Sample records for fork mesaverde granite

  1. Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Characterization of natural fractures in Mesaverde core from the multiwell experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, S.J.; Lorenz, J.C.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural fractures dominate the permeability of tight sandstone reservoirs in the Mesaverde Formation of the Piceance Creek Basin, north-western Colorado. Roughly 1900 natural fractures, detected in 4200 ft of Mesaverde core from the US Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX), have been differentiated into 10 different fracture types on the basis of fracture morphology, inclination, the presence of slickensides, the presence of dickite mineralization and/or host lithology. Approximately 75% of the MWX core fractures are dewatering planes in mudstone and are probably unimportant to reservoir permeability. The remaining 25% of the MWX core fractures include 275 mostly calcite-mineralized, vertical extension fractures, 61 irregular, dickite-mineralized extension fractures, 27 mostly calcite-mineralized, horizontal extension fractures, and 90 slickensided, occasionally mineralized shear fractures. These extension and shear fractures are all potentially important to reservoir permeability and consequently productivity. 13 refs., 61 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. K-AR DATING OF AUTHIGENIC ILLITES: INTEGRATING THE DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF THE FLUVIAL WILLIAMS FORK FORMATION, MESAVERDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ability to date diagenetic reactions in tight gas reservoirs that significantly influence reservoir quality will enhance our ability to characterize and produce these fields. Although diagenetic clays form only a small percent of the sandstone, they have a disproportionately large impact on reservoir

  4. RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. WitherspoonRADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE Paul A. Wither spoona repository site in granite are to evaluate the suitability

  5. Outcrop Analysis of the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Reservation, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, Jennie; Dunbar, Robin Wright

    2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Field work for this project was conducted during July and April 1998, at which time fourteen measured sections were described and correlated on or adjacent to Jicarilla Apache Reservation lands. A fifteenth section, described east of the main field area, is included in this report, although its distant location precluded use in the correlations and cross sections presented herein. Ground-based photo mosaics were shot for much of the exposed Mesaverde outcrop belt and were used to assist in correlation. Outcrop gamma-ray surveys at six of the fifteen measured sections using a GAD-6 scintillometer was conducted. The raw gamma-ray data are included in this report, however, analysis of those data is part of the ongoing Phase Two of this project.

  6. Subsurface Analysis of the Mesaverde Group on and near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-its implication on Sites of Oil and Gas Accumulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the phase 2 Mesaverde study part of the Department of Energy funded project ''Analysis of oil-bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico'' was to define the facies of the oil-producing units within the subsurface units of the Mesaverde Group and integrate these results with outcrop studies that defined the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) integration of subsurface correlations with outcrop correlations of components of the Mesaverde, (2) application of the sequence stratigraphic model determined in the phase one study to these correlations, (3) determination of the facies distribution of the Mesaverde Group and their relationship to sites of oil and gas accumulation, (4) evaluation of the thermal maturity and potential source rocks for oil and gas in the Mesaverde Group, and (5) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  7. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELM FORK OF THE TRINITY RIVER FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT STUDYof the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas,

  8. Crack coalescence in granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis experimentally investigates crack coalescence in prismatic Barre Granite specimens with two pre-cut, open flaws under uniaxial compression. Using a high-speed video system, crack initiation, propagation, and ...

  9. THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF STRIPA GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dependency of Stripa granite . . o Unaxial compressionproperties of Stripa granite are presented as determinedPROPERTIES OF STRIPA GRANITE TWO-WEEK LOAN COpy Graham

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF DISCONTINUITIES IN THE SPRIPA GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, R.K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stress measurements in the Stripa granite, Lawrence Berkeleyof nuclear waste in granite, "Proc. 4th ISRM Congress,"in the Stripa granite - time-scale experiment, Lawrence

  11. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in MesaVerde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.; COOPER,SCOTT P.

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cretaceous strata that fill the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado were shortened in a generally N-S to NN13-SSW direction during the Laramide orogeny. This shortening was the result of compression of the strata between southward indentation of the San Juan Uplift at the north edge of the basin and northward to northeastward indentation of the Zuni Uplift from the south. Right-lateral strike-slip motion was concentrated at the eastern and western basin margins of the basin to form the Hogback Monocline and the Nacimiento Uplift at the same time, and small amounts of shear may have been pervasive within the basin as well. Vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW with local variations (parallel to the Laramide maximum horizontal compressive stress), formed in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones under this system, and are found in outcrops and in the subsurface of the San Juan Basin. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular, vertical extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain more numerous, shorter, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures. Conjugate shear planes in several orientations are also present locally in the Dakota strata.

  12. Granite County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Granite County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 1 1 Community Health Data, MT Dept (CDC) (2012) 4 American Diabetes Association (2012) Region 4 (Southwest) ­ Lewis and Clark, Granite. CLRD* #12; Granite County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2 Socioeconomic Measures1

  13. fork(), exit(), exec() signals, sockets client/server, shared memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafillou, Peter

    memory semaphores - 2 - #12; µ µ µ UNIX µ µ fork fork µ µ µ fork pid = fork(); fork µµ ( ) µ µ pid - pid (ID) - - pid = 0 ? - 3 - #12;- 4 - #include main() { int pid = 0; printf("hello world\

  14. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

  15. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Efficient Appliance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who...

  16. An Introduction to Venture Capital Granite representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    May 2006 An Introduction to Venture Capital #12;2 Granite representatives Sam Kingsland ­ Managing;3 Introduction to Granite Ventures Founded in 1992 Granite has 9 investment professionals Over $1B under

  17. STRESS MEASUREMENTS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlsson, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    get a ance in the Stripa granite disturo the stress field.tensor in the Stripa granite is to do more measurements atPermeability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine and

  18. STRENGTH AND PERMEABILITY TESTS ON ULTRA-LARGE STRIPA GRANITE CORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    granite '. . . Mohr diagram for intact Stripa granite . .healed fractures in Stripa granite. . . . Key to figures

  19. INVESTIGATIONS IN GRANITE AT STRIPA, SWEDEN FOR NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8801 INVESTIGATIONS IN GRANITE AT STRIPA, SWEDEN FOR NUCLEARIS UNLIMITED INVESTIGATIONS IN GRANITE AT STRIPA, SWEDEN FORUNLIMITED One of tnese is granite and the Lawrence Berkeley

  20. HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical Properties of Granite, Stripa, Sweden," TR 77-92,Properties of Stripa Granite from Temperature MeasurementsPermeability Test o~ the Granite in the Stripa Mine and

  1. Origin of alkali-feldspar granites: An example from the Poimena Granite, northeastern Tasmania, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie, D.E.; Black, L.P.; Sun, Shensu (Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra (Australia))

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lottah Granite is a composite pluton of tin mineralized strongly peraluminous alkali-feldspar granite which intrudes the Poimena Granite, a major component of the mid-Devonian Blue Tier Batholith of northeastern Tasmania. Earlier workers interpreted the Lottah Granite as a metasomatised differentiate of the Poimena Granite. The Poimena Granite is a slightly peraluminous, felsic, I-type biotite granite which contains restite minerals and shows linear trends on Harker plots, both consistent with restite separation. The mineralogy, chemical variation, and isotopic characteristics of the Lottah Granite are consistent with origin as a magma genetically unrelated to the host granite. The Lottah Granite contains sanidine, albite, topaz, zinnwaldite and other minerals consistent with crystallization from a melt. Furthermore, Rb-Sr isotopic dating indicates that the Lottah Granite was emplaced about 10 Ma after the Poimena Granite, and initial Sr and Nd isotope ratios indicate that the Lottah Granite was derived from a higher-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, higher-{epsilon}Nd source composition. Chemical and mineralogical evolution of the Lottah Granite conform to the experimental behavior of Li-F-rich melts, and indicate a possible crystallization temperature range as extreme as 750-430{degree}C. Many other examples of alkali-feldspar granite, and much of the associated mineralization, are probably also of essentially primary magmatic origin rather than of metasomatic or hydrothermal origin as commonly interpreted. They may also be genetically unrelated to granites with which they are associated.

  2. HOW IS THE GRANITE MELT FLOW NETWORK RECORDED IN MIGMATITES AND BY ASSOCIATED GRANITE PLUTONS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar, Gary S.

    1 HOW IS THE GRANITE MELT FLOW NETWORK RECORDED IN MIGMATITES AND BY ASSOCIATED GRANITE PLUTONS of granite magma during orogeny has important implications because melt transfer affects the thermal; Milord et al., 2001; Barraud et al., 2001a, 2001b). We also understand well how granite magma is emplaced

  3. Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial...

  4. Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial...

  5. The Ennerdale granite: Implications of a nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Ennerdale granite: Implications of a nuclear waste repository development David Smythe October 2012 #12;Northern Allerdale ­ the Mercia Mudstone Group Eskdale and Ennerdale granites (red areas already excluded #12;The Ennerdale granite is shown in salmon pink within the red ellipse #12;The

  6. North Fork John Day Dredge Tailings Restoration Project Final Report 1997-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, John A. (US Forest Service, Pendleton, OR)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USDA Forest Service (USFS) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) worked together to rehabilitate 2.1 miles of Clear Creek floodplain, a tributary of the North Fork John Day River Basin. Dredge tailing were deposited from mining operations on Clear Creek's floodplain from the 1930's to the 1950's. These tailing confined the stream channel and degraded the floodplain. The work was completed by moving dredge tailing piles adjacent to the Clear Creek channel, using track-mounted excavators and dump trucks. A caterpillar tractor was used to contour the material placed outside the immediate floodplain, blending it into the hillside. The restored floodplain was very near channel bankfull level following excavation and contoured to accept future flood flows. Monitoring was initiated through pre and post-project photo points and cross-section measurements. Work was completed in two efforts. In 1997 and 1998 floodplain restoration was adjacent to the reconstruction of Road 13 from the junction with Road 10 from Clear Creek River Mile 1.9 to 3.1 for a distance of 1.2 miles. In 1999 the Environmental Assessment for Lower Clear Creek--Granite Creek Floodplain Restoration Project was completed for work proposed on Clear Creek from the mouth up to River mile 1.9 and the Granite Creek floodplain from River miles 5.9 to 7.7. Restoration proposed in the 1999 Environmental Assessment is the subject of this report.

  7. Status of the GRANIT facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Roulier; Francis Vezzu; Stefan Baessler; Benot Clment; Daniel Morton; Valery Nesvizhevsky; Guillaume Pignol; Dominique Rebreyend

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANIT facility is a follow-up project, which is motivated by the recent discovery of gravitational quantum states of ultracold neutrons. The goal of the project is to approach the ultimate accuracy in measuring parameters of such quantum states and also to apply this phenomenon and related experimental techniques to a broad range of applications in particle physics as well as in surface and nanoscience studies. We overview the current status of this facility, the recent test measurements and the nearest prospects.

  8. WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, N.G.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of intact specimens cf granite are of the order of onemost hard rock, in cluding granite. Is Interrupted by setsthe pro perties of the granite as measured in laboratory

  9. A PILOT HEATER TEST IN THE STRIPA GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlsson, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Per- meability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine andMechanical Properties of Granite, Stripa, Sweden. Terra Tek,TEST IN THE STRIPA GRANITE : Hans Carlsson .. , Division of

  10. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an in-situ jointed granite. Intl. J. Rock Mech. and Min.of Groundwaters in the Stripa Granite: Results and Preof water through Westerly Granite at temperatures of 100 -

  11. East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South,Earlsboro,Canton, Ohio:InformationFork Biodiesel

  12. CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2£jLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

  14. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  15. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  16. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  17. Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paillet, Frederick I.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

  18. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  19. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  20. Visualization of microcrack anisotropy in granite affected by a fault zone, using confocal laser scanning microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onishi, Celia T.; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996. Permeability in anisotropic granite under hydrostaticP. , 1995. Microfractography of granite rocks under confocalIllinois UHP3 drillhole granite and a comparison with other

  1. The GRANIT project: Status and Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Bae ler; Alexei Gagarski; Ludmilla Grigorieva; Michael Kreuz; Fabrice Naraghi; Valery Nesvizhevsky; Guillaume Pignol; Konstantin Protassov; Dominique Rebreyend; Francis Vezzu; Alexei Voronin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANIT project is the follow-up of the pioneering experiments that first observed the quantum states of neutrons trapped in the earth's gravitational field at the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL). Due to the weakness of the gravitational force, these quantum states exhibit most unusual properties: peV energies and spatial extensions of order 10 $\\mu$m. Whereas the first series of observations aimed at measuring the properties of the wave functions, the GRANIT experiment will induce resonant transitions between states thus accessing to spectroscopic measurements. After a brief reminder of achieved results, the principle and the status of the experiment, presently under commissioning at the ILL, will be given. In the second part, we will discuss the potential of GRANIT to search for new physics, in particular to a modified Newton law in the micrometer range.

  2. The GRANIT project: Status and Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ler, Stephan Bae; Grigorieva, Ludmilla; Kreuz, Michael; Naraghi, Fabrice; Nesvizhevsky, Valery; Pignol, Guillaume; Protassov, Konstantin; Rebreyend, Dominique; Vezzu, Francis; Voronin, Alexei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANIT project is the follow-up of the pioneering experiments that first observed the quantum states of neutrons trapped in the earth's gravitational field at the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL). Due to the weakness of the gravitational force, these quantum states exhibit most unusual properties: peV energies and spatial extensions of order 10 $\\mu$m. Whereas the first series of observations aimed at measuring the properties of the wave functions, the GRANIT experiment will induce resonant transitions between states thus accessing to spectroscopic measurements. After a brief reminder of achieved results, the principle and the status of the experiment, presently under commissioning at the ILL, will be given. In the second part, we will discuss the potential of GRANIT to search for new physics, in particular to a modified Newton law in the micrometer range.

  3. Earthstone granite pavers provide a mix of colors and patterns.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earthstone granite pavers provide a mix of colors and patterns. Earthstone pavers and interior Review from Environmental Building News August 1, 2010 Earthstone's Affordable, Recycled Granite Pavers that's manufactured entirely from pre-consumer recycled granite. These pavers, as well as finished

  4. Physics of the granite sphere fountain Jacco H. Snoeijer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snoeijer, Jacco

    Physics of the granite sphere fountain Jacco H. Snoeijer1 and Ko van der Weele2 1 Physics of Fluids) A striking example of levitation is encountered in the "kugel fountain" where a granite sphere, sometimes with measurements on a fountain holding a granite sphere of one meter in diameter. We close by discussing several

  5. INTRODUCTION Extraction of granite from lower crust, and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar, Gary S.

    INTRODUCTION Extraction of granite from lower crust, and its emplacement at shallower levels, is the principal mechanism by which the continents have be- come differentiated. Thus, understanding how granite orogenic belts spatial and tem- poral relationships between granite and regional tectonic structures

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Granite magma migration and emplacement along thrusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    ORIGINAL PAPER Granite magma migration and emplacement along thrusts Eric C. Ferre´ · Olivier in the emplacement of granite plutons in contractional settings. We address both cases where contractional tectonics. This phenomenon occurs for both low-viscosity magma (basalts to andesite) and high-viscosity magma (dry granite

  7. Les granites varisques du Massif Armoricain Ramon Capdevila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Les granites varisques du Massif Armoricain Ramon Capdevila Géosciences Rennes - Adresse actuelle granites à biotite et hornblende, de composition orogénique, issue de la fusion d'un manteau enrichi par la faveur de roches basiques mantelliques contaminées et de granites crustaux I-type hybridisés avec du

  8. Granite ascent and emplacement during contractional deformation in convergent orogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar, Gary S.

    Granite ascent and emplacement during contractional deformation in convergent orogens MICHAEL BROWN of granite melt through the crust in convergent orogens. During contractional deformation, ¯ow of melt to weakly discordant irregular granite sheets occur in zones of higher strain, which suggests percolative

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Recognition of early Carboniferous alkaline granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    ORIGINAL PAPER Recognition of early Carboniferous alkaline granite in the southern Altai orogen for the Bulgen alkaline granite yield crystallization ages of 358 ± 4 Ma (SHRIMP) and 354 ± 4 Ma (LA-orogenic granitoids (460­375 Ma) in this region. The Bulgen granite has high SiO2, total alkalis, rare earth elements

  10. EIS-0184: South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Seattle City Light, a Department of the City of Seattle proposal to construct a hydroelectric project with an installed capacity of 15 MW on the South Fork Tolt River near the town of Carnation located in King County in the State of Washington.

  11. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2011 GRADUATES Grand Forks, ND 58202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2011 GRADUATES Grand Forks, ND 58202 Website : www.law.und.edu Phone : 701 Date Deferred 0 Total graduates 81 Unemployed - Not Seeking 0 Employment Status Unknown 2 Unemployed - Seeking 9 Employed - Undeterminable * 0 0 0 0 0 Employed - Bar Passage Required 40 0 1 0 41 Pursuing

  12. Retention of Anionic Species on Granite: Influence of Granite Composition - 12129

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Videnska, Katerina [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Havlova, Vaclava [Nuclear Research Institute Rez, Rez, 25068 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technetium (Tc-99, T{sub 1/2} = 2.1.10{sup 5} yrs) and selenium (Se-79, T{sub 1/2} = 6.5.10{sup 4} yrs) belong among fission products, being produced by fission of nuclear fuel. Both elements can significantly contribute to risk due to their complicated chemistry, long life times, high mobility and prevailing anionic character. Therefore, knowledge of migration behaviour under different conditions can significantly improve input into performance and safety assessment models. Granite is considered as a potential host rock for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in many countries. Granitic rocks consist usually of quartz, feldspar, plagioclase (main components), mica, chlorite, kaolinite (minor components). The main feature of the rock is advection governed transport in fractures, complemented with diffusion process from fracture towards undisturbed rock matrix. The presented work is focused on interaction of anionic species (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) with granitic rock. Furthermore, the importance of mineral composition on sorption of anionic species was also studied. The batch sorption experiments were conducted on the crushed granite from Bohemian Massive. Five fractions with defined grain size were used for static batch method. Mineral composition of each granitic fraction was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. The results showed differences in composition of granitic fractions, even though originating from one homogenized material. Sorption experiments showed influence of granite composition on adsorption of both TcO4{sup -} and SeO3{sup 2-} on granitic rock. Generally, Se(IV) showed higher retention than Tc(VII). Se(VI) was not almost sorbed at all. Fe containing minerals are pronounced as a selective Se and Tc sorbent, being reduced on their surface. As micas in granite are usually enriched in Fe, increased sorption of anionic species onto mica enriched fractions can be explained by this reason. On the other hand, fractions enriched in feldspar did not show increased sorption affinity to Tc and Se. (authors)

  13. A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited. We can move

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited the dirtiest tar sands and tar shales, hydrofracking for gas, continued mountain-top removal and mechanized to society. We must collect a gradually rising fee from fossil fuel companies at the source, the domestic

  14. Granite State Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:GeothermalSpringsGranite

  15. LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundstrom, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THE STRIPA MINE AND,PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE ANDPERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND

  16. Magmahost interactions during differentiation and emplacement of a shallow-level, zoned granitic pluton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Magma­host interactions during differentiation and emplacement of a shallow-level, zoned granitic-grade metasediments, with the following succession: leucocratic granites, biotite­granodiorites (±monzodiorites-bearing granites (72

  17. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE ReSULTS AND PRELIMINARYG~UUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE K~SULTS AND PRELIMINARYPermeability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine and

  18. EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire July 23, 2010 EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact Granite...

  19. Reply to N. C. Higgins' comment on origin of alkali-feldspar granites: An example from the Poimena Granite, northeastern Tasmania, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKenzie, D.E.; Sun, S.S.; Black, L.P. (Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra (Australia))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper acts as a rebuttal to comments made by other scientists regarding the origin of the Poimena Granite as discussed in an earlier paper by these authors. The Lottah Granite and the enclosing Poimena Granite of northeastern Tasmania represent one of the best documented and most intensely Li-F-rich alkali-feldspar granite and its much more voluminous biotite granite host. The issue under debate is which of the two most generally supported models for the origin of Li-F-Sn granites-magmatic or metasomatic-hydrothermal-best explains the data obtained from the Lottah and Poimena Granites It is not the authors intent to imply that alkali-feldspar granites cannot be generated from granites similar to the Poimena Granite by fractional crystallization: the St. Austell Granite is an excellent example of such a relationship. Nor do the authors intend to imply that metasomatic and hydrothermal processes have not operated at all in the Lottah Granite. They seek rather to demonstrate that magmatic processes alone are capable of generating alkali-feldspar granites enriched in Sn, Li, Rb, F etc. and that such granites need not be genetically linked to spatially associated normal granites. Some of the arguments and data are subsequently presented in this paper.

