reported ixx Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater A40nitoringReport for the Bear Creek Hydrogeolo@"c Regime at the US. Department ofEnergy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (AJA Technical Services, Inc. 1998a). This report provides an evaluation of the monitoring data with respect to historical results for each sampling location, the regime-wide extent of groundwater and surface water contamination, and long-term concentration trends for selected groundwater and surface water contaminants.

Jones, S.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (BCHR). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the S-3 Ponds, the Oil Landfarm, and the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (units A, C-West, and Walk-in Pits). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Watershed, (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring program during 1996, and (3) update applicable technical procedures with revised versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). With these modifications, the Y-12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2.0 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. The proposed changes to permit language are provided in Section 3.0 (S-3 Ponds), Section 4.0 (Oil Landfarm), and Section 5.0 (Bear Creek Burial Grounds). Sections 6.0 and 7.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the PCP Attachments.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Propane tank explosion (2 deaths, 7 injuries) at Herrig Brothers Feather Creek Farm, Albert City, Iowa, April 9, 1998. Investigation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the explosion/BLEVE that took place on April 9, 1998, at the Herrig Brothers Feather Creek Farm, located in Albert City, Iowa. Two volunteer fire fighters were killed and seven other emergency response personnel were injured. Safety issues covered in the report include protection of propane storage tanks and piping, state regulatory oversight of such installations, and fire fighter response to propane storage tank fires.

NONE

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Moscow Greenbelt Parkway: A Vision for Moscow's Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aesthetic qualities. · Represents rural traditions and protects rural land uses of the Palouse. · Provides, South Fork of the Palouse River, Paradise Creek, Mountainview and Clyde Parks, the Elks Golf Course

Kyte, Michael

366

3 Environmental Conditions 3.1 Characterization of Aquatic Habitat Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLM 1997, 2000; NRCS 2000 for specific methods), which define the ecological condition of streams in the Clover Creek (East Fork Bruneau) subwatershed and include Cedar, Cherry, House, Pole, Shack, and Three

367

Hoe Creek No. 3: first long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are compelling reasons for pursuing underground coal gasification. The resource that could be exploited is huge - enough to quadruple present proved coal reserves - if the process is successful. Cost estimates indicate that substitute natural gas or gasoline may be producible at reasonable prices by the technique. In the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification experiment linkage paths were established between the injection and production wells by drilling a horizontal borehole between them near the bottom of the coal seam. The drilled linkage hole was enlarged by reverse burning, then the forward gasification process began - first with air injection for one week, then with oxygen-steam injection for the remainder of the experiment. During the oxygen-steam injection period, approximately 3900 tons of coal was gasified in 47 days, at an average rate of 83 tons/day. The heating value of the dry product gas averaged 218 Btu/SCF (194 kj/mol), suitable for input to a processing plant for upgrading to pipeline quality, which is approximately 900 Btu/SCF (800 kj/mol).

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second annual storm water report prepared in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) on December 1, 2011, and the corresponding Y-12 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) which became effective on September 7, 2012. However, Appendix A does contain some analytical data gathered under the previous NPDES permit and SWP3 for comparison purposes. The quality of storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek remained relatively stable from 2012 to 2013. However, there was one largely unexpected high concentration of mercury noted in an area that is not known to have previously been a mercury use area. This was noted in Sector AA, Outfall 014. This outfall is normally sampled on a rotating basis but, due this elevated concentration, will be sampled again in 2014. The Y-12 Complex will continue to implement appropriate BMPs and reduce outside material storage ares where possible. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and timely implementation of proper storm water control measures.

None

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program (BMAP) plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y-12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided, but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas or a reduction in sampling intensity in others. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide them in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Cicerone, D.S. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Remedial investigation report on the abandoned nitric acid pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Poplar Creek OU-2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline. This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately} 4,800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. A total of nineteen locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The nineteen samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Y-12 Plant laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health via incidental ingestion of soil, inhalation of dust, dermal contact with the soil, or external exposure to radionuclides in the ANAP soils, under the construction worker and/or the residential land-use scenarios.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2006 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: {sm_bullet} to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; {sm_bullet} to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; {sm_bullet} to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and ! to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2006 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2006 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. The monitoring frequency and selection criteria for each sampling location is in Appendix C. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix D. If issued, addenda to this plan will be inserted in Appendix E, and Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued) will be inserted in Appendix F. Guidance for managing purged groundwater is provided in Appendix G.