  20. Forked Deer Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer Electric Coop, Inc Jump to:

  1. Cherry Fork, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric SurveyChelan County,Chenango County,Oklahoma:County,Fork,

  2. Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County, Kansas:GrahamBlanc,Grand ElectricForks,

  3. Spanish Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop, IncSouthwestern ElectricSpain:Fork, Utah:

  4. Five Forks, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and Wildlife Service8322°,Five Forks, South

  5. Forked River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,Forked River, New Jersey: Energy

  6. Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallaway ElectricCambridge FundsCampaWindCaney Fork

  7. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    in the South Fork American River, California Sarah A. Cocherell & Gardner J. Jones & Javier B. Miranda & Dennis to frequent pulsed releases of water in the South Fork American River (California) from July to October 2005 and migration, and that telemetry is a tool that allows integration across disciplines and between

  8. Late-Stage Mafic Injection and Thermal Rejuvenation of the Vinalhaven Granite,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Late-Stage Mafic Injection and Thermal Rejuvenation of the Vinalhaven Granite, Coastal Maine R. A The Vinalhaven intrusive complex consists mainly of coarse-grained granite, inward-dipping gabbro­diorite sheets, and a fine-grained granite core. Small bodies of porphyry occur throughout the coarse- grained granite

  9. Rubrique : Tectonique Modlisation gomtrique 3D des granites Stphaniens du massif du Pelvoux (Alpes, France).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Rubrique : Tectonique Modélisation géométrique 3D des granites Stéphaniens du massif du Pelvoux (Alpes, France). 3D geometrical modelling of Stephanian granite from the Pelvoux massif (French Alps, granite, modélisation 3D, Carbonifère. Key words : Alps, Granite, 3D modelling, Carbonifere

  10. INVESTIGATIONS IN GRANITE AT STRIPA, SWEDEN FOR NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRIPA, SWEDEN FOR NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE P. A. tfitherspoon,GRANITE AT STRIPA, SWEDEN FOR NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE by P. A.Final and safe storage of nuclear waste materials is one of

  11. Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledger, Ernest Broughton

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their concentrations in unweathered or slightly weathered granitic rocks, soils developed on granitic rocks, and material from a granitic source transported by a local stream. "Uranium maps", obtained by fission track analysis, are used to understand the mode... OF URANIUM AND THORIUM IN THE GRANITIC 17 19 30 30 31 38 SOURCE ROCKS . 44 REDISTRIBUTION OF URANIUM AND THORIUM IN GRANITIC MATERIALS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION 77 CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 105 108 112 113...

  12. Radionuclide Transport in Fracture-Granite Interface Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Mori, A

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ radionuclide migration experiments, followed by excavation and sample characterization, were conducted in a water-conducting shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland to study diffusion paths of radionuclides in fractured granite. In this work, we employed a micro-scale mapping technique that interfaces laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA/ICP-MS) to measure the fine-scale (micron-range) distribution of actinides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np) in the fracture-granite interface zones. Long-lived {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np were detected in flow channels, as well as in the adjacent rock matrix, using the sensitive, feature-based mapping of the LA/ICP-MS technique. The injected sorbing actinides are mainly located within the advective flowing fractures and the immediately adjacent regions. The water-conducting fracture studied in this work is bounded on one side by mylonite and the other by granitic matrix regions. These actinides did not penetrate into the mylonite side as much as the relatively higher-porosity granite matrix, most likely due to the low porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and diffusivity of the fracture wall (a thickness of about 0.4 mm separates the mylonite region from the fracture) and the mylonite region itself. Overall, the maximum penetration depth detected with this technique for the more diffusive {sup 237}Np over the field experimental time scale of about 60 days was about 10 mm in the granitic matrix, illustrating the importance of matrix diffusion in retarding radionuclide transport from the advective fractures. Laboratory tests and numerical modeling of radionuclide diffusion into granitic matrix was conducted to complement and help interpret the field results. Measured apparent diffusivity of multiple tracers in granite provided consistent predictions for radionuclide transport in the fractured granitic rock.

  13. A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, T.S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage of Lac du Bonnet Granite in triaxial tests, Proc.in sparsely fractured granite Thanh Son Nguyen 1* , Lennartand calibration of the granite and bentonite behaviour, both

  14. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  15. EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

  16. Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1608, VTT, FI-02044 (Finland)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

  17. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

  18. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

  19. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

  20. Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledger, Ernest Broughton

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their concentrations in unweathered or slightly weathered granitic rocks, soils developed on granitic rocks, and material from a granitic source transported by a local stream. "Uranium maps", obtained by fission track analysis, are used to understand the mode...RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  1. Vascular flora and vegetation of granite outcrops in the Central Mineral Region of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Terrence Wesley

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas Location of the Central Mineral Region, indicating areas underlain by Precambrian granitic tock 13 Location of 20 granite outcrops in the Central Mineral Region of Texas 20 Climate diagrams for Mason, Llano, Burnet, and Gillespie Counties...& Texas 23 Climate diagrams for Mason, Llano, Burnet, and Gillespie Counties, Texas 25 Distribution of 2 granite outcrop endemics in the area of study and in the state of Texas 60 Distribution of Pilularia americana 63 Distribution of 2 granite...

  2. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

  3. Granite Recrystallization The Key to an Alternative Strategy for HLW Disposal? Fergus G.F. Gibb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Granite Recrystallization ­ The Key to an Alternative Strategy for HLW Disposal? Fergus G.F. Gibb, and hence the key to the entire strategy, depends on whether sufficient melting of granite host rock can-temperature, high-pressure experiments reported here demonstrate that granite can be partially melted and completely

  4. Physics of the granite sphere fountain Jacco H. Snoeijer and Ko van der Weele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snoeijer, Jacco

    Physics of the granite sphere fountain Jacco H. Snoeijer and Ko van der Weele Citation: American: Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:40:51 #12;Physics of the granite sphere fountain Jacco H. Snoeijer Physics in the "kugel fountain" where a granite sphere, sometimes weighing over a ton, is kept aloft by a thin film

  5. The Micromechanics of Westerley Granite at Large Compressive Loads H. S. BHAT,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosakis, Ares J.

    The Micromechanics of Westerley Granite at Large Compressive Loads H. S. BHAT,1,2 C. G. SAMMIS,1 not produce the large negative curvature in the failure surface observed in Westerly granite at high confining failure in Westerly granite. Both the observed curvature in the failure surface and the nonlinear strain

  6. Pull-apart emplacement of the Margeride granitic complex (French Massif Central). Implications for the late

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Pull-apart emplacement of the Margeride granitic complex (French Massif Central). Implications Margeride granitic complex that crops out in the central part of the Variscan French Massif Central. This complex consists of three facies, namely, a main porphyritic monzogranite, a two-mica granite, and late

  7. BRYOPHYTES OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    BRYOPHYTES OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U.S.A. LAURA R. E ultramafic rocks. This paper compares the bryophyte floras of both a peridotite and a granite outcrop from both sites. Fifty-five species were found, 43 on serpentine, 26 on granite. Fourteen species were

  8. Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mesozoic magmatism and granitic dome in the Wugongshan Massif, Jiangxi province and their genetical,CNRS - Université d'Orleans, 45067 Orleans 2, France Abstract In SE China, a Mesozoic granitic dome coeval and granitic gneisses, and the E­W-trending Late-Paleozoic­Mesozoic Pingxiang and Anfu basins are located along

  9. Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1@mnhn.fr Abstract. In French Guiana, inselbergs are granite outcrops rising abruptly from the surrounding rain substrate. Shrub granitic vegetation, organised in thickets on open exposed rocks of inselbergs

  10. GEOLOGY IN THE VICINITY OF THE HODGES COMPLEX AND THE TYLER LAKE GRANITE, WEST TORRINGTON, CONNECTICUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    GEOLOGY IN THE VICINITY OF THE HODGES COMPLEX AND THE TYLER LAKE GRANITE, WEST TORRINGTON Torrington, Connecticut, the Hodges mafic- ultramafic complex and the Tyler Lake granite are the products of the Hodges Complex and the Tyler Lake granite, and the metamorphic stratigraphy and structure of the lower

  11. Large-volume granitic plutons in the Burro Mountains, southwestern New Mex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Jeff

    ABSTRACT Large-volume granitic plutons in the Burro Mountains, southwestern New Mex- ico, cover are part of the ca. 1.4 Ga granite and rhyolite province stretching across Laurentia. U-Pb zircon dating of five samples of the biotite leuco- granite yielded ages ranging from 1469 ± 12 to 1455 ± 11 Ma (2s

  12. The paradoxical aspect of the Himalayan granites Jean-Louis VIGNERESSE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The paradoxical aspect of the Himalayan granites Jean-Louis VIGNERESSE1 and Jean-Pierre BURG2 1 as reference examples of collision-related granites. However, they are much smaller than the Hercynian collision-related granites. Additional comparison with magmatic arcs and cordilleran-type batholiths

  13. NUMERICAL MODELING OF SHOCK-INDUCED DAMAGE FOR GRANITE UNDER DYNAMIC LOADING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    NUMERICAL MODELING OF SHOCK-INDUCED DAMAGE FOR GRANITE UNDER DYNAMIC LOADING H. A. Ai1 , T. J beneath impact crater in granite. Model constants are determined either directly from static uniaxial from Century Dynamics to simulate the shock-induced damage in granite targets impacted by projectiles

  14. Melt segregation under compaction and shear channelling: Application to granitic magma segregation in a continental crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Melt segregation under compaction and shear channelling: Application to granitic magma segregation in a mush submitted to both compaction and shear. It applies to a granitic melt imbedded within of melt to about 20 % in total to be extracted from the matrix. Abridged title Granitic melt segregation

  15. ELSEVIER Sedimentary Geology 124 (1999) 131147 UPb ages and geochemistry of granite pebbles from the Devonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dörr, Wolfgang

    ELSEVIER Sedimentary Geology 124 (1999) 131­147 U­Pb ages and geochemistry of granite pebbles from 1998 Abstract The geochemical composition of some garnet-bearing biotite granite pebbles within from two samples. The granites have suffered low-grade metamorphism as shown by the development

  16. Activity concentrations and dose rates from decorative granite countertops W.J. Llope*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    Activity concentrations and dose rates from decorative granite countertops W.J. Llope* Rice 19 April 2011 Keywords: Granite Gamma radiation Dose Human phantom a b s t r a c t The gamma radiation emitted from a variety of commercial decorative granites available for use in U.S. homes has been

  17. Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the SW Bohemian Massif and their Record of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the SW Bohemian Massif and their Record of Emplacement types of gneisses, migmatites and granites dominate the out- crops of the Bavarian Forest characteristics ofa crustal root zone. Fourteen granite intrusions from this area have been dated by the single

  18. Microfracturing, damage, and failure of brittle granites and Ze'ev Reches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Microfracturing, damage, and failure of brittle granites Oded Katz1 and Ze'ev Reches Institute and the eventual brittle failure are experimentally analyzed for Mount Scott granite of Oklahoma. We quantify of the medium-grain-size granite were loaded triaxially at dry conditions, room temperature, and under 41 MPa

  19. Singlehole GPR reflection imaging of solute transport in a granitic aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Singlehole GPR reflection imaging of solute transport in a granitic aquifer Caroline Dorn,1 Niklas mmaperture fractures. A dipole tracer test was performed in a granitic aquifer by injecting a saline solution of solute transport in a granitic aquifer, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L08401, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL047152. 1

  20. Survival of eclogite xenolith in a Cretaceous granite intruding the Central Dabieshan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Survival of eclogite xenolith in a Cretaceous granite intruding the Central Dabieshan migmatite in a Cretaceous granite from the Central Domain of the Dabieshan massif in eastern China, yields new petrological to inclusion as a xenolith in the granite during the Early Cretaceous, this eclogite xenolith had recorded

  1. Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the Southwestern Bohemian Massif: Reply to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the Southwestern Bohemian Massif: Reply to F. Finger and M. Rene geochemical and geochronological analyses of mainly crustal-derived late Variscan granites (328^321 Ma) from the Bavarian Forest, Moldanubian unit, Bohemian Massif. As an important observation, a high Ca^Sr^Y granite

  2. Isotope systematics of ore-bearing granites and host rocks of the Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Isotope systematics of ore-bearing granites and host rocks of the Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining district and Spokoinoe granite massifs and their host rocks in the Orlovka- Spokoinoe mining district, Eastern Transbaikalia, Russia. Pb isotope analyses indicate one common Pb source for all three granite massifs

  3. Geochronology of the Sikombe Granite, Transkei, Natal Metamorphic Province, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, William P.

    Geochronology of the Sikombe Granite, Transkei, Natal Metamorphic Province, South Africa Robert J of the syntectonic, gneissose Sikombe Granite from northeastern Transkei (Eastern Cape Province). The outcrops form of three samples of the Sikombe Granite give consistent, positive Nd values (+4 at t = 1180 Ma) showing

  4. Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota Fang pegmatite and possible metasedimentary source rocks in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA. The Harney Peak.5 and overlap with post- Archean shales and the Harney Peak Granite. For the granite suite

  5. Monte Carlo simulations for generic granite repository studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Joon H [SNL; Wang, Yifeng [SNL

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a collaborative study between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the DOE-NE Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign project, we have conducted preliminary system-level analyses to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. A general modeling framework consisting of a near- and a far-field submodel for a granite GDSE was developed. A representative far-field transport model for a generic granite repository was merged with an integrated systems (GoldSim) near-field model. Integrated Monte Carlo model runs with the combined near- and farfield transport models were performed, and the parameter sensitivities were evaluated for the combined system. In addition, a sub-set of radionuclides that are potentially important to repository performance were identified and evaluated for a series of model runs. The analyses were conducted with different waste inventory scenarios. Analyses were also conducted for different repository radionuelide release scenarios. While the results to date are for a generic granite repository, the work establishes the method to be used in the future to provide guidance on the development of strategy for long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in a granite repository.

  6. ASTEROIDAL GRANITE-LIKE MAGMATISM 4.53 GYR AGO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terada, Kentaro [Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Bischoff, Addi [Institut fuer Planetologie, Westflische Wilhelms-Universitt Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: terada@sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Constraining the timescales for the evolution of planetary bodies in our solar system is essential for a complete understanding of planet-forming processes. However, frequent collisions between planetesimals in the early solar system obscured and destroyed much of the primitive features of the old, first-generation planetary bodies. The presence of differentiated, achondritic clasts in brecciated chondrites and of chondritic fragments in achondritic breccias clearly witness multiple processes such as metamorphism, magmatism, fragmentation, mixing, and reaccretion. Here, we report the results of ion microprobe Pb-Pb dating of a granite-like fragment found in a meteorite, the LL3-6 ordinary chondrite regolith breccia Adzhi-Bogdo. Eight spot analyses of two phosphate grains and other co-genetic phases of the granitoid give a Pb-Pb isochron age of 4.48 {+-} 0.12 billion years (95% confidence) and a model age of 4.53 {+-} 0.03 billion years (1{sigma}), respectively. These ages represent the crystallization age of a parental granite-like magma that is significantly older than those of terrestrial (4.00-4.40 Gyr) and lunar granites (3.88-4.32 Gyr) indicating that the clast in Adzhi-Bogdo is the oldest known granitoid in the solar system. This is the first evidence that granite-like formation is not only a common process on Earth, but also occurred on primitive asteroids in the early solar system 4.53 Gyr ago. Thus, the discovery of granite magmatism recorded in a brecciated meteorite provides an innovative idea within the framework of scenarios for the formation and evolution of planetary bodies and possibly exoplanetary bodies.

  7. A method to measure the resonance transitions between the gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyerovich, Alex

    of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer M. Kreuz a , V.V. Nesvizhevsky a,?, P. Schmidt-Wellenburg a , T bound quantum states of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer. The purpose of GRANIT is to improve quantum states, the transition probability will sharply increase. The GRANIT experiment is motivated

  8. Age and emplacement of late-Variscan granites of the western Bohemian Massif with main focus on the Hauzenberg granitoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Age and emplacement of late-Variscan granites of the western Bohemian Massif with main focus 30 August 2007 Abstract The Variscan Hauzenberg pluton consists of granite and granodiorite, separated from medium- to coarse-grained biotite-muscovite granite (Hauzenberg granite II), yielded

  9. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrill, Charles; Ross, Doug; Mensik, Fred

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2000 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by lower than average spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased unclipped yearling and subyearling chinook smolts, and 8,300,546 smolts collected and transported compared to 5,882,872 in 1999. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above Lower Granite Dam, we can no longer accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Although some table titles in this report still show ''wild'' column headings, the numbers in these columns for 1999 and 2000 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. The increases over previous years reflect the increased supplementation. A total of 8,300,546 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, 187,862 fish were bypassed back to the river and 7,950,648 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 7,778,853 by barge and 171,795 by truck. A total of 151,344 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 1,361,006 smolts (16.4% of the total collection).

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 16.2 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 11.7 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 8-15 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-27 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 23-25. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 4-10.

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

  12. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-16 days to Lower Granite Dam and 23-29 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, ranged from April 18-29. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 1-8.

  14. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 37.9% (36.0-40.0%) for Pittsburg Landing to 57.9% (53.0-62.8%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 6.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Big Canyon to 10.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 5.2 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 10.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-17 days to Lower Granite Dam and 31-37 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 26-27. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 14-18. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was May 13 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 65.8% (58.5-73.1%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 84.0% (76.2-91.8%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 10.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 19.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 6.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-25 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 21-22. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 5-6. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was April 24 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  16. Fitness consequences of social network position in a wild population of forked fungus beetles (Bolitotherus cornutus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodie III, Edmund D.

    Fitness consequences of social network position in a wild population of forked fungus beetles network analysis can be used to describe the components of the social structure of a population as a whole) (Krause et al., 2007; Croft et al., 2008). Additionally, social network analyses can describe many

  17. Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    379 Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork length) were caught) Vertical movement patterns of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, California 92037-1508 Limited information on the vertical movements of skipjack tuna (Kat- suwonus pelamis

  18. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  19. Source contributions to Devonian granite magmatism near the Laurentian border, New Hampshire and Western Maine, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar, Gary S.

    Source contributions to Devonian granite magmatism near the Laurentian border, New Hampshire complex, a suite of mainly granitic intrusions in New Hampshire and western Maine, are used to evaluate.56­15.58] and an areally dominant granite [370F2 Ma; eNd (at 370 Ma)=?7.0 to ?0.6; initial 207 Pb/204 Pb=15

  20. a-type granitic magmatism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biotite-granodiorites (67 Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 64 Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion Texas...

  1. alkaline a-type granites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biotite-granodiorites (67 Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 47 Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion Texas...

  2. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

  3. DETERMINATION OF IN-SITU THERMAL PROPERTIES OF STRIPA GRANITE FROM TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN THE FULL-SCALE HEATER EXPERIMENTS: METHOD AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffry, J.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical Properties of Granite:Stripa, Sweden. TerraTekStorage of Nuclear Waste in Granite by P. A. Witherspoon, P.Discontinuities in the Strira Granite -- Time-Scale Heater

  4. Water Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb-Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    of water/rock interactions both in terms of source and extent of weathering, by measuring major and traceWater Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Chemical weathering of granitic rocks: experimental approach and Pb, France Abstract In order to characterize water/rock interactions of granite, we performed laboratory

  5. The origin and evolution of granites: an in-situ study of zircons from Scottish Caledonian intrusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleby, Sarah Kristina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Granitic magmatism in collision belts is widely regarded as a major mechanism for generating continental crust. This hypothesis can be tested by identifying the source rocks of granitic magmas, and in particular the ...

  6. Chemical weathering of the Panola Granite: Solute and regolith elemental fluxes and the weathering rate of biotite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical weathering of the Panola Granite: Solute and regolith elemental fluxes and the weathering in a saprolitic granite re- golith at Panola, Georgia, USA. Saturated fluid flow across a low-permeability kaolin

  7. Visualization of microcrack anisotropy in granite affected by afault zone, using confocal laser scanning microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Celia T.; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2004-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Brittle deformation in granite can generate a fracture system with different patterns. Detailed fracture analyses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales, together with physical property data from a drill-core, are used to classify the effects of reverse fault deformation in four domains: (1) undeformed granite, (2) fractured granite with cataclastic seams, (3) fractured granite from the damage zone, and (4) foliated cataclasite from the core of the fault. Intact samples from two orthogonal directions, horizontal (H) and vertical (V), from the four domains indicate a developing fracture anisotropy toward the fault, which is highly developed in the damage zone. As a specific illustration of this phenomenon, resin impregnation, using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) technique is applied to visualize the fracture anisotropy developed in the Toki Granite, Japan. As a result, microcrack networks have been observed to develop in H sections and elongate open cracks in V sections, suggesting that flow pathways can be determined by deformation.

  8. Neo-tectonic fracturing after emplacement of quaternary granitic pluton in the Kakkonda geothermal field, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, N.; Kato, O. [JMC Goethermal Eng. Co., Ltd., Iwate-ken (Japan); Kanisawa, S.; Ishikawa, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture which occurs in the Kakkonda geothermal system was formed by neo-tectonic stress after the emplacement of the neo-granite (Quaternary Kakkonda Granite) at middle Pleistocene to recent. The characteristic contrast in permeability at ca.1.5 km is strongly controlled by the contact metamorphic zone, especially cordierite and higher grade metamorphic zones, in which the high temperature (320{degrees}C<) and low permeable deep reservoir was created. The five geothermal wells 2.5-3.0 km deep have clarified that a microearthquake zone below -1.0 km shows high permeability especially at the margin of the Kakkonda Granite, and low permeability outside of a microearthquake zone. The Kakkonda Granite is a composite pluton which has very few fractures inside of it. Thus, neo-tectonic fracturing has developed in the non-metamorphosed Tertiary formations and the margin of the Kakkonda Granite.