N /A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental, LLC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program 2007 Calendar Yeare Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off the ORR and below an area of intensive commercial and light industrial development; EFK 13.8, located upstream from the Oak Ridge Wastewater Treatment Facility (ORWTF); and EFK 6.3 located approximately 1.4 km below the ORR boundary (Fig. 1.1). Actual sampling locations on EFPC may differ slightly by task according to specific requirements of the task. Brushy Fork (BF) at kilometer (BFK) 7.6 and Hinds Creek at kilometer (HCK) 20.6 are the most commonly used reference sites for the Y-12 BMAP. Additional sites off the ORR are also occasionally used for reference, including Beaver Creek, Bull Run, Cox Creek, and Paint Rock Creek (Fig. 1.2). Summaries of the sampling designs for the three primary tasks of the Y-12 Complex BMAP for EFPC are presented in Tables 1.1-1.3. This report covers the 2007 study period, although data collected outside this time period are included as appropriate. To address the biological monitoring requirements for Bear Creek and McCoy Branch, CERCLA-funded data is summarized in Appendix A (for Bear Creek) and Appendix B (for McCoy Branch). Data for these two watersheds is provided herein to address Section IX of the NPDES Permit for Y-12, where 'Results of these CERCLA programs can be used to meet the biological monitoring requirements of this permit'. For potential comparison with instream biological measures, a summary of the toxicity testing results for Y-12 outfalls into upper EFPC is provided in Appendix C (these results have been previously reported).

Peterson, M.J.; Greeley, M. S. Jr.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryan, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The monitoring data were collected for the multiple programmatic purposes of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) and have been reported in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Annual Monitoring report presents only the results of the monitoring data evaluations required for waste management sites addressed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime. The Annual Monitoring Report also serves as a consolidated reference for the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained throughout the Bear Creek Regime under the auspices of the Y-12 GWPP. This report provides an evaluation of the CY 1996 monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater and surface water quality and long-term concentration trends of regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy For the first time information-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Between 1950 and 1963 approximately 11 million kilograms of mercury (Hg processes. About 3% of the Hg was lost to the air, soil and rock under facilities, and East Fork Poplar

378

Changes in Habitat and Populations of Steelhead Trout, Coho Salmon, and Chinook Salmon in Fish Creek, Oregon; Habitat Improvement, 1983-1987 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, began in 1982 as a cooperative venture between the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (1982-1987) to be financed with Forest Service funds. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to cooperatively fund work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is guided by the Fish Creek Habitat Rehabilitation-Enhancement Framework developed cooperatively by the Estacada Ranger District, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station. The framework examines potential factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin, and the appropriate habitat improvement measures needed to address the limiting factors. Habitat improvement work in the basin has been designed to: (1) improve quantity, quality, and distribution of spawning habitat for coho and spring chinook salmon and steelhead trout, (2) increase low flow rearing habitat for steelhead trout and coho salmon, (3) improve overwintering habitat for coho salmon and steelhead trout, (4) rehabilitate riparian vegetation to improve stream shading to benefit all species, and (5) evaluate improvement projects from a drainage wide perspective. The objectives of the evaluation include: (1) Drainage-wide evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Benefit-cost analysis of habitat improvements.

Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B.; Cain, Thomas C. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The origin of the structural depression above Gulf coast salt domes with particular reference to Clay Creek dome, Washington County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creek, indioatos that the ~ ouroe layer is at least 17, 000 feet below the surfaoe and is older than F. E. Heath, J. A. Waters, and W. B. Ferguson, op. oit. c p, A3. 8, C. W. Saith, "Gulf Coast Oil Fields", The World Oil, Vol. 130, Eo, 7 {June, 1950... information on salt dome geology published sinoe 1936. However, muoh of the pertinent literature since that date consists of field development data with little to no discussion of struotural prooesses ~ An impsrtant exoeption to this apparently diminished...