  9. Timing of granite emplacement and cooling in the SongpanGarze^ Fold Belt (eastern Tibetan Plateau) with tectonic implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timing of granite emplacement and cooling in the Songpan­Garze^ Fold Belt (eastern Tibetan Plateau Abstract New U­Pb and Rb­Sr geochronology on syn- and post-orogenic granites provide constraints on the timing of major tectonic events in the Songpan­Garze^ fold belt, west Sichuan, China. The Ma Nai granite

  10. Emplacement in an extensional setting of the Mont LozreBorne granitic complex (SE France) inferred from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Emplacement in an extensional setting of the Mont Lozère­Borne granitic complex (SE France of the Late Hercynian Mont Lozère­Borne granitic complex (French Massif Central), which consists of several carried out to characterize the internal fabrics of the granitic plutons. Throughout the Pont

  11. A magnetic fabric study of the AigoualSaint GuiralLiron granite pluton (French Massif Central) and relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A magnetic fabric study of the Aigoual­Saint Guiral­Liron granite pluton (French Massif Central been carried out to determine the granite fabric. Biotite, local hornblende, and small grains of magnetite are the main carriers of AMS in both types. Porphyritic granite and dikes display different AMS

  12. Relations between Au / Sn-W mineralizations and late hercynian granite: Preliminary results from the Schistose Domain of Galicia-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Relations between Au / Sn-W mineralizations and late hercynian granite: Preliminary results from, mesothermal mineralization, late hercynian granites, hydrothermalism, Galicia, Spain ABSTRACT : Au and W-Sn mineralization of the Schistose Domain of Galicia-Trás-os-Montes are spatially related to late hercynian granites

  13. Pluton-dyke relationships in a Variscan granitic complex from AMS and gravity modelling. Inception of the extensional tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Pluton-dyke relationships in a Variscan granitic complex from AMS and gravity modelling. Inception Orléans cedex 2, France Abstract The Carnac granitic Complex (South Armorican Domain, Western France zones in the western part of the complex, interpreted as the pluton feeder zones. The internal granitic

  14. The influence of fluid flow through granitic crust: a thermo-tectonic study in and on Mont Blanc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    The influence of fluid flow through granitic crust: a thermo-tectonic study in and on Mont Blanc Tim Dempster, Cristina Persano and Zoe Shipton *Tim.Dempster@ges.gla.ac.uk Granitic and gneissose within a evolving mountain zone, the metasomatic influence of fluids in granite gneiss and the resulting

  15. Gravity inversion, AMS and geochronological investigations of syntectonic granitic plutons in the southern part of the Variscan French Massif Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Gravity inversion, AMS and geochronological investigations of syntectonic granitic plutons gravity inversion does not show any evidence of rooting of the granites along the SHF. Therefore, despite tectonic framework rather than local faulting as a factor controlling pluton emplacement. Keywords: granite

  16. PROJECT SUMMARY The process of generation, segregation, ascent and emplacement of granite magma during orogeny has important

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar, Gary S.

    PROJECT SUMMARY The process of generation, segregation, ascent and emplacement of granite magma and we also understand well how granite magma is emplaced in both extensional and contractional tectonic, petrography, geochronology and geochemistry of leucosomes in migmatites and in associated granite plutons

  17. Conductive incubation and the origin of dome-and-keel structure in Archean granite-greenstone terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Conductive incubation and the origin of dome-and-keel structure in Archean granite August 2003; accepted 24 October 2003; published 27 January 2004. [1] The Archean East Pilbara Granite duration, following the burial of radiogenic granitic crust beneath the accumulated greenstone pile

  18. VASCULAR PLANTS OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    VASCULAR PLANTS OF ADJACENT SERPENTINE AND GRANITE OUTCROPS ON THE DEER ISLES, MAINE, U study of the vascular flora of a serpentine outcrop, Pine Hill, and that of a granite outcrop from serpentine and 89 from granite. Fifty-seven taxa were shared by both sites. Species richness (a

  19. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences (1988) 35, 223-230 Shear-zone deformation in the Yackandandah Granite,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Granite, northeast Victoria Michael Sandiford, 1 Stuart F. Martin2 and Eric M. Lohe2 lDepartment o mid-Devonian age resulted in the formation ofa ductile shear zone in the granite, termed the Kiewa shear zone. Displacement of granite boundaries and shear-zone fabrics, including excellently developed s

  20. Geochemistry, geochronology, and cathodoluminescence imagery of the Salihli and Turgutlu granites (central Menderes Massif, western Turkey): Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geochemistry, geochronology, and cathodoluminescence imagery of the Salihli and Turgutlu granites-type, peraluminous granites (Salihli and Turgutlu) that intrude the Alasehir detachment which bounds the northern Mediterranean floor along the Hellenic trench. In situ Th­Pb ion microprobe monazite ages from the granites

  1. Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

  2. Modulus dispersion and attenuation in tuff and granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haupt, R.W.; Martin, R.J. III; Tang, X.; Dupree, W.J. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of loading frequency, strain amplitude, and saturation on elastic moduli and attenuation have been measured in samples of the Topopah Spring Member welded tuff. Four different laboratory techniques have been used to determine Young`s modulus and extensional wave attenuation at frequencies ranging from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup 6} Hz. The results are compared with data acquired for Sierra White granite under the same conditions. The modulus and attenuation in room dry samples remain relatively constant over frequency. Frequency dependent attenuation and modulus dispersion are observed in the saturated samples and are attributed to fluid flow and sample size. The properties of tuff were independent of strain amplitude in room dry and saturated conditions.

  3. Ultracold-neutron infrastructure for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; K. H. Andersen; P. Courtois; M. Kreuz; S. Mironov; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov; T. Soldner; F. Vezzu; O. Zimmer

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational spectrometer GRANIT will be set up at the Institut Laue Langevin. It will profit from the high ultracold neutron density produced by a dedicated source. A monochromator made of crystals from graphite intercalated with potassium will provide a neutron beam with 0.89 nm incident on the source. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium, in a vessel made from BeO ceramics with Be windows. A special extraction technique has been tested which feeds the spectrometer only with neutrons with a vertical velocity component v < 20 cm/s, thus keeping the density in the source high. This new source is expected to provide a density of up to 800 1/cm3 for the spectrometer.

  4. Ultracold-neutron infrastructure for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Courtois, P; Kreuz, M; Mironov, S; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Soldner, T; Vezzu, F; Zimmer, O

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational spectrometer GRANIT will be set up at the Institut Laue Langevin. It will profit from the high ultracold neutron density produced by a dedicated source. A monochromator made of crystals from graphite intercalated with potassium will provide a neutron beam with 8.9 Angstrom incident on the source. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium, in a vessel made from BeO ceramics with Be windows. A special extraction technique has been tested which feeds the spectrometer only with neutrons with a vertical velocity component v = 20 cm/s, thus keeping the density in the source high. This new source is expected to provide a density of up to R = 800 cm-3 for the spectrometer.

  5. GRANIT project: a trap for gravitational quantum states of UCN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pignol, G; Rebreyend, D; Vezzu, F; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Petukhov, A K; Brner, H G; Soldner, T; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Kreuz, M; Forest, D; Ganau, P; Mackowski, J M; Michel, C; Montorio, J L; Morgado, N; Pinard, L; Remillieux, A; Gagarski, A M; Petrov, G A; Kusmina, A M; Strelkov, A V; Abele, H; Baeler, S; Voronin, A Yu

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of gravitationally bound states of ultracold neutrons showed the quantization of energy levels, and confirmed quantum mechanical predictions for the average size of the two lowest energy states wave functions. Improvements in position-like measurements can increase the accuracy by an order of magnitude only. We therefore develop another approach, consisting in accurate measurements of the energy levels. The GRANIT experiment is devoted to the study of resonant transitions between quantum states induced by an oscillating perturbation. According to Heisenberg's uncertainty relations, the accuracy of measurement of the energy levels is limited by the time available to perform the transitions. Thus, trapping quantum states will be necessary, and each source of losses has to be controlled in order to maximize the lifetime of the states. We discuss the general principles of transitions between quantum states, and consider the main systematical losses of neutrons in a trap.

  6. GRANIT project: a trap for gravitational quantum states of UCN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov; D. Rebreyend; F. Vezzu; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; A. K. Petukhov; H. G. Brner; T. Soldner; P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; M. Kreuz; D. Forest; P. Ganau; J. M. Mackowski; C. Michel; J. L. Montorio; N. Morgado; L. Pinard; A. Remillieux; A. M. Gagarski; G. A. Petrov; A. M. Kusmina; A. V. Strelkov; H. Abele; S. Baeler; A. Yu. Voronin

    2007-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of gravitationally bound states of ultracold neutrons showed the quantization of energy levels, and confirmed quantum mechanical predictions for the average size of the two lowest energy states wave functions. Improvements in position-like measurements can increase the accuracy by an order of magnitude only. We therefore develop another approach, consisting in accurate measurements of the energy levels. The GRANIT experiment is devoted to the study of resonant transitions between quantum states induced by an oscillating perturbation. According to Heisenberg's uncertainty relations, the accuracy of measurement of the energy levels is limited by the time available to perform the transitions. Thus, trapping quantum states will be necessary, and each source of losses has to be controlled in order to maximize the lifetime of the states. We discuss the general principles of transitions between quantum states, and consider the main systematical losses of neutrons in a trap.

  7. Experiments and Simulations of Penetration into Granite by an Aluminum Shaped Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M J; Randers-Pehrson, G; Kuklo, R M; Rambur, T A; Switzer, L L; Summes, M A

    2003-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes experimental results and numerical simulations of jet penetration into granite from an aluminum lined shaped charge. Several penetration versus standoff experiments were conducted into an in-situ granite formation located in the Climax Ridge region of the Nevada Test Site. Simulations of the jet penetration were modeled with a two dimensional arbitrary lagrange eulerian hydrocode. The effects of variations in the granite flow stress, porosity, and EOS have been evaluated. The work described in this paper is a continuation of our studies on jet penetration and modeling into high strength concrete.

  8. 12/27/08 7:27 PMAngie's List Magazine Page 1 of 2http://magazine.angieslist.com/story/web_the-truth-about-granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    12/27/08 7:27 PMAngie's List Magazine Page 1 of 2http://magazine.angieslist.com/story/web_the-truth-about-granite of Atlanta Intown Granite and says his product is safe. MONDAY, DECEMBER 01, 2008 Unearthing the truth about granite By Paul F. P. Pogue Coby and Daine Pearson, of Atlanta, bought granite kitchen countertops in 2006

  9. UPb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite-enriched granite at Pitinga (Amazonia, Brazil): Evolution of the A-type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    U­Pb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite- enriched granite at Pitinga of A-type magmatism and basin formation occurred. The albite-enriched granite emplacement occurred-enriched facies of Madeira granite (Madeira Suite) that is part of a NE­SW alignment of three granitic bodies

  10. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 163, 2006, pp. 291301. Printed in Great Britain. Early Silurian maficultramafic and granitic plutonism in contemporaneous flysch,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    . 291 Early Silurian mafic­ultramafic and granitic plutonism in contemporaneous flysch, Magerøy and regional metamorphism and were intruded by a mafic­ultramafic complex and various granitic plutons. U granite and 437.7 ? 1.6 Ma for the Finnvik granite coincide within error with the age of deposition

  11. Red Fork sandstones (lower Pennsylvanian) in deeper parts of Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, P.H.; Levine, S.D.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Red Fork sandstones in the deeper part of the Anadarko basin are the downdip equivalents of fluvial and deltaic sandstones in the Cherokee Group. The sandstones have repetitive, ordered sequences of sedimentary structures in vertical section. Individual bedsets display sharp basal contacts, gradational tops, and contorted bedding. The characteristics indicate these basinal sandstones were deposited by turbidity currents. The sandstones occur as narrow, linear constructional channels that are dip-trending. The lateral change from channel-fill to overbank facies takes place abruptly. The sandstones are very fine-grained litharenites with an average composition of 58% quartz, 8% feldspar, 17% rock fragments, 5% other grains, and 12% matrix. Cement consists mainly of calcite ranging from 2 to 40% of the bulk volume. Quartz content tends to decrease upward and matrix increases upward within bedsets. The compositional grading is accompanied by a decrease in grain size upward within bedsets, indicating deposition during a decreasing flow-regime. Red Fork sandstones are low-permeability reservoirs with an average porosity and permeability of 7.8% and 0.1 md, respectively. Natural gas reservoirs occur mainly in the thicker, channel sequences. The bedding character of the channel and overbank facies is reflected in ..gamma..-ray log responses. Log characters of the two facies are used to interpret turbidite sections of uncored areas. The interpretations are adapted to the East Clinton field for prediction of constuctional channel reservoirs. The interpretation of dip-trending turbidite deposits may aid in exploration and development of the Red Fork sandstones.

  12. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    County (Fig. 2). The thicknesses of the sandstone sequences increases upward from 2. 0 cm to 30. 0 cm. These sandstones are characterized by repetitive sequences of laminated and rippled sandstones overlain by thin pelacic shales. The cored interval... Sedimentary structures in the Red Fork sandstones, Woods Switzer "C" 5-1 (photographs A through D), Southwest Leedey Field, 5-15N-21W, Roger Mills County, and Gulf Sprowls 1 (photographs E through J), 28-13N-23W, Roger Mills County. Boldface letters (lower...

  13. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spajer, M., E-mail: michel.spajer@univ-fcomte.fr; Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D. [Institut FEMTO-ST, Universit de Franche-Comt, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l'Observatoire, F-25044 Besanon cedex (France)] [Institut FEMTO-ST, Universit de Franche-Comt, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l'Observatoire, F-25044 Besanon cedex (France); Jalocha, A. [CILAS, Dpartement de Photonique, 8 avenue Buffon, BP 6319, F-45000 Orlans (France)] [CILAS, Dpartement de Photonique, 8 avenue Buffon, BP 6319, F-45000 Orlans (France)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  14. Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project 1 Finding of No Significant Impact for Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock &EnergyDepartmentCityClark Fork River

  15. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  16. Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonaradian Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F. Jerry; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to characterize fracture porosity and distribution in the Wasson Clear Fork reservoir and to determine the effects of fractures on well performance. The approach is to measure fracture attributes in an analog outcrop, to develop models of fracture spacing and aperture, and to apply this information to the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir.

  17. Quantum states of neutrons in the gravitational and centrifugal potentials in a new GRANIT spectrometer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We will discuss the scientific program to be studied in a new gravitational spectrometer GRANIT in a broad context of quantum states (quantum behaviour) of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in gravitational [1] and centrifugal [2] potentials, as well as applications of these phenomena/spectrometer to various domains of physics, ranging from studies of fundamental short-range interactions and symmetries to neutron quantum optics and reflectometry using UCN. All these topics, as well as related instrumental and methodical developments have been discussed during dedicated GRANIT-2010 Workshop [3]. The GRANIT spectrometer has been recently installed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France [4] and could become operational in near future. 1. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2002), Nature 415, 297. 2. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2010), Nature Physics 6, 114. 3. GRANIT-2010, Les Houches, 14-19 february 2010. 4. M. Kreuz et al (2009), NIM 611, 326.

  18. LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundstrom, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No.2 LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THEMINE AND, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST Lars Lundstrom and HakanSUMMARY REPORT Background TEST SITE Layout of test places

  19. Determination of Granites' Mineral Specific Porosities by PMMA Method and FESEM/EDAX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leskinen, A.; Penttinen, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki, FIN-00014 (Finland); Alanso, U.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Missana, T. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain); Patelli, Alessandro [Associazione CIVEN, Via delle Industrie 9, Venezia-Marghera, 30175 (Italy)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over extended periods, long-lived radionuclides (RN) or activation products within geologic disposal sites may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. In the bedrock, contaminants will be transported along fractures by advection and retarded by sorption on mineral surfaces and by molecular diffusion into stagnant pore water in the matrix along a connected system of pores and micro-fissures. The objective of this paper was to determine the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities for three granite samples by {sup 14}C methyl-methacrylate ({sup 14}C-PMMA) autoradiography. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDAX) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the diffusion coefficients of RNs from previous experiments which determined apparent diffusion coefficients for the main minerals in three granite samples by the Rutherford Backscattering technique. The total porosity of the Grimsel granite (0.75%) was significantly higher than the porosities of the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites (0.3%). The porosities of the Grimsel granite feldspars were two to three times higher than the porosities of the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites feldspars. However, there was no significant difference between the porosities of the dark minerals. A clear difference was found between the various quartz grains. Quartz crystals were non-porous in the El Berrocal and Los Ratones granites when measured by the PMMA method, but the quartz crystals in the Grimsel granite showed 0.5% intra granular porosity. The apparent diffusion coefficients calculated for uranium diffusion within Grimsel granite on different minerals were very similar (2.10{sup -13} {+-} 0.5 m{sup 2}/s), but differences within both Spanish granites were found from one mineral to another (9 {+-} 1.10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s in feldspars and 4.5 {+-} 0.5.10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s in quartz) - always presenting lower diffusion values than in the Grimsel granite. (authors)

  20. Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba [Department of Science, Bushehr Branch, Islamic Azad University, City of Aalishahr, Bushehr Province, Iran P.O.Box: 7519619555 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

  1. Deformations associated with relaxation of residual stresses in the Barre Granite of Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Thomas Chester

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEFORMATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH RELAXATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN THE BARRE GRANITE OF VERMONT A Thesis by THOMAS CHESTER NICHOLS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AfM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE May, 1972 Major Subject: Geology DEFORMATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH RELAXATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN THE BARRE GRANITE OF VERMONT A Thesis THOMAS CHESTER NICHOLS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: airman o Committee...

  2. A Spanish reference concept for a repository in granite -- The role of the barrier system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, L.B.; Sellin, P. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Huertas, F. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A., Madrid (Spain); Pusch, R. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ENRESA, the organization responsible for radioactive waste management in Spain, is considering clay, salt and granite as optional host rocks for spent fuel disposal. The main features of a reference repository concept developed for the granite alternative is presented as well as a preliminary assessment of its long-term performance. Comments are given on issues, which should be studied more in depth in the continued R and D program.

  3. {sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  6. Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Jerrel R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

  7. Directional drilling equipment and techniques for deep hot granite wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brittenham, T.L.; Sursen, G.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Williams, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional directional drilling technology has been extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot dry Rock (HDR) experimental site. Completing the first of a two-wellbore HDR system has resulted in the definition of operational limitations of many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-2), to a measured depth of 15,300 ft (4.7 km) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 530/sup 0/F (275/sup 0/C) required the development of a new high temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 8500 ft (2.6 km) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35/sup 0/ from the vertical at a controlled azimuthal orientation.

  8. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarime, Nur 'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z.W. [Geology Programme, School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%63% and 46%54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.502.59 and 2.452.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.355.85 for BGR and pH 5.325.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%0.34% and 0.39% 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m{sup 2}/g21.93 m{sup 2}/g and 25.76 m{sup 2}/g26.83 m{sup 2}/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  9. Vol. 20, No. 1 A Publication of the Brushy Fork Institute Spring-Summer 2010 Mountain Promise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    cooled, gas prices dropped and most of us were pretty happy about that. But when energy sector prices today. The key sectors we are trying to move--economic development, education, energy, government. The Brushy Fork Institute carries forward this commit- ment by working to develop strong leadership

  10. Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site selection and safety assessment.

  11. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada Jonny Rutqvist 1* , LennartSafety Commission, Ottawa, Canada * Corresponding author.laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models

  12. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  13. Optimizing Data Locality for Fork/Join Programs Using Constrained Work Stealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach to improving data locality across different phases of fork/join programs scheduled using work stealing. The approach consists of: (1) user-specified and automated approaches to constructing a steal tree, the schedule of steal operations and (2) constrained work stealing algorithms that constrain the actions of the scheduler to mirror a given steal tree. These are combined to construct work stealing schedules that maximize data locality across computation phases while ensuring load balance within each phase. These algorithms are also used to demonstrate dynamic coarsening, an optimization to improve spatial locality and sequential overheads by combining many finer-grained tasks into coarser tasks while ensuring sufficient concurrency for locality-optimized load balance. Implementation and evaluation in Cilk demonstrate performance improvements of up to 2.5x on 80 cores. We also demonstrate that dynamic coarsening can combine the performance benefits of coarse task specification with the adaptability of finer tasks.

  14. Uranium in the Oatman Creek granite of Central Texas and its economic potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Curtis Paul

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: GEOLOGY URANIUM IN THE OATMAN CREEK GRANITE OF CENTRAL TEXAS AND ITS ECONOMIC POTENTIAL A Thesis by CURTIS PAUL CONRAD Approved as to sty1e and content by; C airman of Committee Member em er ep men December... 1982 ABSTRACT Uranium in the Datman Creek Granite of Central Texas and its Economic Potential . (December 1 982) Curtis Paul Conrad, B. S. , Texas ABN University Chairman of Adv1sory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas T. Tieh Recent studies indicate that many...

  15. Strain rate-dependent failure of Westerly Granite at 100 MPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, William Joseph

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRAIN RATE-DEPEIYDENT FAILURE OF WESTERLY GRANITE AT 100 MPa A Thesis by WILLIAh1 JOSEPH HARRIS Submitted to the Graduate Colleoe of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1984 Major Subject: Geophys-, 'cs STRAIN RATE-DEPENDENT FAILURE OF WESTERLY GRANITE AT 100 MPa A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH HARRIS Approved as to styie and content by: Nevi e L. Carter (Chairman of Committee) obert L. Kranz (Member) Me vin ie...

  16. Geochemical characteristics of the Bulgarmarse Granite of the Fall River Pluton in the Avalonian Superterrane of southeastern New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, C.I.; Puffer, J.H. (Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 600 m.y. Bulgarmarsh Granite of the Fall River Pluton crops out along the SE margin of the Pennsylvanian-age Narragansett Basin in the Dedham terrane of the New England Avalonian Superterrane. The Bulgarmarsh is a coarse-grained, quartz-rich, very leucooratic granite, in which mafic minerals, generally less than 5--8%, occur chiefly as chlorite, biotite and garnet disequilibrium intergrowths. Most of the granite is very slightly deformed, but there are many localized zones of deformation, both brittle and plastic, that vary in degree of intensity. The Bulgarmarsh intrudes Basin margin metavolcanics similar to those of Price Neck Formation that crop out within the Basin in Newport and on Gould Island. The Bulgarmarsh Granite has many of the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of an A-type granite. Its geochemistry places it in the post-orogenic classification of Maniar and Piccoli (1989). New major and minor element geochemical data clearly discriminate between the Bulgarmarsh Granite and the adjacent calc-alkaline Metacom Granite Gneiss. Avalonian Orogeny, occupying a place in geologic history similar to that of the Newport Granite.

  17. Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wharton, Amy Laura

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert R. Berg The Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields in Oldham County, Texas produce oil from the Niddle Pennsylvanian Canyon granite wash. Canyon granite wash conglomerates and sandstones have a total thick- ness of about... Regional Structure. Regional Stratigraphy. Oil and Gas Fields of the Texas Panhandle. . . . Granite Wash Oil Fields Lambert I, Hryhor, and Sundance Fields. . Tectonic History. Stratigraphy. Drilling History. Methods CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GRANITE...

  18. Strain localization due to a positive feedback of deformation and myrmekite-forming reaction in granite and aplite mylonites along the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanagawa, Kyuichi

    in granite and aplite mylonites along the Hatagawa Shear Zone of NE Japan Junko Tsurumi, Hiroko Hosonuma mylonitization of aplite veins and their adjacent granite in the Hatagawa Shear Zone of NE Japan, the modal­80% in the granite and aplite ultramylonites. Deformation-induced myrmekite lobes are ubiquitously developed around K

  19. Journal o/Ihe Geological Soeien', London, Vol. 159,2002, pp 5"7-575. Printed in Great Britain. Granite production in the Delamerian Orogen, South Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    . Granite production in the Delamerian Orogen, South Australia J. D. FODEN 1 , M. A. ELBURG 1 , S. P. TURNER.Australia Abstract: In ¡he South Australian sector of the Cambro-Ordovieian Ross-Delamerian Orogen. granites range compositions forming a continuum between 1- and S-type granites. After the cessation of convergent deformation

  20. Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennings, Peter Hill

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana. (August 1986) Peter Hill Hennings, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John H. Spang Field mapping on scales of 1:6, 000 and 1: 12, 000 indicate that the basement involved... in the Field Area Methodology DATA. PAGE I 3 7 10 12 17 25 25 28 Field Map. Interpretive Data: Cross Sections Dry Fork Ridge Anticline. Faole Point Anticline and the Mountain Flank. . Basement Geometry. Fracture Analysis...

  1. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

  2. Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite by Walter A. Illman1 hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Introduction Well test analyses in porous and fractured for the interpretation of three-dimensional pneumatic well tests conducted in porous or fractured geologic media, which

  3. Evidence for the generation of juvenile granitic crust during continental extension, Mineral Mountains Batholith, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Drew S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1992-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    by Coleman [ 1991]. The data in Table 2 Sm MM88-3 MM88-5 MM88-6 MM88-7 MM88-8 TABLE 1. Sample Descriptions and Locations Field Description* (Mmg) thin granophyric dike in biotite-hornblende granite Lincoln porphyry from Lincoln mine (Mbhm...

  4. Chemical weathering of granitic rock: experiments and Pb-Li isotopes tracing Romain Millot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    is to better constrain the processes of water/rock interactions both in terms of source (dissolutionChemical weathering of granitic rock: experiments and Pb-Li isotopes tracing Romain Millot Philippe of weathering. In order to go further and to better characterize water/rock interactions, we performed

  5. 9/2/08 9:41 AMWhat's Lurking in Your Countertop? -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    ://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/24/garden/24granite.html Tony Cenicola/The New York Times TESTING Reports of granite emitting Liebert measures the radiation and radon emanating from granite like that in Lynn Sugarman's kitchen tracks in the kitchen, which had richly grained cream, brown and burgundy granite countertops. His Geiger

  6. Penetrative Deformation of Dolostones during Contact Metamorphism and the Forceful Emplacement of the Tungstonia Granite, Kern Mountains, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodson, Kyle

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Foliated dolostones surrounding the Tungstonia granite of eastern Nevada were investigated with the purpose of testing for models of forceful emplacement. Intragranular strains and lattice-preferred orientations (LPOs) define a zone of penetrative...

  7. Underground pumped storage scheme in the Bukit Timah granite of Singapore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, I.H. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)] [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pumped storage is an energy storage method that involves the pumping of water from a lower reservoir to an upper reservoir during off-peak period using low cost power and releasing of the water from the upper reservoir to produce electricity during peak load period. Because of the very small and relatively flat land area of Singapore, a conventional surface pumped storage plant is not feasible. A pumped storage plant can be constructed here by siting the upper reservoir in one of the many abandoned granite quarries and by placing the lower reservoir and the powerhouse underground in the Bukit Timah granite, which is sound, massive and impervious. The capital costs for a pumped storage plant could be the same as those of an oil-fired plant of a comparable size. When the very high cost of land in Singapore is taken into account, an underground pumped storage scheme for peaking purposes becomes attractive. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Microfracturing in Westerly granite experimentally extended wet and dry at temperatures to 800C? and pressures to 200 MPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Theodor William

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the direction of o&. In dry experiments, between 600' and 800'C, both GBC and IGC densities increase with increasing temperature. The increase in crack abundance is responsible for the thermal weakening of the rock . With increasing temperature, GBC play a... from boundary loads. Sprunt and Brace (1974) observed extensive cracking in granites when cycled to 400'C, particularly a'long grain boundaries. In unconfined Westerly granite subjected to slow, uniform temperature change, significant microcracking...

  9. Gravitational resonance spectroscopy with an oscillating magnetic field gradient in the GRANIT flow through arrangement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pignol; S. Baessler; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; K. Protasov; D. Rebreyend; A. Yu. Voronin

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational resonance spectroscopy consists in measuring the energy spectrum of bouncing ultracold neutrons above a mirror by inducing resonant transitions between different discrete quantum levels. We discuss how to induce the resonances with a flow through arrangement in the GRANIT spectrometer, excited by an oscillating magnetic field gradient. The spectroscopy could be realized in two distinct modes (so called DC and AC) using the same device to produce the magnetic excitation. We present calculations demonstrating the feasibility of the newly proposed AC mode.

  10. Baseline and Postremediation Monitoring Program Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements to present the plan for baseline and postremediation monitoring as part of the selected remedy. It provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the requirements to monitor for soil and terrestrial biota in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain; sediment, surface water, and aquatic biota in LEFPC; wetland restoration in the LEFPC floodplain; and human use of shallow groundwater wells in the LEFPC floodplain for drinking water. This document describes the monitoring program that will ensure that actions taken under Phases I and II of the LEFPC remedial action are protective of human health and the environment.

  11. South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

  12. RADIOACTIVITY DOSAGE OF ORNAMENTAL GRANITIC ROCKS BASED ON CHEMICAL, MINERALOGICAL AND LITHOLOGICAL DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salas, H.T.; Nalini, H.A. Jr.; Mendes, J.C.

    2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred samples of granitic rock were collected from granite traders in Belo Horizonte. Autoradiography, optical microscopy, diffractometry, and chemical analysis (X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, gravimetry and electron probe microanalysis) were used to determine the mineral assemblages and lithotypes. Autoradiographic results for several samples showed the presence of monazite, allanite and zircon. Chemical analysis revealed concentrations of uranium of {le} 30ppm, and thorium {le} 130ppm. Higher concentrations generally correlated with high concentrations of light rare earths in silica-rich rocks of granitic composition. Calculations were made of radioactive doses for floor tiles in a standard room for samples with total concentration of uranium and thorium greater than 60ppm. On the basis of calculations of {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 226}Ra from Th, K and U analysis, the doses calculated were between 0.11 and 0.34 mSv/year, which are much lower than the acceptable international exposure standard of 1.0 mSv/year.

  13. Uranium in granites from the southwestern United States: actinide parent-daughter systems, sites and mobilization. Second year report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, L.T.; Woodhead, J.A.; Williams, I.S.; Chappell, B.W.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of detailed field and laboratory studies are reported on the primary distribution of uranium (and thorium and lead) in the radioactive minerals of five radioactive granite bodies in Arizona and California. This distribution was examined in a granite pluton. Granites with uranium concentrations ranging from 4 to 47 ppM, thorium concentrations from 11 to 181 ppM, and Th/U ratios of 0.6 to 16.0 were compared. Evidence for secondary mobilization, migration, fixation and/or loss of uranium, thorium and radiogenic leads was explored. Uranium distribution in radioactive granites is hosted in a far greater diversity of sites than has previously been known. Uranium and thorium distribution in primary minerals of granites is almost entirely a disequilibrium product involving local fractionation processes during magmatic crystallization. Every radioactive granite studied contains minerals that contain uranium and/or thorium as major stoichiometric components. When the granites are subject to secondary geochemical events and processes, the behavior of uranium is determined by the stability fields of the different radioactive minerals in the rocks. The two most powerful tools for evaluating uranium migration in a granite are (a) isotope dilution mass spectrometry and (b) the electron microprobe. Uranium mobilization and loss is a common feature in radioactive granites of the southwestern United States. A model for the evaluation of uranium loss from granites has been developed. The mineral zircon can be used as an independent indicator of uranium and thorium endowment. The weathering products show surprising differences in the response of different granites in arid region settings. Significant losses of primary uranium (up to 70%) has been a common occurrence. Uranium, thorium and radiogenic lead exist in labile (movable) form on surfaces of cleavages, fractures and grain boundaries in granites.

  14. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

  15. The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes the calmodulin-binding protein in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes and abolish the ability of Hcm1p to act as a suppressor of calmodulin mutants. The promoter of SPC110 contains a match to the consensus binding site. Deletion of HCM1 does not affect the basal level of SPC110

  16. Uranium in granites from the Southwestern United States: actinide parent-daughter systems, sites and mobilization. First year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, L.T.; Williams, I.S.; Woodhead, J.A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the principal findings of the study on the Lawler Peak Granite are: the granite is dated precisely by this work at 1411 +- 3 m.y., confirming its synchroneity with a great regional terrane of granites. Uranium is presently 8-10 times crustal abundance and thorium 2-3 times in this granite. Uranium is found to be enriched in at least eight, possibly ten, primary igneous mineral species over the whole-rock values. Individual mineral species show distinct levels in, and characteristics ranges of, uranium concentration. It appears that in a uraniferous granite such as this, conventional accuracy mineral suites probably cannot account for most of the uranium in the rock, and more rare, high U-concentration phases also are present and are significant uranium hosts. It appears that at least two different geological episodes have contributed to the disturbance of the U-Th-Pb isotope systems. Studies of various sites for transient dispersal of uranium, thorium, and radiogenic lead isotopes indicate a non-uniform dispersal of these components. It appears that the bulk rock has lost at least 24 percent of its original uranium endowment, accepting limited or no radiogenic lead or thorium migration from the sample.

  17. Uranium in the Oatman Creek granite of Central Texas and its economic potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Curtis Paul

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential uranium source. Th1s study focuses on an 80 acre outcrop of the Oatman Creek granite known as Bear Mountain, in Gillespie County, Texas. The gran1te is a medium-grained, gray to pink rock. Nodal analysis indicates the composit1on 1s 35. 5... economically feasible because of the relatively low concentration of uranium in most igneous rocks. Recent studies ot uranium have been confined largely to the origin and development of uranium deposits in sedimentary rocks, namely sandstones. In the futur e...

  18. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  19. A source of ultra-cold neutrons for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Plonka, C; Soldner, T; Vezzu, F; Zimmer, O

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the status of the development of a dedicated high density ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source dedicated to the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons to UCN in superfluid helium. Tests have shown that UCN produced inside the liquid can be extracted into vacuum. Furthermore a dedicated neutron selection channel was tested to maintain high initial density and extract only neutrons with a vertical velocity component 20 cm/s for the spectrometer. This new source would have a phase-space density of 0.18 cm-3(m/s)-3 for the spectrometer.

  20. A source of ultra-cold neutrons for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; P. Geltenbort; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; C. Plonka; T. Soldner; F. Vezzu; O. Zimmer

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the status of the development of a dedicated high density ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source dedicated to the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons to UCN in superfluid helium. Tests have shown that UCN produced inside the liquid can be extracted into vacuum. Furthermore a dedicated neutron selection channel was tested to maintain high initial density and extract only neutrons with a vertical velocity component 20 cm/s for the spectrometer. This new source would have a phase-space density of 0.18 cm-3(m/s)-3 for the spectrometer.

  1. Light oil yield improvement project at Granite City Division Coke/By-Product Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holloran, R.A. [National Steel Corp., Granite City, IL (United States). Granite City Div.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light oil removal from coke oven gas is a process that has long been proven and utilized throughout many North American Coke/By-Products Plants. The procedures, processes, and equipment requirements to maximize light oil recovery at the Granite City By-Products Plant will be discussed. The Light Oil Yield Improvement Project initially began in July, 1993 and was well into the final phase by February, 1994. Problem solving techniques, along with utilizing proven theoretical recovery standards were applied in this project. Process equipment improvements and implementation of Operator/Maintenance Standard Practices resulted in an average yield increase of 0.4 Gals./NTDC by the end of 1993.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk RiverFrederickAZ 03Granite

  3. A method to measure the resonance transitions between the gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreuz, M; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Soldner, T; Thomas, M; Boerner, H G; Naraghi, F; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Rebreyend, D; Vezzu, F; Flaminio, R; Michel, C; Pinard, L; Remillieux, A; Baessler, S; Gagarski, A M; Grigorieva, L A; Kuzmina, T M; Meyerovich, A E; Mezhov-Deglin, L P; Petrov, G A; Strelkov, A V; Voronin, A Yu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to measure the resonance transitions between the gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer. The purpose of GRANIT is to improve the accuracy of measurement of the quantum states parameters by several orders of magnitude, taking advantage of long storage of Ultracold neutrons at specula trajectories. The transitions could be excited using a periodic spatial variation of a magnetic field gradient. If the frequency of such a perturbation (in the frame of a moving neutron) coincides with a resonance frequency defined by the energy difference of two quantum states, the transition probability will sharply increase. The GRANIT experiment is motivated by searches for short-range interactions (in particular spin-dependent interactions), by studying the interaction of a quantum system with a gravitational field, by searches for extensions of the Standard model, by the unique possibility to check the equivalence principle for an object in a quantum state and by study...

  4. Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

  5. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, V. Lance

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1988 spring outmigration at two migrant traps; one each on the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Due to the low runoff year, chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was very low. Steelhead trout catch was higher than normal, probably due to trap modifications and because the trap was moved to the east side of the river. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout catch at the Clearwater River trap was similar to 1987. Total cumulative recovery of PIT tagged fish at the three dams, with PIT tag detection systems was: 55% for chinook salmon, 73% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 75% for wild steelhead trout. Travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, was affected by discharge. Statistical analysis showed that as discharge increased from 40 kcfs to 80 kcfs, chinook salmon travel time decreased three fold, and steelhead trout travel time decreased two fold. There was a statistical difference between estimates of travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged and freeze branded steelhead trout, but not for chinook salmon. These differences may be related to the estimation techniques used for PIT tagged and freeze branded groups, rather than real differences in travel time. 10 figs, 15 tabs.

  6. Explosion in the Granite Field: Hardening and Softening Behavior in Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I N; Antoun, T H; Glenn, L A

    2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of rock materials under quasistatic conditions are well characterized in laboratory experiments. Unfortunately, quasistatic data alone are not sufficient to calibrate models for use to describe inelastic wave propagation associated with conventional and nuclear explosions, or with impact. First, rock properties are size-dependent. properties measured using laboratory samples on the order of a few centimeters in size need to be modified to adequately describe wave propagation in a problem on the order of a few hundred meters in size. Second, there is lack of data about the damage (softening) behavior of rock because most laboratory tests focus on the pre-peak hardening region with very little emphasis on the post-peak softening region. This paper presents a model for granite that accounts for both the hardening and softening of geologic materials, and also provides a simple description of rubblized rock. The model is shown to reproduce results of quasistatic triaxial experiments as well as peak velocity and peak displacement attenuation from a compendium of dynamic wave propagation experiments that includes US and French nuclear tests in granite.

  7. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2003 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam Juvenile Fish Facility (LGR) was characterized by water temperatures, total flows and spill that were below the five year average, low levels of debris, and increased smolt collection numbers compared to 2002 with the exception of unclipped sockeye/kokanee. There were 6,183,825 juvenile salmonids collected. Of these, 6,054,167 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,957,885 by barge and 96,282 by truck. An additional 102,340 fish were bypassed back to the river, primarily due to research projects with another 62,122 bypassed through the PIT-tag bypass system. According to the PTAGIS database, 152,268 PIT-tagged fish were detected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, Smolt Monitoring Staff recorded 345 PIT-tagged raceway and sample mortalities. Of the 6,183,825 total fish collected, 113,290 were PIT-tagged or radio tagged and 380 were sacrificed by researchers. The collection included 836,885 fish that had hatchery marks other than clipped fins (elastomer, freeze brands or Coded Wire Tags). An estimated 54,857 incidental fish were collected with an additional 8,730 adult salmonids removed from the separator.

  8. Explosion in the Granite Field: Hardening and Softening Behavior in Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I N; Antoun, T H; Glenn, L A

    2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of rock materials under quasistatic conditions are well characterized in laboratory experiments. Unfortunately, quasistatic data alone are not sufficient to calibrate models for use to describe inelastic wave propagation associated with conventional and nuclear explosions, or with impact. First, rock properties are size-dependent. properties measured using laboratory samples on the order of a few centimeters in size need to be modified to adequately describe wave propagation in a problem on the order of a few hundred meters in size. Second, there is lack of data about the damage (softening) behavior of rock because most laboratory tests focus on the pre-peak hardening region with very little emphasis on the post-peak softening region. This paper presents a model for granite that accounts for both the hardening and softening of geologic materials, and also provides a simple description of rubblized rock. The model is shown to reproduce results of quasistatic triaxial experiments as well as peak velocity and peak displacement attenuation from a compendium of dynamic wave propagation experiments that includes US and French nuclear tests in granite.

  9. Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

  10. 3/14/09 10:47 AMIs that granite counter in your home emitting radon? Page 1 of 4http://www.startribune.com/41239912.html?page=4&c=y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    3/14/09 10:47 AMIs that granite counter in your home emitting radon? Page 1 of 4http://www.startribune.com/41239912.html?page=4&c=y Advertisement Is that granite counter in your home emitting radon? Homeowners seeking just the right granite for their countertops have something new to ponder, besides which color

  11. 9/2/08 9:42 AMRice professor: Granite countertops may cause you harm | Chron.com -Houston Chronicle Page 1 of 3http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/moms/5908630.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    9/2/08 9:42 AMRice professor: Granite countertops may cause you harm | Chron.com - Houston Be wary of granite that glows Rice professor says countertops may be tainted with uranium By ALLAN TURNER. Some granite countertops, he says, contain high levels of uranium, which, by generating gamma radiation

  12. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Petry; the VERITAS Collaboration

    2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  13. Large zenith angle observations with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petry, D

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRANITE III camera of the Whipple Cherenkov Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona (2300 m a.s.l.) has the highest angular resolution of all cameras used on this telescope so far. The central region of the camera has 379 pixels with an individual angular diameter of 0.12 degrees. This makes the instrument especially suitable for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at large zenith angles since the increase in average distance to the shower maximum leads to smaller shower images in the focal plane of the telescope. We examine the performance of the telescope for observations of gamma-induced air-showers at zenith angles up to 63 degrees based on observations of Mkn 421 and using Monte Carlo Simulations. An improvement to the standard data analysis is suggested.

  14. An Assessment of health risk associated with mercury in soil and sediment from East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revis, N.; Holdsworth, G.; Bingham, G.; King, A.; Elmore, J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from a study conducted to determine the toxicity of Mercury in soils sediments samples. Mice were fed via diet, soils and sediment, from various locations along the East Fork Poplar creek. Tissue distribution of pollutants was determined at various intervals. The tissue level relative to toxicity was used to determine the effect of a complex matrix on the gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the pollutants (other pollutants included cadmium and selenium).

  15. INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Jerry Lucia

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

  16. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Black, M.C. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)] [and others

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

  17. First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

  18. Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dic key Cr Paola Cr Cr ystalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl C r So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathea d

  19. Blanchard Cr West Fk Clearwater R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dick ey Cr Paola Cr Cry stalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl Cr So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathead

  20. Genesis of zoned granite plutons in the Iapetus Suture Zone: new constraints from high-precision micro-analysis of accessory minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Andrew James

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Trans-Suture Suite (TSS) of granitic plutons located in Northern Britain span the Iapetus Suture and represent a particularly enigmatic stage of post-Caledonian Devonian magmatism. Despite calc-alkaline affinities, ...