McDowell, Alfred Norman

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Closure certification report for the Bear Creek burial grounds B area and walk-in pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 5, 1993, the revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1100&D3 and Y/ER-53&D3, was approved by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The closure activities described in that closure plan have been performed. The purpose of this document is to summarize the closure activities for B Area and Walk-In Pits (WIPs), including placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Little Timber Creek Crossing, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Topical report, August 1991--January 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents results of a survey conducted over the period of August 5--7, 1991, at the Little Timber Creek crossing in Gloucester County, New Jersey, where three pipelines, constructed in 1950, 1960, and 1990, cross the creek and associated wetlands. The old side of the ROW, created by the installation of the 1960 pipeline, was designed to contain a raised peat bed over the 1950 pipeline and an open-water ditch over the 1960 pipeline. The new portion of the ROW, created by installation of the 1990 pipeline, has an open-water ditch over the pipeline (resulting from settling of the backfill) and a raised peat bed (resulting from rebound of compacted peat). Both the old and new ROWs contain dense stands of herbs; the vegetation on the old ROW was more similar to that in the adjacent natural area than was vegetation in the new ROW. The ROW increased species and habitat diversity in the wetlands. It may contribute to the spread of purple loosestrife and affect species sensitive to habitat fragmentation.

Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Environmental Restoration Systems; Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Environmental Restoration Systems]|[Trinity Christian Coll., Palos Heights, IL (United States). Dept. of Biology

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Numerical modeling of the Snowmass Creek paleoglacier, Colorado, and climate in the Rocky Mountains during the Bull Lake glaciation (MIS 6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well-preserved moraines from the penultimate, or Bull Lake, glaciation of Snowmass Creek Valley in the Elk Range of Colorado present an opportunity to examine the character of the high-altitude climate in the Rocky Mountains during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6. This study employs a 2-D coupled mass/energy balance and flow model to assess the magnitudes of temperature and precipitation change that could have sustained the glacier in mass-balance equilibrium at its maximum extent during the Bull Lake glaciation. Variable substrate effects on glacier flow and ice thickness make the modeling somewhat more complex than in geologically simpler settings. Model results indicate that a temperature depression of about 6.7°C compared with the present (1971–2000 AD) would have been necessary to sustain the Snowmass Creek glacier in mass-balance equilibrium during the Bull Lake glaciation, assuming no change in precipitation amount or seasonality. A 50% increase or decrease from modern precipitation would have been coupled with 5.2°C and 9.1°C Bull Lake temperature depressions respectively. Uncertainty in these modeled temperature depressions is about 1°C.

Eric M. Leonard; Mitchell A. Plummer; Paul E. Carrara

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

RCRA closure plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk- In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1987, the RCRA Closure/Postclosure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval. TDEC modified and issued the plan approved on September 30, 1987. Subsequently, this plan was modified again and approved as Y/TS-395, Revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (February 29, 1988). Y/TS-395 was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits of BCBG. However, a concept was developed to include the B Area (non-RCRA regulated) in the Walk-In Pits so that both areas would be closed under one cap. This approach included a tremendous amount of site preparation with an underlying stabilization base of 16 ft of sand for blast protection. The plan was presented to the state of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. This amended closure plan goes further to include inspection and maintenance criteria along with other details.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hoe Creek, Wyoming underground coal gasification site and comparison with the Hanna, Wyoming site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978 the third test (Hoe Creek III) in a series of underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments was completed at a site south of Gillette, Wyoming. The post-burn study of the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock of the two coal seams affected by the experiment is based on the study of fifteen cores. The primary purpose of the study was to characterize the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock and to determine and evaluate the mineralogical and textural changes that were imposed by the experiment. Within the burn cavity the various sedimentary units have been brecciated and thermally altered to form several pyrometamorphic rock types of paralava rock, paralava breccia, buchite, buchite breccia and hornfels. High temperature minerals of mullite, cordierite, oligo-clase-andesine, tridymite, cristobalite, clinopyroxenes, and magnetite are common in the pyrometamorphic rocks. The habit of these minerals indicates that they crystallized from a melt. These minerals and textures suggest that the rocks were formed at temperatures between 1200/sup 0/ and 1400/sup 0/C. A comparison of geologic and geological-technological factors between the Hoe Creek III site, which experienced substantial roof collapse, and the Hanna II site, which had only moderate roof collapse, indicates that overburden thickness relative to coal seam thickness, degree of induration of overburden rock, injection-production well spacing, and ultimate cavity size are important controls of roof collapse in the structural setting of the two sites.

Ethridge, F.C.; Burns, L.K.; Alexander, W.G.; Craig, G.N. II; Youngberg, A.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Twentieth quarterly report: September-November 1979. [Hanna IV and Hoe Creek III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the Hanna IV in situ coal gasification test, Hanna IV-B, which was initiated on April 20, 1979, was completed on October 4, 1979. Sandia National Laboratories provided support by fielding and monitoring diagnostic and remote monitoring instrumentation techniques. During the final gasification stage, 765 tons of coal were reacted involving 17,000 cubic feet. The Hoe Creek III experiment conducted by Lawrence Livermore Laboratories began on August 15, 1979, and was terminated on October 10, 1979. The purpose of the experiment was to test the drilled borehole linking concept. Sandia National Laboratories' involvement consisted of fielding and monitoring both an inverted thermocouple and a surface electrical resistivity network. The inverted thermocouple was successfully tested and provided thermal data from beneath the burn zone. A real time analysis procedure for the electrical resistivity technique was implemented at Hoe Creek III. Unfortunately, there was insufficient change in the data for this to have been a useful diagnostic. Efforts are continuing to identify the reason for this lack of response.

Glass, R.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

QUEEN CREEK FOUNTAIN HILLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural Resource Appreciation Air Pollution and Climate: Health Problems Population growth impacts differences in neighborhoods affect the enviro

Hall, Sharon J.

392

Waller Creek Urban Redevelopment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 16-18 ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 ,)--#"+."##/+ .:%$#"B)%>*+ H:>)-+ V:B#"%K#%&+ .:")% !"2B)&#+ 85%(")2$2%S3+ !":S")KK2%S+ W:2...-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 20 Programming in Palm Park ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 7th Street4th Street I-35 21...

McDonald, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Bear Creek Valley Watershed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Highway 95 and the haul road are available to the public during the fall for deer and turkey hunts. All kills made during these hunts are checked for radiation levels prior to...

394

Camas Creek.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N- Energy InnovationINT'L.

395

Idaho_ColdwaterCreek  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSLtheIndustryMitch Arkoosh

396

Squeezer Creek.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I. Tudosa,Spreading an Idea20-acre

397

Poplar trees could be genetically modified to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas emission savings across their life cycle compared with fossil fuels. Problems associated to plant palm oils for biofuels. The country's total rainforest area will soon be about half of what supplies and driving up prices. A new generation of biofuels Scientists are developing a new generation

398

Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed, naturally spawning populations in the Columbia River Basin. As a consequence of that BO, NOAA recommended - as a reasonable and prudent alternative (RPA) - that federal and state agencies phase out non-native broodstocks of steelhead and replace them with native broodstocks. However, NOAA provided no guidance on how to achieve that RPA. The development of native broodstocks of hatchery steelhead can potentially pose unacceptable biological risks to naturally spawning populations, particularly those that are already listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA. The traditional method of initiating new hatchery broodstocks of anadromous salmonid fishes is by trapping adults during their upstream, spawning migration. However, removing natural-origin adults from ESA listed populations may not be biologically acceptable because such activities may further depress those populations via 'broodstock mining'. In addition, trapping adult steelhead may be logistically unfeasible in many subbasins due to high water flows in the spring, when steelhead are moving upstream to spawn, that will often 'blow out' temporary weirs. Additional risks associated with trapping adults include genetic founder effects and difficulties meeting minimum, genetic effective number of breeders without 'mining' the wild population to potential extinction. As a result, alternative methods for developing native broodstocks are highly desired. One alternative for developing native broodstocks, particularly when the collection of adults is logistically unfeasible or biologically unacceptable, is captive rearing of natural-origin juveniles to sexual maturity. In this approach, pre-smolt juveniles are collected from the stream or watershed for which a native broodstock is desired, and those juveniles are raised to sexual maturity in a hatchery. Those hatchery-reared adults then become the broodstock source for gametes and initial progeny releases. Such a captive rearing program offers many genetic advantages over traditional adult-trapping programs for developing native

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes, for the 12-month period January through December 1994, the available dynamic hydrologic data collected on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed as well as information collected on surface flow systems in the surrounding vicinity that may affect the quality or quantity of surface water in the watershed. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to characterize the quantity and quality of water in the surface flow system, assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities, provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance of these data, and support long-term measures of contaminant fluxes at a spatial scale to provide a comprehensive picture of watershed performance that is commensurate with future remedial actions.