  1. A Search for Pulsed TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar using the Whipple High Resolution GRANITE III Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kildea

    2003-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using 97 hours of data recorded with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera of the Whipple 10 m gamma-ray telescope.

  2. A Search for Pulsed TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar using the Whipple High Resolution GRANITE III Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kildea, J

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using 97 hours of data recorded with the high-resolution GRANITE III camera of the Whipple 10 m gamma-ray telescope.

  3. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menski, Fred

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

  4. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

  5. The Feasibility of Using an Ultrasonic Fish Tracking System in the Tailrace of Lower Granite Dam in 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cash, Kenneth; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a study conducted by PNNL in Spring 2002 at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District. Our goal was to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic fish tracking in the untested environment of a hydroelectric dam tailrace. If fish tracking were determined to be feasible, we would track the movement of juvenile hatchery chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), juvenile hatchery steelhead (O. mykiss), and juvenile wild steelhead (O. mykiss) and relate their movement to dam operations. The majority of fish to be tracked were released as a part of a separate study conducted by the Biological Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (BRD), which was investigating the movement of juvenile salmon in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam in relation to Removable Spillway Weir (RSW) testing. The two studies took place consecutively from April 14 to June 7, 2002.

  6. The role of oxalic acid on the dissolution of granitic sand: an experimental investigation in a hydrothermal flow-through system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christy Lynn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis by CHRISTY LYNN REED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis...

  7. Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wharton, Amy Laura

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of time-temperature index (TTI) for burial history of the Cisco Shale in Figure 21. . . . . . . . . 6 Average porosities and permeabilities for the Canyon granite wash, Lambert I and Sundance fields, Oldham County, Texas. Interval footage corresponds...DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF THE MIDDLE PENNSYLVANIAN GRANITE WASH; LAMBERT 1, HRYHOR, AND SUNDANCE FIELDS, NORTHERN PALO DURO BASIN, OLDHAM COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by AMY LAURA WHARTON ' Submi'tted to the Graduate College of Texas A...

  8. The role of oxalic acid on the dissolution of granitic sand: an experimental investigation in a hydrothermal flow-through system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christy Lynn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis by CHRISTY LYNN REED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis...

  9. The effects of unconfined slow uniform heating on the mechanical and transport properties of the westerly and charcoal granites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Stephen Joseph

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF UNCONFINED SLOW UNIFORM HEATING ON THE MECHANICAL AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF THE WESTERLY AND CHARCOAL GRANITES A Thesis L by STEPHEN '-JOSEPH BAUER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... JOSEPH BAUER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairs of Committee) iember) (Member) (Hea f Department) May 1980 111 ABSTRACT The Effects of Unconfined Slow Uniform Heating on the Mechanical and Transport Properties of the Westerly...

  10. Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data are presented in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, along with the required data evaluations specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime. This report provides additional evaluation of the CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater contamination and long-term concentration trends for regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

  11. Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuehrenberg, Lowell C.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of using mass releases of juvenile radio tags represents a new and potentially powerful research tool that could be effectively applied to juvenile salmonid passage problems at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. A system of detector antennas, strategically located, would automatically detect and record individually tagged juvenile salmonids as they pass through the spillway, powerhouse, bypass system, or tailrace areas below the dam. Accurate measurements of spill effectiveness, fish guiding efficiency (FGE), collection efficiency (CE), spillway survival, powerhouse survival, and bypass survival would be possible without handling large numbers of unmarked fish. A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam and at Lower Granite Dam. This report summarizes research to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype juvenile radio-tag system in a field situation and (2) to test the basic assumptions inherent in using the juvenile radio tag as a research tool.

  12. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer of the non-carbonated surfaces of the underlying rock was reason why the hornblende and diorite exhibited a minimum depth of carbonation. Under exposure to the scCO{sub 2}/water at 200 C and 10.34 MPa pressure for up to 42 days, the ranking of the magnitude of erosion caused by wet carbonation was in the following order; granite > albite > hornblende > diorite > quartz. The eroding-caused weight loss of granite (0.88 %) was {approx}2.4, {approx}5.2, {approx}9.8, and {approx}17.6 times greater than that of albite, hornblends, diorite, and quartz, respectively.

  13. Microstructural Characterization of U Coprecipitated Phases Formed in Bentonic-Granitic Groundwater and Under Anoxic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinones, Javier; Iglesias, Eduardo; Cobo, Jose M. [Energy, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Martinez Esparza, Aurora [Enresa, Emilio Vargas, 7, Madrid, 28043 (Spain); Gomez de Salazar, Jose Maria [Materials Science, UCM, Avda. Complutense s/n, Madrid, 28040 (Spain)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For improving the accuracy of the performance assessment studies related to the spent fuel safety under storage conditions, it is necessary to develop a new matrix alteration model. These models must be based on laboratory experiences and they should be capable of extrapolating storage environmental conditions. The most recent models developed include the oxidation and dissolution process of the spent fuel matrix, but the influence of a possible process of secondary phase formation over the spent fuel surface was not yet taken into account. This is a key process that could produce a reduction of the matrix dissolution rate/radiation shielding behaviour; however, the surface precipitation of the secondary phase could induce a localized corrosion process, in which case the dissolution rate of the spent fuel would be increased. This paper is focussed on microstructural characterization of secondary phases formed in co-precipitation experiments performed under anoxic conditions in granitic-bentonitic simulated groundwater. In order to simulate the influence of the container material, the co-precipitation experiments were performed in the absence and presence of iron powder. The solid phases formed were characterized using the following techniques: XRD; SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX. The XRD diffraction pattern showed that under anoxic conditions, a mixture of phases were obtained (sodium and potassium uranate and schoepite), whereas uranate phases were detected when only iron was present. The characterization study indicates that the U secondary phase formed (under reducing conditions and in the presence of iron powder) growth from the iron surface. The crystal size of the secondary phase is independent of the presence of iron powder (and it is always less than 3 {mu}m). Furthermore, the microstructural study showed the growing of U phases over iron powder. (authors)

  14. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by above average water temperatures, below average flows and spill, low levels of debris. The number of smolts collected for all species groups (with the exception of clipped and unclipped sockeye/kokanee) exceeded all previous collection numbers. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook, steelhead and sockeye above LGR, we can not accurately distinguish wild chinook, wild steelhead and wild sockeye/kokanee from hatchery reared unclipped chinook and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Wild steelhead can be identified from hatchery steelhead by the eroded dorsal and pectoral fins exhibited on unclipped hatchery steelhead. The numbers in the wild columns beginning in 1998 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. This season a total of 11,787,539 juvenile salmonids was collected at LGR. Of these, 11,253,837 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 11,164,132 by barge and 89,705 by truck. An additional 501,395 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways and for research purposes. According to the PTAGIS database, 177,009 PIT-tagged fish were detected at LGR in 2004. Of these, 105,894 (59.8%) were bypassed through the PIT-tag diversion system, 69,130 (39.1%) were diverted to the raceways to be transported, 1,640 (0.9%) were diverted to the sample tank, sampled and then transported, 345 (0.2%) were undetected at any of the bypass, raceway or sample exit monitors.

  15. An investigation of cathodoluminescence in albite from the A-type Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalby, Kim N.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Gordon, Robert A.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard (Missouri SU); (SFX); (Simon); (GFZ)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals red and blue colors within single, non-turbid albite (Ab{sub 98-99}) grains from the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia. A 720 nm X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) peak characterizes red CL regions, while a 280 nm XEOL feature dominates blue CL regions. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence results indicate that red CL and the 720 nm XEOL peak intensities relate to total Fe concentrations. The relationship between red CL and Fe content is confirmed by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The XEOL technique is used to exclude the Fe K-edge as the cause of red CL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that Fe in both the red and blue CL regions is Fe{sup 3+}, and that red CL activation may relate to the Si-Al order of the feldspar and to the distribution of Fe on tetrahedral sites. The CL textures, combined with EMPA and LA-ICPMS analyses, indicate that blue CL albite (Ab98) regions contain higher concentrations of Ca, Ti, Pb and rare earth elements, and were replaced, in part, by a more Fe-rich, trace element depleted albite (Ab99) which displays red CL. Complex diffraction contrasts and amorphous deposits identified in transmission electron microscope images suggest that aqueous fluids have reacted with both red and blue CL regions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures of up to 430 C provide a lower estimate of the fluid temperature.

  16. Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  17. SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY AND FACIES ANALYSIS OF THE ROLLINS SANDSTONE MEMBER (MOUNT GARFIELD FORMATION) AND RE-EXAMINATION OF THE CONTACT BETWEEN THE MOUNT GARFIELD AND WILLIAMS FORK FORMATIONS (LATE CRETACEOUS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Jesse David

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    there is no upward-climbing geometry at the top of the Mount Garfield Formation, and the Rollins Sandstone Member and the Cameo Wheeler coal zone (of the Williams Fork Formation) are not time-equivalent units. The marine- shoreface deposits within the Rollins...

  18. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  19. 5/8/08 8:37 AMAre granite countertops bad for your health? | TOP STORIES | KHOU.com | News for Houston, Texas Page 1 of 3http://www.khou.com/topstories/stories/khou080507_jj_countertopdangers.da1f6698.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    5/8/08 8:37 AMAre granite countertops bad for your health? | TOP STORIES | KHOU.com | News University TOP STORIES Are granite countertops bad for your health? 12:13 AM CDT on Thursday, May 8, 2008 conducted tests on granite countertops View larger player More Video It's a popular upgrade for new homes

  20. Soil type: Metabasic soils have 50 to 80 percent more mineralizable C than granitic soils. The same soils appear to more efficiently retain TN and some TOC at greater depths. Very low DOC in both soils indicate efficient C utilization and incorporation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    Soil type: Metabasic soils have 50 to 80 percent more mineralizable C than granitic soils. The same indicate efficient C utilization and incorporation in microbial or SOM pools. Greater mineral N in granite percent. There is not evidence of the impact of increased available C on TOC in granitic soils. Soil

  1. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  2. Impacts of the Snake River drawdown experiment on fisheries resources in Little Goose and Lower Granite Reservoirs, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D D; Geist, D R

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1992, the US Army Corps of Engineers initiated a test to help evaluate physical and environmental impacts resulting from the proposed future drawdown of Snake River reservoirs. Drawdown would reduce water levels in Snake River reservoirs and is being proposed as a solution to decrease the time it takes for salmon and steelhead smolts to migrate to the ocean. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated impacts to specific fisheries resources during the drawdown experiment by surveying Lower Granite Reservoir to determine if fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas and steelhead (0. mykiss) access to tributary creeks were affected. In addition, shoreline areas of Little Goose Reservoir were monitored to evaluate the suitability of these areas for spawning by fall chinook salmon. Relative abundance of fish species in nearshore areas was also determined during the drawdown, and stranded resident fish and other aquatic organisms were observed.

  3. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  4. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

  5. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  6. Reinterpretation of Rb/Sr isotopic data for the Little Elk Granite: Implications for the timing of deformational events, Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, P.S.; Gardner, E.T.; Holm, D.K. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early Proterozoic rift sediments in the Black Hills were multiply deformed (into refolded nappe structures) during the Trans-Hudson Orogeny, which culminated in Harney Peak Granite (HPG) emplacement at 1,715--1,697 Ma. A reset whole-rock Rb/Sr age of 1,840 [+-] 70 Ma obtained from the Archean (2,549 [+-] 11 Ma) Little Elk Granite (LEG, Zartman and Stern, 1967) is widely interpreted as being coeval with D2, based upon parallelism of gneissic foliation in the granite and F2 foliation predominant elsewhere in the Black Hills. However, the authors have recalculated the whole-rock Rb/Sr age by applying the IUGS-recommended [sup 87]Rb decay constant (Steiger and Jager, 1977) to the original isotopic data, obtaining a revised age of 1,905 [+-] 59 Ma. The authors interpret this age as representing a whole-rock isotopic resetting event associated with Early Proterozoic (2,170--1,880 Ma) rifting in the Black Hills. The authors envision the LEG to have experienced a convective hydrothermal fluid-flow regime associated with the rifting. This scenario would allow for the sustained heating and isotopic exchange between granite and abundant water-rich fluid (seawater ) that would be required to effect complete resetting of an Rb/Sr whole-rock isochron. They favor an age for the refolding event and the development of F2 structures that is more closely linked in time with HPG emplacement. Such an age is more compatible with published field/petrologic observations and Proterozoic tectonothermal models for the Black Hills.

  7. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake River between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. A total of 13,785 hours of setline effort and 389 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1998. Of the 278 white sturgeon captured in the Snake River, 238 were marked for future identification. Three sturgeon were captured in the Salmon River and none were captured in the Clearwater River. Since 1997, 6.9% of the tagged fish have been recovered. Movement of recaptured white sturgeon ranged from 98.5 kilometers downstream to 60.7 kilometers upstream, however, less than 25% of the fish moved more than 16 kilometers (10 miles). In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 51.5 cm to 286 cm and averaged 118.9 cm. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 37% since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River.

  8. Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Yarom

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

  9. Biological Evaluation of the Behavioral Guidance Structure at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington in 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Noah (U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Resource Division); Johnson, Gary E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rondorf, Dennis W. (VISITORS); Anglea, Steven M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wik, Timothy O. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Walla Walla District)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 a behavioral guidance structure (BGS; a steel wall 330m long and 17-24 m deep) was installed in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington. The purpose of the BGS was to change the horizontal distribution of downstream migrants approaching the south half of the powerhouse by guiding them toward the surface bypass and collector attached to the dam upstream of the north half of the powerhouses. The effectiveness of the BGS was evaluated with biotelemetry and hydroacoustics. The BGS was designed to be movable, thereby allowing a comparison between the horizontal distribution of the fish when the BGS was deployed as a diversion device and when the BGS was moved 800 m upstream of the dam and no longer influenced fish movements immediately upstream of the powerhouse. Radio telemetry and hydroacoustic techniques showed that about 80% of the fish migrating toward Turbines 1-3 were successfully diverted north. Radio telemetry data revealed that the mean residence times of chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead, and wild steelhead were 1.6, 1.7, and 2.4 times longer, respectively, when the BGS was out compared to when it was in. And overall fish passage efficiency was significantly higher when the BGS was in (93.7%) than out (91.2%).

  10. Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Polsky, Yarom

    This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

  11. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  12. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  13. Recent Approaches to Modeling Transport of Mercury in Surface Water and Groundwater - Case Study in Upper East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, TN - 13349

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States); Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)] [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this case study, groundwater/surface water modeling was used to determine efficacy of stabilization in place with hydrologic isolation for remediation of mercury contaminated areas in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watershed in Oak Ridge, TN. The modeling simulates the potential for mercury in soil to contaminate groundwater above industrial use risk standards and to contribute to surface water contamination. The modeling approach is unique in that it couples watershed hydrology with the total mercury transport and provides a tool for analysis of changes in mercury load related to daily precipitation, evaporation, and runoff from storms. The model also allows for simulation of colloidal transport of total mercury in surface water. Previous models for the watershed only simulated average yearly conditions and dissolved concentrations that are not sufficient for predicting mercury flux under variable flow conditions that control colloidal transport of mercury in the watershed. The transport of mercury from groundwater to surface water from mercury sources identified from information in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System was simulated using a watershed scale model calibrated to match observed daily creek flow, total suspended solids and mercury fluxes. Mercury sources at the former Building 81-10 area, where mercury was previously retorted, were modeled using a telescopic refined mesh with boundary conditions extracted from the watershed model. Modeling on a watershed scale indicated that only source excavation for soils/sediment in the vicinity of UEFPC had any effect on mercury flux in surface water. The simulations showed that colloidal transport contributed 85 percent of the total mercury flux leaving the UEFPC watershed under high flow conditions. Simulation of dissolved mercury transport from liquid elemental mercury and adsorbed sources in soil at former Building 81-10 indicated that dissolved concentrations are orders of magnitude below a target industrial groundwater concentration beneath the source and would not influence concentrations in surface water at Station 17. This analysis addressed only shallow concentrations in soil and the shallow groundwater flow path in soil and unconsolidated sediments to UEFPC. Other mercury sources may occur in bedrock and transport though bedrock to UEFPC may contribute to the mercury flux at Station 17. Generally mercury in the source areas adjacent to the stream and in sediment that is eroding can contribute to the flux of mercury in surface water. Because colloidally adsorbed mercury can be transported in surface water, actions that trap colloids and or hydrologically isolate surface water runoff from source areas would reduce the flux of mercury in surface water. Mercury in soil is highly adsorbed and transport in the groundwater system is very limited under porous media conditions. (authors)

  14. Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  15. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fishereis Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 31 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 138 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 34 white sturgeon eggs were recovered: 27 in the Snake River, and seven in the Salmon River.

  16. Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate egg mats documented white sturgeon spawning in four consecutive years. A total of 49 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River from 1999-2002, and seven from the Salmon River during 2000.

  17. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 309 aged white sturgeon. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 14 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River in 2001.

  18. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheney suggesting a billVehicles | DepartmentStrategicfrom Lower15

  19. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  20. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

  2. The alteration of metamict zircon and its role in the remobilization of high-field strength elements in the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.J.; Wirth, R.; Thomas, R. (SFX); (GFZ)

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and composition of metamict zircon from the Georgeville epizonal A-type granite in the Antigonish Highlands, Nova Scotia, were determined using EMPA, SXRF, LA-ICP-MS, Raman microspectroscopy and TEM data. Individual crystals of zircon are variably altered and consist of four domains distinguished on the basis of texture and composition. Domain A consists of zircon and zirconium oxide nanocrystals in an amorphous matrix and is trace-element-enriched. Replacement of domain A in proximity to microfractures produced a porous and relatively trace-element-poor zircon (domain B) with disseminated Th-U- and Y-enriched inclusions (domain C). Domain D consists of amorphous zirconium silicate that is depleted in trace elements but enriched in Hf. It is found in fractures, together with minor amounts of thorite and thorianite. It Domain D is anhydrous and free of inclusions and pore spaces and has a composition similar to highly crystalline zircon. Micro- and nanoscale element-distribution maps indicate that high-field-strength trace elements in metamict zircon were redistributed during alteration by diffusion and by dissolution-and-reprecipitation processes near microfractures and other fluid channelways. The anomalous chondrite-normalized rare-earth-element patterns and Nd isotopic signature of the granite is attributed largely to the preferential transport and deposition of rare-earth elements during subsolidus re-equilibration of metamict zircon. Hydrothermally deposited zirconium silicate (domain D) has a composition similar to that of highly crystalline Hf-rich zircon but is completely amorphous. This observation emphasizes the need to verify the structural integrity and aqueous durability of hydrothermally deposited zircon before it is used to reconstruct hydrothermal processes.

  3. Evaluation of a Prototype Surface Flow Bypass for Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead at the Powerhouse of Lower Granite Dam, Snake River, Washington, 1996-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Anglea, Steven M.; Adams, Noah S.; Wik, Timothy O.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface flow bypass provides a route in the upper water column for naturally, surface-oriented juvenile salmonids to safely migrate through a hydroelectric dam. Surface flow bypasses were recommended in several regional salmon recovery plans as a means to increase passage survival of juvenile salmonids at Columbia and Snake River dams. A prototype surface flow bypass, called the SBC, was retrofit on Lower Granite Dam and evaluated from 1996 to 2000 using biotelemetry and hydroacoustic techniques. In terms of passage efficiency, the best SBC configurations were a surface skimmer (99 m3/s [3,500 cfs], three entrances 5 m wide, 5 m deep and one entrance 5 m wide, 15 m deep) and a single chute (99 m3/s, one entrance 5 m wide, 8.5 m deep). They each passed 62 ? 3% (95% confidence interval) of the total juvenile fish population that entered the section of the dam with the SBC entrances (Turbine Units 4-5). Smooth entrance shape and concentrated surface flow characteristics of these configurations are worth pursuing in designs for future surface flow bypasses. In addition, a guidance wall in the Lower Granite Dam forebay diverted the following percentages of juvenile salmonids away from Turbine Units 1-3 toward other passage routes, including the SBC: run-at-large 79 ? 18%; hatchery steelhead 86%; wild steelhead 65%; and yearling chinook salmon 66%. When used in combination with spill or turbine intake screens, a surface flow bypass with a guidance wall can produce a high level (> 90% of total project passage) of non-turbine passage and provide operational flexibility to fisheries managers and dam operators responsible for enhancing juvenile salmonid survival.