Borders, D.M.; Ziegler, K.S.; Reece, D.K.; Watts, J.A.; Frederick, B.J.; McCalla, W.L.; Pridmore, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 plant: Walk-in pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 1987, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure/Post-Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) located at the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval.The Closure Plan has been modified and revised several times. This document is an addendum to the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted to TDEC in June, 1994. This addendum contains information on the Walk-In Pits of the BCBG which is meant to supplement the information provided in the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted for the BCBG. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 5: an investigation of dewatering for the modified in-situ retorting process, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The C-a and the C-b tracts in the Piceance Creek Basin are potential sites for the development of oil shale by the modified in-situ retorting (MIS) process. Proposed development plans for these tracts require the disturbance of over three billion m/sup 3/ of oil shale to a depth of about 400 m (1312 ft) or more below ground level. The study investigates the nature and impacts of dewatering and reinvasion that are likely to accompany the MIS process. The purpose is to extend earlier investigations through more refined mathematical analysis. Physical phenomena not adequately covered in previous studies, particularly the desaturation process, are investigated. The present study also seeks to identify, through a parametric approach, the key variables that are required to characterize systems such as those at the C-a and C-b tracts.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Program (Colorado)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Residents of Eagle, Pitkin and Gunnison Counties can participate in the Energy Smart Program. The Energy Smart Program helps residents identify, finance, and complete energy improvements in their...

404

FORKING AND MULTIPLICITY IN FIRST ORDER THEORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequence hb i j i 2 Xi in p over A. 7 #12; COHEIRS Let M j= T and M ` A, p 2 S(A) is a coheir of pjM of pjM . 1. p does not divide over M . 2. If E = he i : i 2 Ii contained in MB is a coherent sequence

Baldwin, John T.

405

Roaring Fork Valley- Renewable Energy Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE), a nonprofit organization promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency in western Colorado, offers residential and commercial rebates within...

406

Spanish Fork Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA Region -SonelgazSunbelt Wind

407

Calendar Year 2007 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2007 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2007 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). In December 2007, the BWXT corporate name was changed to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12), which is applied to personnel and organizations throughout CY 2007 for this report. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2007 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2007 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater and surface water contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Calendar Year 2011 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2011 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. This report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and known extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) contractor responsible for environmental cleanup on the ORR. In August 2011, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) replaced Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) as the DOE EM contractor. For this report, BJC/UCOR will be referenced as the managing contractor for CY 2011. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2011 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. This report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC/UCOR. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC. Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2011 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR address DOE Order 436.1 and DOE Order 458.1 requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring) and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). This report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. This report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

Elvado Environmental LLC,

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Calendar Year 2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2010 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2010 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2010 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1A (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Calendar Year 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2009 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2009 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2009 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1A (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP. Narrative sections of this report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Appendix C contains construction details for the wells in each regime that were sampled during CY 2009 by either the Y-1

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Calendar Year 2006 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2006 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., preparing SAPs, coordinating sample collection, and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2006 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2006 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater and surface water contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP. Narrative sections of this report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Appendix C contains construction details for the wells in each regime that were sampled during CY 2006 by either the Y-12 GWPP or BJC. F

N /A

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 1998 Evaluation of Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the water quality monitoring data obtained by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1998. The Bear Creek Regime contains many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1A - General Environmental Protection Program - require evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality near the Y-12 Plant to: (1) gauge groundwater quality in areas that are, or could be, affected by plant operations, (2) determine the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1A (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). All of the figures (maps and trend graphs) and data tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively.

None

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the Y-12 Plant: Walk-in pits. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revised Closure Plan was initially intended to apply to A Area, C-West, B Area, and the Walk-In Pits (WIPs) of the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). However, a strategy was developed to include the B Area [a solid waste management unit (SWMU)] with the WIPs so that both areas would be closed under one cap. The plan was presented to the State of Tennessee on March 8, 1990, and the Department of Energy was requested to review other unique alternatives to close the site. Therefore, in November 1992, the Closure Plan for B Area and the WIPs was prepared separately from that of the other sites associated with the BCBG and was presented in a RCRA Closure Plan. The Closure Plan revision issued April 1993 was intended to reflect the placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs, revise the closure data, and acknowledge that the disposition of a monitoring well within the closure site could not be verified. A Post-Closure Permit Application (PCPA) was to include the WIPs; however, at the time of submittal, closure of the WIPs had not been certified. This addendum contains information on the WIPs to accompany the BCBG PCPA. The purpose of this document is to supplement the information provided in the BCBG PCPA. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document. Only additional information regarding the WIPs is included in the sections of this document, which correspond to sections of the PCPA submitted in June 1994.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of Hi-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Nuclear Power Station ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-13PN0810022, “Report on Inspection 1”, under Work Package FT-13PN081002. Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for four modules at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI that have been identified as candidates for inspection in late summer or early fall/winter of 2013. These are HI-STORM 100S-218 Version B modules storing BWR 8x8 fuel in MPC-68 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these four storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Cuclear Power Station ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development, a consortium of national laboratories and industry is performing visual inspections and temperature measurements of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States. This report documents thermal analyses in in support of the inspections at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI. This site utilizes the HI-STORM100 vertical storage system developed by Holtec International. This is a vertical storage module design, and the thermal models are being developed using COBRA-SFS (Michener, et al., 1987), a code developed by PNNL for thermal-hydraulic analyses of multi assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. This report describes the COBRA-SFS model in detail, and presents pre-inspection predictions of component temperatures and temperature distributions. The final report will include evaluation of inspection results, and if required, additional post-test calculations, with appropriate discussion of results.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