  4. Investigation of exfoliation joints in Navajo sandstone at the Zion National Park and in granite at the Yosemite National Park by tectonofractographic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahat, D.; Grossenbacher, K.; Karasaki, K.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tectonofractographic techniques have been applied to the study of joint exfoliation in the Navajo sandstone at Zion National Park and in the granite at Yosemite National Park. New types of fracture surface morphologies have been observed which enabled the discerning of incipient joints and consequent fracture growth in these rocks. Incipient jointing in the sandstone is mostly manifested by elliptical and circular fractures (meters to tens meters across) initiating from independent origins. They interfere with each other and grow to larger circular fractures producing exfoliation surfaces up to hundreds of meters across. Less frequently, series of large concentric undulations demonstrate the propagation of a large fracture front producing exfoliation from an individual origin. One such fracture front reveals refraction of undulations at a layer boundary. Certain en echelon fringes surround the joint mirror plane with well defined rims of en echelons and hackles which enable the determination of the tensile fracture stress, {sigma}f. Arches in Zion National Park are ubiquitous in shape and size, revealing stages in their evolution by a mechanical process, which was associated with exfoliation, but independent of local faulting. Exfoliation and arching mostly occurred on vertical surfaces of N-NNW and NE sets of prominent joints, but there are also deviations from this general trend. In Yosemite National Park large exfoliations (hundreds of meters in size) developed on the El Capitan cliff by the interaction and merging of many previous smaller incipient joints that vary in size from meters to tens of meter.

  5. Spent Fuel Test-Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C. (comp.)

    1986-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site, eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized. When test data indicated that the test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase, the spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized. The project demonstrated the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel assemblies between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. The test led to development of a technical measurements program. To meet these objectives, nearly 1000 instruments and a computer-based data acquisition system were deployed. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on a continuing basis for the three-year storage phase and six-month monitored cool-down of the test. This report summarizes the engineering and scientific endeavors which led to successful design and execution of the test. The design, fabrication, and construction of all facilities and handling systems are discussed, in the context of test objectives and a safety assessment. The discussion progresses from site characterization and experiment design through data acquisition and analysis of test data in the context of design calculations. 117 refs., 52 figs., 81 tabs.

  6. Hydrodynamic potential of upper cretaceous Mesaverde group and Dakota formation, San Juan Basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougless, Thomas Clay

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wells near the present site of the New Mexico Public Service power plants in 1912-13; (6) Mesa Verde Oil Company drilled two wells near Flora Vista in 1918-19; and the T. E. Williams Syndicate drilled the the deepest test to date (3, 900 ft) 5 miles... sandstones (Deischl, 1973). The central basin Dakota discovery well was drilled in 1947 in the Angel Peak area south of Bloomfield, New Mexico (Matheny, 1964). Development of the Dakota reserves within the basin was initially very slow due to a lack...

  7. Measurement and analysis of fractures in vertical, slant, and horizontal core, with examples from the Mesaverde formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Hill, R.E. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimum analysis of natural fracture characteristics and distributions in reservoirs requires conscientious supervision of coring operations, on-site core processing, careful layout and marketing of the core, and detailed measurement of fracture characteristics. Natural fractures provide information on the in situ permeability system, and coring-induced fractures provide data on the in situ stresses. Fracture data derived from vertical core should include fracture height, type and location of fracture terminations with respect to lithologic heterogeneity, fracture planatary and roughness, and distribution with depth. Fractures in core from either a vertical or a deviated well will yield information on dip, dip azimuth, strike, mineralization, and the orientation of fractures relative to the in situ stresses. Only measurements of fractures in core from a deviated/horizontal well will provide estimates of fracture spacing and porosity. These data can be graphed and cross-plotted to yield semi-quantitative fracture characteristics for reservoir models. Data on the orientations of fractures relative to each other in unoriented core can be nearly as useful as the absolute orientations of fractures. A deviated pilot hole is recommended for fracture assessment prior to a drilling horizontal production well because it significantly enhances the chances of fracture intersection, and therefore of fracture characterization. 35 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule DTCD SECM LCLT, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schreiber, Daniel K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cabie, M. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CP2M, Marseille (France)

    2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements of diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution rate, contrary to what has been suggested by recent interfacial dissolution-precipitation models for silicate minerals.

  9. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  12. RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    depends on three basic rock properties: (i) permeability, (temperature-dependent rock properties were used, but thereis determined by the properties of the rock matrix and, more

  13. GRANITE RELIABLE | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM RevisedFundingEnergy Issues RelatedDepartment

  14. Characterizing Low-Permeable Granitic Rock From Micrometer to Centimeter Scale: X-ray Micro-computed Tomography, Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and {sup 14}C-PMMA Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laehdemaeki, T.; Kelokaski, M.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O.Box 55, University of Helsinki, FIN- 00014 (Finland); Voutilainen, M.; Myllys, M.; Turpeinen, T.; Timonen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O.Box 35, Jyvaeskylae, FIN-40351 (Finland); Mateos, F.; Montoto, M. [Department of Geology, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, 33005 (Spain)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First results of combining X-ray micro-computed tomography ({mu}CT), confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and {sup 14}C-poly-methyl-methacrylate ({sup 14}C-PMMA) impregnation techniques in the study of granitic rock samples are reported. Combining results of {mu}CT and CLSM with those of the {sup 14}C-PMMA technique, the mineral-specific porosity and morphology of the open pore space, as well as its connectivity, could be analyzed from a micrometer up to a decimeter scale. Three different types of granite were studied. In two cases part of the micro-fissure and pore apertures were found to be in a micrometer scale, but in one case all grain-boundary openings were below the detection limit. Micrometer-scale apertures could be analyzed by CLSM and {mu}CT. The benefit of {mu}CT is that it can also provide the heterogeneous distribution of minerals in 3D. The 2D porosity distributions in the mineral phases, consisting of nanometer-scale pores, could be measured by the {sup 14}C-PMMA method together with the micro-fissures. This method does not, however, give the exact pore apertures. The limitations and applicability of the methods are discussed. (authors)

  15. Confocal {mu}-XRF, {mu}-XAFS, and {mu}-XRD Studies of Sediment from a Nuclear Waste Disposal Natural Analogue Site and Fractured Granite Following a Radiotracer Migration Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denecke, Melissa A.; Brendebach, Boris; Rothe, Joerg; Simon, Rolf [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Janssens, Koen; Nolf, Wout de; Vekemans, Bart [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Falkenberg, Gerald [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) at DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Somogyi, Andrea [Synchrotron Soleil, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Noseck, Ulrich [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Theodor-Heuss-Strasse 4, D-38122 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined {mu}-XRF, {mu}-XAFS, and {mu}-XRD investigations of a uranium-rich tertiary sediment, from a nuclear repository natural analogue site, and a fractured granite bore core section after a column tracer experiment using a Np(V) containing cocktail have been performed. Most {mu}-XRF/{mu}-XAFS measurements are recorded in a confocal geometry to provide added depth information. The U-rich sediment results show uranium to be present as a tetravalent phosphate and that U(IV) is associated with As(V). Arsenic present is either As(V) or As(0). The As(0) forms thin coatings on the surface of pyrite nodules. A hypothesis for the mechanism of uranium immobilization is proposed, where arsenopyrite acted as reductant of ground water dissolved U(VI) leading to precipitation of less soluble U(IV) and thereby forming As(V). Results for the granite sample show the immobilized Np to be tetravalent and associated with facture material.

  16. Roaring Fork Valley- Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE), a nonprofit organization promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency in western Colorado, offers residential and commercial rebates within...

  17. FORKING AND MULTIPLICITY IN FIRST ORDER THEORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, John T.

    sequence hb i j i 2 Xi in p over A. 7 #12; COHEIRS Let M j= T and M ` A, p 2 S(A) is a coheir of pjM of pjM . 1. p does not divide over M . 2. If E = he i : i 2 Ii contained in MB is a coherent sequence

  18. SOUTH FORK CLEARWATER RIVER HABITAT ENHANCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Everson, Project Manager U. S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish

  19. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Program (Colorado)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Eagle, Pitkin and Gunnison Counties can participate in the Energy Smart Program. The Energy Smart Program helps residents identify, finance, and complete energy improvements in their...

  20. Spanish Fork Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp JumpsourceSouthlake,

  1. Structural geology of the Irons Fork - North Fork Creek area, Lake Ouachita, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Marjorie Ann

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shale marks an abrupt increase in depo- sitional rate for Carboniferous rocks; Morris (1974) calculates a rate of 333 m/m. y. Cline (1966) believes this is the beginning of flysch sedimentation within the Ouachita trough. A southeastern source has.... The stratigraphic units in the area can be divided into three structural packages with different mechanical responses based on their observed style of deformation. The Mazarn-Womble shale units behaved as one macroscopically ductile package. Flexural flow folds...

  2. Structural geology of the Irons Fork - North Fork Creek area, Lake Ouachita, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Marjorie Ann

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shale marks an abrupt increase in depo- sitional rate for Carboniferous rocks; Morris (1974) calculates a rate of 333 m/m. y. Cline (1966) believes this is the beginning of flysch sedimentation within the Ouachita trough. A southeastern source has.... The stratigraphic units in the area can be divided into three structural packages with different mechanical responses based on their observed style of deformation. The Mazarn-Womble shale units behaved as one macroscopically ductile package. Flexural flow folds...

  3. Granite Reliable Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind Farm JumpReliable Power Jump

  4. Granite City, Illinois, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ," POSTGranite City, Illinois,

  5. Clean Cities: Granite State Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee Region

  6. Granite Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:Geothermal Project Jump

  7. Granite Falls Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:Geothermal ProjectFalls

  8. Granite Springs Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:GeothermalSprings

  9. Granite Wind LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas:

  10. Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3DepartmentE-23

  11. North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling of a 5000-foot exploratory gas and oil well by Marathon Oil Company is proposed for Section 34, T52N, R106W, near Pagoda Creek in the Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming. An area 75 feet by 80 feet would be cleared of all vegetation and graded nearly flat for the drill pad and reserve pit. The drilling rig, pipe rack, generator, tool house, living facilities, drilling mud pump, pit, and supply platform all would be built on the drill pad. A blooie hole would contain cuttings and dust from the air drilling. Support facilities would include a helicopter staging area along Clocktower Creek approximately one mile south of the Yellowstone Highway and a 2550-foot temporary water pipeline from Pagoda Creek to the well site. Personnel, equipment, and supplies would be trucked to the helicopter staging area and shuttled to the proposed location by helicopters. Lease stipulations prohibit drilling before September 8; therefore, the starting date would be the late fall of the respective year and would have to be completed by the following January 1. Approval of the exploratory well would not include approval of production facilities.

  12. Chemical Sensor Based on Microfabricated Wristwatch Tuning Forks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    made of different conducting polymers or composites in combination with multivariate statistical tech-7 single-walled carbon nanotubes,8,9 polyaniline micro/ nanostructures, 10-12 and carbon-polymer composites the mechanical response of a thin (10-m) polymer wire stretched across the two prongs of a wristwatch quartz

  13. advanced fork system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education (1999), 10, 257-277 257 The Advanced Embedded Training System (AETS): An Intelligent Embedded...

  14. Microsoft Word - CoastMiddleForksWillamette_Wildish__CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Wildish Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-017-00, Contract BPA-004959 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease,...

  15. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Eagle, Gunnison or Pitkin Counties may be eligible for financing through the Energy Smart Program. Loans as low as $1,000 with flexible terms are available for small projects, and...

  16. area forked river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: Restaurants in the T Bar M area Huisache Grill 303 West San Antonio St D New Braunfels, TX 78130 (830) 620-9001 The Gristmill 1287 Gruene Road...

  17. Upper East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment of Energy Office ofStephanie

  18. Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project Draft Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag" | DepartmentCladding AttachmentDepartmentB O

  19. City of East Grand Forks, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton,

  20. Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County, Kansas:GrahamBlanc,Grand Electric

  1. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1 DOEEmissionLowell,2 DOE1East

  2. Three Forks, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood, New York:

  3. Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop, IncSouthwestern ElectricSpain:

  4. American Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch GreenAmeren IllinoisInc AEPS

  5. Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansas County,Minnesota:Arthur,Ascent SolarAscoenergyAsh

  6. Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: Energy Resources JumpCloverCounty,

  7. altered granitic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 Everglades National Park Groundwater wells Surface water monitoring locations Rock mining locations 12 Demers, Nora Egan 211 Nova Scotia Rock Garden Club Membership...

  8. AN EXAMPLE OF FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION IN GRANITIC ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, R.K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. Funding for this projectof California Contract W-7405-ENG-48 with the Department of

  9. Site Name: Granite Rock Date: 2005-2007, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPhee-Shaw, Erika

    pycnocephalus Mustard Brassica campestris Radish Raphanus sativus Sow Thistle Sonchus oleraceus #12;#12;Photos

  10. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m in diameter. 2) geological characterization - includingBasic Objectives Geological characterization Is the process

  11. altered granite area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in chronic human spinal cord injury Katherine M. Deutscha, b, T. George Hornbya, c, Brian D joint torques at the ankle, knee and hip. The results showed that SCI individuals...

  12. Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    nearly parallel to the maximum horizontal stress. In this favorable situation, hydraulic injections will tend both to reactivate natural fractures at low pressures, and to...

  13. Directional drilling and equipment for hot granite wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.E.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following drilling equipment and experience gained in drilling to date are discussed: positive displacement motors, turbodrills, motor performance experience, rotary-build and rotary-hold results, steering devices and surveying tools, shock absorbers, drilling and fishing jars, drilling bits, control of drill string drag, and control of drill string degradation. (MHR)

  14. WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, N.G.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the heat released by the radioactive decay of waste inwaste must increase, establishing a temperature gradient away from it to allowforthe dissipation of the heat

  15. HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Session on Heat Transfer in Nuclear Waste Disposal, C'.heat transfer processes associated with underground nuclear wasteheat transfer and related processes in an un derground environment similar to that expected in a mined nuclear waste

  16. HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. , and Board, M. , "Rock Properties and Their Effect onof thermal properties of the rock; and (h) different thermalon the mechanical properties of rock re ported by a number

  17. ara granites south: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Asians and one of the highest proportions (2.3%) of South Asian residents in the United States Garfunkel, Eric 154 South Dakota Tourism Leopard Frog Geosciences Websites...

  18. agudos grandes granite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Rio GrandeBasin, one of the most productive agriculturalareas in the United States. Irrigated agricul- ture claims 85 percent of its water, and urban water use is...

  19. City of Granite Falls, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity ofCity ofCityCity ofGrandCity of

  20. Granite County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:

  1. Granite Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:Geothermal

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite2_FUSRAP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk RiverFrederickAZ

  3. Town of Granite Falls, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldsonInformationTorpedoBoylston,Information Town of

  4. Mr. Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3Department of Energy

  5. Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7635U: .' .

  6. City of Granite, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity ofInformation CityIowaCityGlenCity ofCity

  7. Granite State Electric Co (New Hampshire) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGolden

  8. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

  9. Analytical modeling of a fracture-injection/falloff sequence and the development of a refracture-candidate diagnostic test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, David Paul

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -injection/falloff sequence Cartesian after-closure analysis graph. ......................... 152 5.11 Fracture-injection/falloff sequence variable-storage type-curve match. ............................... 153 5.12 GM 543-33 Mesaverde formation fracture...-injection/falloff sequence. ................................ 159 5.13 GM 543-33 Mesaverde formation fracture-injection/falloff sequence G-function derivative analysis...

  10. , 18/10/2013 -> Multitasking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafillou, Peter

    µ fork fork (parent) µ (child) - µ fork pid = fork(); fork µ ( ) µ µ pid - pid (ID) - - pid = 0 ? - 2 6 #12;#include #include main() { int pid = 0; printf("hello world\

  11. WATERSHED RESTORATION PLAN Big Creek, North Fork of the Flathead River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................................................................................. 26 2.5 NONPOINT POLLUTION SOURCE INVENTORY AND THE PROPOSED RESTORATION ACTIVITIES .. 27 SECTION 4 4.1 POLLUTANT REDUCTION: The average monthly air temperatures and average monthly precipitation at Glacier International Airport

  12. Appendix 68 Bull Trout Data for Hungry Horse and South Fork of the Flathead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4632 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 No.Redds #12;Figure 2

  13. Diagenesis of the Clear Fork Formation (Leonardian) in the Monahans field, west Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedrick, Carroll Lee

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recognized in thin section for the Scaly Smith ?164, ?163, and ?270. . . . . 24 10. Trace element concentrations from the Scaly Smith ?164. . .. . . . . 26 11. Carbon and oxygen isotopes from the Scaly Smith ?164, Scaly Smith ?163, and Scaly Smith ?270... crystals from the Scaly Smith ?164 have decreasing manganese concentrations from the inclusion-rich core to the clear overgrowth. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes Carbon and oxygen isotopes were determined for one hundred and fourteen samples from the Scaly...

  14. Multi-Signatures in the Plain Public-Key Model and a General Forking Lemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellare, Mihir

    many potential uses. However, existing schemes impose key setup or PKI requirements that make them. Such a system could be useful for contract signing, co-signing, or distribution of a certificate authority power than executing one 32-bit instruction [4]. Reducing the number of bits to communicate saves power

  15. DOE/BP-00005043-1 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Project Number represent the views of BPA. Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 #12;South

  16. Fashionable Form: The Narrative Strategies of Silver-Fork Fiction, 1824-1848

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richstad, Josephine Sara

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buoys the reviewers credibility); and damned for his lack of creative powers, which in the particular language of the review

  17. DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam; The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land...

  18. A comparison of spent fuel assembly control instruments: The Cadarache PYTHON and the Los Alamos Fork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bignan, G.; Capsie, J.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires); Rinard, P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices to monitor spent fuel assemblies while stored under water with nondestructive assay methods, have been developed in France and in the United States. Both devices are designed to verify operator's declared values of exposures and cooling-time but the applications and thus the designs of the systems differ. A study, whose results are presented in this paper, has been conducted to compare the features and the performances of the two instruments. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  19. The FERC EBB working group: Put a fork in us, we`re done

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636 required interstate pipelines to set up electronic bulletin boards for trading released capacity. Their goal was to foster an efficient and competitive secondary market for pipeline capacity. Five working groups were created to address the issues of core capacity, operationally available capacity, customer specific gas flows, communications protocols/operational logistics, and common codes. This paper describes the scope of the working groups and their accomplishments.

  20. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of each thin section consisted of a grid point-count of 125 points for composition and 100 points for monocrystalline quartz size. The composi- tional data were normalized with respect to the detrital component of the sample. Grain size... separated by thin limestone beds. All formation contacts within the Cherokee Group are conformable while tne group is bounded below by a major unconformity on top of the Atokan Series. The younger Marmaton Group limestones lie conformably above...

  1. gr veins gr + x Boom House Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    Granite gr veins gr + x granite veins intruding host rock granite with xenoliths Field trip stop locality

  2. Disposal R&D in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign: A Discussion of Opportunities for Active International Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Start of Repository Operations Granite, Gneiss, Grandiorite,Oskarshamn Geologic Environments ONKALO (Granite) Site atOlkiluoto Selected Granite Aspo (Granite) Site at Osthammar

  3. Laramie, Wyoming December, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    - Industrial Minerals and Uranium W. Dan Hausel, Senior Economic Geologist - Metals and Precious Stones Robert Wyoming. This rig is exploring for coalbed methane in coals of the Almond Formation, Mesaverde Group update................................................................................ 3 Exploration

  4. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Ca++ and Ba++ chemistry, and uranium solution is redoxchemistry samples collect dissolved gas samples collect uraniumUranium-238 Helium-4 and other noble gases. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 3.1 Groundwater Chemistry

  5. Variation of seismic-wave velocities in westerly granite under stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz Muhareb

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -wave Results. S-wave Results. SUMMARY. REFERENCES. . . . :. 10 . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . 17 . . . . . 21 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 28 . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . 36 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE la. Compressional-wave velocities, Vp.... . 17 Figure 7 Crosscorrelation between two P-wave traces along one direction at two different pressure levels to determine the relative time delays. . . . . 20 Figure 8. (a, b and c). P-wave traces measured at the center of the faces along x-, y...

  6. EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

  7. Hafnium isotope evidence from Archean granitic rocks for deep-mantle origin of continental crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    of zircon crystallization. The advent of laser-ablation LuHf isotope analysis of igneous and detrital

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Zircon Hf isotope perspective on the origin of granitic rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Springer-Verlag 2009 Abstract The petrogenetic potential of in situ laser ablation Hf isotope data Bohemian Massif Granitoid Hafnium isotopes Laser ablation ICP-MS Variscan Zircon Introduction the Hf isotopic composition of individual zircons in situ by laser ablation ICP-MS (Thirlwall and Walder

  9. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Italy). In Isotope Hydrology, IAEA Symposium. Sm-129/53,isotopic variations in hydrology. At. Energy Rev. 14: 621-70 GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE

  10. Sediment production and downslope sediment transport from forest roads in granitic watersheds. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketcheson, G.L.; Megahan, W.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study from highly erodible Idaho soils and provides information necessary to develop road design criteria and evaluate risks and trade-offs. Objectives of the study were to: quantify the volume of sediment deposition on slopes in relation to road features; determine the probability distribution of sediment travel distance; evaluate how sediment deposition occurs with respect to forest site conditions and downslope location of streams; determine the volume and particle size distribution of sediment deposits on slopes in relation to sediment travel distance; and investigate time trends in sediment deposition.

  11. Microsoft Word - Granite-Mt-3G-Radio-Station-CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1021): B1.19 Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities... Location: Stevens County, Washington (T34N, R38E,...