Raber, E.; Stone, R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DOE Underground-Coal-Conversion-Program field-test activities for 1979 and 1980. [Pricetown 1, Hoe Creek 3, Hanna IV, and SDB 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the US Department of Energy's Underground-Coal-Conversion program, four field tests were completed in 1979 and preparations were begun in 1980 for two additional field tests to be operated in 1981. The Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) completed Hanna IV, an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) completed Pricetown 1, an air gasification test in West Virginia bituminous coal. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed Hoe Creek 3, a steam-oxygen gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. Gulf Research and Development Co. completed Steeply Dipping Beds (SDB) Test 1, primarily an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal and the first SDB test in the US. In 1980, Gulf R and D Co. began preparation of SDB Test 2, scheduled for operation in the fall of 1981. The DOE project teams at LETC, METC, LLNL, and SNL, in association with the Washington Irrigation and Development Co. (WIDCo), Washington Water Power (WWP), and the State of Washington, are preparing a field test site in the Centralia-Chehalis coal district of Washington. A series of large coal block tests will be completed prior to the field test, scheduled for operation in 1982 or 1983. This field test will utilize a directionally drilled link and steam-oxygen gasification system. This paper summarizes the results of the four recently completed field tests and the plans for additional tests.

Bartke, T.C.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Long-Term Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community Monitoring to Assess Pollution Abatement Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The benthic macroinvertebrate community of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in East Tennessee was monitored for 18 years to evaluate the effectiveness of a water pollution control program implemented at a major United States (U.S.) Department of Energy facility. Several actions were implemented to reduce and control releases of pollutants into the headwaters of the stream. Four of the most significant actions were implemented during different time periods, which allowed assessment of each action. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected annually in April from three locations in EFPC (EFK24, EFK23, and EFK14) and two nearby reference streams from 1986 through 2003. Significant improvements occurred in the macroinvertebrate community at the headwater sites (EFK24 and EFK23) after implementation of each action, while changes detected 9 km further downstream (EFK14) could not be clearly attributed to any of the actions. Because the stream was impacted at its origin, invertebrate recolonization was primarily limited to aerial immigration, thus, recovery has been slow. As recovery progressed, abundances of small pollution-tolerant taxa (e.g., Orthocladiinae chironomids) decreased and longer lived taxa colonized (e.g., hydropsychid caddisflies, riffle beetles, Baetis). While assessments lasting three to four years may be long enough to detect a response to new pollution controls at highly impacted locations, more time may be needed to understand the full effects. Studies on the effectiveness of pollution controls can be improved if impacted and reference sites are selected to maximize spatial and temporal trending, and if a multidisciplinary approach is used to broadly assess environmental responses (e.g., water quality trends, invertebrate and fish community assessments, toxicity testing, etc.).

Smith, John G [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Christensen, Sigurd W [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993--May 12, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division`s efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division`s efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE`s compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division`s findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division`s request to be an active participant in DOE`s prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year`s annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division`s office.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

OAK RIDGE Y-12 PLANT BIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND ABATEMENT PROGRAM (BMAP) PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted for the duration of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and which became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Sciences Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of Y- 12 Plant personnel. The proposed BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted since 1985. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided but experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional toxicity testing if initial results indicate low survival or reproduction) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is observed). By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of the Y-12 Plant operation on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

ADAMS, S.M.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.; GREELEY, M.S.JR; HILL, W.R.; HUSTON, M.S.; KSZOS, L.A.; MCCARTHY, J.F.; PETERSON, M.J.; RYON, M.G.; SMITH, J.G.; SOUTHWORTH, G.R.; STEWART, A.J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Evaluation of lithium as a toxicant and the modifying effect of sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine compliance tests conducted for a groundwater treatment facility at the Y-12 Plant on the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, showed that the effluent was acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae. An evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that increased toxicity coincided with increased concentrations of lithium. Lithium is a light, strong metal that is used in DOE operations, including fusion weapons and fission reactors. Little has been published about lithium toxicity. Toxicity tests were conducted with fathead minnows and C. dubia using lithium chloride and lithium tetraborate. Dilute mineral water (DMW) or the receiving stream water (East Fork Poplar Creek) was used as the dilution water in the toxicity evaluation. A concentration of 1 mg Li/L in DMW reduced the survival of both test species; 0.5 mg Li/L in DMW reduced C. dubia reproduction and minnow growth. Sodium appears to influence the toxicity of Li; the metal was six times more toxic in the low-sodium DMW than in stream water containing 30 mg Na/L. Tests with LiCl in combination with NaCl and NA{sub 2}SO{sub 4} demonstrated that the presence of sodium reduced the toxicity of Li to C. dubia. In laboratory tests with a snail (Elimia clavaeformis) common on the ORR, the feeding rate declined in 0.15 mg Li/L. Because Li has also been demonstrated to be toxic to several plant species, tests with LiCi were also conducted using buttercrunch lettuce (Lactuca saliva). The EC{sub 50} for seed growth after 8 d incubation was 37.5 mg Li/L. These findings are significant because of widespread industrial use and potential accumulation of Li in soils.

Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; O`Reilly, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The revised Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) for East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, as described, will be conducted as required by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective July 1, 1995. The basic approach to biological monitoring used in this program was developed by the staff in the Environmental Science Division (ESD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of the Y-12 Plant. The revision to the BMAP plan is based on results of biological monitoring conducted during the period of 1985 to present. Details of the specific procedures used in the current routine monitoring program are provided; experimental designs for future studies are described in less detail. The overall strategy used in developing this plan was, and continues to be, to use the results obtained from each task to define the scope of future monitoring efforts. Such efforts may require more intensive sampling than initially proposed in some areas (e.g., additional bioaccumulation monitoring if results indicate unexpectedly high PCBs or Hg) or a reduction in sampling intensity in others (e.g., reduction in the number of sampling sites when no impact is still observed). The program scope will be re-evaluated annually. By using the results of previous monitoring efforts to define the current program and to guide us in the development of future studies, an effective integrated monitoring program has been developed to assess the impacts of Y-12 Plant operations (past and present) on the biota of EFPC and to document the ecological effects of remedial actions.

Adams, S.M.; Brandt, C.C.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.JR.; Hill, W.R.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

None

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impact on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1991 survey. Topical report, June 1991--April 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted in June 1991 at the Mill Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. One pipeline had been installed through the wetland in 1966, and another was scheduled to be installed later in 1991. Data were collected along the existing pipeline ROW and also along the planned ROW for use as baseline data in future studies. Four separate communities were surveyed. A scrub-shrub wetland and a forested wetland were sampled along the existing ROW where the planned pipeline was to be installed. A mixed vegetation community was sampled along the existing ROW, west of where the planned pipeline would joint the ROW. A marsh community was sampled along the route of the planned pipeline. All plant species found on the ROW of the scrub-shrub community were also present in the adjacent natural areas. The vegetation on the ROW of the forested wetland community also consisted mostly of species found in the adjacent natural areas. In the mixed vegetation community, a small drainage channel present on the ROW, possibly resulting from the pipeline construction, provided habitat for a number of obligate species not found in other areas of this community. Differences noted among different areas of this community were also attributed to slight variations in elevation.

Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States); Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy-Duty  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar

431

Lowlevel.PDF  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar6 AUDIT

432

Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar6

433

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar6Department

434

Lubricants - Pathway to Improving Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar6Department|

435

Effects of heavy metals in sediments on the macroinvertebrate community in the Short Creek/Empire Lake aquatic system, Cherokee County, Kansas: A recommendation for site-specific criteria. Technical report (Final)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study uses statistical analysis techniques to determine the effects of four heavy metals (cadmium, lead, manganese, and zinc) on the macroinvertebrate community using the data collected in the fall 1987. The concentrations of all four metals were found to be greatly elevated throughout Empire Lake and in both the Spring River and Shoal Creek arms of the reservoir. It is concluded that density and species richness were greatly reduced. The report also includes recommendations for the upper bounds for the sediment criteria of the four metals.