  12. Vascular flora and vegetation of granite outcrops in the Central Mineral Region of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Terrence Wesley

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Me nard ~ Llano F edencasb rg ~ LGJL 1L McCULLOCH i SAN SABA ( W LAMPASASy J gan Saba 8rady ~ r- ?. ? ? ? ? -Q Lamoasas ~ MENARD BURNETT L /+MASON LLANO I / Cc' Mason ~ Burner / / / ~ Jnncnon . BLANCO / / Johnson Crry LESPIE... Maga d ~ I KIMBLE p L r rc McCULLQCi. l MASAN SABA l LAMPASASX &7& gan Saba grasp ~ C c kampasas ) BURNETT . ) I LLANO r ~ Masoa glar a ~ ~ 1 ~ garnet ~ EB ATQ / ~ 84 /' ~ ieh ~ /U4cllaa BLANCO f /c J / 1 ede cksba 8 ~ dahhsaa 8...

  13. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Ca++ and Ba++ chemistry, and uranium solution is redoxchemistry samples collect dissolved gas samples collect uraniumand Uranium-238 Helium-4 and other noble gases. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 3.1 Groundwater Chemistry

  14. Reservoir Characterization and Waterflood Performance Evaluation of Granite Wash Formation, Anadarko Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilangekar, Akshay Anand

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    set of field data was provided by the operator and other necessary parameters were obtained through publicly available field studies and literature. The final objective is implementing advanced reservoir simulation to integrate well log data, PVT data...

  15. Land clearing reduces gene flow in the granite outcrop-dwelling lizard, Ctenophorus ornatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Joseph L.

    not provide adequate resources or protection from predation (Stow et al. 2001; Berry et al. 2005; Hoehn et al genetic variation as an indicator of levels of gene flow (e.g. Driscoll & Hardy 2005; Hoehn et al. 2007

  16. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0.25- to D.5-liter plastic bottles, which were thoroughlycollected in two I-liter plastic bottles. The new bottles~ twenty I-liter plastic bottles were rinsed and filled with

  17. EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011D APPENDIXKahukuCounty, NVDepartment

  18. Summary of four release consequence analyses for hypothetical nuclear waste repositories in salt and granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Release consequence methology developed under the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) program has now been applied to four hypothetical repository sites. This paper summarizes the results of these four studies in order to demonstrate that the far-field methodology developed under the AEGIS program offers a practical approach to the post-closure safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories sited in deep continental geologic formations. The four studies are briefly described and compared according to the following general categories: physical description of the repository (size, inventory, emplacement depth); geologic and hydrologic description of the site and the conceptual hydrologic model for the site; description of release scenario; hydrologic model implementation and results; engineered barriers and leach rate modeling; transport model implementation and results; and dose model implementation and results. These studies indicate the following: numerical modeling is a practical approach to post-closure safety assessment analysis for nuclear waste repositories; near-field modeling capability needs improvement to permit assessment of the consequences of human intrusion and pumping well scenarios; engineered barrier systems can be useful in mitigating consequences for postulated release scenarios that short-circuit the geohydrologic system; geohydrologic systems separating a repository from the natural biosphere discharge sites act to mitigate the consequences of postulated breaches in containment; and engineered barriers of types other than the containment or absorptive type may be useful.

  19. A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy InformationOf TheLtd APWRInformation

  20. PNL-8807 UC-O00 IMPACT OF EXPERIMENTALDEWATERINGOF LOWER GRANITE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than histone modificationsTheA)40PNL-8807

  1. Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County,Texas: EnergyOhio:Geothermal Project

  2. Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmiteInExploration At Geothermal Wells |Eps-1,

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City IL Site - IL 28

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew Mexico Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site

  4. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the night, as part of hydroelectric power generation by theto manage water for hydroelectric power generation. There

  5. C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    berkeley_landmarks/theta-xi.html. Urban Creeks Council.2007. Codornices Creek Watershed Restoration Action Plan (336-361. NRPI. Codornices Creek at Ohlone Greenway. Accessed

  6. C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    history of urban stream restoration. Aquatic Conservation:on Codornices Creek. Restoration of Rivers and Streams.Restoration of Rivers and Streams, Water Resources

  7. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact statement for hydropower license. Upper Americanand permitted for hydropower generation and flood control.1):257268 Hunter MA (1992) Hydropower flow fluctuations and

  8. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT NORTH FORK SKOKOMISH POWERHOUSE AT CUSHMAN NO. 2 DAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Steve; Wilson, Matthew

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to add generating capacity on an in-stream flow release at Tacoma Power's Cushman hydroelectric project, Cushman No. 2 Dam, FERC Project P-460. The flow that is being used to generate additional electricity was being discharged from a valve at the base of the dam without recovery of the energy. A second objective to the project was to incorporate upstream fish passage by use of a fish collection structure attached to the draft tubes of the hydroelectric units. This will enable reintroduction of native anadromous fish above the dams which have blocked fish passage since the late 1920's. The project was funded in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Department of Energy, Office of Energy, Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and Water Power Program.

  9. DRAFT Lower Columbia Salmon and Steelhead Recovery and Subbasin Plan UPPER NORTH FORK LEWIS II, 12-1 May 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    action to reduce or eliminate all manageable factors or threats. The deterioration of habitat conditions land, 11% is state land, and the remainder is private, most of it in private industrial forestland

  10. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  11. INSTRUMENT EVALUATION, CALIBRATION, AND INSTALLATION POME HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrauf, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of Stripa Granite. Lawrence Berkeley LaboratoryGroundwaters in the Stripa Granite: Results and PreliminaryStorage of Nuclear Waste in Granite by P. A. Witherspoon, P.

  12. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1968), Permeability of granite under high pressure, J.resistivity during creep in granite, Pure Appl. Geophys. ,properties of westerly granite with applications, J.

  13. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tumbled blocks of Aswan granite and granodiorite from lowertumbled blocks of Aswan granite and granodiorite from lowerstones, most notably granite and granodiorite from Aswan (

  14. SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallenberg, H.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Philipsburg District, Granite County, Montana: U.S.Buddington, A.F. , 1959, Granite emplacement with specialthe Philipsburg District Granite County, Montana: U.S. Geol.

  15. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical model of the granite-bentonite- groundwaterconductivity scale effects in granite (Full-scale EngineeredSamper et al. , 2008a). granite heater Relative humidity (%)

  16. PRELIMINARY REPORT ON GEOPHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL BOREHOLE MEASUREMENTS AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanical properties of granite, Stripa, Sweden. TR 77-92.Measurements in the Stripa Granite. Berkeley Laboratoryof Groundwaters in the Stripa Granite: Lawrence Berkeley

  17. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sources of salts in a granite batholith on the Canadianpetrological features of Toki Granite. STA Science Exchangefrom the rapakivi granite on the island of Hstholmen.

  18. Transect 22:1 (spring 2004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UC Natural Reserve System

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the future 12 Sweeney Granite Mountains Reserve celebratess Jack and Marilyn Sweeney Granite Mountains Desert Researchareas near the [Sweeney Granite Moun- tains] reserve, when I

  19. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1968), Permeability of granite under high pressure, J.permeability of Westerly granite, J. Geophys. Res. , 80(5),resistivity during creep in granite, Pure Appl. Geophys. ,

  20. Utilitarian Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, James A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pounders in the Gebel el-Granite metadolerite quarry, Newthe Unfinished Obelisk granite quarry, Dynasties 18 - 19 (were chert, dolerite, granite, metagraywacke, and silicified

  1. From the Ground Up: UCSC Professor Gary Griggs as Researcher, Teacher, and Institution Builder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, Gary; Rabkin, Sarah

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    along the San Andreas [fault]. The granite really isnt Sierran Granite; it breaksinto decomposed granite. So we dont find very many rocks [

  2. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON THE STRESS-PERMEABILITY RELATIONSHIP FOR NATURAL FRACTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPENDIX B: REFORMATORY GRANITE AND CORE DEFORMATION DATAProperties of in situ Jointed Granite," Int Mech. Min. Sci.Whole and Jointed Barrier Granite," Int. J. Rock Mech. Min.

  3. PREDICTED AND MEASURED TEMPERATURES, DISPLACEMENTS AND STRESSES FROM THE STRIPA HEATER EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980). Heat transfer in granite as inferred from temperaturethe CSM cell in Swedish granite. Proc. 20th U. S. Symp. Rockproperties of Stripa Granite from temperature measurements

  4. ROCK PROPERTIES AND THEIR EFFECT ON THERMALLY-INDUCED DISPLACEMENTS AND STRESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical Properties of Granite, Stripa, Sweden," Terra TekHeating Experiments in Granite," presented at 1979 Fallthe CSM Cell in Swedish Granite," Proc. 20th U. S. Symp.

  5. The social implications of ritual behavior in the Maya Lowlands : a perspective from Minanha, Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwake, Sonja Andrea

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entirely, exposing older granite. Some of the highest peakslevel include many raw slate fragments, two granite metatefragments, three granite mano fragments, a chert thin biface

  6. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek Chicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek UpstreamFork Strawberry Creek Downstream N. Fork Strawberry CreekSample Chicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek Upstream Field

  7. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Suying

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chicken Creek Chicken Creek downstream of routine monitoringCreek Chicken Creek Downstream Chicken CreekUpstream ENV-Fork Strawberry Creek Downstream N. Fork Strawberry Creek

  8. Western Gas Sands Project: production histories of the Piceance and Uinta basins of Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.; Kohout, J. (comp.)

    1980-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Current United States geological tight sand designations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins' Western Gas Sands Project include the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations. Others, such as the Dakota, Cedar Mountain, Morrison and Mancos may eventually be included. Future production from these formations will probably be closely associated with existing trends. Cumulative gas production through December 1979, of the Mesaverde Group, Fort Union and Wasatch Formations in the Piceance and Uinta Basins is less than 275 billion cubic feet. This contrasts dramatically with potential gas in place estimates of 360 trillion cubic feet. If the geology can be fully understood and engineering problems surmounted, significant potential reserves can be exploited.

  9. Microfracturing in Westerly granite experimentally extended wet and dry at temperatures to 800C? and pressures to 200 MPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Theodor William

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in progress. His expertise and views lent much to the committee discussions. I would like to thank Steve Bauer for experimentally deforming the specimens used in this study. I would also like to thank Dr. Dennis S. Wood for kindling my interest...; Bauer et al. , 1981; Handin et alee 1981; Friedman et al. , 1982 and Bauer, 1982;1983). The principal purpose of this work is to gain a better understanding of why, in the brittle regime, rock strength decreases with increasing temperature...

  10. The effects of unconfined slow uniform heating on the mechanical and transport properties of the westerly and charcoal granites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Stephen Joseph

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), max thermal crack development and widen1ng 1s attributed to the differen- tial thermal strain of quartz and feldspar. For T & ToB, differen- max tial thermal expansion of either neighboring feldspar grains or feld- iv spar-maf1c grains appears to...-be the primary cause for the continued "loosening" of the aggregate. The effects of uniform temperature are similar for both rocks, differing only in detail. As indicated by acoust1c emission, thermal cracking initiates for both rocks upon exceeding a...

  11. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressureof excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, andrange of approaches to model damage and permeability changes

  12. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in-room emplacement method. AECL report 11595, COG-96-223.experiment: an international project of AECL, JNC, ANDARAand WIPP, AECL Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba,

  13. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 2 - Applied Soil Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and langbeinite are mined, non-renewable resources.Granite dust is also non-renewable, but granite occurs in

  14. Report of Flood, Oil Sheen, and fish Kill Incidents on East Fork Poplar Creek at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality and plant opemtion irriiormation provided by the Y-12 Plant strongly suggest that a dechlorinating agent, applied to the raw water released below the North-South Pipes was responsible for the toxicity resulting in the fish kill of July 24. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in upper EFPC indicai e that low oxygen levels (3-5 ppm) occurred for a period of up to 30 min. This slug of low DO water traveling down EFPC to the lake could easily explain the massive fish kill and the resulting observations. Dissolved oxygen levels of 5.2 ppm or lower are documented as causing problems for warmwater fish species (Heath 1995). The presence of other stressors, including a range of petrochemicals, tends to lower resistance to low oxygen conditions. Given the sequence of events in upper EFPC in the few days prior to July 24, where extremely high flows were followed by inputs of a wide range of low concentrations of oils, the sensitivity to low DO conditions might be heightened. The possible toxic impact of ::he oils and other contaminants reaching EFPC as a result of the heavy rainfidl on July 22 doesn't appear significant enough to be the sole cause of the kill on July 24. Even during the height of the kill, a large school of fish remained immediately downstream of the North-South Pipes. If the toxicity of waters flowing through this outlet were the primary cause of the kill, then it would be expected that this school of fish would not have been present immediately below the pipes. Any impact of waters entering from other sources, such as pumping of basements WOUIC1 have produced a staggered pattern of mortality, with fishing dying in different localities at different times and rates. Further, it would be expected that the morta.lhy observed would have continued over several days at least, as more resistant individuals succumbed slowly to the toxic exposure. This would have provided freshly dead or dying fish for the surveys of July 25 and 28. In previous fish kills in this stream section, the impact on the fish community has been judged to be short-term only, with no significant long-term ecological effects. In fact, the numerous fish kills over the past 7 years do not appear to have dampened the growth of the stream fish populations. The magnit~de of these kills was far less than that of the July 24 kill; maximum mortality of 10-20o/0 of th{~ total population above Lake Reality. Because the current kill has tiected a much larger proportion of the resident population, the impacts are expected to extend for a longer period in this situation, perhaps up to a year. Decreased population levels should be evident through the fhll 1997 and spring 1998 samples. Depending on the success rate of reproduction during the summer cf 1998, the recovery of fish populations should be observed in the fdl 1998 population sample. However, complete recovery may take several reproductive seasons to reach the densities seen in 1997. The cyprinid species occurring in upper EFPC have tremendous reproductive capacities and should be able to repopulate this area with little or no long-term ecological impact. Even the redbreast sunfish should, at the worst, only endure a narrowing of its available gene pool, with little if any long-term impacts.

  15. Design of non-serial, non-parallel flexural transmissions as applied to a micro-machined MEMS tuning fork gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Marcel A. C. (Marcel Adam Craig)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement design rules for flexures that emphasize directionality. This work is important for flexure designs that cannot be broken down into equivalent series or parallel components. ...

  16. 1526 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 17, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2008 A Mode-Matched Silicon-Yaw Tuning-Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    in autonomous vehicles [1]. Micromachined vibratory gyroscopes are based on the Cori- olis induced transfer. Small form factor, light weight, and low power consumption make micromachined gyroscopes ideal for use of energy between two vibration modes of a microstructure. They can operate in either mode-matched or split

  17. All talks will be held in the Chateau Roaring Fork Conference Room, 1037 E. Cooper Ave, Aspen, CO, 81611 The Fourteenth Annual Weintraub Meeting on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Brenda L.

    E. Cooper Ave, Aspen, CO, 81611 The Fourteenth Annual Weintraub Meeting on Biological Regulatory Mechanisms October 8-9, 2010 (Aspen, Colorado) THURSDAY

  18. The garden of forking paths: Why multiple comparisons can be a problem, even when there is no "fishing expedition" or "p-hacking" and the research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    there is no "fishing expedition" or "p-hacking" and the research hypothesis was posited ahead of time Andrew Gelman of fishing or examining multiple p-values. We discuss in the context of several examples of published papers. Multiple comparisons doesn't have to feel like fishing 1.1. Background There is a growing realization

  19. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC Appendices, Volume 3, Appendix V-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of appendix V-B which contains the final verification run data package. Validation of analytical data is presented for Ecotek LSI. Analytical results are included of both soil and creek bed samples for the following contaminants: metals; metals (TCLP); uranium; gross alpha/beta; and polychlorinated biphenyls.

  20. Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind

  1. EIS-0353: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Flathead County, Montana

  2. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 3 - Social and Environmental Issues in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the primary materials filling landfills and incinerators. Infrom farm to fork to landfill. National Resource Defense

  3. HYDRAULIC FRACTURE MODEL SENSITIVITY ANALYSES OF MASSIVELY STACKED LENTICULAR RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 50% of the total cost may be due to the well stimulation treatment. Therefore, there is a need (MWX) site. A geologic characterization of the Mesaverde group established that the production. In common with most tight gas reservoirs, hydraulic stimulation is required to interconnect the dual

  4. A Handbook for the Application of Seismic Methods for Quantifying Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    data in the Mesaverde was to perform the analysis on the reservoir rock (lithology): sand, not shale.reservoir and in the formations above the Lewis shale the datadata could not be explained without the fracture-induced anisotropy in the reservoir and above the Lewis shale.

  5. Emerald Lake Watershed study: Introduction and site description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonnessen, K.A. (California Air Resources Board, Sacramento (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Emerald Lake Watershed study was organized to investigate the effects of acidic deposition on high-elevation watersheds and surface waters of the Sierra Nevada, California. Some of the results of this comprehensive study of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at a small, headwater basin are presented in four papers in this series. The watershed study site is in Sequoia National Park, on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. This glacial cirque is located in the upper Marble Fork of the Kaweah River. This 120-ha watershed ranges from Alta Peak (3,416 m) down to Emerald Lake (2,400 m). Most of the watershed surface area is exposed granite and granodiorite rocks, with limited coverage (about 20%) by thin, acidic soils. The hydrology of the basin is dominated by snowmelt runoff during March-June. Emerald Lake, a glacial tarn, is 2.72 ha in area, with a maximum depth of 10.5 m. Surface waters are poorly buffered and dominated by calcium and bicarbonate. Most of the yearly precipitation falls as dilute snow (pH5.2-5.4), with acidic rain storms sampled during May-October.

  6. AN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwaters in the Stripa Granite. Results and PreliminaryPermeability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine aiTdProperties of the Stripa Granite by Graham Swan. (LBL-7074,

  7. VALIDITY OF CUBIC LAW FOR FLUID FLOW IN A DEFORMABLE ROCK FRACTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Nuclear Waste in Granite by P. A. Witherspoon, P.of Discontinuities in the Stripa Granite - Time-Scale HeaterPermeability Test of the Granite i n the Stripa Mine and

  8. Theoretical Temperature Fields for the STRIPA Heater Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Series 1 (average granite properties): Fig. 13-48. SeeModel Series 2 (Strips granite properties): Fig. 49-59.temperature rise (C) in granite caused by one 3.6 kW full-

  9. MONITORING AN UNDERGROUND REPOSITORY WITH MODERN SEISMOLOGICAL METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majer, Ernest L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor Fuel in the Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site: UCRL~KBS, electric heaters in granite were used for the study ofabruptly in Westerly granite at a threshold temperature of

  10. THEORETICAL TEMPERATURE FIELDS FOR THE STRIPA HEATER PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 Mechanical Properties of Granite: Strlpa, Sweden, SummaryPermeability Test of the Granite in (LBL-7049, SAC-01). MineHaken Stille. of the Stripa Granite by Graham Swan. (LBL-

  11. FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, K.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Nuclear Waste in Granite bv P. A. Witherspoon, P.Permeability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine andProperties of the Stripa Granite by Graham Swan. (LBL-7074,

  12. The Aesthetics of Remembering 9/11: Towards a Transnational Typology of Memorials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gessner, Ingrid

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a memorial of bronze or granite at first sight representsfixed on a block of local granite with a 6.8-foot glassUpper Palatinate region (granite and glass). 61 The memorial

  13. Remembering Through the Corpus: The Intersection of (Moving) Bodies with Architecture at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of contact with the black granite memorial wall and wasLin, designer of the black granite memorial wall. Becauseelements: Maya Lins granite wall, Frederick Harts bronze

  14. A STATISTICAL FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH TO THE STRENGTH OF BRITTLE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratigan, J.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strength-size relation of granite", International Journal ofsample size for Bohus granite", Rock Mechanics, 10, pp201Point Bending-Sierra White Granite 6.3 Four Point Bending-

  15. PROGRESS WITH FIELD INVESTIGATIONS AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwaters in the Stripa GraniteResults and PreliminaryPermeability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine andStorage in Nuclear Waste in Granite by P.A. Witherspoon, P.

  16. THE EFFECT OF RADON TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER UPON GAMMA-RAY BOREHOLE LOGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Nuclear Waste in Granite by P.A. Witherspoon, P.of Discontinuities in the Stripa Granite Time-Scale HeaterPermeability Test of the Granite in the Stripa Mine and

  17. GEOLOGY AND FRACTURE SYSTEM AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olkiewicz, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Stripa Granite - Full-Scale Experiment. LawrenceSAC-10). Geochemistry and Granite: Results J.F. Barker, andStorage of Nuclear Waste in Granite by P. A. Witherspoon, P.

  18. Ornamental Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, James A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    limestone (var. 1), granite (var. 1), and granodiorite (var.porphyry (vars. 1-3), granite (var. 1), granodiorite (vars.Basins: Roman Periodgranite (var. 1), andesite-dacite

  19. Comparison Of Intake Gate Closure Methods At Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, And Mcnary Dams Using Risk-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, Bryan F.; Blackburn, Tyrone R.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mara, Neil L.; Phan, Hahn K.; Bardy, David M.; Hollenbeck, Robert E.

    2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to compare the benefits and costs of modifications proposed for intake gate closure systems at four hydroelectric stations on the Lower Snake and Upper Columbia Rivers in the Walla Walla District that are unable to meet the COE 10-minute closure rule due to the installation of fish screens. The primary benefit of the proposed modifications is to reduce the risk of damage to the station and environs when emergency intake gate closure is required. Consequently, this report presents the results and methodology of an extensive risk analysis performed to assess the reliability of powerhouse systems and the costs and timing of potential damages resulting from events requiring emergency intake gate closure. As part of this analysis, the level of protection provided by the nitrogen emergency closure system was also evaluated. The nitrogen system was the basis for the original recommendation to partially disable the intake gate systems. The risk analysis quantifies this protection level.