Jobe, J.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix D -- Nature and extent of contamination report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix D describes the nature and extent of contamination in environmental media and wastes.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 5: Appendix F -- Baseline human health risk assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix F documents potential risks and provides information necessary for making remediation decisions. A quantitative analysis of the inorganic, organic, and radiological site-related contaminants found in various media is used to characterize the potential risks to human health associated with exposure to these contaminants.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) EM Program adopted a watershed approach for performing Remedial Investigations (RIs) and characterizations for ORR because it is an effective system for determining the best methods for protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting human health. The basic concept is that water quality and ecosystem problems are best solved at the watershed level rather than at the individual water-body or discharger level. The watershed approach requires consideration of all environmental concerns, including needs to protect public health, critical habitats such as wetlands, biological integrity, and surface and ground waters. The watershed approach provides an improved basis for management decisions concerning contaminant sources and containment. It allows more direct focus by stakeholders on achieving ecological goals and water quality standards rather than a measurement of program activities based on numbers of permits or samples. The watershed approach allows better management strategies for investigations, therefore maximizing the utilization of scarce resources. Feasibility studies (FSs) evaluate various alternatives in terms of environmental standards, the protection of human health and the environment, and the costs of implementation to find the optimum solution among them. Society has to decide how much it is willing to spend to meet the standards and to be protective. Conducting FSs is the process of trading off those criteria to pick that optimum point that society wants to achieve. Performing this analysis at the watershed scale allows those trade-offs to be made meaningfully. In addition, a Land Use Control Assurance Plan for the ORR was prepared to identify the strategy for assuring the long-term effectiveness of land use controls. These land use controls will be relied upon to protect human health and the environment at areas of the ORR undergoing remediation pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This plan will be implemented by means of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) incorporating its terms with the United States EPA and TDEC. The majority of projects described in this report are grouped into five watersheds. They are the East Tennessee Technical Park (ETTP) Watershed (formerly the K-25 Site), the Melton Valley (MV) and Bethel Valley (BV) Watersheds at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watersheds at the Y-12 Plant.

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report; Reports of the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction, Vol. 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel of individuals appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The panel requested that the principal investigator for the project prepare the following report, ''Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report,'' to serve the following purposes: (1) summarize in a single, less technical report, the methods and results of the various investigations that comprised the Phase II of the dose reconstruction; (2) describe the systematic searching of classified and unclassified historical records that was a vital component of the project; and (3) summarize the less detailed, screening-level assessments that were performed to evaluate the potential health significance of a number of materials, such a uranium, whose priority did not require a complete dose reconstruction effort. This report describes each major step of the dose reconstruction study: (1) the review of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility; (2) estimation of the quantity and timing of releases of radioiodines from X-10, of mercury from Y-12, of PCB's from all facilities, and of cesium-137 and other radionuclides from White Oak Creek; (3) evaluation of the routes taken by these contaminants through the environment to nearby populations; and (4) estimation of doses and health risks to exposed groups. Calculations found the highest excess cancer risks for a female born in 1952 who drank goat milk; the highest non-cancer health risk was for children in a farm family exposed to PCBs in and near East Fork Poplar Creek. More detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, are presented in several technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the ''report number field'' for the number DOE/OR/21981*. The asterisk placed after the base number will enable the search to list all of the related reports in this series.

Thomas E. Widner; et. al.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

SOUTH PEACE 2007 Dawson Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Wind Energy and the Environment are working near Chetwynd to Mike Readman has a long history with UNBC. He first started taking courses in 1993 and was one of UNBC recruitment and retention. Chet-Wind A group of UNBC researchers involved with the University's Centre

Northern British Columbia, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fork poplar creek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Memorial Glade StrawberryCreek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

41 Corporate Funding Faculty Glade 27 31 UC Bees Plus: Secrets of Sourdough · Robot Fleas · Hap of the publishers. Financial assistance for the 2007-2008 academic year was generously provided by Lawrence Berkeley" of sorts, Tracy Powell turns her attention to bees' mechanical cousins--robotic flies and fleas currently

Yaghi, Omar M.

442

Willow Creek - Sept 2009.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISP SignInWhoWilliston to

443

Meadow Creek | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarland is a cityMcleod 88 GeothermalMeadow

444

Panther Creek | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesaPPTAct YearBiofuelsPanther

445

Pigeon Creek | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru: EnergyInformation Insolation(Redirected