  20. A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Borgesson, L.; Chijimatsu, M.; Hernelind, J.; Jing, L.; Kobayashi, A.; Rutqvist, J.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of geological disposal of spent CANDU fuel in Canada, a safety assessment was performed for a hypothetical repository in the Canadian Shield. The assessment shows that such repository would meet international criteria for dose rate; however, uncertainties in the assumed evolution of the repository were identified. Such uncertainties could be resolved by the consideration of coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes. In Task A of the DECOVALEX-THMC project, THM models were developed within the framework of the theory of poroelasticity. Such model development was performed in an iterative manner, using experimental data from laboratory and field tests. The models were used to perform near-field simulations of the evolution of the repository in order to address the above uncertainties. This paper presents the definition and rationale of task A and the results of the simulations. From a repository safety point of view, the simulations predict that the maximum temperature would be well below the design target of 100 C, however the load on the container can marginally exceed the design value of 15 MPa. However, the most important finding from the simulations is that a rock damage zone could form around the emplacement borehole. Such damage zone can extend a few metres from the walls of the emplacement holes, with permeability values that are orders of magnitude higher than the initial values. The damage zone has the potential to increase the radionuclide transport flux from the geosphere; the effect of such an increase should be taken into account in the safety assessment and mitigated if necessary by the provision of sealing systems.

  1. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1 : Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elston, Ralph

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Head burn is a descriptive clinical term used by fishery biologists to describe exfoliation of skin and underlying connective tissue of the jaw and cranial region of salmonids, observed at fish passage facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The observations are usually made on upstream migrant adult salmon or steelhead. An expert panel, convened in 1996, to evaluate the risk and severity of gas bubble disease (GBD) in the Snake and Columbia River system believed that, while head burns appeared to be distinct from GBD, the relationship between dissolved gas saturation in the rivers and head burns was uncertain.

  2. A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, T.S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to heat, desiccation, lack of water and nutrients. Theare not possible due to lack of water and microbes. At 100

  3. 6th International Symposium on Andean Geodynamics (ISAG 2005, Barcelona), Extended Abstracts: 481-484 A Grenvillian anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite suite in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , in the vicinity of the Southern Peru Copper smelter (Fundición), at about 14 km from Ilo (Fig. 1). A few hundred of the smelter, they are overlaid by Cretaceous volcanics whereas to the north, they are unconformably overlaid

  4. EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Environmental Impact EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire Granite Reliable Power, LLC, a subsidiary of Noble...

  5. alkaline pluton kola: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1980). These granites are principally of late Mesozoic age, but in the northwestern United States of the Cordilleran Interior granites, and their distribution and age suggest a...

  6. area north island: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanley Alfred 1957-01-01 37 Structural geology of the Irons Fork - North Fork Creek area, Lake Ouachita, Arkansas Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: STRUCTURAL...

  7. NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FE0003466 Energy & Envir. Research Center FE DE-FE0003466 Task 1.14 Gasification Division 2011 Meghan Napoli 021511 - 063011 Grand Forks, Grand Forks County, ND Fluid-Bed...

  8. Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

  9. Determination of Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, S. J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for safeguards of LEU and MOX spent fuel, Internationalsystems in use today (Safeguards Mox Python Detector, 1 Fork

  10. Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, S. J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for safeguards of LEU and MOX spent fuel, Internationalsystems in use today (Safeguards Mox Python Detector, 1 Fork

  11. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas, Moffat County, Colorado. Structure contours are top of Mesaverde. Contour interval is 1, 000 ft ( 305 m). Modified from Whi tley (1962) Generalized subsurface section of the Upper Cretaceous formations in the Sand Wash basin depicting gross... Correlation section parallel to depositional dip, North Craig field area, showing inclined time- stratigraphic units in the Lewis shale which con- tain thick sandstone intervals. Location of section shown in Fig. 23 Strike correlation section, North Craig...

  12. Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations and modeling of convective clouds in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene and Jeffrey S Tilley, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations and modeling of convective clouds indicated a color change in the accumulated ice. Specifically, the ice color changed from white, during concentrations observed (as well as other changes in the convective cloud properties that were documented

  13. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

  14. Comments, Protests and Interventions for Alaska LNG Project LLC- 14-96-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alaska Region-Granite Construction Company, Michael D. Miller, Business Development Manager/Estimator

  15. Field-Scale Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient for Fractured Rock: Results From Literature Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui Hai; Molz, Fred J.; Zhang, Yingqi; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed fluid flow in fractured reservoirs: An analysis ofa hydraulically fractured granite geothermal reservoir, Soc.

  16. Challenges of the Global Water Shortage: Contamination of Water Resources by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    production Hanford Nuclear Reservation (Washington) #12;Sources: Agriculture Historical use of arsenic Fork Superfund Site (Montana) #12;Sources: Industrial discharges #12;Sources: Legacy of nuclear weapons

  17. EIII'ironmental Biology ofFishes 40: 91-98.1994. 1994 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . and the Wildlife Management Institute. 500-F #12;92 ;(.................'(...:: ,::!:)~=~:I ,/ r··,·,r- A-1 W. Fork

  18. CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Humphrey Oklahoma- Broken Bow Project Office, Broken Bow Powerhouse, Gore Substation, Lamar, Weleetka, Henryetta, Bald Hill, Red Fork, Moody's, Fort Gibson, Gore Radio, and Short...

  19. Notices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    erosion, (2) realigning the existing tailrace channel and constructing a permanent fish passage barrier and concrete outfall at its confluence with the West Fork to prevent...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    described by the Forest Service in the Buffalo Fork Vegetation Management Project Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) published June 15,...

  1. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OH (United States) General Atomics Site, San Diego, CA (United States) General Electric Company Golden Field Office, Golden, CO (United States) Grand Forks Energy Technology...

  2. Programming Considerations on Franklin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the GNU C runtime library, glibc, is implemented: CNL provides limited support of the process control functions such as popen(), fork() and exec(); the resulting processes...

  3. Civil Laws and Civil Justice in Early China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhaoyang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1983. Forke, Alfred, trans. Lun-heng. New York: Paragon BookWenwu chubanshe, 1990. Gao Heng ??. Han dai shangji zhiduwenxian chubanshe, 2003. Gao Heng ??, ed. Shangjunshu zhushi

  4. Farm to School Efforts: Innovations and Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galarneau, Tim; Millward, Suzanne; Laird, Megan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    taste tests, recycling and composting programs, and trips tothrough recycling and composting programs. 80 Developing ato the fork and through composting and waste diversion, a

  5. Some improvements will be almost immediate...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will take decades... Riparian planting, Middle Fork John Day River Jack Creek, Deschutes National Forest #12 Reproductive Success Steelhead Non-local "domestic" stocks

  6. amorphous selenium flat-panel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and organic Heikenfeld, Jason 12 Asymmetric electrical properties of fork a-Si:H thin-film transistor and its application to flat panel displays Mathematics Websites Summary:...

  7. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

  8. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clark Fork, Bonner County, Idaho (see map) acres: 132 Partners: The Idaho Department of Fish and Game Purpose: The Bonneville Power Administration is partnering with the Idaho...

  9. NATURE |VOL 404 |2 MARCH 2000 |www.nature.com 37 The importance of repairing stalled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Michael M.

    replication forks Michael M. Cox*, Myron F. Goodman², Kenneth N. Kreuzer³, David J. Sherratt§, Steven J

  10. Eagle County- Energy Smart Colorado Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Roaring Fork Valley and Eagle, Gunnison, Lake, and Summit Counties are eligible for energy efficiency and renewable energy assistance, rebates, and financing through the Energy Smart...

  11. Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hotspot track from 17 Ma to 2 Ma. The Ruby, Beaverhead, Big Hole, Deer Lodge, Medicine Lodge-Grasshopper, Three Forks, Canyon Ferry, Jefferson, Melrose, Wise River, and...

  12. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    36 months Andrea McNemar Grand Forks, North Dakota Scalable, Automated, Semipermanent Seismic Method for Detecting CO2 Plume Extent During Geological... Activities at this...

  13. Microsoft Word - CX-Rattlesnake-Garrison_ROW_Marking_06June2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    There are multiple perennial and intermittent waterbodies, including the Clark Fork, and wetland complexes throughout the Project area. The Project lies within and along the...

  14. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress in the following five projects: (1) Geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin; (2) Regional stratigraphic studies, Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, southern Piceance Basin, Colorado; (3) Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins--Foundation for a new approach to exploration and resource assessments of continuous type deposits; (4) Delineation of Piceance Basin basement structures using multiple source data--Implications for fractured reservoir exploration; and (5) Gas and water-saturated conditions in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado--Implications for fractured reservoir detection in a gas-centered coal basin.

  15. Employers for CEPS students Career & Internship Fair, March 6, 2012, MUB Granite State Room, Noon-4pm Employers with internships in BOLD print Most employers have both permanent and internship openings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Packet Acme Packet Archer Western Walsh Const. Boston Partners C & S Wholesale Grocers C & S Wholesale Grocers C & S Wholesale Grocers C & S Wholesale Grocers Cobham Cobham Cobham Cornerstone Environ. Group

  16. Performance of incross egg-type pullets as affected by coccidiostats and granite grit during the growing period and varying levels of corn and milo during the laying period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Dharam Dev

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; . ' ', :, "": ' ', ' " ' ':, :: . . ' -:gctMy'O'-Cger:, lbLgleg&, gtqtk+ Seeeao o ?:. :, :-. - -'. . ' ", . ;. , ' m, '. -, ", am Sroeekn 4@"c4 Ri~ . 2 iNS RS+XR@~, I Gceieae eC @~ ' . A 8 AStS Q. QN 8 AS& I Peei@SQ;, : - i% . : . "V. 4408 P~@W', N, i9k~. Fseeeite K ~ ' Q S, MS PAAR... ~~ ~ah oa @a~ ~& ~cap, @4. 35~8854, R. p. , %949. Aoc ~arne 4 Ra~ 88 oh8~~ aa8 eaaheye y~ Rp S ak~~~heapK~ ao@S. msEeeg Rcl. M)$75-R4o CCsore, S. . J. , X9$K. 19e influence of ~ ccasageasnc toccata eyes nncheC quslicp soL yxSNc scaLe in bvoilev...

  17. Performance of incross egg-type pullets as affected by coccidiostats and granite grit during the growing period and varying levels of corn and milo during the laying period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Dharam Dev

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's wee ge~. by tbs Xmet Q. etc@ pxotste XaveXe~ ~ +eras Xqee'ee tbe Na@y egeA. Ie tba X957 tope Ct ceo stet+1 tbat ptotete 'XeeeXs of V, X5& LI ee4 XX pateeet esa'e ~kbXs Ce ~ t~, femk ef@etemey en4 esXat~e of boly eefgbti ~oa eed 8hKttet (XS59...

  18. ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1246.2 2,"Granite Ridge","Natural Gas","Granite...

  19. archean foreland basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the origin of dome-and-keel structure in Archean granite August 2003; accepted 24 October 2003; published 27 January 2004. 1 The Archean East Pilbara Granite duration,...

  20. au tibet oriental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70 Ma) Gangdese activity is expressed in granites west of Namche Barwa. 18 to 25 Ma granites occur both along the suture zone west of Gyala Peri, and directly north of Namche...

  1. Chemie der Erde 67 (2007) 151174 Petrology, geochemistry and zircon age for redwitzite at Abertamy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at about 322 Ma. The granitic melts have been so far mainly interpreted to be formed by heat supply from

  2. arc plutons beneath: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: -grade metasediments, with the following succession: leucocratic granites, biotite-granodiorites (monzodiorites), hornblende-granodiorites...

  3. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC AND THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of in s i t u j o i n t e d granite." I n t . J . Rock Mech.1979. "Waste disposal i n granite: Preliminary r e s u l t sintact samples of basalt, granite, marble, and other rocks.

  4. CX-007108: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy-Saving Opportunities in Water Treatment and DistributionCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 10/12/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, Grand Forks County, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. This article was published in the above mentioned Springer issue. The material, including all portions thereof, is protected by copyright;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    in the South Fork American River, California Sarah A. Cocherell & Gardner J. Jones & Javier B. Miranda & Dennis to frequent pulsed releases of water in the South Fork American River (California) from July to October 2005 and migration, and that telemetry is a tool that allows integration across disciplines and between

  6. Volume VI, Chapter 2 Run Reconstructions of Select

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Coweeman tule fall chinook, East Fork Lewis tule fall chinook, North Fork Lewis bright fall chinook, Wind, Wind summer steelhead, and Grays chum. These populations were selected because they represent a mixture of the ratio of recruits to spawners, in the absence of density dependent mortality (Neave 1953). Run

  7. 1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the strength of Hg-DOM complexes in water from a mercury contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC-contaminated creek, a fraction of the Hg present as Hg-DOM complexes did not react to glutathione addition with a Suwannee River DOM. In East Fork Poplar Creek water in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, about 58% of the DOM

  8. Under Review for Publication in ASME J. Solar Energy Engineering SOL-12-1058 Life Estimation of Pressurized-Air Solar-Thermal Receiver Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Under Review for Publication in ASME J. Solar Energy Engineering SOL-12-1058 Life Estimation of Pressurized-Air Solar-Thermal Receiver Tubes David K. Fork 1 e-mail: fork@google.com John Fitch e-mail: fitch.ziaei@gmail.com Robert I. Jetter e-mail: bjetter@sbcglobal.net The operational conditions of the solar thermal receiver

  9. Computer Systems II Execu'ng Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    = = 0) { execv(argv[0], argv); exit(0); } wait(&cpid); pid = 25 cpid = 26 Text PCB Stack Data pid = 26 cpid = 0 char * argv[ ] = {"/bin/ls", 0}; int cpid = fork( ); if (cpid = = 0 = fork( ); if (cpid = = 0) { execv(argv[0], argv); exit(0); } wait(&cpid); pid = 25 pid

  10. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. Proc. 4th St.Petersburg Workshop on Simulation, St.Petersburg, Russia, 2001, 233-238 Modeling and Performance Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivulin, Nikolai K.

    and Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems Security Operation1 D. Guster2 St.Cloud State University3 N is developed based on the fork-join queueing network formalism. We introduce a secu- rity operation performance system security, security attack, security vul- nerability, performance evaluation, fork-join queueing

  12. Shallow meteoric alteration and burial diagenesis of massive dolomite in the Castle Reef Formation, northwest Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitsitt, Philip Mark

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Sawmill Creek (SC), Half Dome Crag (HDC), Morningstar Mountain (MM), Mount Field (MF), Gateway Pass (GP), North Fork of Dupuyer Creek (NFD), South Fork of Dupuyer Creek (SFD), Volcano Reef (VR), North Fork of Teton River (NFT), Teton River (TR), Cave...SHALLOW METEORIC ALTERATION AND BURIAL DIAGENESIS OF MASSIVE DOLOM I TE I N THE CASTLE REEF FORMAT I ON ~ NORTHWEST MONTANA A Thesis by PHILIP MARK WHITSITT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  13. Chemical and petrological characteristics of the intrusive rocks of the Quitman Mountains, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seay, Christopher Sidney

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    differentiated rock types from the diorite (1) to the last emplaced granite (9). 42 7. Calcium concentration and fluorine concentration vs. the various differentiated rock types from the diorite (1) to the last emplaced granite (9) 8. Ca percentage plotted... concentration for the various rock types from the diorite (1) to the final granite (9). . . . . . . ~ 53 13. Rb/Sr ratios for the intrusive rock types 56 14. Uranium concentrations for the intrusive rock types for the initially emplaced diorite (1...

  14. Feasibility of Starting a Waterjet Fabrication Plant in Amman, Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Khaled A.

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    be seen in expanding and upgrading infrastructure across the Kingdom such as: mega-real estate projects, transport (rail, airports, and port), municipality developments (Amman Master Plan, Salt Master Plan), Red Sea to Dead Sea Canal and many more... and granite. According to the expert tile layers interviewed above, imported tiles have more selection of colors and patterns than locally extracted marble and granite slabs. Marble and granite slabs that compete in quality and color selections...

  15. 376 / JOURNAL OF HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING / APRIL 1999 THE LEGEND OF A. F. SHIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ber cuttings, brown coal, crushed granite, and crushed barite), providing a range of particleb, p. 22). The brown coal experiments were con- ducted in a nonrecirculating wooden flume

  16. account book part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decisions Communicate budgetary and accounting Outdoor Adventures LLC Missoula County Public Schools ASP Healthcare Granite Peak, LLC Creative Arts Vonessen, Nikolaus 144...

  17. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    144 Granite Street, Worcester, MA Premium Power Distributed Energy Storage Demonstration for National Grid Install and operate 500 kW Vanadium Redox flow battery at Worcester, MA....

  18. On the application of the spectral projected gradient method in ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    On the application of the spectral projected gradient method in image segmentation. 7. (a) cameraman 204 204. (b) carplate 285 224. (c) granite 225 נ...

  19. Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by eight samples. Because these samples are more representative of mineral systems or granite gneiss -amphibolite mixtures, the age is interpreted as being anomalously old....

  20. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Fact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Whitman Union Asotin Wallowa Pend Oreille Stevens Columbia Spokane Garfield Beaverhead Granite Sanders Glacier Flathead Lake Ravalli Lewis And Clark Toole Pondera Mineral Powell...

  1. Microsoft Word - All Discounts updated February 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    members a 10% discount on labor for any hard surface installation, i.e., custom tile, granite, hardwood floors, and maintenance and repair. For more information contact Rick...

  2. geo column legal.ai

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermopolis Shale Dakota Lakota Goose Egg Tensleep Amsden Madison Undifferentiated Granite Steele Shale Frontier Sundance Chugwater Group Teapot Ss "Pumpkin Buttes shale"...

  3. The Columbia River System: Inside Story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxbow Bypass Unity Wolf Creek Lower Snake Basin Federal with Power Little Goose Lower Granite Ice Harbor Lower Monumental Dworshak Federal without Power Lower Pine Lake Upper Bear...

  4. The NRS Transect 8:1 (winter 1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UC Natural Reserve System

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Price par- tially renovated the historic StaplesRanch House by providing water from the Granite Cove Spring, adding a small photovoltaic

  5. A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    granites as targets for geothermal resources. Authors DAC Manning, PL Younger, FW Smith, JM Jones, DJ Dufton and S. Diskin Published Journal Journal of the Geological...

  6. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Mesozoic granite granodiorite Aurora Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region MW Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot...

  7. Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zones and temperature. The wells studied intersect rhyolitic dikes and sills in the fractured granitic and dioritic basement rocks which serve as the reservoir for the...

  8. ankle joint loading: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dimensional characteristics of each surface is developed. Artificial joint of granite surfaces are measured,processed, analyzed and three dimensional approaches are carried out...

  9. air flow measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TO ESTIMATE AND VERIFY THE TOTAL RADON HAZARD POTENTIAL OF GRANITES. SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES CiteSeer Summary: Determining the radon hazard potential posed by large rock...

  10. artesian basin australia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Justin Timothy 2013-01-01 178 Evolution and tectonic setting of the Paleoproterozoic Granites-Tanami Orogen, Western Australia. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  11. Geology of an area between Bluff and Honey Creeks, Mason County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Joseph Francis

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the proWambrian rooks oonaist ef two metsmorphio unite y tho mar'bl o and the gneiss y an4 'two tnt rus i vs bodies ~ the ooareo~rainsd granite and the fino~ained granite. The Cambrian reeks aro 4ivido4 into tho Riley snd Nil borne formations... of the marble outcrop are 1} in- trusive caxtacts with precambrian granites, 8) overlap by basal Palsoso1c bede, snd 5) fault ccntacts with lower Paleosoic beds. There are two different precambrian granites which have intrusive contaots w1th ths marble unit...

  12. The Moscow Greenbelt Parkway: A Vision for Moscow's Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    of aesthetic qualities. · Represents rural traditions and protects rural land uses of the Palouse. · Provides, South Fork of the Palouse River, Paradise Creek, Mountainview and Clyde Parks, the Elks Golf Course

  13. 3 Environmental Conditions 3.1 Characterization of Aquatic Habitat Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLM 1997, 2000; NRCS 2000 for specific methods), which define the ecological condition of streams in the Clover Creek (East Fork Bruneau) subwatershed and include Cedar, Cherry, House, Pole, Shack, and Three

  14. CX-004482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gyroscope Guidance Sensor for Ultra-Deepwater ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/18/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-004481: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gyroscope Guidance Sensor for Ultra-Deepwater ApplicationsCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/18/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-001700: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investigation of the Souring Bakken Oil ReservoirsCX(s) Applied: B3.6, A1Date: 04/22/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY12 14.5 months William Fincham Grand Forks, North Dakota Demo. of Gas-Powered Drilling Operations for Econo. Challenged Wellhead Gas & Eval. of Comp. Platforms Demonstrate...

  18. CX-004509: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demonstration of PWR?s Hydrogen Generator TechnologyCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 11/22/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-003609: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cushman North Fork Skokomish PowerhouseCX(s) Applied: A9Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): Tacoma, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  20. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    31 May 2011 UND EERC, Grand Forks, North Dakota Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment. (Note: This activity is part of a Year 6 Proposal made by the...